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Lists of Heads of Government and Heads of State

No Watergate

37. Richard M.Nixon Republican Gerald Ford 1969-1977
38.Charles Percy Republican 1977-1981 John Tower
39. Edmund Muskie Democratic 1981-1989

1. There is no water gate burglary so Nixon completes his 2nd and last term.Nixon wants John Connolly to be his successor but hat never happens. Nixon has enough say in the party that Reagan never gets the nomination.Nixon is happy with that..

2. The conservative side of the g.op never gets control.The dems nominate Jackson in 76.Percy cant fix the economy things go bust.

3. With no Watergate there is no need to nominate a outsider like Carter so the 80s have a democratic president.

http://forum.sealionpress.co.uk/index.php?threads/george-forsyth.1961/post-391126

http://forum.sealionpress.co.uk/index.php?threads/jfk-lives.1156/post-355958
 
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Mumby

'I love the pun he will go far'
Published by SLP
In honor of tomorrow, some SpOoKy LiStgEtTi

1941-1944: Thomas E. Dewey / Charles L. McNary (Republican)
1940: Paul V. McNutt / Alben W. Barkley (Democratic)
1944-1945: Thomas E. Dewey / vacant (Republican)
1945-1974: Charles A. Lindbergh / John W. Brickner (America First)

1944: Henry A. Wallace / Harry S. Truman (Democratic), Thomas E. Dewey / Thomas C. Hart (Republican)
1948: William O. Douglas / W. Averell Harriman (Independent “True” Democratic), James V. Forrestal / James Roosevelt II (All-American Democratic), Robert A. Taft / Harold A. Stassen (Republican)
1952: Robert A. Taft / Adlai E. Stevenson II (Constitutionalist), C. Estes Kefauver / John B. Hynes (All-American Democratic)
1956: George C. Marshall / Coke R. Stevenson (All-American Democratic)
1960: Eugene Siler / Thomas J. Dodd (All-American Democratic)
1964: Martin Dies Jr. / Louise D. Hicks (All-American Democratic)
1968: John V. Lindsay / Adlai E. Stevenson III (All-American Democratic) William O. Douglas / Eugene J. McCarthy (Independent)
1972: Walter F. Mondale / Edmund S. Muskie (All-American Democratic)

1974-1977: L. Ronald Hubbard / vacant (America First) [Acting]
1977-1981: L. Ronald Hubbard / William B. Shockley, Jr. (America First)

1976: Frank F. Church III / Gary W. Hartpence (All-American Democratic)
is there is a significance to the positioning of the election dates?
 

Uhura's Mazda

lying on his back, urinating over his own belly
Published by SLP
Location
Tamaki Makaurau
Leaders of the National Party
1936-1942: Charles Wilkinson
1942-1945: Harry Atmore


Leaders of the New Liberal Party
1943-1952: William Bodkin
1952-1956: Edgar Neale
1956-1969: Rolland O’Regan


Leaders of the Social Liberal Party
1969-1973: Rolland O’Regan
1973-1975: John O’Brien
1975-1988: Rolland O’Regan
1988-1998: Cliff Skeggs
1998-2002: Judy Keall
2002-2008: John Wright
2008-2016: Tipene O’Regan
2016-: Raf Manji

With the advent of the First Labour Government of New Zealand, the anti-Socialist parties resolved to get their act together and merge into the 'National' Party. However, it was to be a short-lived merger. Gordon Coates of the Reform Party threatened to secede from the joint party if ex-Reform Independent Charles Wilkinson won the inaugural leadership, and followed through on his threat when Wilkinson beat Coates' candidate by a single vote. Only a minority of Reformers followed Coates out of the door, but the rest followed - as did a steady stream of United Party members - when Wilkinson embarked on a policy of growing the centre ground of NZ politics by compromising with the Country Party and the monetary reformer Independent Harry Atmore to convince them to join National.

Atmore's sympathies were very much with the Labour Government, and when he succeeded Wilkinson as Leader after the latter had spent far too long in the doldrums and the old guard of the party had all announced their retirements and imminent deaths, he jumped at the chance to join their wartime coalition government - along with Coates, who was expelled from Reform for his troubles. In National, by contrast, the anti-coalitionists didn't quite have the majority in caucus and therefore had to split off into a new political formation: the New Liberal Party, whose branding was an exercise in nostalgia for the 1890s. Meanwhile, the Atmore loyalists dissolved the National Party in 1945. Some went to Labour or Reform, while others remained Independents until defeated at the polls.

The New Liberal Party just about subsisted in the immediate post-war period as New Zealand's default third party, holding only the seats of long-serving incumbents or exceedingly hard campaigners. In terms of policy, they opposed the Socialism of the Labour Party, but also laid claim to a radical heritage and presented a single Land Tax as the solution to structural inequality. Meanwhile, Atmore's heterodox monetary ideas fell by the wayside until Social Credit was founded in the mid-1950s. Socred posed a problem for the New Liberals, as it tempted the same protest voters who provided a lot of their electoral ballast. Under Edgar Neale and Rolland O'Regan, then, the NLP embarked on a permanent campaign, bringing partisan fights down to the Council level (an innovation in most of NZ) to win mayoralties and referendums and thereby change each Council's rating system to be based on the unimproved value of the property in question.

It wasn't enough, and in the 1960s, close contests were lost by both Social Credit and the New Liberals for want of co-operation. In 1969, the two parties got together and hammered out a merger agreement (the Liberals, of course, had had a lot of practice at this) which was mainly drawn up by Cecil Elvidge and Vernon Cracknell of Social Credit and Betty Noble and Bob Keall of the New Liberals. The agreement took the 'Social' element from the Social Credit name and the 'Liberal' element from that of the older party, and created the new 'Social Liberal Party' - a rebuff to Elvidge, who had favoured an alternative name, the 'New Credit Party'.

More importantly, the ideologies of the two parties were welded into one - an ideology which, conveniently, already existed. The Argentinean economist Silvio Gesell had come up with 'Freiwirtschaft' earlier in the century, which called for the abolition of fractional reserve banking, the creation of new money which would be 'perishable' (i.e. it would lose its value over time, just like most of the goods it was used to buy), and, in the non-monetary sphere, free trade and a single Land Value Tax. It was a perfect compromise, and most of the Social Crediters managed to transfer their idolatrous affections from C. H. Douglas to Silvio Gesell without too much in the way of cognitive dissonance.

Rolland O'Regan, who came from a political dynasty, was elected Leader, but the electoral dividends of the merger were disappointing to the hyped-up members, and satisfaction with his leadership fell vertiginously outside of his inner circle. After the 1972 election, in which O'Regan lost his seat, he was successfully challenged by the firebrand Social Crediter John O'Brien, who briefly united a majority of the SLP behind him but watched it break further and further apart every time he opened his mouth. He resigned in 1975, when the Social Liberals lost all their seats in the Reform landslide, and was replaced by the affable O'Regan once more.

During the late 60s and 70s, a younger generation of radicals had joined up with the NLP and SLP, who were against the Vietnam War and nuclear power, and in favour of living according to liberal, Freiwirtschaft values in communes up and down the - well, up and down the Waitakere Ranges and the Coromandel. This tendency was much aided by Labour's legislation in the 1979s which made it easier to set up kibbutz-style communes called 'ohu'. Not that the SLP has expressed much gratitude.

The SLP bounced back in the late 1970s, encouraged by Bruce Beetham winning the Hamilton mayoralty and introducing a perishable local currency - the first time the SLP's local campaigning had been used to implement parts of Freiwirtschaft other than Land Value rating - and reformist Labour MPs such as Gerald O'Brien defecting when it became obvious that they would never sit on the Treasury benches. In the 80s, however, the new Labour Government launched a major attack on the SLP's core concept. By hook or by crook, local Councils would be encouraged to return to Capital Value rating, and the whole process was over by the time Rolland O'Regan finally gave up the leadership in 1988 - his life's work seemingly crushed. The only exception was in Dunedin, where SLP Mayor Cliff Skeggs took his own Council to court over matters related to the rating change. He was launched into the leadership, much to the chagrin of last decade's mayoral darling, Bruce Beetham.

The SLP caught another updraft in the 1990s, with both parties - Labour and Reform - doing their best to discredit themselves in Government. The SLP rode high in the polls, and Skeggs imagined that he might become Prime Minister, but First Past the Post (and the electorate's new-found fear of easy promises of tax cuts combined with increases in social spending) gave the lie to these dreams, and the Party merely re-entered Parliament and held the balance of power in 1996-9, their main achievement in this period being the reintroduction of a small Land Tax and an equivalent cut in Income Tax. Skeggs retired in 1998, both personally and energetically bankrupt from his long campaigns.

He was succeeded by Judy Keall, another Liberal dynast and New Zealand's first woman party leader. Her ascendancy was short-lived, however, as a disappointed electorate threw out the Reform-SLP coalition and most of their MPs. Hindsight has been kind to the coalition, though, as Kiwis have watched Sydney's housing bubble expand and expand in recent years with no equivalent to their Land Tax.

Keall faced concerted opposition from the male, mayoralty-focused wing of the party, and principally Selwyn MP John Wright, who seized the leadership from her in 2002. A counter-challenge from Tim Shadbolt of what is often misnamed the 'hippy' wing (even though Shadbolt as Mayor of Invercargill has introduced that district's local currency, the World's Fastest Depreciator (₩)), was seen off in short order. Nevertheless, the boorish Wright couldn't hold the different factions of the party together - the local power-seekers, the free-trade liberals, the monetary reformers, the hippies and the Land Tax leaseholders. Every single tendency seemed to be an embarrassment to all the others, and only the election of Rolland O'Regan's son as Leader smoothed over this divide.

Tipene O'Regan was the first Maori leader of a political party in New Zealand, and aided the SLP in gaining a couple of Maori electorates for the first time. This quickly revealed itself to be an electoral dead-end. The single tax depends on the idea that all land is the common heritage of mankind, and ought therefore to be vested in the state and leased out to those who wish to use it. Although Maori have a communalist idea of land ownership, they see the title as being vested in the tribe as opposed to the state, and have been conditioned through experience to be suspicious of a white-dominated state edging them out of their land. As the relevance of the SLP increased in Maori communities, the less they liked the party, and Tipene O'Regan received some staunch opposition from Maori aligned with the Labour Party.

As the new move into the Maori seats had been stymied, and as the Reformers were making new hay with their appeal to NZ's traditional fondness of freehold tenure, O'Regan became increasingly isolated and the monetary reform wing grew stronger, with Raf Manji winning a suburban Christchurch seat and being propelled into the leadership. However, the growth of a challenge around the personality of Gareth Morgan is growing day by day, and it seems that the SLP is not yet out of the woods. A century since the Liberals last exited Government, they look no closer to regaining their former primacy, and it is perhaps the adoption of the confusing ideology of Freiwirtschaft which has contributed more than any other factor to this continued ignominy.
 
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Uhura's Mazda

lying on his back, urinating over his own belly
Published by SLP
Location
Tamaki Makaurau
This list is absolutely gold.

Nice to see the frankly underrated ideology of Freiwirtschaft get some press here, and this confirms my belief that New Zealand is the natural home of all ideologies discarded by mainstream politics.
Just to be clear, there is no Freiwirtschaft movement here IOTL, I've just merged Social Credit (which was an Existent Belief for over twenty years before the party was founded, of course), with the equally existent belief of Georgism, which was a minority position in the Liberal Party in the 1890s and was promoted by a lobby group in the post-war period which managed to get 80% of Councils to switch to land value rating.
 

Callan

Absolutely Dire
Published by SLP
Location
Toronto
Chief Ministers of Scotland, 1915-present:

1915-1923: William Henry Cowan (Liberal)
1923-1926: John Gilmour (Unionist)
1926-1929: Cunninghame Graham (National League)
1929-1934: Roland Muirhead (National League)
1934-1949: John Buchan (Unionist)
1949-1951: John Kevan McDowall (Unionist)
1951-1963: Andrew Dewar Gibb (National League)
1963-1965: Jo Grimond (National League)
1965-1969: John Gilmour (Unionist)
1969-1974: Jo Grimond (National League)
1974-1979: Paul Cathcart (National League)
1979-1982: Adam Kelly (Radical)
1982-1991: Iain Currie (National League)
1991-1992: Anne Seton (National League)
1992-2010: Jack Durie (Unionist)
2010-2012: Stuart Conroy (Unionist)
2012-2015: Connie Baird (Radical)
2015-2017: Mike Tunney (Radical)
2017-2019: Angus Conte (Unionist)
2019-: Mike Tunney (Radical)

The Scottish Home Rule Bill passed not long after the Irish Home Rule. It's first elections were held a couple of months after the Liberal victory at Westminster in 1915- "the last landslide"- and produced a similar triumph in Scotland. The passing of Home Rule, the Panic of '23, Horatio Bottomley's mixed success in attempting to neuter the Home Rule Parliaments and the disastrous end to the First Great War led to a created a strong surge of Scottish Nationalism, being both the cause and effect of Cunninghame Graham's formation of the National League of Scotland. The League dominated the Scottish Parliament for over fifty years.

While founded by a Socialist and governing in coalition with the Independent Labour party in its early years, after Graham's death in 1929 the National League shifted away from the left over time and evolved into a big-tent outfit that traded in populism towards both the right and left. The party's ethos of a distinct Scottish identity was shared by the Scottish Unionists with whom they frequently traded power. It was under Grimond that what that the Liberal reforms and movements that are now known as the "Silent Revolution" swept Scotland, serving as the model for Allan Bertram's own liberal reforms through the 1970s. Grimond's efforts to push the party back leftwards eventually led to a severe backlash from the party machine.

Prime Minister Allan Bertram in many ways caused the peak of the National League. He revived the fortunes of the long-moribund Scottish Radicals, who came to displace them their dominance over many Westminster seats. The party took full advantage of the leftist spring brought about by Grimond, who himself stood as a Radical Candidate for Westminster and served in Bertram's third Ministry. Cathcart and Currie were widely viewed as machine politicians in a party that was increasingly viewed as hollowed-out and self-serving, invoking Scottish nationalism and picking fights with Westminster only when there was an election to be won. The Second Great War strongly enhanced a sense of British national identity across the Commonwealth, and the postwar recession was especially severe in Scotland, where Currie was blamed for mismanagement and corruption with the wartime economy.

Corruption scandals and a resurgent Scottish Unionist Party ultimately felled the National League and sent them to third place for the first time in their history. As Jack Durie established his own iron grip on Scotland and its institutions, the League quickly collapsed into infighting as it struggled for a rationale beyond being a party of government. Effectively bankrupt, the party dissolved in 2001. It was succeeded by the Scottish Freedom Alliance, a more left-leaning outfit that explicitly supports Scottish Independence from the Commonwealth. It participated as a junior partner in the Baird and first Tunney Governments.
 
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Mumby

'I love the pun he will go far'
Published by SLP
@Japhy: "America hasn't had a President since Lincoln was assassinated" is difficult to achieve in list form

Presidents of the United States of America (The First Republic)

1861-1864: Abraham Lincoln (Republican)
1860 (with Hannibal Hamlin) def. John C. Breckinridge ('Southern' Democratic), John Bell (Constitutional Union), Stephen A. Douglas ('Northern' Democratic)
1864-1865: Hannibal Hamlin / Andrew Johnson / Ulysses S. Grant (National Union 'Provisional Triumvirate')
1865-1866: Benjamin Wade (Republican presiding over Constitutional Convention)

Triumvirs of the United States of America (The Second Republic)

1866-1867: Benjamin Wade / Ulysses S. Grant / Andrew Johnson (National Union 'Provisional Triumvirate')
1867-1871: Ulysses S. Grant / John C. Fremont / Benjamin Wade (National Union / Radical Republican)
1866 def. Horace Greeley (Radical Republican), Andrew Johnson (National Union), various Democratic tickets, John Cochrane (Radical Republican)
1871-1875: Ulysses S. Grant / Benjamin Wade / Salmon P. Chase (National Union)
1870 def. Horace Greeley (Radical Republican / Democratic), John C. Fremont (Radical Republican), Horatio Seymour (Democratic), Charles Sumner (Radical Republican), various other Democratic tickets
...

1999-2003: Colin Powell / Lamar Alexander / Al Gore (Unionist)
1998 def. Pat Buchanan / Bob Dornan / Oliver North (Democratic), various Radical tickets
2003-2007: Colin Powell / Al Gore / John McCain (Unionist)
2002 def. Pat Buchanan / Pat Robertson / Chuck Baldwin (Democratic), various Radical tickets
2007-2011: John McCain / Mike Huckabee / Al Gore (Unionist / Democratic)
2006 def. Wesley Clark (Unionist), Alan Keyes / Chuck Baldwin (Democratic), various Radical tickets
2011-2012: Mike Huckabee / John McCain / Alan Keyes (Democratic / Unionist)
2010 def. Wesley Clark / Al Gore (Unionist), Rick Santorum (Democratic), Dennis Kucinich (Radical), various other Radical tickets
2012-2015: John McCain / Alan Keyes / vacant (Unionist / Democratic)
2015-2019: Joe Biden / Bernie Sanders / Mitt Romney (Unionist / Radical)
2014 def. Alan Keyes / Rick Santorum / Rick Perry (Democratic), Fred Karger (Unionist), Dennis Kucinich / Rocky Anderson (Radical)
2019-0000: Bernie Sanders / Kshama Sawant / Ron Reagan (Radical)
2018 def. Joe Biden / Mitt Romney / Beto O'Rourke (Unionist), Rick Perry / Eric Trump / Betsy DeVos (Democratic)
 

Mumby

'I love the pun he will go far'
Published by SLP
The Mumbster at it again with another great smash list

Great job.How does the Triumvirate work,exactly?
The idea I had was that Lincoln is assassinated by Confederate sniper in August 1864 - so Hamlin is President, but the Republican/National Union Convention had happened in June which meant Johnson was the VP candidate, so to avoid a complicated election, Hamlin, Johnson and Grant abuse the Constitution to form an emergency government to win the war.

When thats formalised at the wars end with a Constitutional Convention, the intention is to avoid a situation like the 1860 election, so elections aren't driven by popularity races. No one triumvir is more important than the others, every American gets three votes, every party can put forward however many candidates as they like (though generally conventions agree on three-man slates), and the top three vote winners get elected.

That has since evolved, and essentially the Triumvirs effectively divide the work of government between themselves, acting essentially as 'Super-Secretaries'.
 

Stuyvesant

Just wait until I actually get my shit together
Presidents of the United States (First)
1789-1797: George Washington (Nonpartisan)
1797-1805: Aaron Burr (Democratic-Republican)
1805-1811: Thomas Jefferson* (Democratic-Republican)


1811: United States Defeated by Britain in War of 1809, terms of the Treaty of Cambridge "Hereby dissolve the Federal Government of the United States of America".

Presidents of the United States (Second)[1]
1829-1841: Andrew Jackson ("Reckoning")

1828: def. Henry Clay ("Peace")
1841-1847: Silas Wright Jr. ("Annexationist")
1841 def. Henry Clay ("Peace")
1847-1863: Sam Houston ("Compromise")
1847 def. John C. Calhoun ("Reckoning")
1863-1874: Robert Toombs ("Fire-Eater")

1863 def. William Seward ("Barnburner"), John S. Carlile ("Compromise")
1874: AMERICAN CIVIL WAR BEGINS (PRESIDENTISTS VS CONGRESSISTS)
Presidentists
1874-1878: Robert Toombs (Nonpartisan leading Emergency Government)
Congressists
1874-1881: Schuyler Colfax (Democratic leading Anti-Presidential Government)
1878: CONGRESSIST VICTORY, AMERICAN CIVIL WAR ENDS
1878-1881: Presidency Vacant, Congress Has Executive Authority
1881-1891: William T. Sherman (Nonpartisan)

1891: Second United States votes to dissolve itself

[1] - Presidents of the Second U.S. were all nominally Nonpartisan, with historians adding Descriptors to differentiate their platforms
 
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Mumby

'I love the pun he will go far'
Published by SLP
The Sea Of Dust, or, How The Japanese Defeated America (Accidentally)

1929-1937: Herbert Hoover (Republican)
1928 (with Charles Curtis) def. Al Smith (Democratic)
1932 (with Charles Curtis) def. Al Smith ('Northern' Democratic), William H. Murray ('Southern' Democratic)

1937-1941: Douglas MacArthur (Republican / National Union)
1936 (with William Randolph Hearst) def. Huey Long ('Independent' Democratic), Fiorello H. LaGuardia (Labor), Hiram Johnson ('Independent' Republican)
1941-1941: Charles Lindbergh ('Independent' Republican / America First)
1940 (with Joseph P. Kennedy Sr.) def. Huey Long (Democratic / Everyman), Douglas MacArthur (Republican / National Union), Harry Bridges ('Pacific' Labor)
1941: Beginning of the Second American Civil War, and the collapse of the United States of America

So this is one of my favourite PODs, that one where a clique of Japanese officers planned to assassinate their own Prime Minister and also Charlie Chaplin in order to take Japan into an immediate war with the United States to unite Japan in a patriotic war. ITTL, that plan comes off and Hoover is able to win re-election as the Democratic Convention gets messy as many are uncomfortable with a cripple leading them in a war, and the party splits as the hardline racists sneer at the Catholic Smith.

The war goes badly - Japan manages to get a deal with a Chiang to collaboratively smash the Communists, allowing them to focus their energies on besting the US Navy, outcompeting the Air Corps and generally fighting the Yanks to a standstill. War production isn't sufficient to drag the States out of the doldrums of the Depression, and the Dust Bowl spreads, carving out an area of desolation stretching from Alberta to Chihuahua. MacArthur wins the GOP nomination in the midst of the war, cobbling together a war coupon to continue the exhausting conflict. The opposition remained deeply divided from Long's personality cult, to Johnson's decrepit isolationism to LaGuardia's tiny spark of hope.

By 1940 however, the war had entered true stalemate. The Japanese could keep the Pacific Fleet in its harbours, but could make no landings outside the now isolated Hawaii and Alaska - allowing her focus once more on China which had used these years to lick her wounds and prepare to retake Manchuria. The Dust Bowl had grown ever larger, with no New Deal in place to build wind breaks of trees. The East and West were increasingly divided from one another, and bandits took advantage in the badlands. MacArthur's military acumen had been winnowed away, so when Lindbergh emerged with his radical proposal for winning the war the American people grasped it - though with one hand tied behind her back.

Long had not been lazy in these years, capturing the Democratic Party machinery and slowly put surely placing allies into power across the South, and had brokered agreement with John L. Lewis of the Labor Party to aid in controlling the industrial North. However, the Laborites were themselves split, as Bridges' communist-aligned ILWU had slowly but surely spread across the Pacific and was very much a beast of its own. The result was a bitter election, strongly defined by regional splits. Long won much of the South, while MacArthur held the Northeast. Lindbergh won the anti-Japanese Pacific, much of the depopulated West, and parts of the industrial North for whom the war was the only thing keeping them in business. Bridges technically wasn't allowed to run for President but he had surrogates.

Finally, it emerged that Lindbergh had won - and as he announced his oft-repeated intention on the campaign trail, to contact that Mr Hitler and ask for his assistance in defeating the Yellow Peril, the murmurings of secession began. Long declared that Lindbergh had stolen the election and his pet Governors in the South concurred. MacArthur kept a bitter vigil in the White House as the date of the inauguration approached, and Bridges declared his intention to launch a general strike across the Pacific Coast.

America is now bloodily divided - Lindbergh in the fastness of the Pacific, waging a shadow war against Communism as bitter as the one with the Japanese. MacArthur keeps up an extralegal Presidency from Washington - tentatively backed by the British - while Long reigns supreme in the South and courts the British more openly, promising aid in the war in Europe in return for assistance in claiming his throne, but is also waging an internal war against a pro-Japanese African-American movement. The Dust Bowl remains contested, splitting the continent in half. Japan has ended up on the side of the Allies thanks to Lindbergh's chicanery, while Chiang has joined the Fuhrer's anti-Communist crusade.

its all a bit of a mess
 

Skinny87

Official SLP Honeypot
Patreon supporter
Published by SLP
The Sea Of Dust, or, How The Japanese Defeated America (Accidentally)

1929-1937: Herbert Hoover (Republican)
1928 (with Charles Curtis) def. Al Smith (Democratic)
1932 (with Charles Curtis) def. Al Smith ('Northern' Democratic), William H. Murray ('Southern' Democratic)

1937-1941: Douglas MacArthur (Republican / National Union)
1936 (with William Randolph Hearst) def. Huey Long ('Independent' Democratic), Fiorello H. LaGuardia (Labor), Hiram Johnson ('Independent' Republican)
1941-1941: Charles Lindbergh ('Independent' Republican / America First)
1940 (with Joseph P. Kennedy Sr.) def. Huey Long (Democratic / Everyman), Douglas MacArthur (Republican / National Union), Harry Bridges ('Pacific' Labor)
1941: Beginning of the Second American Civil War, and the collapse of the United States of America

So this is one of my favourite PODs, that one where a clique of Japanese officers planned to assassinate their own Prime Minister and also Charlie Chaplin in order to take Japan into an immediate war with the United States to unite Japan in a patriotic war. ITTL, that plan comes off and Hoover is able to win re-election as the Democratic Convention gets messy as many are uncomfortable with a cripple leading them in a war, and the party splits as the hardline racists sneer at the Catholic Smith.

The war goes badly - Japan manages to get a deal with a Chiang to collaboratively smash the Communists, allowing them to focus their energies on besting the US Navy, outcompeting the Air Corps and generally fighting the Yanks to a standstill. War production isn't sufficient to drag the States out of the doldrums of the Depression, and the Dust Bowl spreads, carving out an area of desolation stretching from Alberta to Chihuahua. MacArthur wins the GOP nomination in the midst of the war, cobbling together a war coupon to continue the exhausting conflict. The opposition remained deeply divided from Long's personality cult, to Johnson's decrepit isolationism to LaGuardia's tiny spark of hope.

By 1940 however, the war had entered true stalemate. The Japanese could keep the Pacific Fleet in its harbours, but could make no landings outside the now isolated Hawaii and Alaska - allowing her focus once more on China which had used these years to lick her wounds and prepare to retake Manchuria. The Dust Bowl had grown ever larger, with no New Deal in place to build wind breaks of trees. The East and West were increasingly divided from one another, and bandits took advantage in the badlands. MacArthur's military acumen had been winnowed away, so when Lindbergh emerged with his radical proposal for winning the war the American people grasped it - though with one hand tied behind her back.

Long had not been lazy in these years, capturing the Democratic Party machinery and slowly put surely placing allies into power across the South, and had brokered agreement with John L. Lewis of the Labor Party to aid in controlling the industrial North. However, the Laborites were themselves split, as Bridges' communist-aligned ILWU had slowly but surely spread across the Pacific and was very much a beast of its own. The result was a bitter election, strongly defined by regional splits. Long won much of the South, while MacArthur held the Northeast. Lindbergh won the anti-Japanese Pacific, much of the depopulated West, and parts of the industrial North for whom the war was the only thing keeping them in business. Bridges technically wasn't allowed to run for President but he had surrogates.

Finally, it emerged that Lindbergh had won - and as he announced his oft-repeated intention on the campaign trail, to contact that Mr Hitler and ask for his assistance in defeating the Yellow Peril, the murmurings of secession began. Long declared that Lindbergh had stolen the election and his pet Governors in the South concurred. MacArthur kept a bitter vigil in the White House as the date of the inauguration approached, and Bridges declared his intention to launch a general strike across the Pacific Coast.

America is now bloodily divided - Lindbergh in the fastness of the Pacific, waging a shadow war against Communism as bitter as the one with the Japanese. MacArthur keeps up an extralegal Presidency from Washington - tentatively backed by the British - while Long reigns supreme in the South and courts the British more openly, promising aid in the war in Europe in return for assistance in claiming his throne, but is also waging an internal war against a pro-Japanese African-American movement. The Dust Bowl remains contested, splitting the continent in half. Japan has ended up on the side of the Allies thanks to Lindbergh's chicanery, while Chiang has joined the Fuhrer's anti-Communist crusade.

its all a bit of a mess
Omg Mumby, you've actually accidentally made a coherent timeline for that 'The USN and IJN fight the Kriegsmarine' short story in the anthology I reviewed for the blog recently