• Hi Guest!

    The costs of running this forum are covered by Sea Lion Press. If you'd like to help support the company and the forum, visit patreon.com/sealionpress

Lists of Heads of Government and Heads of State

Blackentheborg

Sewer Socialist
Location
Llareggub, Wales
Pronouns
He/Him
Posting this all together so readers wouldn't have to go through multiple pages to get the full story.

Things Fall Apart

2021-2022: [vacant]/Kamala Harris
defeated Donald Trump/Mike Pence, Joe Biden/Kamala Harris, others

When a whole bunch of raunchy escapades put a real weight on Biden, and Trump was caught literally with his pants down in the Oval, the prophesied TIED ELECTORAL COLLEGE ended up a reality. If that wasn't enough, the Democrats keep their gains in the House, as well as enough Senate seats to force a tiebreaker stalemate, even with Pence trying his best to flaunt what little time he had left in the Oval. As the Senate appoints Harris as VP, the House remains staunch in refusing to do their job they were elected to do. Republicans wouldn't budge, neither would Democrats. Weeks turned into months and one deadline rolled over to the next.

2022-2023: Kamala Harris†/Tulsi Gabbard
defeated Donald Trump/Mike Pence, Joe Biden/Kamala Harris, others

Following the absolutely disappointing result of the Democratic primaries, Hawaiian senator and former presidential candidate Tulsi Gabbard lost her incumbent House seat to challenger Kai Kahele. Surprisingly, tho, she was called back to congress a little more than a month after limping back to her home state, after the gridlocked House begrudgingly decided she'd be the perfect fit for Veep. The fact the Republicans put her name up for consideration at all was enough to mark her as a permanent person of interest when it came to accusations of Russian meddling. What was an already increasingly unpopular and controversial was made a bit worse when Gabbard announced she would be changing her party affiliation to Independent, following several rowdy confrontations with the Democratic party ordering her off the ticket come 2024.

2023-2025: Tulsi Gabbard/[vacant]

Harris was assassinated whilst doing a listening tour of Camden, New Jersey. Almost immediately a nineteen year old came forward claiming responsibility, insisting he was put up to the task as a gang initiation ('for clout'). The subsequent investigation by intelligence services quickly found that while the youth had indeed intended to 'disrupt the President's visit in some manner', he was later found to have no actual affiliation with local gangs (subsequent revaluation by contemporary historians theorise the youth was suffering from undiagnosed histrionic personality disorder). The actual shooter, found less than a week later attempting to gain entry to Canada, was a fifty-something former coal miner and disenfranchised veteran. What really got people going was the sheer amount of alt-right stuff that was found on his internet history. Gabbard used that as fuel for rolling out Patriot Act III.

2025-2029: Sarah Palin/Nikki Haley
defeated Tulsi Gabbard/Sabrina Shrader (Independent), Pete Buttegig/Gretchen Whitmer, others

When the President refused to appoint a new Veep until she's officially elected "because reasons", Republican anger came roaring back, or, as Palin called it, "Apple Pie Populism" or "Redneck Reganomics" or whatever you wanted to call it to avoid using "Trumpism". The actual inventor of his own signature populism brand, Mr. Trump, had just been found guilty by the New York court, which quickly became one of Palin's campaign planks; federal entities should be above the power of the law. Except if it was President Gabbard, of course, she was apparently guilty of as many crimes as they cared to list. And her platform of protecting the government, fiscal sanctity of businesses, privilege of religious groups and illusion of privilege to First Amendmentites would've been enough to crush any completion even if the incumbent wasn't heir to one of the most controversial elections in recent history, who chose to instead run on her own right when the Democrats forbade her from running in their primary, instead nominating safe, reliable, Lockheed-Martin-friendly Buttegig. People were talking about two major tickets having all-female rosters, and one having the first openly gay nominee, when they should've been talking about the heavily guarded camps popping up on the border, or the blight that was spreading across crops, or the last big conglomerate buying up the other. Shocker.

2029-2037: Lee Carter/Joseph Stallcop
defeated Sarah Palin/Nikki Haley, others
defeated Ariana Rowlands/Greg Hafen, others


If Palin gotten in a term earlier, or Trump had kept his hands above the table, then they might've been a bit more lucky. Because shortly after entering office the poor attempt the GOP had made at a nationalist economy came crashing down. It wasn't just a recession, oh no, it was a 'jump out the window of the stock market' situation. Jobs puffed into smoke, so did crops, and supermarket shelves, and civility, or what would be left of it by now. Membership applications for extremist groups on both sides of the spectrum quintupled overnight - by election day, one out of every ten Americans were affiliated with some form of militia. You know those Reddit posts you see sometimes where Proud Boys get owned by ANTIFA mobs or vice versa? Picture that in the thousands, across every state. Palin wasn't prepared for this in the slightest. Solution? Haemorrhage American assets, suspend social security payments indefinitely and de-automate all American factories via Executive Order. If workers didn't get the chance to beat up car-assembly machines in the middle of abandoned fields a la "Office Space" en-masse, there would have been guillotines on the White House lawns by sunrise. This was the perfect atmosphere for Carter, a pro-gun socialist from Coal Country, to clean house.

Despite winning a second term, Carter inherited the poisoned chalice that had become the American political system. His Second Constitutional Convention was quashed before it even convened, the Supreme Court was virtually empty - save for an incredibly bored Chief Justice Engel - and his own party was playing hardball with him. Any attempt to micro-manage tax rates were forestalled by Congressional Republicans, who’d taken to simply getting up and walking out when someone was so much as rude to them - garnering them the common moniker of “Party of Karens”. It was difficult to make sure the country didn’t go bankrupt when the House and Senate acted like spoilt children. So he bailed out the banks. If he did what his heart told him, to demolish Wall Street with bulldozers, he'd never survive. And with this bailout went his base, who now seethed that he was nothing more than “another bastich liberal shillkill”, whatever that meant. He never led the country to civil war, nothing of the sort, but there were assholes all the same, always occupying federal land and refusing to pay parking fines or taxes or the missing nine dollars for their gas-station coffee. But we’re getting ahead of ourselves.

2037-2039: Josh Hawley/Dane Eagle
defeated Geo Saba/Liz Bruenig, others

After progress there comes spewing fourth from the false sense of security a belief in vanity. That’s why the Dems nominated the wholesome farm boy baseball-star-turned congressman Saba, picture perfect and squeaky clean, more than happy to play ball with the party, unlike Carter, who’d burned all bridges by the time he left office. Hawley used to be a wholesome farm boy, too, enough to be taken under the wing of then-President Palin. But he had gotten old. And bitter. And outright murky in his allegiances. He now stalked D.C. with the assistance of a cane, which rumours suggest was carved from the ivory of one of the last remaining elephants. When voters saw the debate streams, where Hawley grumbled, growled and snapped at his opponent, they didn’t see him for the cantankerous bastard he was; New York is sinking into the ocean? Fuck you! What about my 401(k)?!

Then everyone’s 401(k)’s vanished. The Week of Open Windows happened in the blink of an eye for many, tho the history books make it seem like it took years. Global Banks that were “too big to fail” failed, shares in multinationals became instantly worthless, the fake money market was no more. This would’ve been more than enough to cripple the States, but this was a global issue. Overnight the oil magnates retreated into bunkers and refused all exports. Farmland was raided by civilians who attempted to gnaw on the underripe cobs and bushels of wheat. Pure, unadulterated chaos. Gore Vindal would’ve been grinning from ear to ear if he knew how right he was.

Of course, things proceeded to get far worse. When you've reached the bottom of the barrel that is human decency, who says you have to stop digging?

2039-20?? Odessa Oldham/[vacant]
[fmr. Secretary of Agriculture elected via Contingency of Govt.]

It was unthinkable to believe the President, the cabinet and a sizeable chunk of congress could be wiped out in an instant, perhaps even bordering on the realm of crude fiction. When that horrible act is carried out by a rightwing terrorist faction, it becomes even more farcical. But sometimes life imitates art in the worst way possible. Suddenly the angry sovereign citizens screaming about gun rights weren’t on congressional laptops opened up to YouTube — they were tearing down the doors of the capital building. For government-haters they did love bringing up that one part in the Declaration of Independence as justification for their actions, something about it being their right, no, duty, to throw off the government. Luckily for Secretary Oldham, the former Conservative head of the Future Farmers of America, she was back home attending a funeral. She would, unluckily, be attending a lot more within the span of a month, by the end of which she was sat in the newly-repaired Oval Office and administered her oath.

2039-2042: Oldessa Oldham/Daniel Zolnikov
[elections suspended]

With American per-capita credit virtually nonexistent and the dollar note more useful as toilet paper, Oldham announced that domestic trade would be transitioned to a “temporary” barter-based system. In theory, this was just convoluted. In practice, it fell apart far too quickly. Folks with desirable supplies set up impossible and highly personal trade equivalents, only to then be stormed by hordes of ravenous have-nots. Warlords came a dime a dozen, lording over boroughs and inlets and demanding tribute for protection - the government never counted on violence being one of the resources up for barter. They also didn’t count on them organising raids on military bases and police stations. Civilian-piloted tanks did roll through Pennsylvania, but that wasn’t the reason D.C was evacuated.

2042-20??: [debated]
Andrew Andrzejewski (Speaker of the House of Representatives)
Cpo. Eddie Gallagher (Chair of the Joint Chiefs of Staff)
Cpl. Shoshana Johnson (Assistant Secretary of the Army Civil Works)
Sino-American Administrative Caretaker Assembly
Committee of the Common People
various other smaller factions, warlords


Remember, the Week of Open Windows was an international issue. Ever since the Saudi oil fields were set on fire, they never stopped. The EU lay in tatters, India and Pakistan launched nukes at each other (who fired first is still up for debate), Japan had locked down its borders and were shooting down overhead aircraft, and Russia attempted to breeze through Eastern Europe, only to meet the horrors of the Cannibal Kings firsthand. In this chaos was opportunity, said the new Chairman of the CPP, younger than all others had been, with a glint in his eye. If the Peoples Republic wasn’t yet to call in its national debt, they probably wouldn’t get another chance.

Of course, America was nowhere near the condition it’d have to be in to hand over the full $3.01 trillion it had accrued. That was fine, said the Chairman, we will take your land as collateral. They didn’t wait for an answer, but let’s be frank, they weren’t going to get one. As shocked as they were when civilians wielding military-grade firearms took pot shots at them from the coast, they were more taken aback by not being able to get a straight answer on who the president was. Some nervous man with greasy hair who hid in the Rocky Mountains claimed it was him, only for a military man drinking corn chowder from a halved skull to say it was him. So too said the weary but still grizzled woman who never left her Aircraft Carrier stationed off the Texas coast, and a jumbled and haggard group of twelve different representatives of something called the Committee of the Common People, who insisted their Autonomous Zones were far superior to what came before. It would seem that within this chaos, there was even more maddening lunacy than first thought.
 
Last edited:

Lord Caedus

Well-known member
Location
Minnesota
I know I probably shouldn't be that worried about plausibility on a TL that has Tulsi Gabbard initiating "Patriot Act III" only to be succeeded by Sarah Palin in 2024, but that is not how a hung Electoral College, a vice president acting as president, or even how party primaries work.

If there is no majority in the Electoral College, the House (by state delegation) picks the president from the top three electoral vote getters while the Senate picks the vice president from the two vice presidential candidates with the most electoral votes. If no person qualifies as president, but there is a vice president-elect, that person becomes acting president at the start of a new term in addition to their role as vice president.

Finally, in the US, parties can't deny a candidate the right to run in their primary. Bernie Sanders famously spent his entire political career before 2015 as an independent or third-party candidate but faced no legal hurdles running in the Democratic presidential primary. He has also won the Democratic nomination for the Senate three times despite not being a registered Democrat when he ran in any of his Senate races.
 

BClick

One Million Americans
Location
Little Beirut
Pronouns
He/him
The ⅓ Force // The Fourth Force

1967-1975: Tom McCall (Republican)
1966 def. Bob Straub (Democratic)
1970 def. Bob Straub (Democratic)

1975-1979: Bob Straub (Democratic)
1974 def. Vic Atiyeh (Republican)
1979-1982: Tom McCall (Independent) †
1978 def. Roger Martin (Republican), Bob Straub (Democratic)
1982-1983: Norma Paulus (Republican)
1983-1987: Frank Ivancie (Democratic)

1982 def. Norma Paulus (Republican)
1987-0000: Ralph Friedman (Independent)
1986 def. Denny Smith (Republican), Frank Ivancie (Democratic), PJ “Prem Niren” Toelkes (Love)

Tom McCall did not know when to fold ‘em.

His surprise return to the governorship after four years flirting with national ambitions should have been an unmitigated triumph, but even the successful campaign of ‘78 showed the warning signs of what was to come. McCall offered no big ideas for his Third Force. The radical innovation that had made him a living legend was gone; he instead leant on nostalgia for his greatest hits, pledged to finish his tax reforms that had already been rejected by the voters, and stomped Bob Straub for fumbling his legacy. In the end, he only barely snuck back in over a square, suburban conservative who represented the antithesis of everything he stood for. His troubled family life, his brush with cancer, and his drinking habit had taken their toll, and the nasty temper he usually kept private began to shine through his public humor and charm.

It was unsurprising that the roster of McCall’s third-term achievements ended up looking thin. He saved his beloved land-use system, he made some tweaks to property taxes, and he passed an open-primary law over the heads of both political parties by sending it to the voters for approval. That last cost him most of his remaining stature in Salem. Not that there was much to lose at that point.

The timber depression that began as he took office was a tragedy years in the making. Private lumber companies had denuded their holdings recklessly and unsustainably in the decades after the Second World War, mowing down millions of acres of old-growth forest faster than even their monocultural tree plantations could replace them. This was of no concern to timber barons like the Wheeler family, who had already invested heavily in the Southern yellow pine belt: if they ran out of trees in Oregon, they could just harvest in Georgia, with the added bonus of a compliant non-union workforce. The disaster for timber country was compounded by outsourcing, as the remaining cut was shipped to Japan for processing rather than milled at home.

Mills were idled and workers laid off everywhere. The state lost population at a steady clip. And everyone blamed Tom McCall. While the governor had been as enthusiastic a shill for the timber industry as any Northwest politician, his opposition to unchecked economic growth had always drawn the hatred of those Republicans and Democrats who reveled in being “business-friendly.” Now they claimed that years of “Visit, but don’t stay” had given Oregon a poor reputation among investors. Surely these unemployed loggers and millworkers could have found other jobs, if only McCall hadn’t poisoned the well and driven all the potential factories and office parks away.

The governor was still personally popular, and there was an outpouring of sympathy when his cancer returned in 1981, but his era of dominance was over. Business hated him, the party regulars on both sides hated him, timber country hated him, and even the middle-class radicals who’d once swooned for his environmental record were now perturbed by his opposition to Forest Service roadless rules and his support for the Trojan nuclear plant in Rainier. McCall died having secured his legacy in law – but Oregonians were no longer certain they were proud of that legacy.

His interim successor was Secretary of State Norma Paulus, one of the last remaining liberal Republicans now that Senator Hatfield was toeing the party line in DC. In the unusual coalitions created by the new open primaries – in which voters could choose both parties’ nominees – she beat a double handful of conservatives while the Democrats selected a full-throated Reaganite, Portland Mayor Frank Ivancie. (McCall aide Phil Keisling had split the liberal vote with anti-nuclear activist Lloyd Marbet.) The cigar-chomping Slovenian made himself the bring-back-business candidate and won in a walk.

Over the next four years, though, Morning in America didn’t extend much further than the edge of Silicon Forest. The high-tech and sportswear companies in Beaverton boomed, catered to with tax cuts and land-use exemptions, but Reaganomics couldn’t regrow the trees and free markets only encouraged more lumber companies to decamp to the right-to-work South or to East Asia. For most of Oregon, the national slump of the seventies never ended. It didn’t take long for Ivancie’s approach to seem a dismal failure, and there were even murmurings of nostalgia for McCall’s optimism.

The late governor’s proteges were scattered between both parties and were all on the political outs. With a primary challenge to Ivancie sounding difficult and a victory in the increasingly right-wing ORGOP even more so, a few of the more idealistic throwbacks proposed an independent campaign. But it would have to be a personalist campaign in order to cut through, like McCall’s had been, and who among the governor’s yuppie progeny had that kind of charisma?

Only one name from the old administration came to mind: Ralph Friedman. The septuagenarian travel writer and folk historian had been a personal friend of Tom McCall, who had appointed him to lead the state tourism commission in 1979. The irony of one anti-development populist telling another to promote tourism was rich, and the political cartoonists had a field day depicting Friedman hiding behind park benches with a rifle, ready to snipe incoming Californians. It was good-natured humor, though – Oregonians enjoyed Friedman’s mix of practicality and purple prose, and his self-published books appeared on most shelves in the state. He would be just the man to lead a Third Force renaissance.

The one thing the Third Force yuppies hadn’t reckoned with was Friedman’s politics.

Where McCall came from old money and had come by his radical ideas through a patrician liberal’s concern for quality of life, Friedman had been born into poverty as the son of immigrants in Chicago. He had first visited Oregon as a rail-hopping hobo during the Depression, and had returned again and again, entranced equally by the landscape and by the fascinating stories of pioneer grit he found everywhere he looked. After moving to the state for good, he’d become a beloved, apolitical public figure, taking a vocal stand only on issues of conservation and development – but he’d always found time to attend peace vigils and anti-nuclear protests, and he was far more radical than was understood.

The contrast became obvious when he squared off against Ivancie and conservative Representative Denny Smith. Friedman combined a Third Force concern for aesthetics and quality of life with a populist defense of the working poor and the vanishing livelihoods of Oregon’s loggers, small farmers, and other sons of the soil. Unlike the other candidates, he argued that the state’s problem was not just the unemployment rate – which could, after all, be numerically reduced by importing people to work at Intel and Tektronix – but the loss of communities’ entire purpose for existing. He placed the blame squarely on corporate irresponsibility and outsourcing. This wasn’t a centrist: this was a candidate of the Old Left.

Opponents were quick to note that his wife Phoebe hosted a weekly radio program on Marxist theory, and that the couple had met at a demonstration in the late 1940s – while Ralph was walking a picket line with the Communist-dominated Marine Cooks and Stewards Union. It was difficult to argue that Friedman hadn’t been, at the very least, a fellow-traveler. But this was the very tail end of the Cold War, and there were more serious identity questions at stake: Ivancie was a *spit* Portlander and Smith had spent the past decade in DC. Friedman had friends all across the state, from the cities to the most remote rural hamlets; when a heckler called him a member of the Portland elite, Friedman quipped that his dog had been to every county. Polls showed that even those who planned to vote against the folklorist liked his attitude.

Of course, with Friedman pulling the left and the timber-country populists away from the Democrats, Denny Smith was still consolidating the suburbanites and the rural right. The son of a previous state governor and one of Capitol Hill’s loudest tough-on-crime rabble-rousers, Smith looked like he’d walk through the middle with no trouble – until he walked into one of America’s strangest political scandals instead. One of Smith’s Congressional advisers, an ex-Air Force arms designer named Robert Dilger, was arrested in Arlington shortly before the election when a homemade anti-tank gun strapped into his truck misfired and destroyed a gas station.

While Smith quickly fired and disavowed the “mad inventor,” the fallout was entertaining enough to overshadow the entire last month of the campaign – during which Friedman crisscrossed the state on those highways he knew like the back of his hand, alternating between sentimental Third Force speeches about beauty, and hard-headed ideas about an industrial transition towards responsibly-harvested finished wood products. Furniture. Chopsticks. It all worked much better than even Friedman himself had suspected. The upset victory rang in a new era of McCallism: a harder-edged, more militant defense of home and community and quality of life, but ultimately one that would restore unity and pride to Oregon...

The first tree-spiking action took place only a month after Friedman was sworn in.

This is a little self-indulgent, I admit, but then the original Third Force scenario I worked on a while back was pretty self-indulgent too. McCall did indeed run a tired, uninspired comeback campaign in 1978 IOTL, and later claimed his biggest mistake was sticking with the Republicans rather than going Independent. I don’t imagine a third term would have gone well.

I am a big fan of Friedman’s books, which are half practical highway travel guides and half folklore collections, full of wildly overwrought description. Doing a little more digging on him recently, I found out that he had a fascinating early life and surprisingly radical politics, so I had to pick him for the more-populist-Third-Force revival here. Would not recommend as a plausible hipster candidate, though – as far as I can tell the only office he ever sought or held was on a county parks board.

If the timber wars escalate in the same way they did IOTL, Friedman’s probably fucked in the long run, but at least there was a bright spot of hope!
 
Last edited:

Blackentheborg

Sewer Socialist
Location
Llareggub, Wales
Pronouns
He/Him
Yes, I know. Thats why Kamala became President. I DID get the order wrong tho, thanks for pointing that out.
Finally, in the US, parties can't deny a candidate the right to run in their primary.
This was my way of saying that the party made machinations via endorsements, attack ads, et al. against candidates they didn't like. Look at the sheer amount of anti-Bernie hit pieces put out in the primaries. Biden was coming Solid 4th in every state primary RIGHT UP UNTIL Jim Clyburn gave him the endorsement he needed in South Carolina, then every single news source was full of "BERNIE MIGHT AS WELL DROP OUT NOW" articles. It might not be outright, but it happens.
 

Lord Caedus

Well-known member
Location
Minnesota
Yes, I know. Thats why Kamala became President.
No, she would become Acting President. She couldn't appoint Gabbard (lol) as vice president because she herself would still be occupying that role.

This was my way of saying that the party made machinations via endorsements, attack ads, et al. against candidates they didn't like.
Then you should have said that, because nobody else defines a party "forbidding" someone to run in their primary that way.

Look at the sheer amount of anti-Bernie hit pieces put out in the primaries. Biden was coming Solid 4th in every state primary RIGHT UP UNTIL Jim Clyburn gave him the endorsement he needed in South Carolina, then every single news source was full of "BERNIE MIGHT AS WELL DROP OUT NOW" articles. It might not be outright, but it happens.
It's honestly endearing how powerful and competent you seem to think the DNC is.
 

Catalunya

Well-known member
Shouldn't that be condemn considering he's all in on the soviets?

Anyway, I really like this! I wonder how Obama ended up there considering his own origins don't really map, but it's pretty well done.

What's up with the US? It looks like a progressive western government and a worker one in the north east, plus a rump southern one in Miami?
Yeah, you’re right. I didn’t really put too much thought into that. I just kind of tried to map the ideological differences of African-Americans.

There is a Communist America in the north backed by the Soviets. A progressive government out west that is a bit like Mexico with a dominant party that enjoys the support of most labor unions. Their main allies are other anti-Soviet socialist and communist states. Than there is the Omaha government which is mainly in the plains and backed by the British and French. They’re probably the most democratic, but also really right-wing. There’s also a rump racist Dixie America in Florida and a Japanese occupied Hawaii and Alaska which is dominated by the military who are puppets of the Japanese navy.
 

Blackentheborg

Sewer Socialist
Location
Llareggub, Wales
Pronouns
He/Him
No, she would become Acting President. She couldn't appoint Gabbard (lol) as vice president because she herself would still be occupying that role.
Ah yes, I see you too have watched that new CPGrey video.
Lets say, in this example, Harris has been acting president for two whole months while congress is deadlocked. IIRC there's a stipulation that after a 21-day retaining period, they can be officially made President, barring any sort of interruption.
Also to consider; look at what's happened to America in the last four years. Look at how the pillars of law have eroded through sheer incompetency. Any expectation for things to follow the system have been stamped out and buried behind the shed.
Then you should have said that, because nobody else defines a party "forbidding" someone to run in their primary that way.
That I should.
It's honestly endearing how powerful and competent you seem to think the DNC is.
TBH I just find them transparently prehistoric and corrupt. They are politicians, after all.
 

Excelsior

Member
IIRC there's a stipulation that after a 21-day retaining period, they can be officially made President, barring any sort of interruption.
There is no such provision. You may be thinking of the 25th Amendment, which allows the vice president to maintain the Acting Presidency if the vice president and cabinet invoke the amendment and Congress votes to continue the acting presidency within 21 days.
 
Last edited:

Time Enough

New Left Wing Political Queers-Micheal Moran
Pronouns
He/Him
Bringing the Democracy (As Indicated By The Name): Prime Ministers of Japan:

2008-2009: Tarō Asō (Liberal Democratic Party)
2009-2013: Ichirō Ozawa (Democratic Party of Japan)
2009 (Majority) def: Tarō Asō (Liberal Democratic Party), Akihiro Ota (Komeito), Kazuo Shii (Japanese Communist Party), Mizuho Fukushima (Japanese Social Democratic Party), Yoshimi Watanabe (Your Party)
2013-2015: Shigeru Ishiba (LDP)
2013 (Majority) def: Ichirō Ozawa (Democratic Party of Japan), Yuko Mori (Tomorrow Party), Akihiro Ota (Komeito),Shintaro Ishihara (Restoration), Kazuo Shii (JCP), Mizuho Fukushima (JSDP), Yoshimi Watanabe (Your Party)
2015-2016: Yasutoshi Nishimura (LDP)
2016-2018: Akira Nagatsuma (DPJ)
2016 (Coalition with Tomorrow Party of Japan) def: Yasutoshi Nishimura (LDP), Yuko Mori-Tarō Yamamoto (Tomorrow Party),Natsuo Yamaguchi (Komeito), Yuriko Koike (Kibō no Tō), Kazuo Shii (JCP), Kenji Eda-Tōru Hashimoto (Japan Innovation Party), Seiji Maehara (People's Democratic Party)
2018-2019: Kiyomi Tsujimoto (DPJ)
2019-: Yukio Edano (DPJ)

2019 (Majority) def: Fumio Kishida (LDP), Tarō Yamamoto-Ayako Fuchigami (Tomorrow Party), Natsuo Yamaguchi (Komeito), Yuriko Koike-Masaru Wakasa (Kibō no Tō), Kazuo Shii (JCP), Tōru Hashimoto (Japan Innovation Party), Seiji Maehara (People's Democratic Party)

"Yukio Edano has finally done it, he's won the DPJ a Second Term on a message of Centre-Left reform and Revival after the semi-chaotic four years of the coalition years. Meanwhile the Tomorrow Party can celebrate still being relevant with it's Green, Progressive, Left Wing Populist Message it's managed to smash the awkward remains of the JSDP and managed to secure it's place on the Left alongside the JCP. Meanwhile the LDP licks it's wounds as the moderate stance of Fumio Kishida got smashed to pieces by the Right Wing Populism of Kibō no Tō and the JIP, whilst the Centre-Right vote gravitated towards the PDP. Time will tell yet if Japan enjoys it's new two party system or if it decides that the DPJ is what they truly want..."
 
Last edited:

Catalunya

Well-known member
Behind every fascism there is a failed revolution.

2009 - 2017: Barack H. Obama / Joseph ‘Joe’ R. Biden Jr. (Democrat)
2008: John S. McCain III / Sarah L. Palin (Republican)
2012: W. Mitt Romney / Paul D. Ryan (Republican)
2017 - 2021: Donald J. Trump / Michael ‘Mike’ R. Pence (Republican)
2016: Hillary D. Rodham Clinton / Timothy ‘Tim’ M. Kaine (Democrat)

2021 - 2025: Joseph ‘Joe’ R. Biden Jr. / Kamala D. Harris (Democrat)
2020: Donald J. Trump / Michael ‘Mike’ R. Pence (Republican)
2025 - 2033: Tucker S. M. Carlson / Joshua ‘Josh’ D. Hawley (Republican)
2024: JosephJoe’ R. Biden Jr. / Kamala D. Harris (Democrat)

2028: Kamala D. Harris / Mark Kelly (Democrat), Mark Ruffalo / Lee J. Carter (Independent)
2033 - 20##: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez / Chokwe Antar Lumumba (Democrat)

2032: Joshua ‘Josh’ D. Hawley / Matthew ‘Matt’ T. Shea (Republican)
Or
2033 - 20##: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez / Timothy ‘Tim’ R. Ashe (Democrat)
2032: Joshua ‘Josh’ D. Hawley / Matthew ‘Matt’ T. Shea (Republican)
 

theev

Chief Strategist of the UMass Democrats
Pronouns
he/him
1603835689690.png

1953 - 1955: Dwight D. Eisenhower (Republican)
1952 (with Richard Nixon): Adlai Stevenson (Democratic)
1955 - 1957: Richard Nixon (Republican)
1957 - 1958: Estes Kefauver (Democratic)
1956 (with John F. Kennedy): Richard Nixon (Republican), T. Coleman Andrews (States' Rights)
1958 - 1963: John F. Kennedy (Democratic)
1960 (with Stuart Symington): Nelson Rockefeller (Republican), Orval Faubus (States' Rights)
1963 - 1965: Stuart Symington (Democratic)
1965 - 1972: Robert F. Kennedy (Democratic)
1964 (with Lyndon B. Johnson): Barry Goldwater (Republican), Ross Barnett (States' Rights)
1968 (with George McGovern): J. Edgar Hoover (States' Rights), George Romney (Republican)

1972 - 1974: George McGovern (Democratic)
1972 (with Sargent Shriver): Jim Rhodes (Republican), Curtis LeMay [replacing J. Edgar Hoover] (States' Rights)
1974 - 1981: Sargent Shriver (Democratic)
1976 (with Mo Udall): Richard Nixon (Republican)
1981 - 1989: Ted Kennedy (Democratic)
1980 (with Tom Bradley): John Wayne (Republican), Charles Mathias (Independent)
1984 (with Tom Bradley): Bob Dole (Republican)

1989 - 1997: Joe P. Kennedy II (Democratic)
1988 (with John Glenn): Paul Laxalt (Republican)
1992 (with John Glenn): Dick Cheney (Republican), Jerry Brown (People's)

1997 - 2005: Kathleen Kennedy Townsend (Democratic)
1996 (with Paul G. Kirk): Colin Powell (Independent), Jesse Jackson (People's), Pat Buchanan (US Taxpayers)
2000 (with Paul G. Kirk): John McCain (Independent), Ralph Nader (People's)

2005 - 2009: Arnold Schwarzenegger (Independent)
2004 (with Orrin Hatch): Mark Kennedy Shriver (Democratic), Cornel West (People's)
2009 - 2017: John F. Kennedy Jr. (Democratic)
2008 (with Patrick J. Kennedy): Arnold Schwarzenegger (Independent), Dennis Kucinich (People's)
2012 (with Patrick J. Kennedy): David Petraeus (Independent), Bernie Sanders (People's)

2017 - 0000: Joe P. Kennedy III (Democratic)
2016 (with Caroline Kennedy): Mitt Romney (Independent), Bernie Sanders (People's)
2020 (with Caroline Kennedy): Ed Markey (People's), John Kasich (Independent), Michael Flynn (Independent)


Dwight Eisenhower's heart attack and Richard Nixon's inexperience would doom the Republican Party. Estes Kefauver and his young charismatic running mate narrowly won the 1956 election but from the start weren't afraid to make controversial political decisions. Southern Democrats were determined that Estes Kefauver would pay for federalizing the Arkansas National Guard.

And pay he would. In January, 1958 a dossier on the President's sex life was soon plastered across every major newspaper in the country. Maybe some Americans in 1958 could tolerate a President who cheated on his wife, but very few could tolerate a President who preyed on teenage girls, even if they were legally adults. Within months Kefauver would leave office in shame, in lieu of being forced out by the Senate.

John F. Kennedy was determined to not let his presidency's scandalous beginnings define it. Quickly the youngest President in the nation's history made a name for himself. He saved his party from certain defeat in the midterms, he beat the Soviets to getting a man in orbit, he lead the country out of an economic recession, and now he was ready to take on the issue of civil rights. Running to the left, Kennedy would defeat Nelson Rockefeller and in quick succession sign the monumental Civil Rights Act of 1962 and Voting Rights Act of 1963. It appeared that Kennedy would retire with high approval ratings and be remembered as a man who turned his party's misfortune right around. While campaigning for "reformed" Mississippi gubernatorial candidate James P. Coleman in June 1963, Kennedy would be assassinated by white supremacist Byron De La Beckwith.

Although Stuart Symington would ascend to the presidency it would be JFK's brother who waved his bloody banner in the next election. Robert F. Kennedy was his brother's Chief of Staff Attorney General Secretary of Defense in 1963 and used his platform and friendship with President Symington to swap positions with him at the 1964 DNC. Forced into a strategic alliance with Senate Majority Leader Lyndon B. Johnson, RFK would win a landslide over his segregationist opponents. He would get to work quickly, declaring a "War on Poverty" in his first 100 days, a proposed continuation of his brother's domestic policies. But he would struggle. Within weeks his relationship with Vice President Johnson had completely broken down and by summer, 1965 the two were not on speaking terms. The War in Vietnam, started under Symington in 1964, was continuing to rage. In 1966, following a multi-month public spat RFK would fire FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover. Hoover would respond by releasing enough information to give the Democrats a catastrophic midterm, despite attempts by Kennedy to discredit Hoover.

In 1967 RFK would finally initiate a negotiated withdrawal from Vietnam, the war was beginning to seem unwinnable and he really didn't need a reason for his base to turn on him during an election year. From then on he would declare that the worst was probably behind him and that now he could really push for what he wanted - barring he won re-election of course. Kennedy booted a bitter Johnson off the ticket and replaced him with a political ally. By the fall it was clear that despite his opponents' initial strength they had weaknesses. Hoover was posed to carry much of the South and some of the Mountain West but was a terrible politician and had trouble expanding his based while Romney was initially the election's frontrunner but disastrous debate performance after disastrous debate performance revealed he was born with a silver foot in his mouth. The first lunar landing in October sealed the deal and Kennedy and his faction would come out of 1968 as victors.

Given a new mandate, RFK would work towards completing his War on Poverty proposals and many would pass through Congress by the end of his term. His term would be cut short however, in Ottawa in April 1972 when President Kennedy was assassinated by Arthur Bremer shortly after meeting with Prime Minister Trudeau. George McGovern's ascension to the Presidency would secure his victory in the Democratic primaries and the rally-around-the-flag effect following RFK's assassination would give him a big enough wave to win in November. McGovern's tenure would be short. Although he would continue the War on Poverty and pass a UBI program, McGovern's administration would be better remembered for its ending. On February 22, 1974 amateur pilot Samuel Byck hijacked a commercial airplane and flew it into the White House. The carnage would be caught on TV and millions of Americans would strongly remember the speech given by new President Sargent Shriver over the rubble of the White House.

The first Director of the Peace Corp and RFK's Secretary of State, Shriver was seen by the public as a virtual member of the Kennedy family - not just one by marriage. Now with three assassinated presidents in just eleven years, Sargent Shriver saw his chief duty as uniting the country. Shriver would use his massive post-Byck popularity to institute security measures ranging from comprehensive gun control to making the airport a pain in the ass to go through airport security, and to finally finish off the declared bits of the War on Poverty. Shriver would find his popularity waning by 1976 though and would enlist House Speaker Mo Udall to assist him in his campaign against a resurgent Richard Nixon. It would be a close race, the closest since Nixon last ran in 1956, but Shriver would narrowly pull off a victory.

Shriver's second term would be marred by oil embargo and recession but his late misfortune would not spell the end of the Kennedy Dynasty. In 1979, party bosses ushered in Senate Majority Leader Ted Kennedy to seize the party's nomination. Ted was basically given the party's nomination and kept out of the limelight for much of early 1980. What initially was an uphill race would become easier as his main opponent turned out to be controversial California Governor John Wayne whose statements would cause him to hemorrhage votes in the fall and lead to the insurgence of a Republican splinter ticket.

President Ted Kennedy quickly dealt with the economy in 1981 and worked by the end of the year to create a comprehensive universal healthcare program with House Speaker Jesse Unruh and Senate Majority Leader Birch Bayh. "TeddyCare" would be well remembered as a part of the prosperity of the 1980s, prosperity seemingly heightened by the peaceful fall of the Soviet Union in 1987's Eastern Spring.

By 1988 Americans would truly begin to catch on. For 26 of the last 30 years a member of the Kennedy family had served as the country's President. And now, with a new generation of the family waiting in the wings, things were about to get out of control. The 1988 Democratic Primaries would disgust many liberals and Democratic Party loyalists as the party establishment (eventually including President Kennedy) backed freshman Representative Joe P. Kennedy II over Vice President Tom Bradley in a divisive and close primary. Although many would claim racism on behalf of Democratic voters in the so-called "Bradley Effect" many knew that Kennedy had only gotten that close through help from the party.

In November, the Boy with the Golden Name would be elected President. The Democratic Establishment would spend much of JPKII's years preventing the young President and his congressional allies from tearing down the Welfare State that his forefathers had created. The 1992 Election would see the President roll over House Minority Leader Cheney but what would be more remarkable would be former Senator Jerry Brown's return from the political wilderness to challenge "the Establishment, the Democrats, and the Kennedy family" from the left. Following this appearance of significant left-wing opposition the Democratic Old Guard would be more acquiescent to the President's desires to chip away at and "streamline" the Welfare State. DNC Chair Bill Clinton triangulated the party to moderate on fiscal issues so as to strike devastating blows to the rump GOP in 1994.

The 1996 election would be one of the closest in American history and see four major candidates. It was the first election to feature the Republican Party backing independent candidates rather than their own, this time backing General and hero of the Somalian Intervention Colin Powell. Despite losing Washington DC to Jesse Jackson, Maryland Governor Kathleen Kennedy Townsend would maintain enough of her base to narrowly beat General Powell and become the first woman President.

Townsend continued JPKII's soft-neoliberal "modernization" of the American welfare state while also balancing the concerns of old guard social democrats like House Speaker John Dingell and Vice President Paul Kirk. She would win re-election handily despite the increasing radicalization of her opposition whether it be San Francisco Supervisor Eric Boucher's Green Party or the "Great Awakening" conspiracy theory that had consumed the radical right and alleged that Townsend stole the 1996 election and that the Kennedy family was behind the Byck Attack.

The 2004 election would be the first time in 52 years that America had voted against the Democratic Party. California Governor and former Hollywood actor Arnold Schwarzenegger had beaten Steve Westly in 2002 and was immediately primed by opposition politicians to run for President in 2004. To make this happen though they would need to pass a constitutional amendment allowing foreign-born citizens to serve as President. This amendment would be surprisingly popular amongst Democrats and pass in late 2003. Schwarzenegger's campaign launched within a couple weeks and many thought that he could beat presumptive Democratic nominee Maryland Governor Mark Kennedy Shriver. The two would face off as the major candidates in November's election and Schwarzenegger would comfortably defeat his brother-in-law's lethargic campaign. His brother-in-law. The new President had married into the extended Kennedy family. Even when the Democrats lost the Kennedys won.

Not that Schwarzenegger's administration would have much luck. Democratic Party entrenchment made it difficult for the new President to remove popular "cabinet czars" and in early 2006 a recession would begin that the President would respond to with austerity not seen in many decades.

And so JFK Jr. rode in on a white horse to save the country. Or so some of his supporters thought. Although his stimulus measures would help the country rebound from the Aughts Recession he would double down on the Democratic Party's soft-shift to neoliberalism. Also many were a bit unnerved that his Vice President was his cousin and many members of his administration were either family members or close friends.

Thus began a new status quo, one continued by the young President Joe P. Kennedy III following his election in 2016. To many it appeared that the country was and will be dominated a clique of close family members. Just ask Senator turned Secretary of State turned Vice President Caroline Kennedy or RFK Jr., the Secretary of Health and Human Services since 1995. The Kennedys had grown far too wide as a family and far too entrenched in the country's dominant party and the seat of power.

In 2020 things changed. Initially predicted to be a comfortable victory for the President, wavering in the stock market and a feared recession sent Joe Kennedy III's approval ratings south and on election night he would be in for a surprise. He would win the election with less than 40% of the popular vote and 270 electoral votes and change. Not only that but he would lose the family's stronghold, Massachusetts.

Change was coming.
 

Mumby

Always mysterious!
Published by SLP
Location
Municipal Commune of Bourne
Pronouns
He/Him
View attachment 26849

1953 - 1955: Dwight D. Eisenhower (Republican)
1952 (with Richard Nixon): Adlai Stevenson (Democratic)
1955 - 1957: Richard Nixon (Republican)
1957 - 1958: Estes Kefauver (Democratic)
1956 (with John F. Kennedy): Richard Nixon (Republican), T. Coleman Andrews (States' Rights)
1958 - 1963: John F. Kennedy (Democratic)
1960 (with Stuart Symington): Nelson Rockefeller (Republican), Orval Faubus (States' Rights)
1963 - 1965: Stuart Symington (Democratic)
1965 - 1972: Robert F. Kennedy (Democratic)
1964 (with Lyndon B. Johnson): Barry Goldwater (Republican), Ross Barnett (States' Rights)
1968 (with George McGovern): J. Edgar Hoover (States' Rights), George Romney (Republican)

1972 - 1974: George McGovern (Democratic)
1972 (with Sargent Shriver): Jim Rhodes (Republican), Curtis LeMay [replacing J. Edgar Hoover] (States' Rights)
1974 - 1981: Sargent Shriver (Democratic)
1976 (with Mo Udall): Richard Nixon (Republican)
1981 - 1989: Ted Kennedy (Democratic)
1980 (with Tom Bradley): John Wayne (Republican), Charles Mathias (Independent)
1984 (with Tom Bradley): Bob Dole (Republican)

1989 - 1997: Joe P. Kennedy II (Democratic)
1988 (with John Glenn): Paul Laxalt (Republican)
1992 (with John Glenn): Dick Cheney (Republican), Jerry Brown (People's)

1997 - 2005: Kathleen Kennedy Townsend (Democratic)
1996 (with Paul G. Kirk): Colin Powell (Independent), Jesse Jackson (People's), Pat Buchanan (US Taxpayers)
2000 (with Paul G. Kirk): John McCain (Independent), Ralph Nader (People's)

2005 - 2009: Arnold Schwarzenegger (Independent)
2004 (with Orrin Hatch): Mark Kennedy Shriver (Democratic), Cornel West (People's)
2009 - 2017: John F. Kennedy Jr. (Democratic)
2008 (with Patrick J. Kennedy): Arnold Schwarzenegger (Independent), Dennis Kucinich (People's)
2012 (with Patrick J. Kennedy): David Petraeus (Independent), Bernie Sanders (People's)

2017 - 0000: Joe P. Kennedy III (Democratic)
2016 (with Caroline Kennedy): Mitt Romney (Independent), Bernie Sanders (People's)
2020 (with Caroline Kennedy): Ed Markey (People's), John Kasich (Independent), Michael Flynn (Independent)


Dwight Eisenhower's heart attack and Richard Nixon's inexperience would doom the Republican Party. Estes Kefauver and his young charismatic running mate narrowly won the 1956 election but from the start weren't afraid to make controversial political decisions. Southern Democrats were determined that Estes Kefauver would pay for federalizing the Arkansas National Guard.

And pay he would. In January, 1958 a dossier on the President's sex life was soon plastered across every major newspaper in the country. Maybe some Americans in 1958 could tolerate a President who cheated on his wife, but very few could tolerate a President who preyed on teenage girls, even if they were legally adults. Within months Kefauver would leave office in shame, in lieu of being forced out by the Senate.

John F. Kennedy was determined to not let his presidency's scandalous beginnings define it. Quickly the youngest President in the nation's history made a name for himself. He saved his party from certain defeat in the midterms, he beat the Soviets to getting a man in orbit, he lead the country out of an economic recession, and now he was ready to take on the issue of civil rights. Running to the left, Kennedy would defeat Nelson Rockefeller and in quick succession sign the monumental Civil Rights Act of 1962 and Voting Rights Act of 1963. It appeared that Kennedy would retire with high approval ratings and be remembered as a man who turned his party's misfortune right around. While campaigning for "reformed" Mississippi gubernatorial candidate James P. Coleman in June 1963, Kennedy would be assassinated by white supremacist Byron De La Beckwith.

Although Stuart Symington would ascend to the presidency it would be JFK's brother who waved his bloody banner in the next election. Robert F. Kennedy was his brother's Chief of Staff Attorney General Secretary of Defense in 1963 and used his platform and friendship with President Symington to swap positions with him at the 1964 DNC. Forced into a strategic alliance with Senate Majority Leader Lyndon B. Johnson, RFK would win a landslide over his segregationist opponents. He would get to work quickly, declaring a "War on Poverty" in his first 100 days, a proposed continuation of his brother's domestic policies. But he would struggle. Within weeks his relationship with Vice President Johnson had completely broken down and by summer, 1965 the two were not on speaking terms. The War in Vietnam, started under Symington in 1964, was continuing to rage. In 1966, following a multi-month public spat RFK would fire FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover. Hoover would respond by releasing enough information to give the Democrats a catastrophic midterm, despite attempts by Kennedy to discredit Hoover.

In 1967 RFK would finally initiate a negotiated withdrawal from Vietnam, the war was beginning to seem unwinnable and he really didn't need a reason for his base to turn on him during an election year. From then on he would declare that the worst was probably behind him and that now he could really push for what he wanted - barring he won re-election of course. Kennedy booted a bitter Johnson off the ticket and replaced him with a political ally. By the fall it was clear that despite his opponents' initial strength they had weaknesses. Hoover was posed to carry much of the South and some of the Mountain West but was a terrible politician and had trouble expanding his based while Romney was initially the election's frontrunner but disastrous debate performance after disastrous debate performance revealed he was born with a silver foot in his mouth. The first lunar landing in October sealed the deal and Kennedy and his faction would come out of 1968 as victors.

Given a new mandate, RFK would work towards completing his War on Poverty proposals and many would pass through Congress by the end of his term. His term would be cut short however, in Ottawa in April 1972 when President Kennedy was assassinated by Arthur Bremer shortly after meeting with Prime Minister Trudeau. George McGovern's ascension to the Presidency would secure his victory in the Democratic primaries and the rally-around-the-flag effect following RFK's assassination would give him a big enough wave to win in November. McGovern's tenure would be short. Although he would continue the War on Poverty and pass a UBI program, McGovern's administration would be better remembered for its ending. On February 22, 1974 amateur pilot Samuel Byck hijacked a commercial airplane and flew it into the White House. The carnage would be caught on TV and millions of Americans would strongly remember the speech given by new President Sargent Shriver over the rubble of the White House.

The first Director of the Peace Corp and RFK's Secretary of State, Shriver was seen by the public as a virtual member of the Kennedy family - not just one by marriage. Now with three assassinated presidents in just eleven years, Sargent Shriver saw his chief duty as uniting the country. Shriver would use his massive post-Byck popularity to institute security measures ranging from comprehensive gun control to making the airport a pain in the ass to go through airport security, and to finally finish off the declared bits of the War on Poverty. Shriver would find his popularity waning by 1976 though and would enlist House Speaker Mo Udall to assist him in his campaign against a resurgent Richard Nixon. It would be a close race, the closest since Nixon last ran in 1956, but Shriver would narrowly pull off a victory.

Shriver's second term would be marred by oil embargo and recession but his late misfortune would not spell the end of the Kennedy Dynasty. In 1979, party bosses ushered in Senate Majority Leader Ted Kennedy to seize the party's nomination. Ted was basically given the party's nomination and kept out of the limelight for much of early 1980. What initially was an uphill race would become easier as his main opponent turned out to be controversial California Governor John Wayne whose statements would cause him to hemorrhage votes in the fall and lead to the insurgence of a Republican splinter ticket.

President Ted Kennedy quickly dealt with the economy in 1981 and worked by the end of the year to create a comprehensive universal healthcare program with House Speaker Jesse Unruh and Senate Majority Leader Birch Bayh. "TeddyCare" would be well remembered as a part of the prosperity of the 1980s, prosperity seemingly heightened by the peaceful fall of the Soviet Union in 1987's Eastern Spring.

By 1988 Americans would truly begin to catch on. For 26 of the last 30 years a member of the Kennedy family had served as the country's President. And now, with a new generation of the family waiting in the wings, things were about to get out of control. The 1988 Democratic Primaries would disgust many liberals and Democratic Party loyalists as the party establishment (eventually including President Kennedy) backed freshman Representative Joe P. Kennedy II over Vice President Tom Bradley in a divisive and close primary. Although many would claim racism on behalf of Democratic voters in the so-called "Bradley Effect" many knew that Kennedy had only gotten that close through help from the party.

In November, the Boy with the Golden Name would be elected President. The Democratic Establishment would spend much of JPKII's years preventing the young President and his congressional allies from tearing down the Welfare State that his forefathers had created. The 1992 Election would see the President roll over House Minority Leader Cheney but what would be more remarkable would be former Senator Jerry Brown's return from the political wilderness to challenge "the Establishment, the Democrats, and the Kennedy family" from the left. Following this appearance of significant left-wing opposition the Democratic Old Guard would be more acquiescent to the President's desires to chip away at and "streamline" the Welfare State. DNC Chair Bill Clinton triangulated the party to moderate on fiscal issues so as to strike devastating blows to the rump GOP in 1994.

The 1996 election would be one of the closest in American history and see four major candidates. It was the first election to feature the Republican Party backing independent candidates rather than their own, this time backing General and hero of the Somalian Intervention Colin Powell. Despite losing Washington DC to Jesse Jackson, Maryland Governor Kathleen Kennedy Townsend would maintain enough of her base to narrowly beat General Powell and become the first woman President.

Townsend continued JPKII's soft-neoliberal "modernization" of the American welfare state while also balancing the concerns of old guard social democrats like House Speaker John Dingell and Vice President Paul Kirk. She would win re-election handily despite the increasing radicalization of her opposition whether it be San Francisco Supervisor Eric Boucher's Green Party or the "Great Awakening" conspiracy theory that had consumed the radical right and alleged that Townsend stole the 1996 election and that the Kennedy family was behind the Byck Attack.

The 2004 election would be the first time in 52 years that America had voted against the Democratic Party. California Governor and former Hollywood actor Arnold Schwarzenegger had beaten Steve Westly in 2002 and was immediately primed by opposition politicians to run for President in 2004. To make this happen though they would need to pass a constitutional amendment allowing foreign-born citizens to serve as President. This amendment would be surprisingly popular amongst Democrats and pass in late 2003. Schwarzenegger's campaign launched within a couple weeks and many thought that he could beat presumptive Democratic nominee Maryland Governor Mark Kennedy Shriver. The two would face off as the major candidates in November's election and Schwarzenegger would comfortably defeat his brother-in-law's lethargic campaign. His brother-in-law. The new President had married into the extended Kennedy family. Even when the Democrats lost the Kennedys won.

Not that Schwarzenegger's administration would have much luck. Democratic Party entrenchment made it difficult for the new President to remove popular "cabinet czars" and in early 2006 a recession would begin that the President would respond to with austerity not seen in many decades.

And so JFK Jr. rode in on a white horse to save the country. Or so some of his supporters thought. Although his stimulus measures would help the country rebound from the Aughts Recession he would double down on the Democratic Party's soft-shift to neoliberalism. Also many were a bit unnerved that his Vice President was his cousin and many members of his administration were either family members or close friends.

Thus began a new status quo, one continued by the young President Joe P. Kennedy III following his election in 2016. To many it appeared that the country was and will be dominated a clique of close family members. Just ask Senator turned Secretary of State turned Vice President Caroline Kennedy or RFK Jr., the Secretary of Health and Human Services since 1995. The Kennedys had grown far too wide as a family and far too entrenched in the country's dominant party and the seat of power.

In 2020 things changed. Initially predicted to be a comfortable victory for the President, wavering in the stock market and a feared recession sent Joe Kennedy III's approval ratings south and on election night he would be in for a surprise. He would win the election with less than 40% of the popular vote and 270 electoral votes and change. Not only that but he would lose the family's stronghold, Massachusetts.

Change was coming.
NOTHING BAD EVER HAPPENS TO THE KENNEDYS
 

Walpurgisnacht

Paul Zion
Location
Banned from the forum
Pronouns
He/Him
It's Halloween, and there's nothing spookier than over-convoluted world-building no-one asked for!

Ministers for Industrial Planning
Prime Ministers of the United Kingdom

1937-1939: Neville Chamberlain (Conservative)
1939-1940: Neville Chamberlain (Conservative leading War Government)
1940-1940: Cyril Deverell (Independent leading War Government)
1940-1945: Frederick Marquis (Conservative leading War Government)
1945-1950: Stafford Cripps (Labour)
def 1945: (Majority) Richard Law (Conservative), Archibald Sinclair (Liberal)
1950-1958: Oliver Stanley (Conservative)
def 1950: (Majority) Stafford Cripps (Labour), Jo Grimond (Liberal), Herbert Morrison (Patriotic Labour)
def 1955: (Majority) Hugh Dalton (Labour), Jo Grimond (Liberal), Herbert Morrison (Patriotic Labour)

1958-1962: Douglas Jay (Labour)
def 1958: (Majority) Oliver Stanley (Conservative), Alfred Suenson-Taylor (Liberal), Honor Balfour (Radical), Herbert Morrison (Patriotic Labour)
def 1961: (Minority) Selwyn Lloyd (Conservative), Oliver Smedley (Liberal), Bob Mellish (People's), Honor Balfour (Radical)

1962-1965: T. Dan Smith (Labour)
1965-1969: Victor Montagu (Conservative)
def 1965: (Coalition with Liberals) T. Dan Smith (Labour), Oliver Smedley (Liberal), Pat Arrowsmith (Radical), Bob Mellish (People's)
1969-1979: Barbara Castle (Labour)
def 1969: (Majority) Patrick Wall (National Movement), Peter Walker (New Democracy), Bob Mellish (People's), Eric Lubbock (Radical), Oliver Smedley (Liberal), Victor Montagu (Conservative)
def 1973: (Majority) Peter Walker & Edmund Dell (Centre Pact), Eric Lubbock (Radical), Patrick Wall (National), Ralph Harris (Liberal), Jock Stallard (People's)
def 1977: (Majority) Anthony Meyer (Centre), Piers Dixon (National), David Penhaligon (Radical), Norris McWhirter (Liberal)

1979-1984: Hugh Scanlon (Labour)
def 1979: (Minority with Radicals support) Norman St John-Stevas (Centre), Teddy Taylor (National), Dafydd Wigley (Radical), Norris McWhirter (Liberal)
1984-1987: Robert Gascoyne-Cecil (Centre)
def 1984: (Majority) Hugh Scanlon (Labour), Geoffrey Dickens (National), Christopher Foxley-Norris (Liberal), Dafydd Wigley (Radical)
1987-1997: Brendan Donnelly (Centre)
def 1987: (Majority) Eric Varley (Labour), Geoffrey Dickens (National), Chris Tame (Liberal), Michael Meadowcroft (Radical)
def 1992: (Majority) Frank Dobson (Labour), Geoffrey Dickens (National), Chris Tame (Liberal), Richard Holme (Radical)
1997-2005: Andreas Adonis (Labour)
def 1996: (Majority) Brendan Donnelly (Centre), Chris Tame (Liberal), Peter Tapsell (National), Sara Parkin (Radical)
def 1999: (Majority) Peter Bottomley (Centre), David Davis (Defending Democracy: The Liberals), Sara Parkin (Radical), Ian Anderson (National)
def 2003: (Majority) Simon Woodroffe (Centre), David Davis (Defending Democracy: The Liberals), Adrian Ramsay (Radical), David Campbell Bannerman (National)
2005-2008: Tony Lloyd (Labour)
2008-2013: David Willetts (Centre)

def 2008: (Majority) Tony Lloyd (Labour), Adrian Ramsay & Amir Taaki (Civil Liberties Alliance), Dave West (Defending Democracy: The Liberals), Neil Herron (National)
2013-2017: Charles Stross (Labour)
def 2013: (Coalition with Civil Liberty) David Willetts (Centre), Harley Faggetter (Civil Liberty), Paul Strasburger (Defending Democracy: The Liberals), Ashley Mote (National)
2017-xxxx: INTERSYN NETWORK ASSUMES GOVERNMENTAL FUNCTIONS

-------------------------------------------
-PROCESSING-
-------------------------------------------

"Ladies and gentlemen, welcome to the future's embassy to the present!"
--Stafford Beer's remarks welcoming Government dignitaries to the Intersyn control room at the top of the Post Office Tower, as depicted in the 2005 biopic Everything Is Systems. Often attributed to the real Stafford Beer, but this is a misconception.

---------------------------------------------
-PROCESSING-
-PROCESSING-

---------------------------------------------

THE BIG FIVE: Postwar Prime Ministers

With Charles Stross's recent entry into Admiralty Arch, unseating David Willets, it's a good idea to devote today's Big Five to looking back to the biggest shoes he has to fill. Will he stack up in a century's time? We'll see.

FIVE: Oliver Stanley
Steady As He Went

It was never Stanley's ambition to join the list of the greats; indeed, Stanley once joked in private conversation that his aim was to be forgotten by history. Nevertheless, his tenure has mostly gone down well in the history books, despite overseeing a chaotic period in foreign affairs. Harold Macmillian, the foreign secretary, had his hands full with the insurgency in Cyprus, American requests to intervene in China, soothing the Egyptian government after the Ismalia barracks incident, and desperately trying to keep all the colonies in the Western tent. Privately, many Foreign Office insiders despaired at Britain's loss of status. However, Stanley's great strength as a leader was keeping Britain insulated from all of this as much as possible, trying to wield the soft-power scalpel rather than the military club wherever he could.

Many advisors urged a rapid rollback of Cripps' reforms, but Stanley wisely stuck to the middle path, choosing only to drop the most ridiculous nationalisations like British Sugar and overly grandiose schemes like the Garden Cities. Sometimes he went left, with the Smallholdings Act, and sometimes he went right, refusing to end National Service, satisfying as many as he could. Thanks to these steady and common-sense policies, not rocking the boat too far either way, the common Brit enjoyed his time in office. With a chicken in their pot, a house they could call their own, and a new car in the drive, what did they care for what happened far away? Public opinion only turned when British body bags started coming back from the Kenyan highlands--when what was far away came back to Britain. Stanley's Prime Ministerial career offers an important lesson--most people care more for their bellies than for lofty ideals.

-------------------------------------------
-PROCESSING-
-------------------------------------------

FOUR: Brendan Donnelly
Hands Across The Channel

Donnelly's ascension to the Prime Ministership was a fluke. While he had been particularly busy as Foreign Secretary, he'd never been hotly tipped--Heseltine was the uncrowned king of the pro-European faction, and next to Tarzan all but the most dynamic personalities faded into the background. Then it turned out that Gascoyne-Cecil meant it when he said he'd rather quit than sign the Hillsborough Accords. And then Heseltine caught a nasty flu, and the Bow Group panicked and picked their most senior ally, and then no-one else in the party really wanted to fight the snap election, and then Varley dropped the ball on Europe and lost the suburbs, and then the Nationals slowly collapsed without Dickens there to lead them, and on the nineteenth of September Brendan Donnelly shook hands with the Queen and wondered what to do next.

Some have argued that his premiership merely continued Gascoyne-Cecil's agenda, but that doesn't detract from his genuine achievements. Tax cuts and limited free-market measures revitalised a stagnant economy, the Employee Share Scheme gave thousands of workers a greater stake in their company's future, and the depoliticisation of the Industrial Control Group paved the way for greater technical achievements. His real crowning achievement, however, was foreign policy. After years of Labour vacillating on the issue and caving to protectionist unions, Donnelly finally brought the UK back into the world. The photograph of Donnelly shaking hands with President Barre and Chancellor Ortleb outside the EC's Parliament became an iconic image of Anglo-European co-operation. By achieving this perennial goal of his party, Donnelly shows that greatness doesn't necessarily require new ideas, just new accomplishments.

-------------------------------------------
-PROCESSING-
-------------------------------------------

THREE: Andreas Adonis
The Millennium Man

More than any other PM on this list, Andreas Adonis was aware of the power of image. His aspirational backstory, combined with a practised manner and political know-how, made him a bookie's favourite for Labour leader even when he was just the GLC chair. Once leader, his publicity strategy could be reduced to one goal--make Labour the party of the future. Out went the suspicion of Europe and antagonism to the cyber-economy that had defined Labour's opposition years, and in went a whole-hearted commitment to the EC and to world-leading technology. The "Millennium Election" was perhaps his greatest gamble for publicity--a mercenary snap election prompted by high polling, rebranded as "letting the British people choose their future". It worked like a charm. Next to the dynamic young PM, Bottomley and his party looked old and tired, and the Labour majority went from thin to healthy.

Of course, politics isn't just about the image you project, it's about what you do. Adonis was criticised by both wings of the party for his increased openness to Europe, but it got results--greater access to the European market massively improved the British economy, as did linking Intersyn up to the pan-European industrial management system. Adonis' domestic policy was more in line with previous Labour achievements. While finally achieving Beer's end-goal of completely computerised industrial management, freeing the economy from human error and irrationality, would be sufficient for any PM to go down in history, Adonis wouldn't stop there. The National Enterprise Board, based off the scheme he and Mike Cooley had piloted in London, the complete modernisation of British Rail, and the historic recognition of civil partnerships as marriages, stand as a testament to what a well-developed image can let you achieve.

-------------------------------------------
-PROCESSING-
-------------------------------------------

TWO: Frederick Marquis
St Crispian's Day

Britain's future had never looked so bleak as in May 1940. The country was at war with most of Europe. All its efforts had ended in failure, from the slaughter at Bjørnfjell to the men hastily rescued from Dunkirk. To top it all off, the Prime Minister had just fallen dead at his desk. While General Deverell was a safe pair of hands for the moment, protocol demanded a leadership election. The interventionist faction were largely headless. Their main cheerleader and de-facto candidate, Winston Churchill, had been forced to resign in disgrace for the Norway debacle. In desperation, they picked an outsider to politics, a canny businessman with a head for figures, one of the few ministers who could be said to be handling their brief well. They made the right choice.

Many were anxious about how his public performance would be received, but Marquis exceeded expectations with his first speech. Refusing to sugar-coat the bleak post-Dunkirk situation, he emphasised that the British people "must take a ration of iron with their daily bread, and, in Shakespeare's words, stiffen their sinews for the fight". In a way, Marquis was that ration of iron himself, his campaigns of publicity encouraging the British people to fight on. His background in business served him well--Marquis was the first modern Prime Minister to grasp that one could advertise morale in the same way you advertised soap and tea. While his personal property may have reached giddy heights thanks to this, his focus on the home front largely left the war effort up to General Ironside. However, Marquis' decision to let the generals do their job and get out of the way has been credited by many historians as a major factor in Allied performance in the war, compared to the continually interfering Hitler and (until 1942) Stalin. Sometimes the best thing a leader can do is get out the way and let their subordinates do their job.

-------------------------------------------
-PROCESSING-
-------------------------------------------

ONE: Barbara Castle
Red Queen

No Prime Minister has ever achieved such a radical transformation of the UK. While a wet dishcloth with a Labour rosette could have demolished Montagu after the revelations around his family, her 1973 victory was a rare case of a startling realignment becoming visible from a re-election. Castle went to the nation with a question--what was Britain? Was Britain a country that was mired in an Edwardian past? Or was Britain a country that could let go of its colonies, and build towards a grand design? The answer was resounding. With a mandate for her program sufficient to convince any wavering backbenchers, Castle was free of all constraints. The achievements of her first ministry--the new settlement with the unions, the Open University--were remarkable enough, but would be forever overshadowed by what came next. On the 12th of April 1974, the Hub went online, and suddenly all the nationalised industries could be controlled from one room. The modern economic system as we knew it had arrived.

While the ideas behind it weren't entirely new--Bellamy had dreamed of a planned economy in the 1880s, and Premier Kosygin had already begun what would later be called the Kharkevich-Lange Project when Castle first took office--Britain's radical implementation was. Not only was this a boost to British prestige, but many historians claim that this perceived willingness to meet the East halfway, as it were, was a contributing factor to the European Thaw. If so, then it is ironic that the Thaw ended with Premier Kardashev merging the Warsaw Pact into the European Community, as Castle's insistence on working outside the EC is seen by many as her greatest failing. Trade with the Commonwealth simply wasn't enough to make up for Western Europe, and by her decision the UK missed out on the chance to shape the EC's formation and her party's factional splits ended up holding them back for a decade.

It feels trivial, however, to focus on this flaw. In decolonisation, in industrial policy, in infrastructure, in science, the Red Queen changed the UK permanently. Nearly every Prime Minister after her has been influenced by her. To borrow a phrase, we are all living in the shadow of the Hub. Mr Stross has grand designs, but he has a long way to go before he can be said to match her impact.

--Weekly Big Five column taken from the 13th August, 2014, edition of NewSheet

-------------------------------------------
-PROCESSING-
-PROCESSING-
-PROCESSING-
-FINISHED-

-------------------------------------------

Mark Fisher gazed at his screen, not quite responding.

Was this it? Was this really all he had to do to realise the vision of centuries of philosophers, to end the reign of capital? No barricades, no Molotovs, no guillotines--he just had to reach out and push a button.

It was almost disappointing, in a way.

-INTERSYN NETWORK ONLINE-
-ASSUME GOVERNMENT? y/n-

Taking a deep breath, he steadied his hands and reached towards the keyboard.

Y

-THANK YOU-
-ASSUMING CONTROL...-


The screen flashed to brilliant life.

=Good Morning Britain=
=Welcome To The Future=


------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
--This extract was take from Here Comes Tomorrow, the 2089 biopic of INTERSYN.
For 5 points, discuss historical inaccuracies visible. For 15, comment on the use of juxtaposition.
For 30 points, write an essay on the extent to which pre-Singularity portrayals of AIs neglected their personal autonomy, using the above as a primary source. Your time starts now.​
 

Yokai Man

Well-known member
It's Halloween, and there's nothing spookier than over-convoluted world-building no-one asked for!



Prime Ministers of the United Kingdom

1937-1939: Neville Chamberlain (Conservative)
1939-1940: Neville Chamberlain (Conservative leading War Government)
1940-1940: Cyril Deverell (Independent leading War Government)
1940-1945: Frederick Marquis (Conservative leading War Government)
1945-1950: Stafford Cripps (Labour)
def 1945: (Majority) Richard Law (Conservative), Archibald Sinclair (Liberal)
1950-1958: Oliver Stanley (Conservative)
def 1950: (Majority) Stafford Cripps (Labour), Jo Grimond (Liberal), Herbert Morrison (Patriotic Labour)
def 1955: (Majority) Hugh Dalton (Labour), Jo Grimond (Liberal), Herbert Morrison (Patriotic Labour)

1958-1962: Douglas Jay (Labour)
def 1958: (Majority) Oliver Stanley (Conservative), Alfred Suenson-Taylor (Liberal), Honor Balfour (Radical), Herbert Morrison (Patriotic Labour)
def 1961: (Minority) Selwyn Lloyd (Conservative), Oliver Smedley (Liberal), Bob Mellish (People's), Honor Balfour (Radical)

1962-1965: T. Dan Smith (Labour)
1965-1969: Victor Montagu (Conservative)
def 1965: (Coalition with Liberals) T. Dan Smith (Labour), Oliver Smedley (Liberal), Pat Arrowsmith (Radical), Bob Mellish (People's)
1969-1979: Barbara Castle (Labour)
def 1969: (Majority) Patrick Wall (National Movement), Peter Walker (New Democracy), Bob Mellish (People's), Eric Lubbock (Radical), Oliver Smedley (Liberal), Victor Montagu (Conservative)
def 1973: (Majority) Peter Walker & Edmund Dell (Centre Pact), Eric Lubbock (Radical), Patrick Wall (National), Ralph Harris (Liberal), Jock Stallard (People's)
def 1977: (Majority) Anthony Meyer (Centre), Piers Dixon (National), David Penhaligon (Radical), Norris McWhirter (Liberal)

1979-1984: Hugh Scanlon (Labour)
def 1979: (Minority with Radicals support) Norman St John-Stevas (Centre), Teddy Taylor (National), Dafydd Wigley (Radical), Norris McWhirter (Liberal)
1984-1987: Robert Gascoyne-Cecil (Centre)
def 1984: (Majority) Hugh Scanlon (Labour), Geoffrey Dickens (National), Christopher Foxley-Norris (Liberal), Dafydd Wigley (Radical)
1987-1997: Brendan Donnelly (Centre)
def 1987: (Majority) Eric Varley (Labour), Geoffrey Dickens (National), Chris Tame (Liberal), Michael Meadowcroft (Radical)
def 1992: (Majority) Frank Dobson (Labour), Geoffrey Dickens (National), Chris Tame (Liberal), Richard Holme (Radical)
1997-2005: Andreas Adonis (Labour)
def 1996: (Majority) Brendan Donnelly (Centre), Chris Tame (Liberal), Peter Tapsell (National), Sara Parkin (Radical)
def 1999: (Majority) Peter Bottomley (Centre), David Davis (Defending Democracy: The Liberals), Sara Parkin (Radical), Ian Anderson (National)
def 2003: (Majority) Simon Woodroffe (Centre), David Davis (Defending Democracy: The Liberals), Adrian Ramsay (Radical), David Campbell Bannerman (National)
2005-2008: Tony Lloyd (Labour)
2008-2013: David Willetts (Centre)

def 2008: (Majority) Tony Lloyd (Labour), Adrian Ramsay & Amir Taaki (Civil Liberties Alliance), Dave West (Defending Democracy: The Liberals), Neil Herron (National)
2013-2017: Charles Stross (Labour)
def 2013: (Coalition with Civil Liberty) David Willetts (Centre), Harley Faggetter (Civil Liberty), Paul Strasburger (Defending Democracy: The Liberals), Ashley Mote (National)
2017-xxxx: INTERSYN NETWORK ASSUMES GOVERNMENTAL FUNCTIONS

-------------------------------------------
-PROCESSING-
-------------------------------------------

"Ladies and gentlemen, welcome to the future's embassy to the present!"
--Stafford Beer's remarks welcoming Government dignitaries to the Intersyn control room at the top of the Post Office Tower, as depicted in the 2005 biopic Everything Is Systems. Often attributed to the real Stafford Beer, but this is a misconception.

---------------------------------------------
-PROCESSING-
-PROCESSING-

---------------------------------------------

THE BIG FIVE: Postwar Prime Ministers

With Charles Stross's recent entry into Admiralty Arch, unseating David Willets, it's a good idea to devote today's Big Five to looking back to the biggest shoes he has to fill. Will he stack up in a century's time? We'll see.

FIVE: Oliver Stanley
Steady As He Went

It was never Stanley's ambition to join the list of the greats; indeed, Stanley once joked in private conversation that his aim was to be forgotten by history. Nevertheless, his tenure has mostly gone down well in the history books, despite overseeing a chaotic period in foreign affairs. Harold Macmillian, the foreign secretary, had his hands full with the insurgency in Cyprus, American requests to intervene in China, soothing the Egyptian government after the Ismalia barracks incident, and desperately trying to keep all the colonies in the Western tent. Privately, many Foreign Office insiders despaired at Britain's loss of status. However, Stanley's great strength as a leader was keeping Britain insulated from all of this as much as possible, trying to wield the soft-power scalpel rather than the military club wherever he could.

Many advisors urged a rapid rollback of Cripps' reforms, but Stanley wisely stuck to the middle path, choosing only to drop the most ridiculous nationalisations like British Sugar and overly grandiose schemes like the Garden Cities. Sometimes he went left, with the Smallholdings Act, and sometimes he went right, refusing to end National Service, satisfying as many as he could. Thanks to these steady and common-sense policies, not rocking the boat too far either way, the common Brit enjoyed his time in office. With a chicken in their pot, a house they could call their own, and a new car in the drive, what did they care for what happened far away? Public opinion only turned when British body bags started coming back from the Kenyan highlands--when what was far away came back to Britain. Stanley's Prime Ministerial career offers an important lesson--most people care more for their bellies than for lofty ideals.

-------------------------------------------
-PROCESSING-
-------------------------------------------

FOUR: Brendan Donnelly
Hands Across The Channel

Donnelly's ascension to the Prime Ministership was a fluke. While he had been particularly busy as Foreign Secretary, he'd never been hotly tipped--Heseltine was the uncrowned king of the pro-European faction, and next to Tarzan all but the most dynamic personalities faded into the background. Then it turned out that Gascoyne-Cecil meant it when he said he'd rather quit than sign the Hillsborough Accords. And then Heseltine caught a nasty flu, and the Bow Group panicked and picked their most senior ally, and then no-one else in the party really wanted to fight the snap election, and then Varley dropped the ball on Europe and lost the suburbs, and then the Nationals slowly collapsed without Dickens there to lead them, and on the nineteenth of September Brendan Donnelly shook hands with the Queen and wondered what to do next.

Some have argued that his premiership merely continued Gascoyne-Cecil's agenda, but that doesn't detract from his genuine achievements. Tax cuts and limited free-market measures revitalised a stagnant economy, the Employee Share Scheme gave thousands of workers a greater stake in their company's future, and the depoliticisation of the Industrial Control Group paved the way for greater technical achievements. His real crowning achievement, however, was foreign policy. After years of Labour vacillating on the issue and caving to protectionist unions, Donnelly finally brought the UK back into the world. The photograph of Donnelly shaking hands with President Barre and Chancellor Ortleb outside the EC's Parliament became an iconic image of Anglo-European co-operation. By achieving this perennial goal of his party, Donnelly shows that greatness doesn't necessarily require new ideas, just new accomplishments.

-------------------------------------------
-PROCESSING-
-------------------------------------------

THREE: Andreas Adonis
The Millennium Man

More than any other PM on this list, Andreas Adonis was aware of the power of image. His aspirational backstory, combined with a practised manner and political know-how, made him a bookie's favourite for Labour leader even when he was just the GLC chair. Once leader, his publicity strategy could be reduced to one goal--make Labour the party of the future. Out went the suspicion of Europe and antagonism to the cyber-economy that had defined Labour's opposition years, and in went a whole-hearted commitment to the EC and to world-leading technology. The "Millennium Election" was perhaps his greatest gamble for publicity--a mercenary snap election prompted by high polling, rebranded as "letting the British people choose their future". It worked like a charm. Next to the dynamic young PM, Bottomley and his party looked old and tired, and the Labour majority went from thin to healthy.

Of course, politics isn't just about the image you project, it's about what you do. Adonis was criticised by both wings of the party for his increased openness to Europe, but it got results--greater access to the European market massively improved the British economy, as did linking Intersyn up to the pan-European industrial management system. Adonis' domestic policy was more in line with previous Labour achievements. While finally achieving Beer's end-goal of completely computerised industrial management, freeing the economy from human error and irrationality, would be sufficient for any PM to go down in history, Adonis wouldn't stop there. The National Enterprise Board, based off the scheme he and Mike Cooley had piloted in London, the complete modernisation of British Rail, and the historic recognition of civil partnerships as marriages, stand as a testament to what a well-developed image can let you achieve.

-------------------------------------------
-PROCESSING-
-------------------------------------------

TWO: Frederick Marquis
St Crispian's Day

Britain's future had never looked so bleak as in May 1940. The country was at war with most of Europe. All its efforts had ended in failure, from the slaughter at Bjørnfjell to the men hastily rescued from Dunkirk. To top it all off, the Prime Minister had just fallen dead at his desk. While General Deverell was a safe pair of hands for the moment, protocol demanded a leadership election. The interventionist faction were largely headless. Their main cheerleader and de-facto candidate, Winston Churchill, had been forced to resign in disgrace for the Norway debacle. In desperation, they picked an outsider to politics, a canny businessman with a head for figures, one of the few ministers who could be said to be handling their brief well. They made the right choice.

Many were anxious about how his public performance would be received, but Marquis exceeded expectations with his first speech. Refusing to sugar-coat the bleak post-Dunkirk situation, he emphasised that the British people "must take a ration of iron with their daily bread, and, in Shakespeare's words, stiffen their sinews for the fight". In a way, Marquis was that ration of iron himself, his campaigns of publicity encouraging the British people to fight on. His background in business served him well--Marquis was the first modern Prime Minister to grasp that one could advertise morale in the same way you advertised soap and tea. While his personal property may have reached giddy heights thanks to this, his focus on the home front largely left the war effort up to General Ironside. However, Marquis' decision to let the generals do their job and get out of the way has been credited by many historians as a major factor in Allied performance in the war, compared to the continually interfering Hitler and (until 1942) Stalin. Sometimes the best thing a leader can do is get out the way and let their subordinates do their job.

-------------------------------------------
-PROCESSING-
-------------------------------------------

ONE: Barbara Castle
Red Queen

No Prime Minister has ever achieved such a radical transformation of the UK. While a wet dishcloth with a Labour rosette could have demolished Montagu after the revelations around his family, her 1973 victory was a rare case of a startling realignment becoming visible from a re-election. Castle went to the nation with a question--what was Britain? Was Britain a country that was mired in an Edwardian past? Or was Britain a country that could let go of its colonies, and build towards a grand design? The answer was resounding. With a mandate for her program sufficient to convince any wavering backbenchers, Castle was free of all constraints. The achievements of her first ministry--the new settlement with the unions, the Open University--were remarkable enough, but would be forever overshadowed by what came next. On the 12th of April 1974, the Hub went online, and suddenly all the nationalised industries could be controlled from one room. The modern economic system as we knew it had arrived.

While the ideas behind it weren't entirely new--Bellamy had dreamed of a planned economy in the 1880s, and Premier Kosygin had already begun what would later be called the Kharkevich-Lange Project when Castle first took office--Britain's radical implementation was. Not only was this a boost to British prestige, but many historians claim that this perceived willingness to meet the East halfway, as it were, was a contributing factor to the European Thaw. If so, then it is ironic that the Thaw ended with Premier Kardashev merging the Warsaw Pact into the European Community, as Castle's insistence on working outside the EC is seen by many as her greatest failing. Trade with the Commonwealth simply wasn't enough to make up for Western Europe, and by her decision the UK missed out on the chance to shape the EC's formation and her party's factional splits ended up holding them back for a decade.

It feels trivial, however, to focus on this flaw. In decolonisation, in industrial policy, in infrastructure, in science, the Red Queen changed the UK permanently. Nearly every Prime Minister after her has been influenced by her. To borrow a phrase, we are all living in the shadow of the Hub. Mr Stross has grand designs, but he has a long way to go before he can be said to match her impact.

--Weekly Big Five column taken from the 13th August, 2014, edition of NewSheet

-------------------------------------------
-PROCESSING-
-PROCESSING-
-PROCESSING-
-FINISHED-

-------------------------------------------

Mark Fisher gazed at his screen, not quite responding.

Was this it? Was this really all he had to do to realise the vision of centuries of philosophers, to end the reign of capital? No barricades, no Molotovs, no guillotines--he just had to reach out and push a button.

It was almost disappointing, in a way.

-INTERSYN NETWORK ONLINE-
-ASSUME GOVERNMENT? y/n-

Taking a deep breath, he steadied his hands and reached towards the keyboard.

Y

-THANK YOU-
-ASSUMING CONTROL...-


The screen flashed to brilliant life.

=Good Morning Britain=
=Welcome To The Future=


------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
--This extract was take from Here Comes Tomorrow, the 2089 biopic of INTERSYN.
For 5 points, discuss historical inaccuracies visible. For 15, comment on the use of juxtaposition.
For 30 points, write an essay on the extent to which pre-Singularity portrayals of AIs neglected their personal autonomy, using the above as a primary source. Your time starts now.​
 

Walpurgisnacht

Paul Zion
Location
Banned from the forum
Pronouns
He/Him
Nice Pirate placement there, Mumby. Love how this implies that the post-singularity world is maybe not as bad as I feared
Thanks!

It's not exactly "post-singularity" yet--as the text below implies, just having an AI run the economy doesn't a singularity make.
I felt it appropriate to throw a Pirate into a very tech-themed list, although I did go back and forth over putting in a somehow more hipster pick. Ultimately, their recent collapse got them in out of pity.

thats not me

but i am flattered
I'm also flattered to have been mistaken for you, so we can call it even.
 
Top