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Lists of Heads of Government and Heads of State

Sideways

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Published by SLP
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2015: Chukka Umunna (Labour)
Labour leadership election 2015 Round 1: Chukka Umunna (32.8%), Andy Burnham (27.9%), Jeremy Corbyn (27.7%), Yvette Cooper (13.8%)
Round 2: Chukka Umunna (37.1%), Andy Burnham (32.4%), Jeremy Corbyn (32.7%)
Round 3: Chukka Umunna (52.1%), Andy Burnham (47.9%), Jeremy Corbyn (17.2%)

Umunna was the favourite throughout the leadership campaign, however a strong campaign from Corbyn and outrage over Labour's voting under their interim leader meant that his win was actually by a narrow margins. His first big challenge was the European referendum where he made a point of putting party politics, aside and campaigning with Cameron in favour of remain.

EU Referendum: Leave: 51.6%, Remain 48.4%

Following the referendum, Cameron resigned but Umunna made it clear that he felt the most important thing was to deliver Brexit. He swapped out some high profile remainers in his cabinet for Leavers, including Kate Hoey (the new Shadow Brexit Minister) and Frank Field.

2016-2019: Theresa May (Conservative)

Theresa May was elected unopposed when Michael Gove stood down - he would go on to serve as Foreign Secretary. Immediately the Conservatives started to storm ahead in the polls. By the start of 2017 the lead was abating. The Tories were facing criticism for not calling a snap election to secure May's position, and for delaying activating Article 50 until March 2017. However, their lead was still sufficient for an electoral wipe out Labour in the 2017 locals - Labour lost over 500 seats in a single night, their worst local election swing since 2007.

There was talk of a leadership challenge, but it never quite materialised. Instead there was a "chicken coup" of people hinting at a challenge that never quite appeared. However, there were resignations from Umunna's cabinet - including Heidi Alexander, Liz Kendall, and Luciana Berger. The chicken coup was seen as a damp squib at the time, then Chukka caved into their demands. The full story of what happened is still being pieced together, but in one big reorganisation of cabinet it was out with the leavers and back in with the remainers, along with new faces such as Jess Philips and Jo Stevens. The weird about face cost the party in credibility, but that was already shot, with nobody quite trusting them to be fully remain or completely leave. However Jess Philips, the new Shadow Brexit Minister, attempted to take on the Lib Dems directly and prove that Labour was the natural home for remainers.

In 2018, riding high on the opinion polls and hoping to outflank Labour, the Conservatives attempted to establish themselves as a party for the whole nation. Part of this was a consultation on reform of the Gender Recognition Act, and this opened up a cultural can of worms. Over the course of the first GRA Consultation hate crimes against trans people went up, events were picketed and Pride marches invaded. The Conservatives were usually arrayed against their own party's suggestions. The SNP boasted about its own far more comprehensive plan for trans rights that never happened. The Liberal Democrats, bouyed up by new remain members largely from the Tories, were split on the matter. Things were made worse after Tim Farron's disastrous gaffe on whether trans lesbians having sex with women were sinning - his quick response that it wasn't, followed by his silence on whether gay sex was a sin, caused a rift in the party and opened a space for the Lib Dem Women's Declaration and other groups to establish themselves. All this gave Labour an easy ride on the matter - the party had a diversity of views, but the leadership could come down strongly in favour of self-ID.

2018 was an interesting intermediate year in Brexit, with intra-party wrangles as May attempted to produce a brexit deal that would satisfy all sides of her party, in the hope that the Conservatives could take full credit for Brexit.The Chequors Plan was drafted in July 2018 but by November 2018 it was clear it would not meet with unanimous approval from the Conservatives. Resignations began. Backroom deals on the plan were complex, with concessions both to Tory remainers and to Labour, and thesises have been written on trying to dissect who won in these negotiations. But the end result was that in December 2018 Labour mostly abstained in the Meaningful Vote. An action that was seen as a betrayal by remainers and as sabotaging Brexit by forcing the government to soften it by leavers. The only thing that was certain was that nobody was happy.

The UK officially left the EU on 29 March 2019, and May announced she would step down as leader the next day.

2019-2023: Boris Johnson (Conservative)
2019 Conservative Leadership Election: Boris Johnson (63.1%) Amber Rudd (36.9%)

Boris Johnson called an election immediately after getting elected, planning it for 4 July 2019. The Conservatives intended the election to be about Brexit, but with this issue seemingly resolved in the public's mind they fell back to focusing on immigration and law and order. Labour attempted to persuade the voters that they were tougher on both issues, but they could do little on the trans issue. With people's attention straying from Brexit and with an election during Pride month, this issue became highly contentious, with protests at most prides, near daily articles in the papers and constant pieces on the television.

The Conservatives promised to ban all medical treatments for under 18s and legislate to ensure it could be legal for trans women with penises to be kept out of women's spaces. While Labour promised to respect women's places and await the results of the consultation, they came down in favour of self-ID. The Liberal Democrats and Greens ironically had the most clearly trans inclusive policies, but were also mired in conflict with their own transphobic wings.

While repeated studies have shown that the issue didn't really cut through to voting intention, the idea that it did would have a long impact on all parties.

2019: Boris Johnson (Conservative) [341] Chukka Umunna (Labour) [231] Nicola Sturgeon (SNP) [48] Arlene Foster (DUP) [8] Tim Farron (Liberal Democrat) [7] Michelle O'Neill (Sinn Fein) [7] Adam Price (Plaid Cymru) [3] Colum Eastwood (SDLP) [2] Caroline Lucas and Jon Bartley (Green Party England & Wales) [1] Naomi Long (Alliance) [1] Lindsay Hoyle (Speaker) [1]

Boris had a strong honeymoon after the election while the Liberal Democrats, Labour, and UKIP held their leadership contests. UKIP had experienced a steady decline under Paul Nuttall, but on the election of Anne Marie Waters the process would go into overdrive as the party lurched to the far-right while the NEC fought with the membership.

The Lib Dems had an easier ride. Jo Swinson and Ed Davey stood for leader and Ed Davey just edged ahead, promising a more stable and professional party. In his mumsnet Q&A session he promised there would be no rolling back on trans rights, then quietly replaced references to gender self-ID with "reform of the GRA".

2019: Richard Burgon (Labour)
2019 Labour Leadership Election: Richard Burgon (51.8%), Lisa Nandy (22.4%), Jess Philips (19.3%), Luciana Berger (6.5%)

Burgon was, without a doubt, the most leftwing leader in his party's history and his election was almost definitely a response to the perceived weakness of the Labour right on the issue of Brexit. Attempts to work matters out with his party almost immediately collapsed when the moderates in his own party resigned on discovering that he had appointed Corbyn and Diane Abbott as Shadow Foreign and Home Secretaries. For the year, Boris Johnson had an easy ride in parliament as the Labour Party fought a desperate battle to the death with itself.

The trans issue would raise its head very soon into matters - while rebels such as Jess Philips and Luciana Berger were perceived as very strong on the issue, Burgon's side was not. Key Burgon allies like Ann Henderson, Laura Pidcock, Ken Livingstone, Chris Williamson and Jared O'Mara were all connected with transphobia, and the party's silence on self-ID and education in favour of "health and class" was taken as the leadership distancing itself from the promises of the 2019 manifesto. By the end of the year, discussions had moved on to antisemitism as well, and the party's lack of progress on these issues would increasingly allow the moderates to speak from a moral highground in criticising the leadership.

In 2020 the national conversation changed. The COVID-19 pandemic locked down the country for most of the year and flung the country into the worst recession in its history. Boris Johnson's handling of the pandemic is now universally accepted as poor. In the world of party politics, this caused a problem - the lack of elections meant there were few opportunities to oust Burgon, but most agreed that in this post-Brexit era, with a massive pandemic and the Tories in government for 10 years, there was really no reason for Burgon to be behind Boris in the polls aside from his own personal ineffectiveness.

Rumours had been that the PLP would attempt a coup after Burgon did badly in the 2021 elections, but these elections were delayed due to the ongoing crisis and the party moved anyway. Rosena Alin-Khan was their preferred candidate

2021 Labour Leadership Election: Richard Burgon (54.2%) Rosena Allin-Khan (45.8%)

The election was close, but also, in some ways not. It was clear to the party that they were stuck with Burgon till the next election. Meanwhile he was seen as ever more radical, supporting the anti-fascist riots and the National Rent Strike. He even spoke in favour of Permanent Revolution communities and camps as they began to appear in 2022. This put him completely at odds with the government at every turn, but usually not in a way that impacted policy. However, the government were defeated on a new benefits cap, workfare, and the Covert Intelligence Act, the Anti-Extremism Register, and various other motions.

In 2022 austerity was in full swing, as were increasingly vicious riots and protests. Unlike the Corbynistas of 2015, the Burgonistas were a subset and an outgrowth of the new left in the UK. Burgon had little support in his parliamentary party, and relied heavily on an increasingly fractured and extreme extra-parliamentary movement. And that movement was increasingly hardened to identity politics, which it associated with centrist politics, particularly since the left in America had rallied around Biden to the British Left's view at the expense of Bernie Sanders.

April 2022 saw a political realignment of sorts - with an initial "Gang of Eight" made up of Jess Phillips, Luciana Berger, Ruth Smeeth, Rosie Duffield, Ben Bradshaw, Dan Jarvis, Tristram Hunt, and Liz Kendall. By July this was at 14 members. It had also fallen foul of its own scandals over racism and transphobia, particularly after accepting money from disgraced former novelist, JK Rowling. The visible existence of transphobia issues in centrist politics began to change views on the left of the party. Dissatisfaction grew within the Burgonistas.

In 2023, the Conservatives called another election. Despite personal unpopularity, the Conservatives had consistently polled over 40% and expected an easy ride - their manifesto promised tax cuts, HS2, stop and search and tough but vague measures against crime. The Labour manifesto, on the other hand, was a catalogue of promises - they even managed to promise self-ID for trans and non-binary people over 16, alongside. The Liberal Democrats promised likewise but were keen to point out that they would be sensitive to the cultural change this would be and to protect women's spaces. The Greens followed suit, though their statements were vague and attempted to keep a lid on growing disputes within the party. Jess Philips Open Britain, despite announcing that they were the foremost party for trans allies in the UK, said nothing about the matter in their manifesto beyond that.

2023: Boris Johnson (Conservative) [314] Richard Burgon (Labour) [249] Joanna Cherry (SNP) [54] Michelle O'Neill (Sinn Fein) [10] Arlene Foster (DUP) [7] Ed Davey (Liberal Democrat) [9] Adam Price (Plaid Cymru) [5] Jess Philips (Open Britain) [1] Caroline Lucas (Green Party England & Wales) [1] Naomi Long (Alliance) [2]

2023-: Rishi Sunak (Conservative) Coalition with Ed Davey (Liberal Democrat)

Boris was not popular by the end of his term, and the election did nothing to fix that. With fears growing of a border poll in Northern Ireland, a referendum in Scotland that looked likely to favour independence, and riots in the rest of the UK, the Conservatives opted for strong government and Boris quietly resigned. His space was filled by Rishi Sunak and Ed Davey joined him in the rose garden, and into coalition.

It is not yet clear whether Burgon will resign, the news were expecting his utter wipeout so confidently that the party's survival looks like a triumph.
 

Sideways

A jpeg stock photo of gas station flowers
Published by SLP
Location
Teignmouth, Devon
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Thanks!

It's not exactly "post-singularity" yet--as the text below implies, just having an AI run the economy doesn't a singularity make.
I felt it appropriate to throw a Pirate into a very tech-themed list, although I did go back and forth over putting in a somehow more hipster pick. Ultimately, their recent collapse got them in out of pity.
It's a good piece, I'd say sorry for mistaking it for a mumby piece, but its the dieselpunk mood which you caught really well.

Also, who wouldn't want to be a little mumby sometimes?
 

Nyvis

Token Marxist
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Paris
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It is not yet clear whether Burgon will resign, the news were expecting his utter wipeout so confidently that the party's survival looks like a triumph.
Interesting, Burgon ends up looking a lot like Corbyn's election against May rather than his election against Johnson here.

On the other hand, a left wing stance on the economy is probably a lot more relevant in the covid crisis circumstances than among the whole Brexit debacle.

Pretty good piece all told!
 

Sideways

A jpeg stock photo of gas station flowers
Published by SLP
Location
Teignmouth, Devon
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Interesting, Burgon ends up looking a lot like Corbyn's election against May rather than his election against Johnson here.

On the other hand, a left wing stance on the economy is probably a lot more relevant in the covid crisis circumstances than among the whole Brexit debacle.

Pretty good piece all told!
Thanks, I genuinely think that along with May being a bad campaigner over-confidence was a real factor in her winning, here Burgon lacks Corbyn's appeal but has an advantage that the country is in a worse state and the tories have been in longer.

Basically, this was me thinking - WI Corbynism came about now? Would it be better? More aware of intersectionality? Or would it have been lead by the Pidcocks and Williamsons and other monsters of the movement?

Also, otl people like Dawn Butler and Angela Rayner got to represent the Labour Party early on in the GRA issue and generally got out sounding okay, while the moderates were out of power and running their mouths off pretty much at random on twitter all the time. Corbyn was willing to listen to TERFs, just like Starmer, and transphobia is as bad on the left as on the right of the party. But Corbyn got away with it more. What if JK Rowling and all the other stuff dropped while the left was in the ascendent, after the moderate wing had been seen to be okay on it?

So, in this world, Rosie Duffield is far less radical. When she thinks of transphobes she thinks of Pidcock and her ilk. Dirty leftists and communists all. She's still transphobic, of course, but she's closer to power and less likely to side with the visible transphobes in her party. Meanwhile, your dirtbag left men only podcaster types are less likely to be passionate on trans issues because they're used to seeing it as "of course transphobia is an awful issue in and beyond the Labour Party, but-"

idk, it's a half formed thought. Issues percolating
 

Time Enough

New Left Wing Political Queers-Micheal Moran
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Jess Philips Open Britain, despite announcing that they were the foremost party for trans allies in the UK, said nothing about the matter in their manifesto beyond that.
This is the most Jess Philips to Jess Philips in a Jess Philips.
Basically, this was me thinking - WI Corbynism came about now? Would it be better? More aware of intersectionality? Or would it have been lead by the Pidcocks and Williamsons and other monsters of the movement?
I think it’s hard to say, your list is a good grasp at it but Corbynism seems like such an entity of it’s time of Left Wing Populism and Anti-Austerity politics mixed with the skeleton of Labour’s past mixing in with it’s new dangerous elements.

Damn I need to ponder this idea more, really is making me think.
 

Sideways

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I think it’s hard to say, your list is a good grasp at it but Corbynism seems like such an entity of it’s time of Left Wing Populism and Anti-Austerity politics mixed with the skeleton of Labour’s past mixing in with it’s new dangerous elements.

Damn I need to ponder this idea more, really is making me think.
Some thoughts
  • The modern New Left is coming up anyway, without our equivalent of Bernie Bros we can expect them free floating, building up a culture, which will then come to Labour, as opposed to being constructed within Labour
  • Many will end up in the Greens, and did, in the 2014 surge
  • This means six years of young leftist feminists getting their foot in the door with Green politics - they'll still be outflanked by the mid-party transphobic senior activists by 2020, but they'll be much more powerful and will dominate the party in studenty progressive places like Brighton, Bristol, etc.
  • It also means a lot of experienced activists won't break for Labour so quickly - I doubt that'll determine what happens but it has an impact.
  • People like Chris Williamson and Ken Livingstone will be able to just carry on. There's much less views on the left's problems
  • From the election on, !2020Corbyn will have to nail their colours to the mast on trans issues - it'll be an election issue and TERFs on their side will be discussed.
  • All this means that issues of systemic transphobia break in the consciousness of voters before antisemitism issues.
  • Whether this matters depends on what a transphobe looks like in the minds of Momentum equivalent members - if a TERF is a Karen who votes Tory then this will be an embarrassment for the movement. If a TERF is seen as a leftist union guy with a banner, then the existence of transphobia in Labour is unfortunate and anyway the Tories-
  • This impacts how these people will perceive accusations of antisemitism made against often the same people.
 

Nyvis

Token Marxist
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Paris
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I wonder if a radical labour would see the greens as the natural allies it lacks in its own party, if it's even less institutional than Corbynism?

One thing I'm perpetually baffled by is Britain's lack of electoral pacts in general. French large parties have always had a willingness to throw a few seats at minor parties who align with them to get them to stop spoiling races, which usually result in quite a bit of influence for them. To be sure, our two turns election system plays into that because it gives you more data about where you want to trade endorsements, but that still sounds possible based on internal polling.

I think it's also worth distinguishing between transphobic guys and TERFs in the analysis of transphobia within a movement.

Another thing to think about is that every year that passes means more young people entering the voting pool, and they tend to break away from the older TERF crowd. 5 years may not seem like much but that can be the tipping point. Corbynism already had quite a bit of youth activist feel to it, and something more non Labour, New Left based will probably have even more of that at its core. Rejection of TERFs as "those middle aged women" is always a possibility.
 

Sideways

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One thing I'm perpetually baffled by is Britain's lack of electoral pacts in general. French large parties have always had a willingness to throw a few seats at minor parties who align with them to get them to stop spoiling races, which usually result in quite a bit of influence for them. To be sure, our two turns election system plays into that because it gives you more data about where you want to trade endorsements, but that still sounds possible based on internal polling.
Okay, so post Alliance there have been a few attempts at this - most notably in the 90s Plaid attempted an alliance with the Greens and got an MP elected on the basis of a joint candidacy, Cynog Dafis has made it clear he doesn't consider himself a contender for first Green Parliamentarian and the deal really didn't work - Plaid holding meetings in Welsh and the Greens not all speaking Welsh was a problem. The deal apparently kept a Green Counillor in Aberystwyth until the 00s but other candidates put forward included someone who went on to a job defending nuclear energy so maybe the fusion ticket thing never quite worked. And now the Greens still don't really have a presence in Wales despite how by the numbers Cardiff meets all the demographic conditions to be favourable for them

In Tatton in 1997 Labour and the Lib Dems stood down for an Indo to get out Neil Hamilton. The Liberal Democrats stood down for Health Concern in 2005.

Then, in 2017 obviously the greens pushed hard for a progressive alliance and it was horrific - British voters don't seem to understand it - campaigning in a Green minor target seat and having to explain why people should vote Green when you're standing down for the Lib Dems in other seats was pretty bad. In 2018 the party voted never again, then did basically the same thing again in 2019. Along the way there've been big problems - how do two parties that value local party autonomy swap the Isle of Man for Lewes, for example? The Greens are really bad at this kind of disciplined thinking, and if the Lib Dems say they'll do something it's 50/50 whether they will or not.

I kinda think electoral pacts will happen one day, but right now not so much. Too much bad blood. Also, well, the Tories won Mansfield and Labour win Canterbury. Surprise wins are possible and lots of people don't quite trust targetting right now. It makes it tough to make deals.

Maybe election after next, if the Tories are still in power, Labour will consider a limited amount of that
 

Nyvis

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Okay, so post Alliance there have been a few attempts at this - most notably in the 90s Plaid attempted an alliance with the Greens and got an MP elected on the basis of a joint candidacy, Cynog Dafis has made it clear he doesn't consider himself a contender for first Green Parliamentarian and the deal really didn't work - Plaid holding meetings in Welsh and the Greens not all speaking Welsh was a problem. The deal apparently kept a Green Counillor in Aberystwyth until the 00s but other candidates put forward included someone who went on to a job defending nuclear energy so maybe the fusion ticket thing never quite worked. And now the Greens still don't really have a presence in Wales despite how by the numbers Cardiff meets all the demographic conditions to be favourable for them

In Tatton in 1997 Labour and the Lib Dems stood down for an Indo to get out Neil Hamilton. The Liberal Democrats stood down for Health Concern in 2005.

Then, in 2017 obviously the greens pushed hard for a progressive alliance and it was horrific - British voters don't seem to understand it - campaigning in a Green minor target seat and having to explain why people should vote Green when you're standing down for the Lib Dems in other seats was pretty bad. In 2018 the party voted never again, then did basically the same thing again in 2019. Along the way there've been big problems - how do two parties that value local party autonomy swap the Isle of Man for Lewes, for example? The Greens are really bad at this kind of disciplined thinking, and if the Lib Dems say they'll do something it's 50/50 whether they will or not.

I kinda think electoral pacts will happen one day, but right now not so much. Too much bad blood. Also, well, the Tories won Mansfield and Labour win Canterbury. Surprise wins are possible and lots of people don't quite trust targetting right now. It makes it tough to make deals.

Maybe election after next, if the Tories are still in power, Labour will consider a limited amount of that
Yeah, I can see how our two rounds system makes the whole "explain the calculus to your voters" part much easier, actually, that makes sense.

If it happens under UK FPTP, it'll probably be in pretty obvious seats to start with, where it just amounts to one party standing down where the other already has much of the support and the voter flow is expected to be obvious?

I imagine for a coalition of minor parties you'd be better off with an actual joint ticket to avoid the same confusion, but that's a bridge further.
 

Thande

BidenHarris, vaccine, England's got the same Queen
Published by SLP
Besides what @Sideways said, electoral pacts used to be a lot more common in the 1920s-1960s when Liberals and Conservatives would routinely stand down for each other in order to consolidate the anti-Labour vote (sometimes with formal mergers on the municipal level). Arguably this came to an end with the Jeremy Thorpe era of the Liberal Party when there was more of an effort to make the Liberals into a genuine third force again (partly due to public dissatisfaction with the big two and the Butskellite consensus starting to break down, though there were other reasons).

In the modern UK I think there's a perception that 'pacts = trying to rig the system in your favour' and will lose you more votes than it'll gain, but it's very situationally dependent.
 

Nyvis

Token Marxist
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Besides what @Sideways said, electoral pacts used to be a lot more common in the 1920s-1960s when Liberals and Conservatives would routinely stand down for each other in order to consolidate the anti-Labour vote (sometimes with formal mergers on the municipal level). Arguably this came to an end with the Jeremy Thorpe era of the Liberal Party when there was more of an effort to make the Liberals into a genuine third force again (partly due to public dissatisfaction with the big two and the Butskellite consensus starting to break down, though there were other reasons).

In the modern UK I think there's a perception that 'pacts = trying to rig the system in your favour' and will lose you more votes than it'll gain, but it's very situationally dependent.
I wonder if there's room for a Britain that maintains a 3 parties system. You'd have to find a clearer niche for the liberals, but that would make for interesting electoral politics. Though the pressure for electoral reform would probably be great enough to have change if people keep abusing pacts left right and center.
 

Alex Richards

She needs an artificial Mountain, not AV
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Okay, so post Alliance there have been a few attempts at this - most notably in the 90s Plaid attempted an alliance with the Greens and got an MP elected on the basis of a joint candidacy, Cynog Dafis has made it clear he doesn't consider himself a contender for first Green Parliamentarian and the deal really didn't work - Plaid holding meetings in Welsh and the Greens not all speaking Welsh was a problem. The deal apparently kept a Green Counillor in Aberystwyth until the 00s but other candidates put forward included someone who went on to a job defending nuclear energy so maybe the fusion ticket thing never quite worked. And now the Greens still don't really have a presence in Wales despite how by the numbers Cardiff meets all the demographic conditions to be favourable for them

In Tatton in 1997 Labour and the Lib Dems stood down for an Indo to get out Neil Hamilton. The Liberal Democrats stood down for Health Concern in 2005.

Then, in 2017 obviously the greens pushed hard for a progressive alliance and it was horrific - British voters don't seem to understand it - campaigning in a Green minor target seat and having to explain why people should vote Green when you're standing down for the Lib Dems in other seats was pretty bad. In 2018 the party voted never again, then did basically the same thing again in 2019. Along the way there've been big problems - how do two parties that value local party autonomy swap the Isle of Man for Lewes, for example? The Greens are really bad at this kind of disciplined thinking, and if the Lib Dems say they'll do something it's 50/50 whether they will or not.

I kinda think electoral pacts will happen one day, but right now not so much. Too much bad blood. Also, well, the Tories won Mansfield and Labour win Canterbury. Surprise wins are possible and lots of people don't quite trust targetting right now. It makes it tough to make deals.

Maybe election after next, if the Tories are still in power, Labour will consider a limited amount of that
I think specifically in London there could be a move to a much more formal Lib Dem-Green pact. Things seem pretty friendly in Richmond, and I could see a similar 'open up council seats for an uncontested run at Parliament' deal working in Sutton (the 759 Green voters would have put Brake over the top there, though I expect in reality some would have broken for Labour instead). Outside of London it feels a lot more patchy. Labour as a rule don't seem interested in anything formal, though use of Paper Candidates for informal support certainly seems realistic.
 

Thande

BidenHarris, vaccine, England's got the same Queen
Published by SLP
I wonder if there's room for a Britain that maintains a 3 parties system. You'd have to find a clearer niche for the liberals, but that would make for interesting electoral politics. Though the pressure for electoral reform would probably be great enough to have change if people keep abusing pacts left right and center.
There's definitely a possibility for it. The other thing I forgot to mention is ever since I found out about France's two-round system, I've felt it would probably have produced very good results for the mid-2000s Lib Dems, when there was a sense that Labour voters preferred them over the Tories and Tories preferred them over Labour.
 

Sideways

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I think specifically in London there could be a move to a much more formal Lib Dem-Green pact. Things seem pretty friendly in Richmond, and I could see a similar 'open up council seats for an uncontested run at Parliament' deal working in Sutton (the 759 Green voters would have put Brake over the top there, though I expect in reality some would have broken for Labour instead). Outside of London it feels a lot more patchy. Labour as a rule don't seem interested in anything formal, though use of Paper Candidates for informal support certainly seems realistic.
I'm less sure - iirc Richmond Park generated some stress within the Greens in 2016, with new rules introduced to reduce the power of senior party officials to pressure party groups to stand down afterwards. Now they have for a long time, but all it takes is a change in the local group and that's a fight that'll open up again.

As I say, Greens lack discipline a lot of the time, and - you know - much love to you, but Lib Dems have a reputation for lying - when I was in the Greens any electoral pact suggestions were tempered with "last time we did this the Lib Dems said they'd stand down but didn't"

I think in 2017 the Greens wanted a pact to counter Corbyn, and in 2019 it was a brexit thing. The leadership is keen but the membership seem restless. Though it's happened twice now, so by 2024 it may be just expected
 

Nyvis

Token Marxist
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There's definitely a possibility for it. The other thing I forgot to mention is ever since I found out about France's two-round system, I've felt it would probably have produced very good results for the mid-2000s Lib Dems, when there was a sense that Labour voters preferred them over the Tories and Tories preferred them over Labour.
That makes a lot of sense. It's also a very "low tech" approach to the problem you can actually implement without that much effort from the people counting ballots, unlike ranked choice.

I think something else you could experiment with is the French municipal election style, maybe for councils? You have a first round of party lists, then a second round where lists who did better than 10% can all run, and lists who did better than 5% can negotiate an explicit fusion list with those who run, where they'll be on the ballot jointly. It's great for dealing with the "why are we voting for those guys under party instructions, actually" effect, but of course require party list elections.
 

Alex Richards

She needs an artificial Mountain, not AV
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As I say, Greens lack discipline a lot of the time, and - you know - much love to you, but Lib Dems have a reputation for lying - when I was in the Greens any electoral pact suggestions were tempered with "last time we did this the Lib Dems said they'd stand down but didn't"
There was talk about it before the 2019 locals round here (2017 possibly? Round then anyway) but locally it pretty much became 'the Greens are enquiring about whether we'd stand down for them in a couple of places. We tried to have a meet-and-greet with them and then they never actually bothered to call back.'

Wouldn't happen now. The most prominent bloke is an extremely shouty, extremely aggressive, extremely anti-HS2 bloke who's talking about how the whole thing is a massive establishment stitch-up and everyone else is corrupt and even the half of our local branch who are somewhat against HS2 don't actually like him.
 

Mumby

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Mumby's Halloween Special: '...Socialist Government [...] would have to fall back on some kind of Gestapo...'

1940-1945: Winston Churchill (Conservative leading War Government with Labour, Liberal Nationals, Liberals and National Labour)
1945: DISPUTED [Clement Attlee (Labour majority), considered Prime Minister designate, until leadership challenge]
1945-1950: Nye Bevan (Labour)
1945 (Majority) def. Winston Churchill ('National Government' - Conservatives, Liberal Nationals), Herbert Morrison ('Patriotic' Labour), Archibald Sinclair (Liberal)
1950-1957: Anthony Eden (Conservative)
1950 (Anti-Communist Pact with Liberals and Populists) def. Nye Bevan (Labour), Megan Lloyd George (Radical)
1953 (Anti-Communist Pact with Liberals and Populists) def. Nye Bevan (United Front - Labour, Radicals)

1957-1957: Herbert Morrison (Peoples' leading Anti-Communist Pact with Conservatives and Liberals)
1957-1968: Bernard Montgomery (Union)
1958 (Majority) def. Jim Callaghan [replacing Nye Bevan] (United Front - Labour, Radicals)
1963 (Majority) def. Evan Durbin (Labour) [referred to officially as 'The Socialists']
 
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Qaz_plm

SLP's only Clown egirl
Location
Inbetween dreams and reality
Pronouns
She/her

1990-1995:John Major(Conservative)
Def '92:Neil Kinnock(Labour),Paddy Ashdown(Liberal Democrats)
1995-1997:Michael Portillo(Conservative)

1997:John Smith(Labour),Charles Kennedy(Liberal Democrats), Ken Livingston(Democratic Socialist),Alex Salmond(SNP)
1997:Peter Lilley(Conservative)
1997-2001:Kenneth Clarke(Conservative)
2001-2004:Norman Lamont(Conservative)
2002:Angela Eagle(Labour),Charles Kennedy(Liberal Democrats),Diane Abbot(Democratic Socialist),John Swinney(SNP)
2004-2005:David Davis(Conservative)
2005:Peter Hain(Labour),Charles Kennedy(Liberal Democrats),Diane Abbot(Democratic Socialist),Alex Salmond(SNP)

2005-2009:Michael Howard(Conservative)
2009-2010:Gordon Brown(Labour)
2009:Michael Howard(Conservative),Menzies Campbell(Liberal Democrats),Diane Abbot(Democratic Socialist)

2010-2011:Tony Blair(Labour)
2011-2013:Ed Balls(Labour)
2013-2014:David Cameron(Conservative)
2013:Ed Balls(Labour),Vince Cable(Liberal Democrats),Alex Salmond(SNP),Elin Jones(Plaid Cymru),George Galloway(Democratic Socialist)
2014-2015:Boris Johnson(Conservative)
2015-2018:Michael Gove(Conservative)
2018-2020:Jeremy Hunt(Conservative)
2018:Liz Kendall(Labour),Nicola Strugeon(SNP),Ed Davey(Liberal Democrats),Adam Price(Plaid Cymru)

2020-2021:Sajid Javid(Conservative)
 
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Yokai Man

Well-known member
Eternal Apocalypse or A Very Dumb ASB List

1996-2000 Constantin Mudava (Independent)

1996 Presidential Election First Round-Ion Iliescu(PDSR),Emil Constantinescu(CDR),Petre Roman(USD)
1996 Presidential Election Second Round-Ion Iliescu(PDSR)
1996 Parliamentary Election-CDR(163),PDSR(118),USD(69),UDMR(36),PRM(23),PUNR(22),PSM(11),ANLE(8),PS(7),PR(7),PPR(4),ULB(4),PNA(4)


2000-2000 Petre Roman (Interimary President,Democratic Party)

2000-2004 Ion Iliescu (Romanian Social Democratic Party,Social Democratic Party after 2001)

2000 Presidential Election First Round-Corneliu Vadim Tudor(PRM),Theodor Stolojan(PNL),Petre Roman(USD),Emil Constantinescu(PNTCD)
2000 Presidential Election Second Round-Corneliu Vadim Tudor(PRM)
2000 Parliamentary Election-PDSR(224),PRM(119),PNL(42),UDMR(41),PD(37),APR(14),PUNR+PNR(7),Reform(1),PNTCD(1)
2004 Parliamentary Election-PSD+PUR+APR(210),PRM(72),PNL(66),UDMR(41),PD(37),PNG-CD(16),PNMSR(10),PNTCD(1)


2004-2005 Lia Roberts † (Independent)
2004 Presidential Election First Round-Adrian Nastase(PSD+PUR+APR),Theodor Stolojan(PNL),Corneliu Vadim Tudor(PRM)
2004 Presidential Election Second Round-Adrian Nastase(PSD+PUR+APR)


2005-2010 Adrian Nastase (Social Democratic Party)
2005 Presidential Election First Round-Calin Popescu Tariceanu(A.D.A),Corneliu Vadim Tudor(PRM),Markó Bela(UDMR)
2005 Presidential Election Second Round-Calin Popescu Tariceanu(A.D.A)
2008 Parliamentary Election-PSD+PC(189),A.D.A(180),UDMR(41),PRM(24),PNG-CD(23),PNMSR(10),PNTCD(1)


2010-2010 Lorin Fortuna (National Rebirth Alliance)
2010 Presidential Election First Round-Adrian Nastase(PSD+PC),Varujan Vosganian(A.D.A),Corneliu Vadim Tudor(PRM)
2010 Presidential Election Second Round-Adrian Nastase(PSD+PC)


2010-2010 Doru Ioan Taracila (Interimary President,Social Democratic Party)
November 2010 Presidential Impeachment Referendum:54% Yes,voting presence 42,78%-INSUFFICIENT VOTING PRESENCE TO BE APPROVED

2010-2011 Lorin Fortuna (National Rebirth Alliance)

2011-2011 Doru Ioan Taracila (Interimary President,Social Democratic Party)

April 2011 Presidential Impeachment Referendum:65,29% Yes,voting presence 51,93%-APPROVED

2011-2012 Pavel Corut (National Rebirth Alliance)
2011 Presidential Election First Round-Mircea Geoana(PSD+PC),Radu Berceanu(A.D.A),Mugur Mihaescu (Taxpayers Coalition)
2011 Presidential Election Second Round-Mircea Geoana(PSD+PC)


2012-2012 Doru Ioan Taracila (Interimary President,Social Democratic Party)
2012 Presidential Impeachment Referendum: 65% Yes,voting presence 51,89%-APPROVED

2012-2017 Crin Antonescu (Truth and Justice Alliance,National Liberal Party after 2014)
2012 Presidential Election First Round-Mircea Geoana(PSD+PC),Dan Diaconescu(ARN),Mugur Mihaescu (Taxpayers Coalition)
2012 Presidential Election Second Round-Mircea Geoana(PSD+PC)
2012 Parliamentary Election-A.D.A(190),PSD+PC(170),UDMR(40),ARN(40),PNG-CD(30),TC(12),PRM(7),PNMRS(7),PNTCD(1)
2016 Parliamentary Election-PSD+UNPR+PC(240),URN(94),UDMR(40),PNL(34),ARD(30),PP-TB(11)


2017-present day Titus Corlatean (Social Democratic Party)
2017 Presidential Election First Round-Mugur Mihaescu (URN),Tudor Chirila(Independent),Ludovic Orban(PNL)
2017 Presidential Election Second Round-Mugur Mihaescu (URN)
2017 Constitutional Referendum:94% Yes,voting presence 35%-APPROVED
2017 Constitutional Referendum Regarding the Death Penalty:81,98% Bring It Back,voting presence 40,75%-APPROVED
2018 Constitutional Referendum Regarding the Origins of Romanians:79,10% Dacian Bloodline,voting presence 29%-APPROVED
2018 Constitutional Referendum Regarding Gender Studies and Sexomarxism,as well as Sex Education and the Teaching of Evolution and Big Bang Theory in state school:81% Ban,94% Ban respectively,voting presence 29,04%-APPROVED

2018 Constitutional Referendum Regarding Banning George Soros and Certain NGO’s:60% For,voting presence 29,10%-APPROVED
2019 Constitutional Referendum Regarding Withdrawing Citizenship From Both Romanians and Minority Group Members For Certain Unlawful Actions:61,39% For, voting presence 28,49%-APPROVED
2019 Constitutional Referendum Regarding Vaccination:59,19% Optional,voting presence 29%-APPROVED
2020 5G Referendum:53% Ban,voting presence 27%-APPROVED
2020 Online Referendum Regarding Mask Wearing and Health Restitutions:60% Against-APPROVED
2020 Online Referendum Regarding Extended Presidential and Government Powers During Times Of Emergency:54% For-APPROVED


Will add footnotes on Saturday/Sunday.
 

zaffre

I want rustlers,
Location
Massachusetts
ATLF: Halloween, 2020

2021-2023: Joe Biden (D-DE)* / Kamala Harris (D-CA)

2020: Donald Trump (R-FL) / Mike Pence (R-IN)
2023-2024: Kamala Harris (D-CA) / Vacant
2024-2029: Kamala Harris (D-CA) / Doug Jones (D-AL)

2024: Greg Abbott (R-TX) / Daniel Cameron (R-KY)
2029-: Amy Coney Barrett (R-IN) / Kurt Daudt (R-MN)
2028: Amy Klobuchar (D-MN) / Alejandro Padilla (D-CA)

for those keeping score at home
  • Democrats have last held a Senate majority on January 3rd, 2015
  • President Harris' six years in office are the current record for longest term of any President to appoint zero (0) Supreme Court justices
  • If defined to also include all intermittent fighting between the Armistice Agreement and the Evacuation of Seoul, the total duration of the Korean conflict falls midway between the Spanish conquest of Petén and the Eighty Years' War
  • Senator Klobuchar is the third major-party candidate to lose to an opponent with the same forename, previous candidates being John Davis in 1924 and William Jennings Bryan in 1896, 1900, and 1908, and the first Democratic candidate to lose the state of Minnesota since George McGovern in 1972
  • As of the recent election of Anneliese Dodds, of all prime ministers in office this century, a majority (4 of 7) have birthplaces outside of the United Kingdom
  • Some lighter news - with less than two months until release, Avengers: Amalgam is currently projected to gross over one billion dollars, the first and last film released this decade expected to do so
 
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