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Tibby's Graphics and Grab-Bag Thread.

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Tsundoku Tibby
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Another poem, this time with a clear rhyming scheme. It's supposed to be set circa partition.

Alas, poor Pole!
In Senate a squabble
And nary a soul
Protecting the rabble

Do not weep for Poland
Weep for the moment

Alas, poor Pole!
The proud wings
Nary a cowardly soul
Victory or death!, all sings

Do not weep for Poland
Weep for the moment

Alas, poor Pole!
A nation to their doom
The country no longer whole
Vultures openly loom

Do not weep for Poland
Weep for the moment.
 

Turquoise Blue

Tsundoku Tibby
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Stewards of the Principality of Wales (formed after the "Home Rule All Round" Reform of 1894)
T. E. Ellis ("Cymru Fydd" Liberal majority) 1894-1898*
1894: def. William Brace ("Labour" Liberal), Sir Henry James (Unionist)

...

Walter Roch (Liberal majority, then "Asquith Alliance" Liberal minority) 1916-1923
1918: def. Vernon Hartshorn (Labour), Sir Arthur Griffith-Boscawen (Unionist), George M. Ll. Davies (Christian)
Sir Arthur Griffith-Boscawen (Unionist minority) 1923-1927
1923: def. David Lloyd George (Liberal (Cymru Fydd)), Vernon Hartshorn (Labour), Walter Roch (Liberal (Asquith Alliance)), Saunders Lewis (Plaid Cymru)
David Lloyd George (Cymru Fydd-Labour coalition) 1927-
1927: def. Sir Arthur Griffith-Boscawen (Unionist), Vernon Hartshorn (Labour), Walter Roch (Liberal), Saunders Lewis (Plaid Cymru)
1931: def. Sir Arthur Griffith-Boscawen (Unionist),
1935: def.


...

S. O. Davies (Labour majority, then "Cymru Goch" Labour majority) 1961-1972*
1963: def. Gwilym Lloyd George (Liberal-Unionist), D. J. Davies (Plaid Cymru), Bertrand Russell (Fellowship)
...
1972: def. George Thomas ("Socialist" Labour), Emlyn Hooson (Liberal-Unionist), D. J. Davies (Plaid Cymru), Julian Cayo-Evans (Codi Cymru! [front for Free Wales Army]) [abst.],


...

Basically this is just "pick the most interesting Welsh people I can find and make a chaotic list out of it". WIP obvs.
 

Turquoise Blue

Tsundoku Tibby
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The Treforic language is written in three ways.

First, there is the Sinsic script, called the "whole script". It is an ideograph system, and hence is used a lot to communicate with fellow Sharastran countries. It is the most prestigious writing in Treforic culture, but is the most difficult to learn for most people.
"The man took off the hat" - 那人脫下帽子

Then there is the "broken script". It has the same origin as the Kogojin katakana, but has undergone a lot of modification to fit the Treforic language, including using the dakuten to note mutations and handakuten to note the absence of a vowel to compensate for the syllabus nature of the original writing. It makes no distinction between "d" and "t" (and hence between "dd" and "th"), "e" and "y", "o" and "w" and "l" and "r" (and hence "ll" and "rh"), so its suitability has been questioned.
"The man took off the hat" -テノダ ゚エテンエラ ゚ヘタ ゚イヲ ゙ラ ゚ダ ゚

Then there is the Coric one, contemptuously called the "empty script". It has the least prestige of the three, but is the one most used (although efforts have been made to shift Treforic back to the broken script).
"The man took off the hat" - Tynnodd y dyn yr het i ffwrdd.


(If Unicode doesn't work for you, hereScreenshot_20201012_154031.jpg
 
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Edmund

政治ギャル、永田町を叱る!
Location
Tynemouth
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The Treforic language is written in three ways.

First, there is the Sinsic script, called the "whole script". It is an ideograph system, and hence is used a lot to communicate with fellow Sharastran countries. It is the most prestigious writing in Treforic culture, but is the most difficult to learn for most people.
"The man took off the hat" - 那人脫下帽子

Then there is the "broken script". It has the same origin as the Kogojin katakana, but has undergone a lot of modification to fit the Treforic language, including using the dakuten to note mutations and handakuten to note the absence of a vowel to compensate for the syllabus nature of the original writing. It makes no distinction between "d" and "t" (and hence between "dd" and "th"), "e" and "y", "o" and "w" and "l" and "r" (and hence "ll" and "rh"), so its suitability has been questioned.
"The man took off the hat" -テノダ ゚エテンエラ ゚ヘタ ゚イヲ ゙ラ ゚ダ ゚

Then there is the Coric one, contemptuously called the "empty script". It has the least prestige of the three, but is the one most used (although efforts have been made to shift Treforic back to the broken script).
"The man took off the hat" - Tynnodd y dyn yr het i ffwrdd.


(If Unicode doesn't work for you, hereView attachment 26179
What's Marcapada like? I haven't played there in over a year now.
 
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Henŵyl: An Introduction

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Tsundoku Tibby
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I have decided to scrap using katakana and instead use Hangul. Now, Hangul is a featural script, so using it in its original sense doesn't make sense.

However, I am going with the presumption that Hangul in Marcapada is way older, and hence use it in a corrupted way for Treforic. I'm ignoring completely all grammatical combinations and just using the base symbols. Remember, this is originated with like, Treforic monks mangling it for Treforic.

아리냍・라훌 is an example of what I am calling the "blood script". Blood in the sense of lineage of course. The others are renamed to "gold script" [for Sinsic/Chinese] and "dirty script" [for Coric/Latin]. The written out script that I have posted translates as Aliniad Llafur, or Labour Alignment, my party.

To go into how to convert Welsh/Treforic to be able to write it in the blood script, I'll use the classic Welsh national anthem's first line.

Mae hen wlad fy nhadau yn annwyl i mi

Mae is simple enough - 매 [this is mae too].

Now to hen. 헨 [this one - hen]

Now we get to a bit of a conundrum. How do we represent w in Hangul? That is actually quite simple, as Korean doesn't make a distinction between u and w, using the letter-equivalent of o or u to represent a consonant such as in wo or we. This dovetails quite nicely with historical Welsh orthography.

We get to l. And this is where we must simplify Welsh a bit to push it into an alphabet designed for Korean. Korean doesn't have different letters for l or for r, as it does not have the scriptual distinction [indeed the l sound is apparently only found in the final]. So I am electing to use the same version for both. And this is the case for mutations too which will not be represented. Before you cry foul, I will have to cite early medieval Welsh orthography in where <p> and <t> were used to represent /b/ and /d/, and mutations weren't written at all. So I feel warranted enough to build on this.

Anyway, the final two is simple enough, and we can construct the Hangul for wlad. Now, remember the "no writing down mutations" rule. This does not except the soft mutation [maybe in more modern writings it does, but not traditionally]. Hence we write gwlad. Which is 구랃 (gulad in the original script).

Anyway, we're almost half-done. Fy is 위 [wi in the original Korean]. I had two options to encode the /f/ and /v/ sounds. Either the traditional Welsh way of merging it with <u> or the Korean custom of romanticising /h/ sounds as <f> and just use the /h/ symbol for /f/ and /ff/. I have elected to do the later, but I will say that the former is the traditional way of writing /f/ and /v/ and is likely still quite used especially for personal and place names. And of course, for particles like fy, the wi usage is used as a sort of hodge-podge compromise since people likely will resist changing such elementary words.

The circle above the symbol for u/w is a filler space for vowel-first blocks, and expect to see it a lot in Welsh/Treforic Hangul, that is all I will say.

Now on to nhadau. Nh is a mutation, and as covered before, we are not encoding them in Welsh/Treforic Hangul. So we are electing to use the t encoding instead. This is a multi-syllable word, so we must work out how to 'break' it. Since breaking it in 'tad-au' leaves us with a completely vowelised bloc, which would require a filler circle, I am encoding a rule that every medial or final block in Treforic/Welsh Hangul must start with a consonant if possible.

Ta is easy enough - 타. Now for dau, I am going to use some archaic Korean writing to represent the /au/ sound. ᄃᅷ. That translates to dau!

For yn, that's not hard, Filler circle, use the closest thing to a schwa for a symbol, then the n. 앤. There you are - aen in the original romanisation.

Annwyl. That's not hard now we got in the swing of things, really. 안 윌.

I is obviously 이 , which isn't hard.

And mi is 미.

Before we put it all together, I would like to note that because the Korean is agglunative and the Welsh/Treforic is not, those Treforic monks came up with a way to distinguish words. Namely, a dot between each word. This is very like the Japanese nakaguro.

So together, let us sing the anthem...

Mae hen wlad fy nhadau yn annwyl i mi (original Welsh)
매・헨・구랃・위・타ᄃᅷ・앤・안윌・이・미 (Welshised Hangul)
mae hen gulad wi tadau aen anwil i mi (transliterated).

And that's how to encode the first sentence of the Welsh national anthem in a very, very mangled version of Hangul.

Oh, to continue, 터레홀 [teorehor] is the writing for Trefor, the name of the weird Welsh-Korean country.
The -eo symbol [ㅓ], being the closest audio-wise to a schwa, is the "filler" sound. It's basically never used outside of being a filler vowel between two consonants. Actual schwa is ㅔ, and the extra line denotes that "yes, this is a sound you say, don't ignore it".
 
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Henŵyl: More Rules

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Tsundoku Tibby
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Location
The Land of the Trembling Star (UK)
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Gwlad beirdd a chantorion, enwogion o fri (Original Welsh)
구랃・배이ᇎ・아・가ᇉ오ᄅᆚᆫ・엔워굔・오・터라 (Welsh Hangul)
gulad byaerd a cantorion enwogyon o beori (transliteration)

If you read a syllable without any vowel, and only the silent one, you're supposed to add an "i" to the end of reading it aloud.

And here's one I made for the topical issue of our times - coronafeirws! 고로나햬룻

Oh, and for a full stop, the Japanese circle is used. Dots in Welsh Hangul denotes spaces, circle denotes end of a sentence.

Okay, just had to alter a certain rule to fix the irritating consonant combination starting.
If you see a syllable block of one consonant and the "silent verb", it is more a prefix than anything, to the succeeding block.

버리 - beori - read that as bri, or accounting for mutations, fri.
터라 - teora - read that as tra. The silent verb is never spoken, it is more the verb equivalent of the circle for "filler consonant".
 
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Turquoise Blue

Tsundoku Tibby
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Alrighto, time to test the quotation marks - 「 」.

고힌옫・궨・이・햰「버레・매・위・헽?」
Gofynnodd Gwen i Ffion "ble mae fy het?"
Gwen asked Ffion "where's my hat?"

As you can see, gofynnodd is one of those words that just get very easily sliced up and put into blocks in Welsh Hangul...
 
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Henŵyl: Hen Wlad Fy Nhadau

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Tsundoku Tibby
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Alright, time to properly do the whole of Hen Wlad Fy Nhadau in Welsh Hangul [Hangŵl? Henŵyl.]. After this, I'll do Siant Plant Trefi [the actual song of the Treforic] and then I'll try to do a complete breakdown of what each 'letter' means in the Welsh Hangul reading, along with notes on each of them.

매・헨・구랃・웨・타ᄃᅷ・앤・안윌・이・미
구랃・배이ᇎ・아・가ᇉ오ᄅᆚᆫ・엔워굔・오・버리
의・고롤・레헤윌・구랃갈윌・터라・맏
더롯・렏읻・골아사ᇉ・으・괟

「고룻」
구랃!・구랃!・버릗욜・윟・임・구랃
터라・몰・앤・밀・일・불・홓・배
오・빋엗・밀・헨・얕・발애

헨・겜리・멘읻익・바라뒷・에・바ᇎ
봅・데린・봅・거록윈・임・고록・싣・하ᇎ
터뤼・틔랃・구랃가롤・몰・쉬놀・으・시
의・넨틷・아혼읻・이・히

옷・터의ᅀᅩᇀ・에・게인・웨・구랃・탄・의・터ᄅᆁᆮ
매・헨・ᄋᆙᇀ・에・겜리・몰・ᄋᆌ・악・엘ᄋᆜᆮ
니・룯ᄋᆔᆮ・일・ᄋᆣᆫ・간・엘칠・ᄅᅷ・버앋
나・테린・벨싄ᄋᆚᆯ・웨・구랃

This took me like, three days. So yay, happy it's done.
 
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Notes on Treforic Culture: The Ridiculous Life of Siana L.

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Tsundoku Tibby
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An example of a Treforic sylun [anime-style, Welsh-attitude, basically] is...
The Ridiculous Life of Siana L. (ᄇᅻ읻・궬틴릳・ᅀᅣ나・러。- Bywyd Chwerthinllyd Siana L.)

Basically it's about a very withdrawn and slightly depressed schoolgirl with immense powers. She hates it, and just wants to be left alone. Tragically, she's stuck in a situation where there's a lot of teenage boys pining for her, and she's just irritated by the whole thing. The whole thing is one giant piss-take at anime, of the Sinsic (donghua), Tae (aeni), Kogojin (anime) or Treforic (syluniad) model, and has been praised for its utter dead-pan surrealism.

[Basically this is a mixture of Daria, The Disastrous Life of Saiki K. and piss-taking of harem anime, but fair warning, I have only watched the second].
 
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Turquoise Blue

Tsundoku Tibby
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Vernon Hartshorn (Labour) 1922-1931*
1922: def. David Lloyd George (Liberal), Sir Arthur Griffiths-Boscawen (Unionist)
1923: def. David Lloyd George (Liberal), Sir Arthur Griffiths-Boscawen (Unionist)
1924: def. David Lloyd George (Liberal), Sir Arthur Griffiths-Boscawen (Unionist)
1929: def. David Lloyd George (Liberal), Sir Arthur Griffiths-Boscawen (Unionist)

Jim Griffiths (Labour) 1931-1952
1931: def. J. H. Thomas (Labour (Opposition)/Unionist), David Lloyd George (Liberal)
1935: def. J. H. Thomas (National), Goronwy Owen (Liberal)
1945: def. J. H. Thomas (National), Goronwy Owen (Liberal)
1950: def. Gwilym Lloyd George (National), Clement Davies (Liberal)
1951: def. Gwilym Lloyd George (National), Clement Davies (Liberal)

Aneurin Bevan (Labour) 1952-1960*
1955: def. Gwilym Lloyd George (National), Clement Davies (Liberal)
1959: def. Gwilym Lloyd George (National), Clement Davies (Liberal), Gwynfor Evans (Plaid Cymru)

Megan Lloyd George (Labour) 1960-1967*
1964: def. Morys Bruce, 4th Lord Aberdare (National), Emlyn Hooson (Liberal), Gwynfor Evans (Plaid Cymru)
1966: def. Morys Bruce, 4th Lord Aberdare (National), Emlyn Hooson (Liberal), Gwynfor Evans (Plaid Cymru)

James Callaghan (Labour) 1966-1980
1970: def. Peter Thomas (National), Gwynfor Evans (Plaid Cymru), Emlyn Hooson (Liberal)
1974 (F): def. Peter Thomas (National), Emlyn Hooson (Liberal), Gwynfor Evans (Plaid Cymru)
1974 (O): def. Peter Thomas (National), Emlyn Hooson (Liberal), Gwynfor Evans (Plaid Cymru)
1979: def. Peter Thomas (National), Geraint Howells (Liberal), Gwynfor Evans (Plaid Cymru)

Michael Foot (Labour) 1980-1983
1983: def. Beata Brookes (National), Geraint Howells & Gwynoro Jones (Alliance), Dafydd Wigley (Plaid Cymru)
Neil Kinnock (Labour) 1983-1993
1987: def. Beata Brookes (National), Geraint Howells & Gwynoro Jones (Alliance), Dafydd Elis-Thomas (Plaid Cymru)
1993: def. Nicholas Bennett (Conservative), Alex Carlile (Liberal Democrats), Dafydd Wigley (Plaid Cymru)

Ron Davies (Labour) 1993-1998
1997: def. Rod Richards (Conservative), Alex Carlile (Liberal Democrats), Dafydd Wigley (Plaid Cymru)
Alun Michael (Labour, then Labour minority) 1998-2000
1999: def. Dafydd Wigley (Plaid Cymru), Rod Richards (Conservative), Michael German (Liberal Democrats)
Rhodri Morgan (Labour minority, then Labour-Liberal Democrats coalition, then Labour minority, then Labour-Plaid Cymru coalition) 2000-2009
2003: def. Ieuan Wyn Jones (Plaid Cymru), Nick Bourne (Conservative), Michael German (Liberal Democrats)
2007: def. Ieuan Wyn Jones (Plaid Cymru), Nick Bourne (Conservative), Michael German (Liberal Democrats)
Carwyn Jones (Labour-Plaid Cymru coalition, then Labour minority, then Labour-Liberal Democrats coalition) 2009-2018
2011: def. Nick Bourne (Conservative), Ieuan Wyn Jones (Plaid Cymru), Kirsty Williams (Liberal Democrats)
2016: def. Leanne Wood (Plaid Cymru), Andrew R. T. Davies (Conservative), Nathan Gill (Independence), Kirsty Williams (Liberal Democrats)

Mark Drakeford (Labour-Liberal Democrats coalition) 2018-present

As the Socialist Republic of Wales approaches its 100th year in 2022, the people reflect on the hundred years that passed since...

[This is basically "try to create a 'background' for an OTL Assembly list]
 

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Tsundoku Tibby
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Pronouns
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1920: A Truly American Election


Senator Charles Curtis (R-KS)/Governor J. Calvin Coolidge (R-MA): 298 EV, 54.3%
Senator Robert L. Owen (D-OK)/Fmr. Ass. Sec'y of the Navy Franklin D. Roosevelt (D-NY): 233 EV, 42.3%

In the end, the 1920 election was a foregone conclusion, no matter the political choices made. The charismatic Democratic running-mate was famously noted to have 'snookered' his rival the of-little-words Governor when it came to winning East Coast voters. But that didn't change much in the end.

Charles Curtis was widely considered a weak candidate from the get-go, but his deep contacts in the GOP, with appeal to both progressive and conservative Republicans, was considered just the thing to heal a party. Picking a more East Coast figure with a similarly ambiguous reputation, he sought to draw a lot of his contacts to campaign for him, while running a traditional 'front-porch' campaign. Much was made out of his 'bipartisan' reputation on the trail, with even Democrats on record as having admired his conduct in the Senate. William Borah, leader of the 'irreconciables', would end up granting Curtis the nickname that would be much-used by campaigners yet little-remembered by history - "The Great Reconciliator".

However, he was up against an intensely ambitious man who was in many ways William Jennings Bryan's protege, a man who chose to run an active campaign. Senator Owen was considered, while still a keen supporter of the League, more moderate than the intransigent President, and chose to lean into that reputation. He emphasised the need for bipartisan compromise, highlighting his active work with Republicans and Democrats which was then doomed by William Borah's 'irreconciables'. This was seen by many Democrats as a subtle distancing from Wilson's heavily unpopular die-hard support and while he lost some support from fellow Wilsonians, moderates increasingly considered him a secure pick.

With both men portraying themselves as 'bipartisan reconciliators', their campaigners of course did not hesitate to attack the other. Curtis and Coolidge were portrayed by Democrats as against many of the domestic advancements of the last decade, and Owen and Roosevelt was castigated as 'apologists' for the failures in foreign policy of the last few years. It was vicious.

One notable event was that when Curtis, upon being met by National Women's Party campaigners, floated the idea of a constitutional amendment to enshrine protection against discrimination of women on basis of their sex into law, the earliest example of an Equal Rights Amendment, Owen [upon being told of this promise], would commit himself to that such promise as well, emphasising his support of making amendments easier to implement.

In the end, despite Owen and Roosevelt's spirited campaign turning it from a devastating landslide into a major defeat, it was still a defeat. Charles Curtis would be inaugurated as the 29th President of the United States of America.
 
Seventh Party System Infoboxes: 2017 Oregon

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Tsundoku Tibby
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The Land of the Trembling Star (UK)
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Seventh Party System Infoboxes: 2018 Media California (Mandarin LB)

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Tsundoku Tibby
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The Land of the Trembling Star (UK)
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they/them
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