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Lists of Heads of Government and Heads of State

Sideways

Гуси 🦢
Published by SLP
Location
Teignmouth, Devon
Pronouns
She/Her
In Marian Rome, the Consuls Elect You!
Marius-Meditating-on-the-Ruins-of-Carthage.jpg

Consuls

86-79 BC: Gaius Marius

Having defeated Sulla Marius settled into his prophesied 7th Consulship, a process that involved purging Rome of Sulla's supporters but leaving the generals supporters alive. For the next four years Rome fought a brutal civil war between the Populares and the Optimates, which ended with the defeat of the Optimates.

79-50 BC: Gnaeus Carbo

Carbo's first challenge was to overcome his political rival Quintus Sertorius for control of the Populares faction, which he achieved through both extra-legal mob actions and redirecting the purges against the Optimates on former Populares. Sertorius escaped, first to Hispania and then onto Mauritania where he was killed by an assassin. More secure and with an unrivalled control of the Roman political system, Carbo focused on the Third Mithradatic War which finally saw Rome defeat their Pontic enemies and claim Armenia as a satellite Kingdom.

Martius to Skipia 50 BC: Triumvirate - Marcus Antonius, Gaius Carrinas, Gaius Marius Minor

The younger Marius began as the dominant figure in the Triumvirate but his reputation for brutality lead the other triumvirs to side with Scipio Asiaticus in bringing him down.

50-39 BC: Scipio Asiaticus

Scipio is remembered primarily for his reforms to the Roman system which avoided the violence of the prior Marian Consuls. Most notably, he implemented the Scipian Calendar, dividing the year into the twelve months we know today. He also created the buffer zone provinces of Gallia Ulterior and Moesia. Thrace was also fully incorporated as a Roman province.

39-21 BC: Julius Caesar

A successful general under Scipio, Julius was considered past his prime by the time he took on the Consulate. Aging, fat and unhealthy, Caesar came to personify an era of political and social stagnation. While he bought about some reforms largely to expand citizenship and political representation of the lower orders, his main goal was to consolidate the work of Marius and return the Marian revolution to its roots.

The grain dole, slave supplies from the Gallic campaigns and increasing army salaries lead to an increasingly urbanised population that was reliant on government handouts. While Caesar attempted to re-energise rural towns by encouraging work for the government, and expanding the grain dole, he could not overcome the economic factors that were bringing the Marian period to an end.

21-19 BC: Marcus Lepidus

As a general of Caesar, Lepidus was responsible for putting down the Pontic revolt. As consul however he dedicated most of his time to attempting to stamp out truancy in the army and corruption in the grain dole, however his reign was brief

19-17 BC: Aulus Hirtius

Aulus' was a representative of the gerontocracy that had established itself within the Consilium of the Populares. Due to his rapidly failing health, Aulus served as Consul for just 13 months between Romula 19 BCE and Martius 17 BCE.

17-12 BC: Quintus Aelius Tubero

Significantly younger than previous Consuls Tubero began a process of reforms to the Marian system, which allowed formerly proscribed families to return to positions of power within the Republic. Tubero's attempts to seek better relations with other kingdoms and to create peace at home would lead to disaster both home and abroad. A wave of revolts hit the republic, culminating in an alliance between Egypt and the Parthian Empire pushing Rome out of Asia Minor. Tubero was placed under house arrest and was replaced as leader.

The Principate

12-4 BC: Marcus Crassus

Crassus refused undergo the niceities of ratification by the Comitia Curiata, or the Consilium of the Populares. He instead focused on the Senate and on restoring the power of what had once been the Patrician class. A military leader and political leader but not necessarily a Consul, Crassus established himself as Princeps - a title which was not yet seen as the same as Emperor. Without grain from Egypt the grain dole was cancelled and Rome was impoverished throughout his reign. Crassus turned to the bottle and to lavish parties and games, and is mostly remembered for leading Rome through a period of intense corruption and decline, and leading very much by example.

4 BC - ???: Sempronius Gracchus

Sempronius was a great general in the dismal era of Crassus, and took power from Crassus by threats of a coup. Sempronius served twice as Consul, but was willing to hand the position over to a political inferior when it was convenient for him. This confirmed the subjugation of the title of consul to that of Princeps. He expanded Gallia Ulteria and established a new province of Celtica. He also re-secured the Greek coast and while he never retook Asia Minor he did retake the strategically valuable province of Crete. Domestically, Sempronius used the newly found wealth of Rome to re-establish the grain dole and began a process of settling soldiers on the frontier, allowing him to them launch punitive campaigns to protect the interests of Roman citizens. However, the old problems of soldier pay and excess labour reared their heads again and ensured that the Principate would, inevitably, fail.

Following Sempronius the alliance of interests that had held Rome together unravelled. Rome would lose control of Greece and with it any claim to cultural dominance in the East, however, the Empire in the West would expand into Britannia and Hibernia and would remain the dominant power into the fourth century AC when it was overcome by the Marcomannic Empire. However due to the cultural exchanges between settlers and Marcomannians Latin continued to be used in a limited form in the Marcomannic legal system into the 9th century and while it was mostly supplanted by Greek during the Messianisation of the West it remained a liturgical language within the Western Church in some isolated areas of Eastern Europe into the thirteenth century and is still the basis for the Western calendar.

For the most part, the Empire has been forgotten but the Republic has cast a long shadow. The influence of Rome can be seen on the Britannic-Hibernian Kingdom's King's Consilium and direct democratic Assembly, and through it, all the ideas of democracy that define modern Europe and Newfoundland.

(can you see the gimmick here?)
 

Mumby

Always mysterious!
Published by SLP
Location
Municipal Commune of Bourne
Pronouns
He/Him
The Invisible Empire

Presidents of the United States of America

1889-1897: Benjamin Harrison (Republican)
1888 (with Levi P. Morton) def. Grover Cleveland (Democratic)
1892 (with Levi P. Morton) def. David B. Hill (Official 'Silver' Democratic), James B. Weaver (Populist), Simon Bolivar Buckner (National 'Gold' Democratic)

1897-1897: William E. Russell (Democratic)
1896 (with Horace Boies) def. Levi P. Morton (Republican), Eugene V. Debs (Populist)
1897-1901: Horace Boies (Democratic)
1901-1909: George Dewey (Democratic)
1900 (with Adlai Stevenson) def. Cushman Davis (Republican), Eugene V. Debs (Social Democratic)
1904 (with Adlai Stevenson) def. Charles W. Fairbanks (Republican), Eugene V. Debs (Socialist)

1909-1913: Elihu Root (Republican)
1908 (with Joseph B. Foraker) def. Adlai Stevenson (Democratic), Bill Haywood (Socialist)
1913-1924: Woodrow Wilson (Democratic)
1912 (with George E. Chamberlain) def. Bill Haywood (Socialist), Elihu Root (Republican)
1916 (with George E. Chamberlain) def. Charles W. Fairbanks (Republican)
1920 (with A. Mitchell Palmer) def. William Randolph Hearst (Independence), Leonard Wood (Republican)

1924-1933: A. Mitchell Palmer (Democratic)
1924 (with William Gibbs McAdoo) def. Robert M. LaFollette Sr. (Republican), William Randolph Hearst (Independence)
1928 (with William Gibbs McAdoo) def. William Randolph Hearst (Republican), Herbert Hoover (Constitutional)

1933-1941: Edward L. Jackson (Republican)
1932 (with Hanford MacNider) def. William H. Murray (Democratic), Franklin D. Roosevelt (Constitutional)
1936 (with Charles Lindbergh) def. Theodore G. Bilbo (Democratic), Huey Long (Union)


Imperial Wizards of the American Empire

1915-1922: William Joseph Simmons
1922-1935: Hiram Wesley Evans
1935-0000: D.C. Stephenson
 

Bolt451

Anxious millenial cowgirl
Location
Sandford, Gloucestershire
Pronouns
She/Her
In Marian Rome, the Consuls Elect You!
View attachment 14195

Consuls

86-79 BC: Gaius Marius

Having defeated Sulla Marius settled into his prophesied 7th Consulship, a process that involved purging Rome of Sulla's supporters but leaving the generals supporters alive. For the next four years Rome fought a brutal civil war between the Populares and the Optimates, which ended with the defeat of the Optimates.

79-50 BC: Gnaeus Carbo

Carbo's first challenge was to overcome his political rival Quintus Sertorius for control of the Populares faction, which he achieved through both extra-legal mob actions and redirecting the purges against the Optimates on former Populares. Sertorius escaped, first to Hispania and then onto Mauritania where he was killed by an assassin. More secure and with an unrivalled control of the Roman political system, Carbo focused on the Third Mithradatic War which finally saw Rome defeat their Pontic enemies and claim Armenia as a satellite Kingdom.

Martius to Skipia 50 BC: Triumvirate - Marcus Antonius, Gaius Carrinas, Gaius Marius Minor

The younger Marius began as the dominant figure in the Triumvirate but his reputation for brutality lead the other triumvirs to side with Scipio Asiaticus in bringing him down.

50-39 BC: Scipio Asiaticus

Scipio is remembered primarily for his reforms to the Roman system which avoided the violence of the prior Marian Consuls. Most notably, he implemented the Scipian Calendar, dividing the year into the twelve months we know today. He also created the buffer zone provinces of Gallia Ulterior and Moesia. Thrace was also fully incorporated as a Roman province.

39-21 BC: Julius Caesar

A successful general under Scipio, Julius was considered past his prime by the time he took on the Consulate. Aging, fat and unhealthy, Caesar came to personify an era of political and social stagnation. While he bought about some reforms largely to expand citizenship and political representation of the lower orders, his main goal was to consolidate the work of Marius and return the Marian revolution to its roots.

The grain dole, slave supplies from the Gallic campaigns and increasing army salaries lead to an increasingly urbanised population that was reliant on government handouts. While Caesar attempted to re-energise rural towns by encouraging work for the government, and expanding the grain dole, he could not overcome the economic factors that were bringing the Marian period to an end.

21-19 BC: Marcus Lepidus

As a general of Caesar, Lepidus was responsible for putting down the Pontic revolt. As consul however he dedicated most of his time to attempting to stamp out truancy in the army and corruption in the grain dole, however his reign was brief

19-17 BC: Aulus Hirtius

Aulus' was a representative of the gerontocracy that had established itself within the Consilium of the Populares. Due to his rapidly failing health, Aulus served as Consul for just 13 months between Romula 19 BCE and Martius 17 BCE.

17-12 BC: Quintus Aelius Tubero

Significantly younger than previous Consuls Tubero began a process of reforms to the Marian system, which allowed formerly proscribed families to return to positions of power within the Republic. Tubero's attempts to seek better relations with other kingdoms and to create peace at home would lead to disaster both home and abroad. A wave of revolts hit the republic, culminating in an alliance between Egypt and the Parthian Empire pushing Rome out of Asia Minor. Tubero was placed under house arrest and was replaced as leader.

The Principate

12-4 BC: Marcus Crassus

Crassus refused undergo the niceities of ratification by the Comitia Curiata, or the Consilium of the Populares. He instead focused on the Senate and on restoring the power of what had once been the Patrician class. A military leader and political leader but not necessarily a Consul, Crassus established himself as Princeps - a title which was not yet seen as the same as Emperor. Without grain from Egypt the grain dole was cancelled and Rome was impoverished throughout his reign. Crassus turned to the bottle and to lavish parties and games, and is mostly remembered for leading Rome through a period of intense corruption and decline, and leading very much by example.

4 BC - ???: Sempronius Gracchus

Sempronius was a great general in the dismal era of Crassus, and took power from Crassus by threats of a coup. Sempronius served twice as Consul, but was willing to hand the position over to a political inferior when it was convenient for him. This confirmed the subjugation of the title of consul to that of Princeps. He expanded Gallia Ulteria and established a new province of Celtica. He also re-secured the Greek coast and while he never retook Asia Minor he did retake the strategically valuable province of Crete. Domestically, Sempronius used the newly found wealth of Rome to re-establish the grain dole and began a process of settling soldiers on the frontier, allowing him to them launch punitive campaigns to protect the interests of Roman citizens. However, the old problems of soldier pay and excess labour reared their heads again and ensured that the Principate would, inevitably, fail.

Following Sempronius the alliance of interests that had held Rome together unravelled. Rome would lose control of Greece and with it any claim to cultural dominance in the East, however, the Empire in the West would expand into Britannia and Hibernia and would remain the dominant power into the fourth century AC when it was overcome by the Marcomannic Empire. However due to the cultural exchanges between settlers and Marcomannians Latin continued to be used in a limited form in the Marcomannic legal system into the 9th century and while it was mostly supplanted by Greek during the Messianisation of the West it remained a liturgical language within the Western Church in some isolated areas of Eastern Europe into the thirteenth century and is still the basis for the Western calendar.

For the most part, the Empire has been forgotten but the Republic has cast a long shadow. The influence of Rome can be seen on the Britannic-Hibernian Kingdom's King's Consilium and direct democratic Assembly, and through it, all the ideas of democracy that define modern Europe and Newfoundland.

(can you see the gimmick here?)
I feel an urge to do the reverse of this. I would if I had more knowledge
 

Oppo

Erik Ƭ̵̬̊
Pronouns
he/him
When Richard Nixon killed himself in front of a hundred million television viewers, the country was left shocked. Woodward and Bernstein were even more controversial figures, blamed for driving a family man to suicide. Televangelists and religious figures spoke of the end of American morals after such graphic footage was televised. Hunter S. Thompson and George Carlin, struck dark comedy gold, while a young Nixon associate named Roger Stone catapulted himself to stardom. Gerald Ford's presidency was also short-lived, ending in the Manson family's most high-profile murder. Rumsfeld, knowing that his all-volunteer army was ill-equipped for another conflict, presided over the fall of South Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos, and South Korea to communism.

Conservatives were vexed at Rumsfeld's inaction, leading to Richard Viguerie and others promoting Ronald Reagan's primary challenge and Meldrim Thompson's third-party campaign. To them, it was "easier to sell an Edsel or Typhoid Mary" than the Republican Party, and this was proved by Humphrey and McGovern's landslide victory. On his fifth attempt at the White House, the Happy Warrior had only a year to pass full employment before his death. McGovern was far more abrasive to his Senate colleagues than Humphrey and his attempts at passing universal basic income or a national health service were dead on arrival. The international coalition of the US, UK, Vietnam, and the Soviet Union to remove Pol Pot from power in Cambodia hurt relations with Dengist China and American war veterans. A continuing insurgency from the Khmer Rouge did not improve matters, leaving the U.S. powerless when Iran and Saudi Arabia fell to Islamic revolutionaries. McGovern lost the 1980 nomination to Senator Moynihan and ran as a third-party candidate.

Paul Weyrich, who won the special election to Gaylord Nelson's Senate seat, was the candidate blessed by the Viguerie machine. After the death of Ronald Reagan in 1978, Weyrich was opposed by George Bush and former president Rumsfeld, who largely fought between themselves. Promising to appoint former White House chief of staff James M. Cannon as Vice President won over Nelson Rockefeller's personal fortune. For the 1980 election, the GOP rebranded itself to the Conservative Party. Weyrich's presidency saw the end of U.S. involvement in Cambodia, a ramping up of military spending, and a series of ultra-conservative decisions by the Bork Court. Blaming the media for Nixon's death and a decline in morals, Weyrich launched a crusade against cultural Marxism. The administration also inaugurated the country's high-speed rail network and reintroduced trollies to American cities.

Near the end of Weyrich's term, the Rhodesiagate scandal broke, where the administration funneled money into the recruitment of mercenaries for the Rhodesian Security Forces. The scandal led to the election of William Sloane Coffin, a former member of the Skull and Bones society turned CIA operative turned radical anti-war figure. Coffin's staunch advocacy for peace and international disarmament in light of increased military tensions allowed him to win the nomination over more moderate figures. Coffin's inaugural address proclaimed that the Cold War was over. While seen as a "surrender speech" by many within the Conservative Party, the public is struggling to justify why the fight is necessary.

1969 - 1973: Richard Nixon / Spiro Agnew (Republican)
1968 def. Hubert Humphrey / Edmund Muskie (Democratic), George Wallace / Curtis LeMay (AIP)
1972 def. George McGovern / Sargent Shriver (Democratic)

1973 - 1974: Richard Nixon / Gerald Ford (Republican)
1974 - 1975: Gerald Ford / Donald Rumsfeld (Republican)
1975 - 1977: Donald Rumsfeld / John Tower (Republican)
1977 - 1978: Hubert Humphrey / George McGovern (Democratic)
1976 def. Donald Rumsfeld / John Tower (Republican), Meldrim Thompson / Richard Viguerie (AIP)
1978 - 1981: George McGovern / Gaylord Nelson (Democratic)
1981 - 1989: Paul Weyrich / James M. Cannon (Conservative)
1980 def. Daniel Patrick Moynihan / Adlai Stevenson III (Democratic), George McGovern / Gaylord Nelson (Citizens), John B. Anderson / Edward Broke (Independent)
1984 def. Bess Myerson / Tom Foley (Democratic)

1989 - 0000: William Sloane Coffin / Elizabeth Holtzman (Democratic)
1988 def. Barry Goldwater Jr. / Alexander Haig (Conservative)

After the 1974 election, pro-European moderates from both majority parties united together to form a new National Government. The arrangement continued for three years until the American press got their hands on allegations made against several top figures in the coalition. The dossier revealed several rumors surrounding a relationship between Roy Jenkins and Tony Crosland, Jeremy Thorpe murdering his former lover, and Louis Mountbatten's pedophilia. The government quickly fell apart, with the scandals having the same impact on public trust in government as did the Watergate scandal in America. With the moderate wings of both parties discredited, the Bevanite and monetarist wings took over as Tony Benn and Enoch Powell's influence crept in the background. The Liberals rebranded, while anti-Jenkins yet anti-Castle social democrats formed their own grouping.

1970 - 1974: Edward Heath (Conservative)
1970 (Majority) def. Harold Wilson (Labour), Jeremy Thorpe (Liberal)
1974 (Coalition) def. Harold Wilson (Labour), Jeremy Thorpe (Liberal), William Wolfe (SNP)

1974 - 1976: Edward Heath ('National' Conservative leading National Government with Democrats & Liberals)
1976 - 1977: Louis Mountbatten (Peer leading National Government with 'National' Conservatives, Democrats & Liberals)
1977 - 1984: Barbara Castle (Labour)
1977 (Majority) def. Airey Neave (Conservative), William Wolfe (SNP), George Brown (Independent Group), Jo Grimond (Liberal), Dick Taverne (Democratic), Gordon McLennan (CPGB)
1981 (Majority) def. Julian Amery (Conservative), William Wolfe (SNP), George Brown (Independent Group), David Penhaligon (Radical), Gordon McLennan (CPGB)

1984 - 1989: Peter Shore (Labour)
1985 (Majority) def. Julian Amery (Conservative), William Wolfe (SNP), Bob Mellish (Independent Group), Jimmy Reid (CPGB), David Penhaligon (Radical)
1989 - 1989: Tony Banks (Labour majority)
1989 - 0000: Ian Gow (Conservative)
1989 (Majority) def. Tony Banks (Labour), William Wolfe (SNP), Bob Mellish (Independent Group), Michael Meadowcroft (Radical), Jimmy Reid (CPGB)

1974 - 1981: Valéry Giscard d'Estaing (Independent Republicans)
1974 def. François Mitterand (Socialist), Jacques Chaban-Delmas (Union of Democrats for the Republic)
1981 - 1988: Georges Marchais (Communist)
1981 def. Valéry Giscard d'Estaing (Union for French Democracy), Jacques Chirac (Rally for the Republic), Pierre Mauroy (Socialist), Coluche (United Wave Movement)
1988 - 0000: Charles Pasqua (Rally for the Republic)
1988 def. Georges Marchais (Communist), Michel Rocard (Socialist), Raymond Barre (Union for French Democracy), Jean-Marie Le Pen (National Front)

1964 - 1975: Leonid Brezhnev (Communist)
1975 - 1982: Alexei Kosygin (Communist)
1982 - 0000: Yegor Ligachyov (Communist)
 
Last edited:

Ares96

a Frenchman really named "Jean-Jacques Le Racisme"
Published by SLP
Location
Fubbicktown
Pronouns
he/him
1974 - 1981: Valéry Giscard d'Estaing (Independent Republicans)
1974 def. François Mitterand (Socialist), Jacques Chaban-Delmas (Union of Democrats for the Republic)
1981 - 1988: Georges Marchias (Communist)
1981 def. Valéry Giscard d'Estaing (Union for French Democracy), Jacques Chirac (Rally for the Republic), Pierre Mauroy (Socialist), Coluche (United Wave Movement)
1988 - 0000: Charles Pasqua (Rally for the Republic)
1988 def. Georges Marchias (Communist), Michel Rocard (Socialist), Raymond Barre (Union for French Democracy), Jean-Marie Le Pen (National Front)
a) You misspelled "Marchais" throughout.
b) What the hell is happening here?
 

Uhura's Mazda

Forum Poster 'General Fructuoso Rivera'
Published by SLP
Location
Tamaki Makaurau
New Zealand Legislative Council elections
1919: Liberal [16], Reform [15], Progressive [6],
Labour [2]

The Massey Government of 1912-19, which had never had a solid majority, came to an end with the exit of Joseph Ward's Liberals from the wartime coalition. At around the same time, the Reform Party itself split, with frustrated office-seekers creating the Progressive Party to fight for statist aid to farmers (such as the creation of a state-owned shipping line). The Progressives were led by ANZAC General Russell and did rather better in the upper house, which was elected by STV for the first time, than in the lower. Their central position in the political system made them transfer-friendly, while Labour did worse than in the lower house due to the expense of campaigning in such large districts. Ward could have governed with either minor party in the House, but could only do so with the Progressives in the Council, leading to the formation of the Liberal-Progressive coalition which returned the Liberals to their traditional predominance.

Until the 1980s, there were three additional seats reserved for Maori, which were filled by nominees of the Government. The Liberals took two and the Progressives one.

1925: Liberal [21], Reform [11], Progressive [5], Labour [3]

Joseph Ward was at the height of his powers in 1925, having weathered the storm of the post-war depression and benefiting from the positivity of the public mood in winning a majority of both houses of Parliament. However, he remained in coalition with the Progressives, who were now little but a transfer-funnelling service for the Liberals, who had copied all their policies. Notably, however, Ward had failed to follow through on introducing PR for the lower house, as he feared that this would give further momentum to Labour (who had in fact been outmanoeuvred by the Liberals in policy terms and had to make do with paranoiac radical speechmaking. Bill Veitch managed to wean the Federation of Labour away from outright support for Labour, which hamstrung the Party in the long term.

It was in this term that Joseph Ward had to contend with the Massey-Fergusson Affair.

1931: Reform [16], Liberal [10], Labour [8], Progressive [6]

With Ward dead of old age and replaced in the fight against the mounting Depression by the laissez-faire Bill Veitch, it was hardly surprising that Reform's William Downie Stewart would take the victory in 1931. He began with an orthodox policy, strongly opposing devaluation, but was convinced by Labour (whose votes he depended on) and by the facts on the ground to take an interventionist line, which got him castigated as "socialistic" by Liberals and his own allies alike. The Liberals arrogantly refused to form a National Government with Reform, whom they considered to be a temporary aberration in the natural order of things. Downie Stewart was swept out of office by the merged Liberals and Progressives in 1934, but the Council remained as it had been elected in 1931, with the Progressive Liberals relying on Labour votes to overcome the 19 Reform Councillors (including the three Maori) and therefore going for a policy that was equally Socialistic.

1937: Progressive Liberal [24], Reform [10], Labour [5], Real Democracy Movement [1]

The new Progressive Liberal Prime Minister, Harry Atmore, is fondly regarded by New Zealanders, and many houses still have a photograph of him on the walls. He gained control of the Council in 1937, but continued to put in place his social safety net without needing to be badgered by the irrelevant Labour Party.

1943: National Government [31], Labour [8], Communist [1]

The 1940 lower house election was delayed due to the War, which meant that the upper house only lasted one term of the lower, instead of two. By this stage, the Prog Libs had invited the Reformers into coalition, adding people like Gordon Coates, Sidney Holland and Keith Holyoake to the ministry. Frustration with the privations of the Home Front were running high, hence the high vote for the Left.

1949: Progressive Liberal [19], Reform [13], Labour [8]

Harry Atmore having died in 1946, it was up to his successor, Walter Broadfoot, to maintain his cautiously progressive social policy (now wrapped up in the international post-war consensus) and to gain control of the Council. He failed to do this by electoral means, but the three Maori seats in the gift of the Government came in very handy. Broadfoot was conservative by inclination, building little on Atmore's legacy except the expansion of medical insurance. Instead, he tried as much as possible to retrench spending - except on projects that might defeat international Communism, such as the sending of troops to Korea.

1955: Progressive Liberal [18], Reform [15], Labour [7]

Broadfoot's Government began to tire, but still had enough vim in 1955 to win a majority in the lower house - although even the Maori nominees couldn't save him in the Council, and he had to rely on Reform's good nature to respect his mandate. This they did, to their credit, but their election of a new, charismatic leader in John A. Lee was the death knell for Broadfoot. Lee had originally been a Labour member and lost an arm in the First World War, but was courted by the Reformers from the early 20s, and eventually joined them when Labour, scenting an illusory electoral appeal during World War Two, pushed him out. Lee sympathised with Reform's support of rural interests (he had been a swagger in an earlier life) and for banking and monetary reform, as well as their opposition to what he saw as the unwelcome influence of the Catholic Hierarchy. Lee, who became PM in a landslide in 1958, is best remembered for his social welfare spending and his promotion of an independent foreign policy (in which he was ahead of his time), but was hampered in every initiative by his invidious position in the Council, elected in 1955. He also struggled to manage the disparate factions of the Party, and had an unstable personality. However, in providing the Reformers with only their second majority government, he reinvigorated New Zealand democracy.

1961: Progressive Liberal [16], Reform [16], Labour [8]

In 1961, Ralph Hanan took the Prog Libs back into Government House with a minority in both houses, and proceeded to work with Labour to pass progressive social policies, as well as reforms such as the abolition of the death penalty. To this day, both parties bitterly dispute who exactly was responsible for each of his reforms.

1967: Progressive Liberal [19], Reform [11], Labour [10]

After two terms of minority government, Hanan finally won a majority in the House in 1967, and gained an upper house majority with the use of the Maori seats. For those hoping that this would provide an answer as to how progressive Hanan could be on his own, it was a disappointment, though, as he was below par over the next 18 months and died in 1969. He was replaced by Norman Kirk, a much stronger personality who was perhaps New Zealand's most divisive politician.

1973: Progressive Liberal [16], Reform [15], Labour [9]

Kirk's long period in office was a triumph for the Left, although again he depended on Labour support to a greater extent than is perhaps remembered. He increased social spending, regulated the capitalists, and returned to Lee's independent foreign policy - he pulled NZ troops out of Vietnam and went as far as to send frigates to protest French nuclear testing in the Pacific. He was also an opponent of Apartheid South Africa, causing ructions on rugby tours. However, most of his more far-sighted legislation around abortion and homosexuality came from underlings such as Gordon Dryden (the best PM we never had) against Big Norm's judgement. Meanwhile, his tenure was dominated by oil shocks, unemployment and rampant inflation, hardly helped by the quasi-autarkic policies of Finance Minister Muldoon. The scandals involved with the long reign of the Libs were also an occupational hazard by this point.

1979: Reform [18], Progressive Liberal [17], Labour [5]

The 1979 election was won by Reform, who swept Kirk out of office with a promise of fiscal continence and Not Being Corrupt by the telegenic young Reformer Bruce Beetham. Despite coming to power with a promise to implement monetary reform, Reform could not muster a majority in either House and instead presented the Black Budget, which involved increasing taxes on things like alcohol and petrol. Sensing an opportunity, Kirk volubly opposed it. Beetham fell, and Kirk returned to power in the snap election of 1980. However, he had to deal with the strong Reform contingent elected (and appointed) the previous year, and only just managed to pass the New Zealand Bill of Rights with Labour support.

Reform came back to power under Irish Catholic Jim Bolger, who not only pushed for free-market reforms and deregulation, but also sought to reform the NZ constitutional situation. He achieved final legislative independence from the UK and made the Maori seats in the upper house elective, even though Maori traditionally voted Liberal.

1986: Reform [23], Progressive Liberal [11], Labour [9]

Bolger's second term saw him defeat all comers, achieving a free trade agreement with Australia and introducing a GST to defray the costs of his other tax cuts. However, he had to deal with backbench dissention, most notably that of Hobson MP Winston Peters, a populist who opposed the free-market turn of the party of Downie Stewart and Lee, and made hay by publicising the corruption that was endemic in NZ business and politics as a result of the Liberals' decades of graft. However, Bolger was a typical Irish politician and some of the mud inevitably stuck on him in 1992, when he was forced to resign in favour of Marilyn Waring, and Peters was forced out of Reform.

1992: Progressive Liberal [24], Country [7], Labour [5], Reform [4], Young Maori [3]

Waring, an outspoken feminist and liberal, had never been a solid fit in the Reform Party, but they were happy to be led by anyone with a modicum of popular appeal after a gruelling period in office. She was loyally supported by the Social Credit faction, but few others were invested in her success. The Party collapsed in the 1992 despite Waring's best efforts, eviscerated by Winston Peters' new Country Party, which appealed to rural and elderly constituencies with particular popularity in the Auckland region. There was also the Young Maori Party, a Maori rights party led by former Reform Minister Parekura Horomia. This took all the Maori seats on offer in either House, so ready were Maori to embrace the radicals.

1998: Progressive Liberal [23], Country [7], Labour [6], Reform [5], Young Maori [2]

During the period when the Right was split between Country and Reform, the Progressive Liberals returned to power under the odd-looking working class battler Mike Moore, who went further than Bolger towards the new free-market consensus. His Finance Minister, Roger Douglas, filed balanced budgets and surpluses at the expense of the disadvantaged, while Moore hauled in the public support - which, of course, had nowhere else to go. Two successive majorities on the Council delivered near-unchecked support for Moore, and he was able to renegotiate New Zealand's independent foreign policy as far as intervening in Afghanistan, although he opposed the Iraq War. Towards the end of his term, though, the Country and Reform parties merged, and the Prog Libs were hit by a major corruption scandal, involving the redirection of Maori Affairs subsidies to the Party coffers. An embattled Moore retired, to be replaced by Roger Douglas.

2004: Progressive Liberal [19], Conservative [14], Labour [8], Young Maori [2]

Douglas was, if anything, even more extreme in support of the free market than Moore (who had vetoed his flat tax proposal). His popularity as Finance Minister fell through the floor when the electorate realised what kind of guy he actually was, and he was ejected from office in 2007, having relied on Young Maori and Conservative sympathy votes in the Council for most of his premiership. Douglas' main contribution was to reorganise the Progressive Liberal Party into essentially being a pyramid scheme, but for raffle tickets.

The new Prime Minister, Bill English, was regarded as scarily right-wing, but was in fact fairly moderate. Despite his political and religious views, he didn't backtrack on social issues, and even engaged in a bit of stimulus spending. He was, however, hamstrung by his Legislative Council for his first three years, making a mockery of his characterisation of his ministry as 'The New New Zealand Government'.

2010: Conservative [21], Progressive Liberal [10], Labour [9], Young Maori [2], Green [1]

English didn't quite get his upper house majority in 2010 due to having about as much personality as a potato, and had to govern with the support of the Young Maori Party, which had quickly become a mere means of distributing patronage - ironically, much like the original Young Maori Party for which it was named. The Conservatives continued in Government until 2016, when the electorate grew tired of their knee-jerk conservatism on subjects such as house-building, welfare, mandatory minimums and anti-terror legislation. The Labour Party surged in 2013 and started appearing at the top of the polls for the first time.

2016: Progressive Liberal [23], Conservative [12], Labour [5], Green [2], Young Maori [1]

But amid a short-campaign wave of support for untried Prog Lib leader Jo Luxton, a relative of Norman Kirk, the traditional party of Government came back once more. But the hopeful masses who voted for her have been disappointed by her lack of action on electoral reform and climate change, while the Liberal scandal-factory keeps on churning out ever more fodder for our thriving newspapers.

As a side note, some wags online are in the habit of noting that NZ's political history is very similar to that of another British settler colony: Australia.

Prime Ministers of New Zealand
1919-1926: Sir Joseph Ward (Liberal-Progressive coalition)
1926: Jack Massey (Reform)
1926-1930:
Sir Joseph Ward (Liberal-Progressive coalition)
1930-1931: Bill Veitch (Liberal-Progressive coalition)
1931-1934: William Downie Stewart (Reform)
1934-1946: Harry Atmore (Progressive Liberal)
1946-1958: Sir Walter Broadfoot (Progressive Liberal)
1958-1961: John A. Lee (Reform)
1961-1969: Sir Ralph Hanan (Progressive Liberal)
1969-1979: Norman Kirk (Progressive Liberal)
1979-1980: Bruce Beetham (Reform)
1980-1983: Norman Kirk (Progressive Liberal)
1983-1992: Jim Bolger (Reform)
1992: Marilyn Waring (Reform)
1992-2003: Mike Moore (Progressive Liberal)
2003-2007: Sir Roger Douglas (Progressive Liberal)
2007-2016: Sir Bill English (Conservative)
2016-:
Jo Luxton (Progressive Liberal)
 

Uhura's Mazda

Forum Poster 'General Fructuoso Rivera'
Published by SLP
Location
Tamaki Makaurau
Oh I like this. I wouldn't even begin to know where to start, so I'll restrict myself to this gem:
I was only going to do it as a vaguely 'rhyming' analogue until I thought of that joke, and then it was like "No, this has to be as close as possible except with less Social Credit".
 

Mumby

Always mysterious!
Published by SLP
Location
Municipal Commune of Bourne
Pronouns
He/Him
a rework of an idea i last worked on back in february 2017, which at the time i referred to as @Sideways -punk.

its pretty different now, and goes a bit further into the future, but the spirit is much the same, i feel

Cottingley v2

Prime Ministers of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland

1916-1923: David Lloyd George (National Liberal)
1918 (National Government with Conservatives and NDLP) def. Eamon de Valera (Sinn Fein), William Adamson (Labour), H.H. Asquith (Liberal). John Dillon (Irish Parliamentary)
1923-1924: David Lloyd George (United Reform)
1923 (Majority) def. J.R. Clynes (Labour), Stanley Baldwin (Independent Conservative), Eamon de Valera (Sinn Fein), H.H. Asquith (Liberal)

Prime Ministers of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

1924-1926: Austen Chamberlain (United Reform majority)
1926-1932: Winston Churchill (United Reform)
1927 (Coalition with Patriotic Covenant) def. Arthur Cook (Labour), Henry Page Croft (Patriotic Covenant), Reginald McKenna (Liberal), John Hargrave (Kibbo Kift)
1932-1933: George Lansbury (Labour)
1932 (Minority with Kibbo Kift confidence and supply) def. Winston Churchill (United Reform), John Hargrave (Kibbo Kift), Henry Page Croft (Patriotic Covenant), John Simon (Liberal)
1933-1935: Winston Churchill (United Reform leading Constitutional Government with Patriotic Covenant, Social Democrats and Liberals)
1935-1936: David Lloyd George (United Reform leading King's Government with Labour, Loyal Patriots and Loyal Liberals)
1936-1938: Nye Bevan (Labour)
1937 (First Preparedness Coupon with United Reform, Patriotic Covenant, Liberals and SDP) def. David Lloyd George (Loyalist Movement)
1938-1939: Nye Bevan (Labour leading War Government with United Reform, Patriotic Covenant, Liberals and Social Democrats)
1939-1939: E.F.L. Wood (United Reform leading Armistice Government with Loyalist Movement, Patriotic Covenant, Independent Labour, Liberals and Social Democrats)

Prime Ministers of the Kingdom of Great Britain

1939-1944: David Lloyd George (Loyalist Movement)
1939 (Majority) def. E.F.L. Wood (Second Preparedness Coupon - United Reform, Patriotic Covenant, Liberals, SDP), Nye Bevan (War In '39 - Labour, War, CPGB)
1940 (Sole Legal Party) def. unopposed


Governors of the Allied Military Government of the Occupied Territory of Great Britain

1944-1945: Winston Churchill & Stafford Cripps (United Reform / Labour, appointed by US Army and Red Army respectively)

Prime Ministers of the Commonwealth of Great Britain

1945-1952: Tom Wintringham (Labour)
1945 (Resistance Coalition with United Reform and CPGB) def. Douglas Bader (Patriotic Covenant), Archibald Sinclair (Democratic Action)
1950 (Coalition with CPGB) def. Anthony Eden (United Reform), Harry Pollitt (Communist), Douglas Bader (Patriotic Covenant), Archibald Sinclair (Democratic Action)

1952-1955: Herbert Morrison (Labour minority)
1955-19XX: Gerald Gardner (United Reform)
1955 (Minority) def. Herbert Morrison (Labour), Harry Pollitt (Communist), Alfred Roberts (Patriotic Covenant), William Douglas-Home (Democratic Action)
 

Mumby

Always mysterious!
Published by SLP
Location
Municipal Commune of Bourne
Pronouns
He/Him
and some heads of state to go with that

Kings of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland

1910-1917: George V (Saxe-Coburg and Gotha)
1917-1924: George V (Windsor)

Kings of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

1924-1935: George V (Windsor)
1935-1939: Edward VIII (Windsor)

Kings of the Kingdom of Great Britain

1939-1944: Edward VIII (Saxe-Coburg and Gotha)

Governors of the Allied Military Government of the Occupied Territory of Great Britain

1944-1945: Winston Churchill & Stafford Cripps (United Reform / Labour, appointed by US Army and Red Army respectively)

Lord Protectors of the Commonwealth of Great Britain

1945-1952: Albert York (Independent)
1945 def. unopposed
1950 def. unopposed

1952-19XX: Belphoebe Glorian (Independent)
1952 def. Elizabeth York (Independent), Harry Pollitt (Communist), George Gloucester (Independent)
 
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