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Lists of Heads of Government and Heads of State

A list detailing the Prime Ministers of the UK from my latest TL which you can find the First Drafts section of the site. Details are there, which is why I've neglected to include footnotes.

Feel free to give it a read and say what you thought of it (praise or criticism is equally appreciated), although if you want to avoid spoilers, then I suggest you head over there before checking this list out. It was a longer read than I thought it'd be, but I'm proud regardless.

A Bold British Bull-Moose

1886-1892: Robert Gascoyne-Cecil, 3rd Marquess of Salisbury (Unionist)
1892-1895: John Wodehouse, 1st Earl of Kimberley (Liberal)
1895-1901: Robert Gascoyne-Cecil, 3rd Marquess of Salisbury (Unionist)

1901-1910: Theodore Roosevelt (Unionist)
1910-1912: Austen Chamberlain (Unionist)

1912-1919: Henry Herbert Asquith (Liberal)
1919-1922: Andrew Bonar Law (Conservative)

1922-1926: F.E. Smith (Conservative)
1926-1930: Alfred Mond (Conservative)

1930-1932: Douglas Hogg (Conservative)
1932-????: Neil Primrose (Progressive)
 
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Stuyvesant

Just wait until I actually get my shit together
Based off of my recent game as Gran Colombia in the Divergences Victoria 2 Mod.

In the midst of the Spanish Crown becoming embroiled in the Europe-wide German Wars with Bohemia[1], its American colonies began a nearly 24-year War for Independence. The first phase saw the war mostly confined to Mexico, and ended in 1818 with the formation of the Colombian Alliance. Vicente Guerrero pushed the Spanish out of Lusitania[2] before being killed in 1822 at the Battle of San Salvador, which was followed by a three-year armistice between the combatants. This was reignited with Simon Bolivar's declaration of the Republic of Free Granada, that incorporated the Governorates of Arequipa and Quito. Starting the third phase, which provided the Alliance with an opening to restart its advance into Salvador[3]. Thus the Spanish were reduced to their holdings in Nueva Castilla and Essequibo[4] The desperate governor of Nueva Granada called upon the support of the Inca to their south, promised southern Peru. The Colombians mustered troops to stop the Incan Incursion, and faced them at Lima, where Bolivar was killed by a charge from Hyuna Capac IV's Guard. Bolivar's successor, Santander was eventually able to defeat the Incans, but only at the sacrifice of his own life.

The resulting power vacuum saw Francisco de Miranda centralize the Alliance under his Tetrarchy of one representative from each member republic. The Tetrarchy removed Spanish control of the remainder of Ameriga[5], and gathered a fleet to seize Cuba in 1835, which was destroyed in the Battle of Havana along with half of the Army. This was followed up with an invasion of the Yucatan, Lusitania, and Grenada, a last-ditch attempt by the Crown to reestablish control. Miranda in response abolished the Tetrarchy, and replaced it with a Federal Republic centered in Mexico City. The newly-centralized Army was able to evict the Spanish from the America in 1839, and President Miranda gathered a Congress in Andagoya[6] to decide the future of the Federal Republic...

It was an abject disaster, with brawls, a failed coup, a forced provision to abolish slavery, and the dominance of the Independentists in the debates saw all parties storm out and the dissolution of Gran Colombia. Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna declared an independent Republic of Mexico with himself as dictator, and began a 20-year campaign of conquest of Lusitania to his north and the disparate republics of Salvador to his south. In 1855, he declared himself Emperor of Colombia (which now only incuded Andagoya north) with a liberal Constitution, and cemented Colombia under his dynasty.

[1] – The Holy Roman Emperor Bohemia attempted to centralize control of the HRE set off a chain of events that produces a conflict like the love child of the Reign of Terror and 1848.
[2] – OTL Northern Mexico/SW US
[3] – OTL Central America/Yucatan
[4] – Venezuela and Guiana, respectively
[5] – South America, North is called Arcadia
[6] – Panama City

Leader of the Executive Council of the Mexican Rebellion
1815-1819: Vicente Guerrero


Leaders of the Colombian Alliance
1819-1822: Vicente Guerrero (Mexico)
1822-1825: Collective Leadership
1825-1829: Simon Bolivar (Granada)
1829-1832: Francisco de Paula Santander (Granada)
1832-1835: Francisco de Miranda (Granada) / Manuel José Arce (Salvador) / Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna (Mexico) / Manuel Luis de Madeira (Lusitania)
1835-1839: Francisco de Miranda (Granada)


President of the Mexican Republic:
1839-1855: Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna (Centralista)


Emperors of the Colombian Empire:
1855-1876: Antonio I (de Santa Anna)
1876-1908: Manuel (de Santa Anna)
1908-XXXX: Antonio I (de Santa Anna)
 
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moth

Mothleton
Location
Portsmoth
The Electoral History of John Major (1968-1995)

1968-1971: Conservative, Councillor for Ferndale Ward of Lambeth Council
1968 serving alongside: J.E. Langley & G.R.I. Allnut (Conservative
1971-1974: Conservative, Councillor for Streatham Wells Ward of Lambeth Council
1971 serving alongside: Hugh Chambers & Robert Greenwood (Conservative)
1973-1986: Conservative, Member of the Greater London Council for Streatham
1973 def: H.H. Walker (Labour), A. Mitchell (Liberal), 2 others
1977 def: D.J. Dahl (Labour), A.J. Mould (Liberal), V.F. Lillington (National Front), 1 other
1981 def: Michael Drake (Labour), Christine Headley (Liberal), 3 others

1986-1994: Conservative, Councillor for Streatham Wells Ward of Lambeth Council
1986 serving alongside: Hugh Chambers & James Hutchings (Conservative)
1990 serving alongside: Hugh Chambers & Edward Castle (Conservative)

1987: Conservative, Candidate for Norwood (Westminster)
1987 defeated by: John Fraser (Labour)
1989: Conservative, Candidate for Vauxhall Constituency by-election
1989 defeated by: Martha Osamor (Labour)
1990: Conservative, Candidate for Norwood (Westminster)
1990 defeated by: John Fraser (Labour)
1994: Conservative, Candidate for Streatham Wells Ward of Lambeth Council
1994 defeated by: Julian Heather & Valarie Collins & Michael Young (Liberal Democrats)
1995: Conservative Candidate for Streatham Constituency of the London Assembly
1995 defeated by: Roger O'Brien (Liberal Democrats)
 

Skinny87

[INSERT POSTER HERE]
Patreon supporter
Published by SLP
The Electoral History of John Major (1968-1995)

1968-1971: Conservative, Councillor for Ferndale Ward of Lambeth Council
1968 serving alongside: J.E. Langley & G.R.I. Allnut (Conservative
1971-1974: Conservative, Councillor for Streatham Wells Ward of Lambeth Council
1971 serving alongside: Hugh Chambers & Robert Greenwood (Conservative)
1973-1986: Conservative, Member of the Greater London Council for Streatham
1973 def: H.H. Walker (Labour), A. Mitchell (Liberal), 2 others
1977 def: D.J. Dahl (Labour), A.J. Mould (Liberal), V.F. Lillington (National Front), 1 other
1981 def: Michael Drake (Labour), Christine Headley (Liberal), 3 others

1986-1994: Conservative, Councillor for Streatham Wells Ward of Lambeth Council
1986 serving alongside: Hugh Chambers & James Hutchings (Conservative)
1990 serving alongside: Hugh Chambers & Edward Castle (Conservative)

1987: Conservative, Candidate for Norwood (Westminster)
1987 defeated by: John Fraser (Labour)
1989: Conservative, Candidate for Vauxhall Constituency by-election
1989 defeated by: Martha Osamor (Labour)
1990: Conservative, Candidate for Norwood (Westminster)
1990 defeated by: John Fraser (Labour)
1994: Conservative, Candidate for Streatham Wells Ward of Lambeth Council
1994 defeated by: Julian Heather & Valarie Collins & Michael Young (Liberal Democrats)
1995: Conservative Candidate for Streatham Constituency of the London Assembly
1995 defeated by: Roger O'Brien (Liberal Democrats)
The darkest timeline
 

Japhy

This is the way
Published by SLP
The Flag, The Cross, The Hood: Klan Fascism in America

Presidents of the United States
1921-1925: Warren G. Harding / J. Calvin Coolidge, Jr. (Republican)

1920: James M. Cox / Franklin D. Roosevelt (Democratic), Eugene V. Debs / Seymour Steadman (Socialist)
1925-1933: William G. McAdoo / Samuel M. Ralston (Democratic)
1924: Hiram W. Johnson / Carmi A. Thompson (Republican), Robert M. LaFollette, Sr. / Jacob S. Coxey, Sr. ("Progressive" --- Populist, Non-Partisan, Independent), Daniel W. Hoan / Devere Allen (Socialist)
1928: Herbert C. Hoover / George W. Pepper (Republican)

1933-1937: Charles W. Bryan / Robert L. Bullard (Democratic)
1932: Joseph I. France / Robert R. McCormick (Republican)
1937-1941: Charles W. Bryan / Hiram W. Evans (Democratic)

1936: George W. Norris / Herman L. Ekern (Republican)
1941-1949: Edward L. Jackson / J. Lister Hill (Democratic)
1940: Amos R. E. Pinchot / William F. Lemke (Republican)
1944: Suspended

1949: J. Strom Thurmond / Frank Hague (Democratic) [Disputed]
1949-1950: Richard M. Nixon / Jacqueline Cochran (Servicemen’s Union)

1948: J. Strom Thurmond / Frank Hague (Democratic), Robert A. Taft / Federick G. Payne (Republican)

National Managers of the United States

1926-1928: John W. Davis (Non-Partisan Democratic Consensus)
1928-1939: David C. Stephenson (Non-Partisan Democratic Consensus)
1939-1941: Arthur H. Bell (Non-Partisan Bullardite-Longist Democratic)
1944-1948: David C. Stephenson (Non-Partisan Democratic Consensus)
1948-1949: Herman E. Talmadge (Non-Partisan Democratic Consensus)


Warren G. Harding's heart attack was treated by later historians as a turning point in his administration, a demarcation line that was not exactly true. Even before his brush with death the embattled President was turning away from the Ohio Gang that had put him in the White House and towards the Progressives and Reformers of the Republican Party to try and clean up the mess his friends had put him in. And while he was unable to secure the popular support he needed, he was able to limp forward to the point where his announcement to not seek a second term was treated with a begrudging degree of respect. Calvin Coolidge, his VP attempted to put together a Run, but found himself wedged between Charles Hughes and Frank Lowden on the more conservative wing of the Party while Hiram Johnson was able to secure the Progressives and then the nomination itself. Johnson was weakened though when Robert LaFollette denounced him and ran a populist "Progressive" ticket and the Socialists nominated one of the Sewer Faction, aiming to pick up less radical votes rather then follow LaFollette on his crusade or attempt to win back support from the Communists. In the end, in spite of the damage he initially took in the Teapot Dome scandal, it was William McAdoo, the Democratic nominee who was able to win. McAdoo was an odd sort, much like his father in law, able to command the support of Progressives, Populists, and a certain Men's Social Organization.

Under McAdoo racial violence and Progressive reform came hand in hand with each other. In 1924 the former Secretary of the Treasury was not yet a Klan member --- only joining the organization after he left the White House after eight years in office --- but under him it did become a Federally Chartered organization and began to be given special authority by the Attorney General as the National Security League had during the Wilson Administration. Child Labor Laws, Wall Street Oversight, Efforts to promote Homesteading in the West, Nationalization of the Railroads, came with pogroms against Racial, Ethnic and Religious minorities and more and more, the images of White Shirts --- the pointed hoods being replaced by more conventional uniforms and often, simply White Armbands with the Klan's crest --- marching, brawling and saluting were beamed across the nation on newsreels and on the radio. Socialist, Communist and other radical political parties were proscribed in 1926 the same year that the National Manager amendment passed: creating a "Non-Partisan" office, appointed by Congress to oversee much of the day-to-day administration of the US Government, taking a progressive program that had been popular in many cities and putting it on a level never before seen. President McAdoo was able to create a work balance he supported for his administration but in the years to follow the office would become the personal perveiw of one man who with his massive influence over the ever-triumphant Democratic party was able to become a dicatator in all but name.

For the decade and a half after the Democratic triumph of 1924 America slipped into what was effectively a single party state. Opportunists flocked to the Democratic banner and to join the Klan, Self-Defense Klaverns, later re-designated Klompanies, marched though the streets with Thompson Anti-Bandit guns and operated re-education camps, klamps. The Socialists were pushed underground, the Republicans were hobbled with many party members harassed by the government and party splits that argued how to respond to the tightening noose, in the end, no decision was made and the party was transformed into a weak patsy, the Klan Democrats claimed that they were defending American Democracy and thus let an opposition party survive, exerting enough influence that it was never able to actually be opposition. Many in WASP America didn't mind, the Democrats and the Klan offered far more opportunities, and fighting the system could easily see one arrested and possibly executed as a Communist sympathizer. And anyway, why worry about the nature of the Democracy when everything was clearly fine? For many American minorities mass slaughter was always just one false accusation of a wink away, and often came with even less rational. For many refuge could only be found in the big cities, and often not even there.

In 1932 Charlie Bryan took the White House brushing aside weaker and weaker Republican opposition with each of this two votes but Robert Bullard his first Vice President would rise to become one of the two great threats to the Democratic-Klan system that D.C. Stephenson, the National Manager for 11 straight years was able to create. Bullard tapped into military veterans organizations and seemed more focused on Anti-Communism then Anti-Catholic or Anti-Black politics. Huey P. Long, the other great rival of the system would take the economic slump and growing corruption of the 1930s to exert his own influence while Stephenson became quietly notorious for his corruption and for his 'moral' issues as he roamed Washington City or the Summer Capital of Denver at nights with his personal driver. Eventually, briefly at the end of the Bryan years Stephenson would go too far, though things were kept as an inner-party affair, removed from office Bullard and Long were able to secure the post of National Manager for the State Manager of New Jersey, a Bullard Ally. They did not have long to celebrate though.

Freed from his managerial position but not charged or publicly denounced, Stephenson was able to go full bore to work on securing the Democratic nomination for Edward Jackson, a close personal ally who had been running Indiana for years now. Jackson was one of many Pro-Klan Republicans who had long ago crossed over to join the winning party, and with great economic and 'Social' Credentials, as well as Stephenson's influence on the white shirts, Jackson was able to beat out the opposition. (William Pelley, Gerald L. K. Smith, and Henry Breckinridge) Stephenson then went to work, using Arthur Bell's support for the Third Reich as a blunt interments to suggest that the Grand Wizard was disloyal and sought to abolish American Democracy.

Jackson and Stephenson were odd figures for the coalition of nations that sought to save the world for Democracy in the Second World War, but the farce of American Democracy was enough for the likes of British Prime Minister Leo Amery. It wasn't enough for Joseph Stalin but then, after his death in the battle of Moscow in 1942 that didn't really matter anymore. Jackson, and his Secretary of State Richard Russell were able to secure Mussolini's neutrality a decisive turn in a war which had been going against the Triple-Union since the war began with Hitler's Invasion of The Netherlands. But it was still a long and costly war. In 1942 US Army and Klan Divisions attempted to land on the French Coast at Normandy with Five Divisions, nearly all of them were obliterated, the courtmarshals that followed would see George Patton and Walter Waters, the commanding Generals of the Army and KKK troops executed for Cowardice as well as nearly 100 other officers. In the Pacific things were worse, the US Navy would go though a half dozen Commanding Admirals in the Pacific as they tried to fight with a shoestring force: For all the power that the United States could bring to the war its One Ocean Navy was spread to thin, and tactical innovation had been sacrificed for years in the name of political loyalty. The marines who tumbled off of Guadalcanal into horrifying captivity could only look on for years as the Navy struggled to build the forces it needed to fight, and this after watching what seemed to be a generation of pilots killed as their late-stage biplanes proved no match to the Zeroes flown by "Racial Inferiors" who could never stand up to the White Man. Eventually though numbers caught up. The Russians after the collapse of the Soviet Government were able to keep on fighting thanks to the British forwarding quite a bit of the Bonded and Leased supplies they were getting from the US. The Chinese weren't so lucky but in both cases the massive swaths of country that the Axis took became black holes for men and material as well as charnel houses of mass slaughter. 1944 would see the US and it's allies land troops on the Calais coast. The summer of 1945 would see them discovering the horrors of the Gas Chambers, the Slaughter of the Battle of Berlin and the Suicide of Hitler. Jackson was interested in seeing if Goering could take over and secure a peace with the Western Allies but when that proved impractical US forces, with growing horror at what they were seeing pushed on and the War in Europe would send when Speer became the last man standing after a series of Assassinations and gave up at Konigsburg in October. The War in the Pacific would in turn drag on another year, with the US government giddy at the idea of mass civilian casualties and equally shocked at the Slaughter of GIs as trey landed on the Home Islands under a downpour of suicide rockets, banzai charges and more conventional styles of fighting to the death. But in January of 1947 it was all over as well. The Emperor would hang from the Cherry Blossom Trees and what was left of the Japanese people would be thin on the ground for years to come, but victory was at hand.

But trouble was brewing for the White Shirts. Millions of Americans had served under arms in WWII. Many in the segregated units that after the disastrous Normandy Landings had become unavoidable. They and the WASPs hadn't served side by side but they had come out knowing they'd chewed the same mud, and seen the same madness. Many were fine going home, joining the party and joining the Klan. But others weren't. They'd been told they were fighting for Democracy and damn it they wanted it.

The young guns in the regime took advantage too, seeing Stephenson removed again with one of their own in charge. They had one of their own nominated for President, but this time there would be a real opponent: A one armed navy vet with a small baby blue, star studded tab on his uniform. Dick Nixon had kept his Destroyer afloat off Honshu in 1946 after the Commander and XO and the rest of the Bridge crew had been killed by a suicide attack. Supported by other young men like George Bush and George McGovern, Al Gore and Lyn Johnson the Democratic defectors and Gerald Ford the ex Republican, as well as Catholic Jack Kennedy who'd served as a supply officer for a segregated construction Battalion and millions of other young veterans who had seen what the road the Klan was heading down ended at, he went to work. The Servicemen were so dynamic that even the GOP nominee would go on to endorse them in an act of revolt that would see him dragged off in the night by White Shirts even before election day.

In the end of course, the Klan and the Democrats simply declared themselves the winners and decided that in a few days they'd arrest these new opponents and everything would go back to normal. What they didn't expect was that after two decades and a campaign that had offered a real chance of hope, that the American People weren't interested in the same old rotten government and hate.

Within a day of the election, those White Shirts with their Thompsons were taking fire in the cities, the suburbs and even the rural regions where they'd previously drawn the most support, and the regime found that its foundations were as rotten as its leadership.
 

BClick

AHC: French Montana
It's not quite Fascism of course but I figure that an American homebrew of the ideology would always be different then the European model if only because at least the idea of Democracy is too essential to the Civic Nationalism of the US. So make Democracy a farce.
The Manager role is a great (terrible) idea that both encapsulates the nasty side of the Progressive Era and gives the reader an unpleasant sense of recognition - I immediately thought of the unelected Emergency Managers foisted upon bankrupt cities
 

Japhy

This is the way
Published by SLP
The Manager role is a great (terrible) idea that both encapsulates the nasty side of the Progressive Era and gives the reader an unpleasant sense of recognition - I immediately thought of the unelected Emergency Managers foisted upon bankrupt cities
I hadn't even thought of Emergency Managers but it's the other side of the more traditional city manager coin.


Edit: One day I should post my notes on what I think American Fascism might look like while also being original. But I'm also afraid to put that out in the world less it become a political tulpa.
 
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BClick

AHC: French Montana
I hadn't even thought of Emergency Managers but it's the other side of the more traditional city manager coin.

Edit: One day I should post my notes on what I think American Fascism might look like while also being original. But I'm also afraid to put that out in the world less it become a political tulpa.
I understand the worry, but I would love to see that and I think chances are slim that your outline will inspire anybody to bad ends - I don't think Reds!, for instance, has become an actual manifesto even for its legions of fans, and that one's explicitly demi-utopian.
 

Thande

I could not fail to disagree with you less
Published by SLP
It's not quite Fascism of course but I figure that an American homebrew of the ideology would always be different then the European model if only because at least the idea of Democracy is too essential to the Civic Nationalism of the US. So make Democracy a farce.
If you're going for a more 'American' take on this, I've always thought the "List of Presidents of the United States ... break ... List of Something Elses of the United States" model doesn't feel quite right (not a criticism of your list specifically, to be clear, which is very interesting). To be fair this is probably because I am too influenced by a view of modern America which is more constitutionally calcified, and in the Progressive era it would be much more within the Overton window (Nebraska, etc.).

With that caveat, though, I thought it would be interesting to see a take on the USA if it's been taken over by (say) Communists, but it's still called the United States with the same flag and President and Congress, and the only difference is that the directly elected offices are either 'effectively unopposed' like in the old South or else the electorate is restricted, and that the electoral college that elects the President consists of Politburo members formally nominated by the state legislatures. Something like that, where at first glance it looks the same, rather than splashing hammers and sickles everywhere - that feels more like something that could happen in OTL.
 

Oppo

Nationalize Five Guys
The Manager role is a great (terrible) idea that both encapsulates the nasty side of the Progressive Era and gives the reader an unpleasant sense of recognition - I immediately thought of the unelected Emergency Managers foisted upon bankrupt cities
It’s an interesting concept. Hunter S. Thompson spoke about his support for it in F&L 1972.

Yeah, I’d do almost anything after that, even run for President – although I wouldn’t really want to be President. As a matter of fact, early on in the ’72 campaign, I remember telling John Lindsay that the time had come to abolish the whole concept of the presidency as it exists now, and get a sort of city manager-type President…. We’ve come to the point where every four years this national fever rises up – this hunger for the Saviour, the White Knight, the Man on Horseback – and whoever wins becomes so immensely powerful, like Nixon is now, that when you vote for President today you’re talking about giving a man dictatorial power for four years. I think it might be better to have the President sort of like the King of England – or the Queen – and have the real business of the presidency conducted by … a city manager-type, a Prime Minister, somebody who’s directly answerable to Congress, rather than a person who moves all his friends into the White House and does whatever he wants for four years. The whole framework of the presidency is getting out of hand. It’s come to the point where you almost can’t run unless you can cause people to salivate and whip on each other with big sticks. You almost have to be a rock star to generate the kind of fever you need to survive in American politics.
 

Japhy

This is the way
Published by SLP
It’s an interesting concept. Hunter S. Thompson spoke about his support for it in F&L 1972.
I don't know if he's remembering something from a college class or nor but it is interesting that he's putting that out there, I'd actually forgot he had advocated for it but he certainly wasn't the first.

It was a solution in search of a problem, much like Woodrow Wilson's idea of a PM style figure like we see being enacted in Reds.
 

moth

Mothleton
Location
Portsmoth
idk

1966-1970: Gerry Fitt (Republican Labour, Belfast West)
Elected in the 1966 snap election, the prominent Nationalist and Civil Rights campaigner became the first member of a Fourth Party elected to the House of Commons since both his predecessor in Belfast West and former Party comrade, Jack Beattie of Irish Labour, in 1951. The lone Irish Nationalist in the Commons until the election of Bernadette Devlin in 1969, Fitt used his unique position to rally for the Civil Rights of the Catholic Community at a time when the rest of the country began to notice the strife in the province, even taking a policeman's baton to the skull in 1968 to draw the worlds attention to Unionist abuse. A socialist at his core, Fitt's main goal was to break with the traditionally conservative tendencies of the Nationalist movement, and to build a broad cross-community movement to tackle the Unionists and gain Catholics the same rights as their Protestant neighbours. While the former would prove to be ultimately out of reach, the latter would come to fruition following the 1970 General Election with the formation of the SDLP.

1970-1972: Bernadette Devlin/Frank McManus (Unity, Mid Ulster/Fermanagh & South Tyrone)
Although technically lacking a Leader, it was clear that the two-person outfit of the Unity Alliance would form the fourth largest party in the Commons following the Conservative & Unionist upset victory in the 1970 election. Despite a surge of support for the Tories rinsing into Labour's socialist strongholds, in Northern Ireland, Socialists such as Devlin and McManus were able to wrangle seats from the Unionist Party. Devlin, elected in 1969, was largely the face of the coalition of socialists, nationalists, and republicans, while her partner in Parliament, McManus, would form the Northern Resistance Movement in late 1971 following the introduction of internment in the Province. Both were, like Fitt, firm advocates for the Civil Rights movement, and sought to introduce a socialist voice to a debate dominated by small c-conservatives, but their time as the fourth largest party in the House was cut short by events in early 1972.

1972-1973: Roy Jenkins (Democrats, Birmingham Stechford)
The sudden formation of the Democrats in early 1972 was one of the bigger shockwaves in recent British politics. Formed by the former Home Secretary and Chancellor, Roy Jenkins, following the election of Jim Callaghan to the Leadership of the Labour Party, the outfit was initially consistent of 6 pro-European Labour MPs, although their ranks quickly swelled following the decision to enter an electoral pact with the Liberal Party. Although not a Coalition or Alliance- the Liberals would still contest in some seats against Democrats- the Lib-Dem Pact was largely viewed with excitement among the electorate, an excitement pumped by The Sun newspaper. Although the endorsement by the tawdry rag may not have been what Jenkins was particularly looking for in terms of endorsement, he grabbed the opportunity with both hands. However many in the Labour Movement eyed Jenkins with suspicion; others called him a traitor. In The Sun he was Jesus, while the Mirror he was Judas. The voters would decide, and in the Autumn election of 1973, Jenkins would lose his seat, despite the Democrats doing well in the country and winning in seats the Liberals had stepped aside in.

1973-1974: Dick Taverne (Democrats, City of Lincoln)
Following Jenkins defeat, Taverne took the reigns of the Democrats. With the Conservative Party holding its majority thanks to the split in Labour, opposition was a fragmented kaleidoscope, with a mess of Labour, the Liberals, the Democrats, the SNP, Plaid Cymru, anti-Common Market Tories, Protestant Unionists, Vanguard Unionists, SDLP, Sinn Féin, and Independents. The Lincoln MPs job was mainly to keep a hold of the party, now 12 strong, as Jenkins found his way back into the Commons. However, Taverne had other plans. A close friend of Jeremy Thorpe and a co-conspirator in other matters with the same man, both recognised that Jenkins' belief in the Democrats as an independent fourth force was, however noble, misguided. Under Taverne what began simply a Pact had to become something more, but with many activists and backers happy to keep the Democrats afloat, a general merger couldn't happen. With the Liberals 22 seats, the Lib-Dem Pact had 34 bodies (and counting) on the Green benches of Opposition. Together they could form the largest third force in Parliament since 1931. However these plans were put onto hold when Roy Jenkins returned to the Commons.

1974-1974: Roy Jenkins (Democrats, Newcastle-upon-Tyne Central)
Following the resignation of his former colleague Edward Short from Parliament, Jenkins launched a feverish campaign for Short's seat. He won, barely, and returned in the Spring to a Party that had grown used to living without him. 12 MPs were at his command, but most of them weren't happy with the return of the old management. Believing in the need to prove his legitimacy, Jenkins declared a Leadership contest- a mistake if anything. Immediately Taverne jumped onto this, and his pitch was clear: if he won, the Democrats would form a joint-whip with the Liberal Party and contest the next election as an alliance. Jenkins was not opposed to this, however Taverne had put him into a dire position, as he was forced to articulate support for the Democrats continued independence, an independence he had grown unsure of during his time searching for a seat. Ultimately, Jenkins was unable to make the case for his continued Leadership- his heart just wasn't in it. Taverne won, and in his first official act as leader, merged the whips office and sat alongside the Liberals.
 

Oppo

Nationalize Five Guys
The Greens Are Coming - A Country of Conspiracies & Fearmongering

2016-2019: Theresa May (Conservative & Unionist)
2017 (Minority with DUP support) def. Jeremy Corbyn (Labour), Nicola Sturgeon (SNP), Tim Farron (Liberal Democrats), Arlene Foster (DUP), Gerry Adams (Sinn Féin)

Brexit negotiations soldiered on, but the issue of the Irish border was one that could not be overcome. David Davis and Michael Barnier could not come to an agreement, leaving the UK quickly isolated. Those who worked in the North were unable to get to work the South, and vice versa. Ports were also unable to supply goods from EU countries. This, coupled with the fallout of President Trump’s protectionist agenda, resulted in the late 2010s recession. Quickly, Davis and Barnier scrambled, and were left with the realities of a hard border. The effects of the “No Deal” were not quite as dramatic as many Remainers speculated, but there were still significant ramifications.

2019-2019: Boris Johnson (Conservative & Unionist minority)

Theresa May announced her resignation as Prime Minister shortly after (as expected since the 2017 disaster). The subsequent leadership contest was less competitive than expected, with many not wishing to run, fearing that they would lose to Corbyn’s Labour. David Davis’ failed negotiations ruled him out, and a deal between Michael Gove and Ruth Davidson was never achieved. Johnson was a figure known by the general public, and that allowed him to defeat Health Minister Jeremy Hunt in the members’ vote. Johnson chose to call an election, believing that his charisma and popular appeal would pull off an upset win, but Corbyn also had those skills. Johnson ended up looking like a fool in the debates, with all of the opposition parties going after him (including a few mocking comparisons to the American President).

2019-2024: Jeremy Corbyn (Labour)
2019 (Coalition) def. Boris Johnson (Conservative & Unionist), Nicola Sturgeon (SNP), Sir Vincent Cable (Liberal Democrats), Mary Lou McDonald (Sinn Féin), Arlene Foster (DUP), Jonathan Bartley & Siân Berry (GPEW)
2021 (Majority) def. Sajid David (Conservative & Unionist), Sir Vincent Cable (Liberal Democrats), Nicola Sturgeon (SNP), Nigel Farage [de-facto] (Constitutional Unionist), Jonathan Bartley & Siân Berry (GPEW)


Corbyn secured a positive result, but yet not a majority. Preferring Vince Cable’s Liberal Democrats to the wounded SNP, he and Cable announced a 2-year coalition agreement. Issues between Corbyn’s cabinet ministers and their LibDems counterparts were tense, especially on economic issues - but there was some leeway. Ironically, one of the first things that was achieved were the abolition of college tuition fees. The budget was not as radical as many had expected, but Chancellor McDonnell was hard to push. Regardless of how Vince Cable felt, tax hikes were introduced to pay for Corbyn’s expanded social programs.

In the long run, Corbyn’s first term was largely unremarkable, except for one major event. With Sinn Féin holding the most Northern Irish seats in Parliament and Irish unity polls at a toss-up, Corbyn decided that the conditions of the GFA to hold a referendum. In a fierce battle for the future of Northern Ireland, the election was expected to go either way. While the hard border had awful ramifications for the economy, many were still uncomfortable with the idea of Irish rule. Many believe that the tipping factor was Naomi Long and the Alliance agreeing to campaign for Irish unity. Regardless, Northern Ireland agreed to join Ireland in a 53-47 vote.

Leo Varadkar, the Taoiseach of Ireland, agreed to call for a snap election directly before the handover to allow Northern Ireland a chance for representation. The Alliance and SDLP joined forces with Fianna Fáil, the UUP joined Fine Gael, and the DUP stayed the course. Sinn Féin, PBP, and the Greens joined their respective parties in the Republic. Varadkar was able to ride a patriotic wave and cement his campaign strategy to be the “Irish Trudeau.” Martin and Fianna Fáil was simply too out of touch with modern Ireland, and Sinn Féin still had image problems in the south. While Fine Gael had a lead in seats, Ireland had a proper tricornered Dáli. A fragmented coalition agreement was drafted between Fine Gael and Sinn Féin, as the two parties had been warming to each other in recent years. Taking over Fianna Fáil was former SDLP leader Colum Eastwood, which represented a switch away from the three-time loser Martin. Eastwood would go on to win a shock election in 2025 that took Fianna Fáil in power for the first time in fourteen years.

With the two-year Lib-Lab agreement ending, Corbyn called a snap election. With high personal popularity, Jezza was far ahead in the polls of Sajid David’s Tories, who had to deal with the Constitutional Unionist Party. The CUP was formed between former DUP members, hard right Tories, and the DVP. Nigel Farage, who became a DUP MP in the 2019 election, was the main public figure of the party. The LibDems were stuck in the middle, but were in much better shape than they had been following 2015. Voters had no good reason to reject Corbyn, in fact, many viewed them much better than they had before 2019.

Corbyn’s second term allowed a truer implementation of his policies, with McDonnell’s new budget clearly showing that. Upon the death of the Queen, “the establishment” began plotting.

2024-2026: John McDonnell (Labour majority)

this is where the weird shit starts

As the UK had began moving away from the establishment and removed one of the last pieces of their empire, King George VIII began plotting to save the environment and the monarchy. McDonnell’s history with the miners and republicans meant that he could not be trusted, while the Tories had sold themselves out to the evil polluters. The King organized a meeting with Michael Gove, the nation’s top environmentalist (having taken over from David Attenborough for the BBC) and a former cabinet minister. Despite him making earlier comments comparing the then-prince to Adolf Hitler, the two banded together. Gove already had a good reputation among Conservatives, and his new King’s Party was boosted by several defecting Tories like William Rees-Mogg, Elizabeth Truss, and Anna Soubry. Labour MPs also joined, with Chuka Umunna being the biggest name. Numerous other politicians were brought out of retirement and the Lords. Along with the members of the King’s Party, the Liberal Democrats and Greens also expressed interest in joining in a common coalition.

2026-20??: Michael Gove (King’s Party - Ecological Coalition)
2026 (Coalition) def. John McDonnell (Labour), Ben Bradley (Conservative & Unionist), Ruth Davidson (Progressive Unionist - Ecological Coalition), Layla Moran (Liberal Democrats- Ecological Coalition), Derek Mackay (SNP), Jonathan Bartley & Siân Berry (GPEW - Ecological Coalition), John Rees-Evans (Constitutional Unionist)

2026 will always be remembered as the year of Gove. The United Kingdom worked to become the greenest state in the world, and pave the way for a sustainable future.