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Caprice's Maps and What-Not

Caprice

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To commemorate somehow having enough content to reach Page 10, I just want to inform you all that I accidentally saved my latest furry art commission into my elections folder.

Someday I will have furry content that does belong in my elections folder*, but not now, as it's getting on 4 AM and I am about to pass out.

*maybe relating to my idea of a non-binary land speculation bubble whose details I will not yet explain
 

Caprice

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Apparently it's time for Illinois state legislative districts. This is 1872, when Illinois first used its unique voting system via which each voter got three votes for state representative, divided equally between up to three candidates. Parties only ran two candidates for each representative district, which resulted in a whole lot of candidates getting something something and a half votes.

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Cook County inset:

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Caprice

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I'm doing work on Illinois for Sages à la Chełm and I just had the idea of a bicameral executive council

Also after the 1908 election Illinois' executive council ends up with the balance of power held by the sole member elected on a New England independence ticket

You know, Illinois, famous bastion of the New England independence movement
 

Caprice

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Here's the Illinois state legislative districts used from 1902 to 1954, inclusive:

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Starting in 1956, the House and Senate districts were somewhat different, so that'll be fun to deal with.
 

Caprice

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From Sages à la Chełm, the apportionment in the 2010s to the lower house of Maine's state assembly:

house2010.png

There are 488 seats, and I'm not 100% sure yet how I want elections in the state to work. I'm thinking something like Ley de Lenas but for some sort of Northern Ireland-esque split, and if neither side's candidates get enough votes for a seat (a majority of a quota?) it gets thrown to a moderate Alliance-type. The backstory of Maine's independence involves an entire civil war due to Reasons that I might get into when I get back from the grocery store. (Yes, I'm doing my shopping at 11 PM on a weekday, precisely because nobody else does.)
 

Caprice

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I'm not going to explain this to the level of profession befitting an official post on the SalC thread or anything, but here's my notes on Maine's founding.

So, like IOTL, Maine used to be part of Massachusetts. Of course, some people wanted independence from Massachusetts, and a number of referendums were held. The issue here is that there's a movement of people, on both sides of separatism and unionism, who think that, when the results of a referendum are announced, it goes into effect. This is largely championed by this one particular bloke, who is a fervent campaigner for Mainer independence.

The first referendum is in 1792. It overall fails, but in towns that vote for independence, there is light rioting as people try to kick out town officials under the belief that their offices are now vacant due to the nonexistent change in power. This is righted.

The second referendum is in, what, 1806? That sounds about right. That or 1808. Anyway, in this referendum, the yes vote does win, and Mister Instant Referendum starts a bit of a civil war. Independence for Maine is thus called off. This happens multiple times over the next decade, and finally, in 1820, Massachusetts evacuates all civil authority in advance of the referendum, and so a full-on civil war breaks out.

I'm glad I'm typing this out and not saying it in person, because I'm not sure I can say this to somebody with a straight face: the war is very civil, and so everybody is very polite and nobody dies in battle. It's still a goddamn mess, though, and it takes up to a year and a half for the state of Maine to properly set itself up in any way. The first couple of elections are contested three ways between the two national factions and the followers of Mister Instant Referendum, who blasts both of the other parties as full of foreign Massachusetts agents for having participated in the Massachusetts government. Then the party system collapses in some way or another. I don't know what Maine gets up to after that, though they did abolish the year 1851.
 
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Caprice

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Out of all the amendments to the US constitution, the 21st (ending Prohibition) is unique in that it was ratified, not by the state legislature, but by a specially elected constitutional convention in each state. Therefore, it is at times possible to glean how a given state felt about national Prohibition at the end of its thirteen-year run. Here is how Maine voted.

convention1933.png
 

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I am notarizing a bet between two people on the OFC Discord server on the results of the next Albertan provincial election. If the United Conservative Party wins the next Albertan provincial general election, T will owe D fifty Canadian dollars, and if the New Democratic Party wins, D will owe T fifty Canadian dollars. Should any other party not descended from one of the two win, neither will owe one another.

My apologies if this is not the right place for such a notice, but it's the best place I could think of for a public record.
 

Caprice

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Maine senatorial apportionment in Slightly More Canada through the 2020 state election. Using a continuation of the system used from 1932 to 1968 IOTL in which each county got one senator, plus an additional one at population milestones of 30,000, 60,000, 120,000, and 240,000, this results in 42 senators in the 2010s. I might add seven leveling senators, for a total of 49.

Like the rest of the Northeast, ITTL Maine has relatively short legislative terms, with both houses elected in every even year via STV, probably. The lower house is apportioned somehow or other, but I haven't gotten to it; I do know that there are single- and multi-member constituencies below the county level, steadfastly not splitting towns.
 

Caprice

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A map of the Scottish general election in SalC, 2017. I don't know the government or the leaders or anything, but I have vote totals by camp (a vaguely ideologically-aligned mess of local political groups). Preliminary results for 2012 imply an independent plurality.

CampVotes%Seats
Nationalist613,41323.9747
Tory557,18421.7839
Independent610,49123.8638
Socialist384,53515.0330
Whig393,05715.3624
Total2,558,680100178

scotland 2017.png
 
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Caprice

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From Fools, Not Charlatans (in which I muck about with American state politics less facetiously), the 67 districts and sub-districts of the Delaware State Assembly for the elections of 2022, 2026, and 2030:

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The provincial constitution lays out thirty-five districts, and any district with greater than 22,500 inhabitants is divided into two or more sub-districts based upon population.
 

Caprice

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I've never seen this format done for early 19th-century presidential elections, which is a shame. It isn't as worth it for elections after 1832, though, since that was the last one until 1892 to have any states choose electors in any way other than statewide bloc vote.
1824-pres.png
 
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