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Biaggi’s Other Opium Den

gentleman biaggi

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California is most likely the state that has lost the most amount of territory in its existence as a state, being split into three, with Fremont and Shasta being born out of the state (and lower Oregon). However, it still exists as a major economic power, and largely has since its existence. Originally the home of the Gold Rush, the key part of the economy shifted from gold to oil, and then from oil to tech, as the so-called "Silicon Valley" would be located in the state. This, along with San Francisco's boom, have created a state divided by liberal and left-wing interests, with the conservative movement dead in the state. However, it wasn't always this way. San Francisco, forever the dominant part of the state, went through an extremely xenophobic, albeit left-wing period, as the state rebelled against Gold Barrons, and would elect some of the earliest Labor party officials (and latest Know-Nothing officials), most of whom opposed immigration to the state. Support of Chinese Exclusion allowed for Sylvester Pennoyer to win the state in 1896, and the People's Party soon took over. Then, the large naval community in the state through its strength behind the hawkish Republicans, opposing Wilson's isolationism. The People's and Republican parties battled for control of the state for a generation, with Democrats allying with the People's Party in the state. As such, the California People's Party joined the Commonwealth Coalition in the 1930s, forging an alliance with Huey Long, and California pretty consistently elected a People's-Democratic-Labor coalition into the 1960s.

However, while said coalition was dominant over the near-dormant Republicans, it was also full of inner conflict. The main conflict of this era was between progressive Raymond Haight, who was a corporate investigator and lawyer, and formerly-Mormon immigrant to the state and "classical populist" Culbert Olson. Olson took power in 1936, winning over the People's Party with his left-wing politics and closeness with the states' labor population. However, Olson's out-and-out atheism caused him to lose institutional support among the People's Party base and with more conservative leadership. As such, he was overthrown and replaced by Raymond Haight, who was seen as much more appealing to the party base. Olson, who was convinced his loss of power was due to measures taken to curtail the Catholic Church's power in the state, was furious, and after multiple leadership challenges to Haight (many of them eventually dismissed as "frivolous"), founded his own party. Olson named the party the Association Party (a very stupid name), and began to run a campaign many considered similar to the Know-Nothings of old. Olson attacked "papist power" and ran increasingly xenophobic campaigns, something that won him support due to fleeing, heavily Catholic German populations after WW2 ended but America's anti-German sentiment remained. However, even Olson's campaigns failed to break the People's Party power structure, and it remained until the 1960s and 1970s.

During the 1960s and 1970s, the rise of Civil Rights and the Indonesian-Malaysian War led to a new left-wing movement, mostly structured around the Black Panthers, Rainbow Coalition, and Free Speech Movement. The first and third groups mentioned were founded in California, in particular in Oakland and Berkley. The two groups grew to significant power during the 1970s, and formed the Peace and Freedom Party, led by Black Panther (and later mayor of Oakland) Bobby Seale and white journalist Paul Jacobs. The group directly challenged the People's Party, breaking them down, and, due to the growth of said movements, the Peace and Freedom Party obtained a government in 1973, aligning with the Labor Party, which itself was being taken over by more left-wing movements. However, the People's Party, which had grown comfortable in power under mob-aligned San Francisco-based leader Joseph Alito, refused to back down, utilizing techniques many described as "paramilitary" to win back power. The Black Panthers came into conflict with various groups, led by right-wing anti-communist Asian immigrants, mob-backed Italians, and sometimes even just normal WASP white terror organizations. When Alito stepped down as leader following a corruption scandal, the party got increasingly violent when Dan White took power, as White would find himself on the "front lines" of many incidents of paramilitary violence. Meanwhile, the Peace and Freedom Party fractured, as former Black Panther leader Eldridge Cleaver felt that the BPP was abandoning the ideas of global anti-capitalistic resistance, and saw the security restrictions placed by the Peace and Freedom-Labor coalition to defeat "white terror" as hurting the Black Panthers and as such, formed the Black Freedom Movement, which created its own Maoist political party, and also firebombed the house of Joseph Alito.

However, two things would lead to the end of the conflict. Dan White, along with his allies in Chinese and Italian organized crime would be caught shooting at the house of Black Freedom leader Eldridge Cleaver's house, and, upon hearing that there was a warrant out for his arrest, fled the state to live out the rest of his life in South Africa. Along with this, the increase in San Francisco's gay community, which made organized crime lots of money, and also backed the Peace and Freedom Party, led to a general change in organized crime's tune. Soon, California, which had once been described as a "hub" of organized crime and paramilitary attacks, began to enter an era of peace, as the Peace and Freedom Party dominated elections against dwindling People's and Black Freedom election results.

While many would expect the state to remain one full of radical left wing politics, such an arrangement would not last. The economic growth of the state of California led to a rise in the computer industry, which, once many companies such as Windows began making millions and billions, saw little reason to support the socialistic Peace and Freedom Party. Instead, said groups supported at first the Republicans (once again becoming token opposition), but once they saw little reason to back them, backed Jerry Brown, who promoted technocracy under his "Future Party", and soon, with the support of the Republicans, unseated the Peace and Freedom Party. Millions of dollars were bankrolled into Brown's campaigns to lead the state, and with it he became one of the most powerful politicians in America. The Future-Republican alliance notably cut taxes, but would also be known for their attempts to create a "House of Supervisors" appointed once every 10 years by the elected state legislature, to allow experts into office. This attempt led to the collapse of the Future-Republican coalition, as voters rejected the idea of unelected officials holding such power over them. Jerry Brown was overthrown by a more right-wing technocrat, Meg Whitman, who appealed more directly to the multimillionaire base of the party.

Today, the Future Party and their Republican allies remain dominant in the state. Fracturing in the Peace and Freedom Party, largely led by rapper Brandon McCartney, also known by Lil B, who's Social Democrat "Based Party", largely based (haha) around McCartney's increasingly esoteric views. Along with them, the People's Party, surviving in its one west coast hub, wins over voters in former logging and some wine producing areas. As for more "ethnic" parties, the Asian Alliance and Black Freedom parties hold a small amount of power, while the Labor party wins over mostly Hispanic voters in the state, and the United Washoe Party, which exists both in Alpine County, California, and in Ormsby County, Utah, as the Washoe make up a significant portion of the population surrounding the Lake Tahoe.

Political Parties:

Government:
Future -
Originally a party to represent the most intense fantasies of the wealthy tech billionaires and millionaires making up California in the 1980s, they are now much more coherent, building a center-right consensus with only a hint of technocracy. Their main goals are continued tax breaks on the creation of computers, and continued social progress. The party is increasingly less run by "politicians" and instead by business leaders, which has led to the party being deemed the anti-establishment establishment by some of its opponents.

Republican - Little separates the Future party from the Republicans anymore, other than a more conservative base, largely within tourism communities, which they have to fight to maintain with the People's, Democratic, and Future parties. As such, they are coalition partners, and are kept alive by the party, largely to win votes from increasingly angry "traditional" Republicans, who dislike the technocratic leadership of the Future Party.

Opposition:
Peace and Freedom - The main leaders of the far-left of the state of California, the P&F has remained true to its roots, unlike the Progressive Party of nearby Oregon, which has abandoned socialism for watered-down social democracy or even liberalism. This does not mean the P&F has remained without splits, although they have avoided being eaten by the Young Greens. The Based Party is the most obvious example of this, but the Trotskyist Socialist Labor Party, led by Peter Camejo, has also done the same. However, strong margins in San Francisco, Oakland, and Berkeley keep the party alive.

People's - The People's Party of California is very different than almost all People's parties nationally. The party's position of leadership for decades led to them accepting a much more urban and soon much more conservative base, which means the party acts as little more than a right-wing opposition in the state, even winning suburban voters. While they have mellowed down since the Dan White days, they still remain very, very right wing, and mostly represent the interests in the east of the state.

Based Party - Led by Lil B, the Based Party was originally seen as a joke, but soon morphed into something much, much more serious, as they represent a more moderate form of the Peace and Freedom Party, but also one that gains support from younger voters, as it is connected to the grassroots, and promotes, as its leader says, "radical positivity". However, despite their weirdness, they are little more than a Social Democratic party, and arguably take more from Labor.

Labor - As they do in much of the west, the Labor Party represents the large Hispanic vote in California, and as such win votes in the south of the state. However, they are in an uncomfortable position, as many Hispanics in California are not too worried about the Future Party, and quite often support them, and the Labor Party often refuses to accept more socially conservative support due to fears of being eaten away by the Peace and Freedom or Based parties. As such, they are stuck between a rock and a hard place, and are bleeding support as a result.

Democratic - There is a smaller-than-expected Mormon population in the state of California, but the Democratic party survives anyway, especially due to the high presence of libertarian-minded folks, who generally hold the reigns of power in the party. Still, they are usually regulated to fourth or even fifth place in many places, and their power is limited.

Asian Alliance - Its predecessors were founded in small Chinese-American "Tongs" in San Francisco - but the Asian Alliance is much, much stronger now, with heavy Japanese, Korean, Malay, and Indonesian populations representing in the state, especially as the P&F government allowed millions of Malay and Indonesian people to enter the state in the late 1970s. However, the Asian Alliance is much less strong than it used to be, as the Asian population has become much more "spread out", disadvantaging them in the D'Hondt system. Still, their power in San Francisco and Oakland, where they have fallen to third behind the Based Party is one to behold, and they definitely have a community behind them. They are very right wing in nature, particularly as it represents an increasing petit-bourgeoise and even just straight up bourgeoise population as Asians move up the social latter.

United Washoe Party - The party representing Native American rights in the Lake Tahoe area has a major presence in only one county, but D'Hondt laws and extreme vote splitting allow them to punch above their weight in Alpine County. Meanwhile, they largely remain very left wing, and are allies of the Peace and Freedom party.

Socialist Labor - The Socialist Labor party was little more than a Trotskyist vehicle for Peter Camejo in the 1970s, but it soon expanded into something much bigger, as what was once the New Left looked for something more reactionary to cling onto. The SLP is very incoherent, and often filled with internal battles, but it is still alive, with a single seat in the legislature.

Black Freedom - Irrelevant at its founding and still irrelevant now, the Black Freedom Party has fallen off even harder with the Based Party's rise. As such, it has become increasingly esoteric, and now supports full-on black nationalism. It still holds a single seat, but it is clearly at risk.


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gentleman biaggi

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Kansas is a state that represents political conflict in the eyes of many Americans. Its foundation came with it "bleeding Kansas", where the state was fought over by abolitionists and slavers in an attempt to shift the state one way or another. The abolitionists eventually won, with the state backing the union and also growing to have a large black population due to the Great Migration. While this led to a period without much conflict, the 1890s, and a growing influx of German-Americans, particularly Catholic ones, caused great controversy in Kansas, which had traditionally been led by the Protestant-backed Free Soil Party (which was basically just the Kansas wing of the Republicans). A battle within the party erupted, as the Free Soil Party banned language schools in 1891 (allowing Grover Cleveland to take the state in 1892), but saw several splits within the party due to it. This, along with the rise of the People's Party in the West of the state, caused the Free Soil Party to lose power for the first time since statehood. While this was a relatively tame political battle, it would not be the first time that religious tensions spilled into Kansas. Once again, in the 1920s, Kansas would be a home for "white terror", as the Klu Klux Klan, having a relatively strong presence in urban portions of the state that disliked growing Catholic immigrant and Great Migration black populations, grew. This led to not only a split in the Kansas Democrats, but the election of KKK-backed Governor-General Don C. McCombs, who helped bring in extremely puritan laws in the 1920s. Various acts of political violence and paramilitary usage continued in Kansas throughout the 1920s and 1930s, leading to the death of anti-Klan journalist William Allen White, thousands of African Americans leaving the state (and largely fleeing to Nebraska, becoming known as the "Kansas Migrants" among Nebraskans). This violence come to a climax during the 1931 General Election.

Al Smith had been chosen in the escalons of Tammany Hall with the hopes of uniting a broad coalition of center-left politicians and parties to combat the Great Depression, and had managed to work with enough Southerners that his anti-Prohibition and Catholic ways gave him a pass. His so-called "Commonwealth Coalition" united in 1931, overthrowing the Republican government. While the Democrats had been split six ways during the rise of the Klan in Kansas, their People's Party was still powerful, and still part of the CC. Soon, a battle arose. McCombs' Klan allies spent the entire election season attempting to get farmers, who had been pushed into economic ruin, to vote against their interests and back the Republicans. Anti-Catholic literature was utilized heavily in the election, as was violence towards blacks (now backing a Democratic politician for the first time ever), and Catholics. The split was clear on election night. The state's eastern portion, bordering the heavily protestant Ozarks, voted near-unanimously for the Republicans, with the exception of some urban areas. Meanwhile, the more German, Irish, and farm-friendly west backed Smith, but much less impressively. The result was a split in Kansas' delegation between the Republicans and People's Party, along with a major victory for the Commonwealth Coalition nationwide.

Things began to change in Kansas after Al Smith was shot and killed by anti-Catholic conspiracy theorist Richard Pavlick in Boston. The result was Huey Long, the Southern Democratic/People's Party choice for national Governor-General after Smith's death doing a massive crackdown on the KKK nationwide. Many political figures, including Don McCombs would be revealed as Klansmen, and arrested under surveillance laws. While McCombs' arrest would be the "death" of the KKK in Kansas in the 1930s, many believe that McCombs' movement was falling apart, as it no longer worried about blacks, and were more focused on the "Papist Menace". McCombs' political machine, known as the Liberty Party was banned, but in its place, McCombs founded the infamous Orange Party. Named after the Irish Orange Order, the Orange Party would become extremely prominent in the state, as they moved past more paramilitary groups and more into protestant far-right politics. While McCombs' would lead the party from prison, its "street" leader, James P. Fox (himself an ex-Klansman) would find himself an extremely effective leader, as the People's and Orange parties battled for decades, with the Free Soil party in the background.

While Kansas would calm itself down after the era of the Commonwealth Coalition, sectarian conflict would still define it. Throughout various periods, Kansas would return to political violence and paramilitary action. Kansas City's attempts at desegregation led to great conflict, while Vern Miller's time as Attorney General led to a revival of the Prohibition Party, as did the notable conflict over gay rights, which spawned a new political faction entirely. Fred Phelps had long been a leading "liberal" in the Orange Party, as he constructed a sort of machine in Topeka, Kansas that supported civil rights and helped integrate the city. However, he was still fiercely anti-Catholic and most importantly, anti-gay. While constructing his machine, he was also a pastor at the Westboro Baptist Church, which began protesting anything they saw as "homosexual activity". This, plus Phelps' national profile following a political attack on Governor-General Frank Giglio following his appointment of an ambassador to the Vatican, allowed him to form the "Westboro Baptist Association" in 1983, or more simply "Westboro Party". The group soon took over the Topeka political machine, and overthrew most Orange Party politicians in northeastern Kansas. The WP was much more violent and intense than the Orange Party, and often even picketed funerals of its opponents. While the party removed the "Baptist" label in the hopes of "uniting all good Christians", it would be an almost entirely religious vehicle, with Phelps even leading "conversions" throughout the region.

At this time, the ruling Orange-People's dichotomy collapsed. The Orange Party saw the rise of the Westboro Party, while the People's Party was eaten by both the Western Association and Prohibition Party. During the late 1980s, a crippled Orange Party, led by longtime leader Bob Dole, saw widespread controversy in the west of the state, largely over educational conflict. The result was the formation of the "Western Association", which chewed into the People's Party, and also became a major part of West Kansas becoming a state. Soon the Prohibition Party took the People's Party's place in the west, but it would not take their place on the political left. Charles Chaput, a noted Catholic-Potawatomi activist, had faced much discrimination and suffering due to the furious response from Kansas' furious political right. As such, Chaput formed a party and named it the Knights of Kansas, named after the old Catholic Knights of Labor, beginning a mission to determine the state's future. Soon the Knights of Kansas, winning over German and Irish constituencies (along with a few Native groups) became a powerful group in the state, although one that was threatened heavily. Their leaders homes were bombed out, threats were made, and paramilitary conflicts generally occurred throughout the state.

Meanwhile, the growth of West Kansas as a gambler's paradise created a large suburban population in the northwest of the state, leading to the revival of the Free Soil party, which still holds large black support as well. Today the state holds a strange mix of politics, much of which seems very near violence. The Knights-Free Soil alliance is in power, largely opposed by the heavily protestant Prohibition, Orange, and Westboro parties. Politics seems to be in yet another period of calm, but many doubt it can last. The state has moved past much of its old urban-rural split now as well, as many areas in western Kansas are now suburbs of the growing West Kansas gambling economy or of Wichita, leaving the People's Party as a thing of the past. Meanwhile, Charles Chaput's various governments have also led to a better system for native Americans, allowing reservations to become stronger. However, Kansas is the only state in the union to not have any major national parties in office (the Prohibition Party holds no national seats), making it famous for having strange political factions.

Political Parties:

Government:
Knights of Kansas -
Often misconstrued as the "Catholic Party", the Knights of Kansas in fact attempt to represent various downtrodden groups, from Catholics, to Native Americans, to Jews, to Hispanics, to blacks and many others. The party is very economically left-wing, as the Chaput government has been praised for how it feeds and provides for the poor, but remains as socially right wing as many others, tearing up gay bars and often working with the Prohibition Party to enforce anti-drug and abortion laws. Kansas has the most conservative laws on "sodomy", illegal abortion, and drug use in the nation, and much of that is thanks to the Knights of Kansas. They also have a paramilitary organization, and have been known to use brutal tactics to defend themselves.

Free Soil - Basically the states' Republican Party, the Free Soil party has an uneasy alliance with the Knights of Kansas. Although both try to be multi-racial and multi-ethnic groups, the Free Soil Party's economic conservatism and social moderacy have caused it to be a very confused partner as the Knights of Kansas carry on with their policies. Still, they have remained good coalition partners, but are often the reason for Kansas having many, many elections.

Opposition:
Orange Party -
Kansas's unfortunate association of various Protestants is extremely conservative and extremely violent. Although less so in past years, and often having a socially moderate policy due to the Westboro Party's exit, they are still famous for ballot-stuffing, paramilitary groups, and other such acts. In recent years they have begun closer ties to farmers, and often finish in a close second in counties bordering West Kansas due to opposition to "degeneracy" among the suburban poplace.

Prohibition Party - The party of the political establishment, the Prohibition Party is arguably the least violent party in the state, often sharing a "quiet alliance" with the Knights of Kansas due to various agreements on policy. However, this lack of violence is charged by political opponents. While they are often nonviolent to political opponents such as the Orange Party, Prohibition-backed municipal governments are criticized for their extreme use of police violence to stomp out drug and alcohol abuse, which is often described as "fascistic".

Westboro Party - Described as a cult, there's few groups these folks do like. They hate Catholics and gays the most, but also are known for extreme Islamophobia and anti-Semitism. While their original leader, Fred Phelps, died in 2017, they have remained a powerful group, largely due to the fact that in Westboro-controlled municipalities, opposition parties are often firebombed into leaving. However, while they are hateful, many describe them as to the left of the Orange Party on race, as the group has many black members, and they practice a liberal form of prohibition (banning alcohol sales on Sundays). Still, they are extremely violent and often armed.


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Hey, @gentleman biaggi
We know what college football looks like, but what does pro football look like in the Many States?
I have also wanted to talk about this. Professional Football looks very similar to what it did before 1920 OTL. Much of the sport is very, very regionalized, with no true governing force nationally. This leads to a very interesting sport, especially in the northeast as their "version" of football has been often mixed with other forms. For instance in lower New England one can find similarities to Gaelic football with a double goal post, and in upper New England, where one can find similarities to Canadian football, as the sport includes the "rouge". While this may be unfortunate for the viewer (college football is still very dominant), it is fantastic for the athlete. Various leagues pretty much jump over each other to acquire talent from each other (or to stop athletes from jumping into some other profession), with salaries jumping massively. It also led to a much quicker desegregation of the sport, as fights for talent led to black athletes making tons of money in leagues starting in the 1930s (although the Southern Professional Football League remained segregated until the 1950s). These fights for talent also led to HBCUs being much more respected on the college football landscape.


Also, my apologies for not being active, I've struggled to find motivation to open my computer since winter break started, this was largely something to break in-class boredom.
 

MrVulcan

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Iowa
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I have also wanted to talk about this. Professional Football looks very similar to what it did before 1920 OTL. Much of the sport is very, very regionalized, with no true governing force nationally. This leads to a very interesting sport, especially in the northeast as their "version" of football has been often mixed with other forms. For instance in lower New England one can find similarities to Gaelic football with a double goal post, and in upper New England, where one can find similarities to Canadian football, as the sport includes the "rouge". While this may be unfortunate for the viewer (college football is still very dominant), it is fantastic for the athlete. Various leagues pretty much jump over each other to acquire talent from each other (or to stop athletes from jumping into some other profession), with salaries jumping massively. It also led to a much quicker desegregation of the sport, as fights for talent led to black athletes making tons of money in leagues starting in the 1930s (although the Southern Professional Football League remained segregated until the 1950s). These fights for talent also led to HBCUs being much more respected on the college football landscape.
That's pretty neat.

Anyway, I have another request: a president list. So far I've been able to find:

Robert E. Quinn
Grover Cleveland
Woodrow Wilson
Martin Van Buren
Ulysses S. Grant
Huey Long
Levi P. Morton
Abraham Lincoln

Who are the rest?
 

gentleman biaggi

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That's pretty neat.

Anyway, I have another request: a president list. So far I've been able to find:

Robert E. Quinn
Grover Cleveland
Woodrow Wilson
Martin Van Buren
Ulysses S. Grant
Huey Long
Levi P. Morton
Abraham Lincoln

Who are the rest?
first and formost the position of president was replaced with a governor-general under wilson, and as such all “presidents” after ~1918 are in fact governor-generals

as for the remaining presidents/gov-generals i am not sure as i am not completely sure of the PoD - which is likely the early 1800s due to the existence of west connecticut as a state, but i’ll attempt to build some sort of list of post-1918 gov-generals after the next state. as of right now they are:

Woodrow Wilson ~1918-1922
A Republican 1922-1931
Al Smith 1931-1931
Huey Long 1931-1943 (it appears the long decade has been expanded)
Robert E. Quinn 1943-1950
A Republican 1950-(~) 1959
Soapy Williams (likely leading some form of a Labor-People’s-Progressive coalition) 1959-1967
Some Sort of Conservative Coalition 1967-1978
Frank Giglio 1978-1983
David Treen 1983-1984
Jerry Lewis 1984-1992
Frank Gigilo 1992-1997
Jerry Lewis 1997-1999
Tony McGee* 1999-2000
Ray Mabus 2000-2006
Stephen Yokich 2006-2015
???? (could be multiple admins) 2015-“present”


*first black gov-general, replaced lewis upon an ethics scandal

basically, the current political system is a three party Republican-Labor-Democrat system nationally, but the presence of many ethnic/regional/minor parties makes this quite interesting! please note that at the current time none of these presidents/terms are “final”, but fit the events of the TL. perhaps i could write a national electoral update of some sort, or even a long form review from some sort of a bias perspective (A People’s History of the Many States…)
 

MrVulcan

Member
Location
Iowa
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he/him
first and formost the position of president was replaced with a governor-general under wilson, and as such all “presidents” after ~1918 are in fact governor-generals

as for the remaining presidents/gov-generals i am not sure as i am not completely sure of the PoD - which is likely the early 1800s due to the existence of west connecticut as a state, but i’ll attempt to build some sort of list of post-1918 gov-generals after the next state. as of right now they are:

Woodrow Wilson ~1918-1922
A Republican 1922-1931
Al Smith 1931-1931
Huey Long 1931-1943 (it appears the long decade has been expanded)
Robert E. Quinn 1943-1950
A Republican 1950-(~) 1959
Soapy Williams (likely leading some form of a Labor-People’s-Progressive coalition) 1959-1967
Some Sort of Conservative Coalition 1967-1978
Frank Giglio 1978-1983
David Treen 1983-1984
Jerry Lewis 1984-1992
Frank Gigilo 1992-1997
Jerry Lewis 1997-1999
Tony McGee* 1999-2000
Ray Mabus 2000-2006
Stephen Yokich 2006-2015
???? (could be multiple admins) 2015-“present”


*first black gov-general, replaced lewis upon an ethics scandal

basically, the current political system is a three party Republican-Labor-Democrat system nationally, but the presence of many ethnic/regional/minor parties makes this quite interesting! please note that at the current time none of these presidents/terms are “final”, but fit the events of the TL. perhaps i could write a national electoral update of some sort, or even a long form review from some sort of a bias perspective (A People’s History of the Many States…)
Nice! Can't wait for the next update.
 

gentleman biaggi

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Presidents of the United States:
Gary Hart/Dick Gephardt (Democratic) 1989-1993

1988 def. George H.W. Bush/Alan Keyes (Republican), David Duke/George V. Hansen[1] (Populist)[2]
1991 Impeachment[3]: Failed [54-47 For (S), 231-199 For (H)]
Pat Buchanan/Thad Cochran (Republican) 1993-1998
Thad Cochran/
vacant (Republican) 1998-1999
Thad Cochran/James R. Thompson (Republican) 1999-2001

1992 def. [backed by "National" Populists[4]] Gary Hart/Dick Gephardt (Democratic), Lowell Weicker/Peter Ueberroth (A USA Party), Ralph Nader/Heart Warrior Chosa (Progressive), Ron Paul/Mary Jane O'Brannon (Libertarian)
1996 def.[5] [backed by America First! alliance of parties] Dick Gephardt/Wayne Dowdy (Democratic), Dick Lamm/Clint Eastwood (Progressive Conservative)
1998 Impeachment[6]: Successful [76-12 For (S), 302-122 For (H)]
Rebecca Vigil-Giron/Mike McWherter (Democratic) 2001-2009
2000 def. [backed by Unite for Progress!] Pat Choate/Steve Forbes (Rebuild), Herb Titus/Mike Pence (Christian Values), James Thompson/John Kasich (Republican)
2004 def. [backed by Unite for Progress!] Pat Choate/Trent Franks (Rebuild)
Mike McWherter/Mazie Hirono (Democratic) 2009-????
2008 def. [backed by Unite for Progress!] John McCain/Steve Forbes (Rebuild)
2012 def. [backed by Unite for Progress!] Tommy Franks/Michael Bloomberg (Rebuild), Jim Gilchrist/Rick Jore (Sovereignty), William Smaldone/Bernard Sanders (Socialist)


[1] Serving prison sentence at time of election
[2] Although the Populist ticket didn't receive 5% of the vote nationally (finishing with just over 1.08%), a 10% performance in Louisiana and 7% performance in Idaho gets them mentioned here.
[3] Impeached over misuse of funds to pay off former girlfriend/mistress Donna Rice
[4] Alliance/Fusion with Populists created an "electors controversy", as in the state of Idaho, voters were confused over separate electoral slates, with one having a national Buchanan/Cochran ticket, and the other having a ticket consisting of Buchanan and Representative George V. Hansen (P-ID-02). The split was so severe that it cost Buchanan Idaho, a state that had previously been one of the most Republican in the nation, as president Hart received 179,828 votes, while the Buchanan/Cochran ticket received 178,864 votes (with the Buchanan/Hansen ticket receiving 108,979 votes, almost all of which were in Hansen's district 2). While Hart was eventually awarded the 3 electors after a lengthy court case, one elector, John Peavey, voted for a Hart/Hansen ticket. While Idaho's 3 electors didn't matter, the controversy eventually led to the National Ballot Fusion Act of 1994 being passed by Reformist Republicans and Democrats alike, ironically receiving the blessing of both Hart and Buchanan.
[5] It became commonplace for political parties to unite their allies through a forged alliance, usually with a catchy name. While every single party was doing this by 1996, I'm only designating them for the winners, as naming the Liberal Party (NY)-CPUSA-New Alliance coalition that backed Gephardt seems tedious.
[6] Impeached over illegal use of US funds to Koos Bischoff's Afrikaner Volksfront during post-Apartheid violence in South Africa. While the scandal was compared to Iran-Contra, the atrocities committed by the Volksfront were seen as much more heinous due to the racial impact of the attacks. Not only that, but evidence pointed to Buchanan's funding of American white supremacist mercenaries fighting in South Africa, something many Americans were disgusted by. As such, Buchanan was removed from office, and the resulting controversy led to the downfall of the American Republican Party. Buchanan would later defend himself as defending South Africa from Communists such as Chris Hani (the de facto leader of anti-Apartheid forces after Nelson Mandela's death), but has since largely removed himself from the public eye.
 

AnActualFam

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Somewhere at Sea
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He/Him
Presidents of the United States:
Gary Hart/Dick Gephardt (Democratic) 1989-1993

1988 def. George H.W. Bush/Alan Keyes (Republican), David Duke/George V. Hansen[1] (Populist)[2]
1991 Impeachment[3]: Failed [54-47 For (S), 231-199 For (H)]
Pat Buchanan/Thad Cochran (Republican) 1993-1998
Thad Cochran/
vacant (Republican) 1998-1999
Thad Cochran/James R. Thompson (Republican) 1999-2001

1992 def. [backed by "National" Populists[4]] Gary Hart/Dick Gephardt (Democratic), Lowell Weicker/Peter Ueberroth (A USA Party), Ralph Nader/Heart Warrior Chosa (Progressive), Ron Paul/Mary Jane O'Brannon (Libertarian)
1996 def.[5] [backed by America First! alliance of parties] Dick Gephardt/Wayne Dowdy (Democratic), Dick Lamm/Clint Eastwood (Progressive Conservative)
1998 Impeachment[6]: Successful [76-12 For (S), 302-122 For (H)]
Rebecca Vigil-Giron/Mike McWherter (Democratic) 2001-2009
2000 def. [backed by Unite for Progress!] Pat Choate/Steve Forbes (Rebuild), Herb Titus/Mike Pence (Christian Values), James Thompson/John Kasich (Republican)
2004 def. [backed by Unite for Progress!] Pat Choate/Trent Franks (Rebuild)
Mike McWherter/Mazie Hirono (Democratic) 2009-????
2008 def. [backed by Unite for Progress!] John McCain/Steve Forbes (Rebuild)
2012 def. [backed by Unite for Progress!] Tommy Franks/Michael Bloomberg (Rebuild), Jim Gilchrist/Rick Jore (Sovereignty), William Smaldone/Bernard Sanders (Socialist)


[1] Serving prison sentence at time of election
[2] Although the Populist ticket didn't receive 5% of the vote nationally (finishing with just over 1.08%), a 10% performance in Louisiana and 7% performance in Idaho gets them mentioned here.
[3] Impeached over misuse of funds to pay off former girlfriend/mistress Donna Rice
[4] Alliance/Fusion with Populists created an "electors controversy", as in the state of Idaho, voters were confused over separate electoral slates, with one having a national Buchanan/Cochran ticket, and the other having a ticket consisting of Buchanan and Representative George V. Hansen (P-ID-02). The split was so severe that it cost Buchanan Idaho, a state that had previously been one of the most Republican in the nation, as president Hart received 179,828 votes, while the Buchanan/Cochran ticket received 178,864 votes (with the Buchanan/Hansen ticket receiving 108,979 votes, almost all of which were in Hansen's district 2). While Hart was eventually awarded the 3 electors after a lengthy court case, one elector, John Peavey, voted for a Hart/Hansen ticket. While Idaho's 3 electors didn't matter, the controversy eventually led to the National Ballot Fusion Act of 1994 being passed by Reformist Republicans and Democrats alike, ironically receiving the blessing of both Hart and Buchanan.
[5] It became commonplace for political parties to unite their allies through a forged alliance, usually with a catchy name. While every single party was doing this by 1996, I'm only designating them for the winners, as naming the Liberal Party (NY)-CPUSA-New Alliance coalition that backed Gephardt seems tedious.
[6] Impeached over illegal use of US funds to Koos Bischoff's Afrikaner Volksfront during post-Apartheid violence in South Africa. While the scandal was compared to Iran-Contra, the atrocities committed by the Volksfront were seen as much more heinous due to the racial impact of the attacks. Not only that, but evidence pointed to Buchanan's funding of American white supremacist mercenaries fighting in South Africa, something many Americans were disgusted by. As such, Buchanan was removed from office, and the resulting controversy led to the downfall of the American Republican Party. Buchanan would later defend himself as defending South Africa from Communists such as Chris Hani (the de facto leader of anti-Apartheid forces after Nelson Mandela's death), but has since largely removed himself from the public eye.
RETURN OF THE KING!
 
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