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Lists of Heads of Government and Heads of State

Time Enough

European Pollution Police Force
Pronouns
He/Him
Hypernormalisation...

Prime Ministers of Great Britain:
1997-2007: Tony Blair (Labour)

1997 (Majority) def: John Major (Conservative), Paddy Ashdown (Liberal Democrat)
2001 (Majority) def: Ken Clarke (Conservative), Charles Kennedy (Lib Dem)
2005 (Majority) def: Ken Clarke (Conservative), Charles Kennedy (Lib Dem)

2007-2010: Gordon Brown (Labour)
2010-2015: David Miliband (Labour)
2010 (Coalition with Lib Dems) def: David Davies (Conservative), Simon Hughes (Lib Dem), Alex Salmond (SNP), Caroline Lucas (Green Party)
2015-2019: George Osborne (Conservative)
2015 (Majority) def: David Miliband (Labour), Simon Hughes (Lib Dem), Nicola Sturgeon (SNP), Natalie Bennett (Green Party), Douglas Carswell (UKIP)
2019-: Liz Kendall (Labour)
2019 (Coalition with Lib Dems) def: George Osborne (Conservative), Susan Kramer (Lib Dems), Nicola Sturgeon (SNP), Natalie Bennett-Cat Boyd (Green Party), Micheal Gove (UKIP)

Presidents of the United States:
2001-2005: Al Gore (Democratic)

2000 (With Joe Lieberman) def: George W. Bush (Republican), Donald Trump (Reform), Ralph Nader (Green)
2005-2009: John McCain (Republican)
2004 (With Jeb Bush) def: Al Gore (Democratic), Jerry Brown (Reform-Green)
2009-2017: Hillary Clinton (Democratic)
2008 (With Barack Obama) def: John McCain (Republican), Mike Gavel (Reform)
2012 (With Barack Obama) def: Mitt Romney (Republican), Lincoln Chafee (Reform), Ron Paul (Libertarian)

2017-: Jeb Bush (Republican)
2016 (With Marco Rubio) def: Kamala Harris (Democrat), Bernie Sanders ('Progressive Democrat'-Reform)
2020 (With Marco Rubio) def: Amy Kolbuchar (Democrat), Tulsi Gabbard (Reform), Marianne Williamson (Progressive)


*Scuba Z The Vanishing American Family starts playing, footage of Blair, Brown, Miliband, Osborne and Kendall all trying to Prime Ministeral despite chaos happening around them. Al Gore looks depressed, John McCain awkwardly shakes Jeb’s hand, Clinton grins a false grin, Jeb Bush fails to high five a supporter. Declining voting numbers, Jets bomb Syria, Protests occur outside banks, a man stares gloomily at a TV screen...*

“We live in a world where the powerful deceive us. We know they lie, they know we know they lie, they don’t care. We say we care, but we do nothing. And nothing ever changes. It’s normal. Welcome to the post-truth world.”

“Despite the attempts to change society, it’s seems that the world is becoming more and more like a business. Politicians no longer offer visions of the future but instead manage the world we have and tell us they will keep forces of darkness away.”

“We see how the forces of change have become harnessed by people who actively seek to destroy the system that have been built, but offer no alternative. In this documentary it will explore how the world is becoming more and more managed even as it decays around and how we have seen this before...because we’re living in a false reality”

Hypernormalisation, Adam Curtis 2016
 

Uhura's Mazda

If it were up to me then money would be free
Published by SLP
Location
Tamaki Makaurau
If It Had Happened Otherwise

List of Prime Ministers of the United Kingdom
1919: Winston Churchill (Conservative-Liberal-National Democratic coalition)
1919-1923: H. A. L. Fisher (Conservative-Liberal-National Democratic coalition) [1]
1923-1927: G. M. Trevelyan (Conservative-Liberal-National coalition) [2]
1927-1928: Philip Guedalla (Liberal minority) [3]
1928-1936: G. K. Chesterton (Round Table) [4]
1936: Ronald Knox (Round Table)
1936-1939: J. C. Squire (Round Table) [5]
1939-1947: Hilaire Belloc (Round Table) [6]
1947-1960: Harold Nicolson (Round Table) [7]
1960-1974: Sir Charles Petrie (Round Table) [8]
1974-1975: Milton Waldman (Round Table) [9]

[1] - After the failed Bolshevik uprising was crushed at the Battle of Deptford, the coalition government was forced to rapidly regroup - not least because of the deaths of half the Cabinet in bombings and executions. Winston Churchill, who had led in the final stages of the crackdown after the demise of Lloyd George, was encouraged to step aside as a gesture of good faith towards the moderates and those rebels who now chose peaceful means of political action. The perfect replacement was a straight-forward Liberal with a hunger for incremental improvements in the social sphere: H. A. L. Fisher. He achieved very little of his reformist objectives, but managed to hold the Tories and Liberals together during the trying period of reconstruction. In the meantime, the Labour Party split between patriots and seditionists, with the former faction joining their former fellows in the National Democratic and Labour Party, which enjoyed an electoral pact with the other government parties.

[2] - Fisher resigned shortly after the results of the 1923 election came through: the surge in support for the Socialist Party boded ill for the safety of the loyal citizens of Britain, and he no longer felt that he could achieve a reconciliation between the two tribes that were emerging in post-war Britain. In came a new man, the urbane historian G. M. Trevelyan, who was touted as a new hope of progress and constitutionalism by the Liberal Party, but angered many in the Conservative Party, who were beginning to think that compromise with the Socialists was a fundamentally doomed option. However, the Tories knew that they couldn't govern alone, and Trevelyan's earlier forthrightness was clearly tempered by every day he spent in a position of actual responsibility, so the coalition held for a little longer. However, Trevelyan struggled to match his intellectual talents with the bonhomie required of a parliamentary statesman, and faced a leadership challenge within the Liberal Party. He lost and led a small faction into the Conservatives.

[3] - Philip Guedalla took power with only the support of the mainstream Liberals, while the Tories and Trevelyanites went into Opposition - partly because of the new Prime Minister's pungent wit. For the brief months of the Guedalla ministry, the Liberals relied on external support from the Socialists - a situation which brought about immense public anger. Guedalla was rumoured (on no factual basis) to be in league with the USSR, while anti-Semites had a field day and the militias of the anti-Socialist trade unions battled the extremists on the streets of London. When the clock ran out on a prorogued parliament, it was no surprise that the Liberals and their long-time abettors in the Conservative Party were thrown out on their ears.

[4] - Chesterton parlayed his reputation as a jaunty wit into a chance at high office by promoting his Round Table as the only basis for a new, united, national consensus. The party (if such it was) sprang from his own Distributist followers, as well as the Guild Socialists of the New Age and the Social Creditors on the fringes, and received a major boost from its merger with the ex-coalitionist National Party (the patriotic wing of the old Labour Representation Committee, with the vocal support of craft unionists and ex-servicemen) in 1927. Chesterton, seen as the personification of the British duffer, achieved enormous popular support for his replacement of Parliament with a corporatist Chamber, his fundamental reforms of the economy during the Great Depression, his defence of traditional social standards against the onslaughts of the flappers, and his sterling support for fraternal regimes in Spain and Italy. He introduced the Christian ethos into policymaking for the first time in British history: the Socialists locked up in his camps were allowed to go free as soon as they had succumbed to the "invisible hook" tugging them back towards political normality.

[5] - G. K. Chesterton could not survive forever - especially not in his condition. Although speculation in terms of his successor had been open and rife (and largely focused on his cousin A. K. Chesterton and the former National MP Sir Oswald Mosley), few people suspected that the choice of the Grand Council, meeting under the interim leadership of Chesterton's close colleague Ronald Knox, would fall on a has-been literary editor named J. C. Squire. While Squire (a former Marxist) had long been a key intellectual figure on the Right, he attracted opposition from the elitist Nicolson faction, who thought him vulgar. Squire's weakness for day-to-day leadership allowed the anti-State opposition forces to unite under Winston Churchill and begin a Resistance campaign of terrorism and gangsterism.

[6] - Squire resigned in favour of ex-Liberal Hilaire Belloc as soon as the going got tough. Belloc was a unifying figure throughout the Emergency: despite wasting political capital on efforts to bring the Church of England back into communion with the Church of Rome, he expressed a fiercely independent sense of Britishness that was based on traditional virtues and hatred of the Jews - both of which attracted huge support from the yeomen of the land. Later, it emerged that Belloc was simply exporting the Problem to the German Reich. It is also suspected that Winston Churchill and some of his Marxist comrades were dealt with in a similar manner.

[7] - With the post-Emergency world still waiting to be formed, Harold Nicolson took office with a pledge to bring the promises of Tory-Socialist synthesis to fruition with his 'National Labour Plan'. Although the economy had previously been largely directed by the State on an ad-hoc basis, this was the first five-year-plan, and it combined with the American aid given to anti-Communist European governments (e.g. those of Petain and Ciano, both of whom were facing serious insurgencies) to produce a post-war boom. This coincided with huge population growth (a 'Baby Boom') encouraged by the Government's financial incentives towards motherhood, and Nicolson is held in great adulation even by modern opponents of Chestertonianism for his institution of a true Welfare State. Instead of decadent Socialist versions of the idea, Nicolson's revolved around empowering the receiver by creating, for each deserving citizen, a quantity of State Credit to be paid as a monthly dividend.

[8] - Petrie was a much more conservative figure within the Round Table than Nicolson had been, and had occasionally directed coded allegations of homosexuality towards his factional rival. However, the Grand Council nominated him in succession to the aging Nicolson on a unanimous vote, and sat back to watch him retrench the Welfare State. Although younger members of the Round Table favoured the development of a United States of Europe and the acknowledgement of separatist aims in the Third World, with a view to creating a Third Force against Communism and Godless Wall Street Finance Capitalism, Petrie shut down the modernists with an iron fist - and, ultimately, this is what led to the decline of the Round Table State. Party elites became increasingly greedy with the proceeds of economic development, and corruption increased. There were even rumours of a ring of influential paedophiles extending as high as Sir James Savile himself. Petrie simply left these issues to fester, while he busied himself on replacing King Edward VIII (who had been forced to reside in New Zealand for several decades due to his dangerous liberalism) with the Duke of Bavaria, which came to pass in 1967 - really the apogee of the diplomatic efforts of the aged Adolf Hitler.

[9] - Petrie's retirement was forced by the Grand Council, but few people had any ideas of what to do next. The appointment of Milton Waldman as Prime Minister was a very contentious vote, as Waldman was not only a colourless Party apparatchik, but had also been born in America - a fact which worried the younger, more internationalist members of the Round Table. After defeating that faction in the inner sanctum, Waldman set out to end them comprehensively: he reintroduced democratic rule and held free elections, complete with observers from America and other democratic states.

The process of de-Chestertonisation has been a long and arduous one.
 

Comrade TruthTeller

So much for hope in politics.
Location
Pinner, London
Pronouns
He/him
1979-1994: Margaret Thatcher (Conservative and Unionist)
1979: (Majority) def: James Callaghan (Labour), David Steel (Liberal)
1983: (Majority) def: Michael Foot (Labour), David Steel and Roy Jenkins (SDP-Liberal Alliance)
1987: (Majority) def: Neil Kinnock (Labour), David Steel and David Owen (SDP-Liberal Alliance)
1992: (Majority) def: Neil Kinnock (Labour), Paddy Ashdown (Liberal Democrat)
1994-1997: Joseph R. Biden II (Conservative and Unionist)
1997-2006: Frank Dobson (Labour)
1997: (Majority) def: Joseph R. Biden II (Conservative and Unionist), Paddy Ashdown (Liberal Democrat), Alex Salmond (SNP)
2001: (Majority) def: Michael Howard (Conservative and Unionist), Charles Kennedy (Liberal Democrat), Alex Salmond (SNP)
2006: (Majority) def: Michael Howard (Conservative and Unionist), Charles Kennedy (Liberal Democrat), Roseanna Cunningham (SNP)
2006-2015: Alan Johnson (Labour)
2010: (Minority, with SNP C&S) def: Kenneth Clarke (Conservative and Unionist), Charles Kennedy (Liberal Democrat), Roseanna Cunningham (SNP), Nigel Farage (UKIP)
2015-present: Joseph R. Biden II (Conservative and Unionist)
2015: (Majority) def: Alan Johnson (Labour), Norman Lamb (Liberal Democrat), Keith Brown (SNP), Nigel Farage (UKIP)
2020: (Majority) def: Jonathan Ashworth (Labour), Keith Brown (SNP), Nigel Farage (UKIP), Alistair Carmichael (Liberal Democrat)
 

Time Enough

European Pollution Police Force
Pronouns
He/Him
1979-1994: Margaret Thatcher (Conservative and Unionist)
1979: (Majority) def: James Callaghan (Labour), David Steel (Liberal)
1983: (Majority) def: Michael Foot (Labour), David Steel and Roy Jenkins (SDP-Liberal Alliance)
1987: (Majority) def: Neil Kinnock (Labour), David Steel and David Owen (SDP-Liberal Alliance)
1992: (Majority) def: Neil Kinnock (Labour), Paddy Ashdown (Liberal Democrat)
1994-1997: Joseph R. Biden II (Conservative and Unionist)
1997-2006: Frank Dobson (Labour)
1997: (Majority) def: Joseph R. Biden II (Conservative and Unionist), Paddy Ashdown (Liberal Democrat), Alex Salmond (SNP)
2001: (Majority) def: Michael Howard (Conservative and Unionist), Charles Kennedy (Liberal Democrat), Alex Salmond (SNP)
2006: (Majority) def: Michael Howard (Conservative and Unionist), Charles Kennedy (Liberal Democrat), Roseanna Cunningham (SNP)
2006-2015: Alan Johnson (Labour)
2010: (Minority, with SNP C&S) def: Kenneth Clarke (Conservative and Unionist), Charles Kennedy (Liberal Democrat), Roseanna Cunningham (SNP), Nigel Farage (UKIP)
2015-present: Joseph R. Biden II (Conservative and Unionist)
2015: (Majority) def: Alan Johnson (Labour), Norman Lamb (Liberal Democrat), Keith Brown (SNP), Nigel Farage (UKIP)
2020: (Majority) def: Jonathan Ashworth (Labour), Keith Brown (SNP), Nigel Farage (UKIP), Alistair Carmichael (Liberal Democrat)
This is interesting and I would like to know more about how we got here, also how did Thatcher win 1992?
 
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Comrade TruthTeller

So much for hope in politics.
Location
Pinner, London
Pronouns
He/him
This is interesting and I would like to know more about how we got here, also how did Thatcher win 1992?
Honestly? I didn't give it much thought. I just had Thatcher stay on and win 1992 as a sort of butterfly from Biden having been an MP since 1970 onwards. The main idea thought around it was 'What if the Biden family never left the UK?' and I wanted him to have a short stint in the 90s and so I had an extended Thatcher stay.
 

Indicus

<insert title here>
Location
Trawno
Pronouns
he/him
Cabinet of India (1982-3)

Prime Minister: Jagjivan Ram (Indian National Congress (Democratic))

Deputy Prime Minister: Charan Singh (Indian Democratic Revolutionary Party)

Minister of Home Affairs: Charan Singh (Indian Democratic Revolutionary Party)
Minister of Finance: Yashwantrao Chavan (Indian National Congress (Democratic))
Minister of External Affairs: Karan Singh (Indian National Congress (Democratic))
Minister of Defence: Atal Bihari Vajpayee (Indian Democratic Revolutionary Party)
Minister of Information and Broadcasting: H.N Bahugana (Indian National Congress (Democratic))
Minister of Industry: Raj Narain (Indian Democratic Revolutionary Party)
Minister of Agriculture: Parkash Singh Badal (Akali Dal)
Minister of Works and Housing and Supply and Rehabilitation: Biju Patnaik (Indian Democratic Revolutionary Party)
Minister for Energy: Madhu Limaye (Indian Democratic Revolutionary Party)
Minister of Education: Nanaji Deshmukh (Indian Democratic Revolutionary Party)
Minister of Law and Justice: Hans Raj Khanna (Indian Democratic Revolutionary Party)
Minister of Communications: Purushottam Kaushik (Indian Democratic Revolutionary Party)
Minister of the Railways: Lal Krishna Advani (Indian Democratic Revolutionary Party)
Minister of Health: Mohan Dharia (Indian Democratic Revolutionary Party)
Minister of Petroleum: Madhu Dandavate (Indian Democratic Revolutionary Party)
Minister of Labour and Parliamentary Affairs: Ravindra Varma (Indian Democratic Revolutionary Party)
Minister of Commerce: Subramanian Swamy (Indian Democratic Revolutionary Party)
Minister of Steel, Mines, and Coals: Krishna Kumar Goyal (Indian Democratic Revolutionary Party)
Minister of Tourism and Civil Aviation: Hitendra Desai (Indian Democratic Revolutionary Party)

The 1982 presidential election and electoral defeat of President Sanjay Gandhi put an end to his brutal reign of terror, and the new president Vijaya Lakshmi Pandit freed political prisoners and called for a general election. The subsequent election was won totally and utterly by the Democratic alliance, an alliance between the Indian Democratic Revolutionary Party (an alliance of much of the opposition to Indira Gandhi), the Indian National Congress (Democratic) (a breakaway group from the Congress party), the Communists, the Marxists, and various small parties, which won 468 seats in the Lok Sabha in total. However, the Democrats lacked a real leader. Jayaprakash Narayan, who led the opposition before the Emergency, died in jail in 1978 from kidney failure (many allege that he was poisoned), and J.B. Kripalani, its other great old man, was on his deathbed. Thus, Charan Singh and Jagjivan Ram, the two people with the highest levels of support in the Democratic alliance, were forced to allow the elected MPs to decide. They decisively elected Jagjivan Ram for prime minister despite his prominent role as an Indira supporter prior to the Emergency. Subsequently, he became the first Dalit prime minister in Indian history.

The composition of the cabinet proved a difficult balancing act. Charan Singh was naturally made deputy PM, as well as the Home Minister, and as such he was second in command. Yashwantrao Chavan, who previously served numerous portfolios in the cabinet under Indira before being sidelined by Sanjay, was given the ministry of finance, while Karan Singh, the former crown prince of Jammu and Kashmir who went on to become a cabinet minister in Indira's government was made Foreign Minister. The far less experienced Vajpayee was made minister of defence. Other notable appointments include Raj Narain, who beat Sanjay Gandhi in his own constituency, as minister of industry; Hans Raj Khanna, who previously served on the Supreme Court where he famously disagreed on its ruling that the government had the power to abrogate human rights before later being removed by President Sanjay Gandhi, as minister of law; and Subramanian Swamy, who in 1976 famously entered Parliament and denounced the government despite being a fugitive, as minister of commerce. The Communists and Marxists refused to allow ministers into the "bourgeois" cabinet, intent on only giving outside support until the restoration of the constitution.

After his honeymoon period, and after successfully passing the Forty-Third Amendment, which amended out the entirety of what Sanjay had placed within the constitution and turned India back into a parliamentary system while also adding further checks on the government, it suddenly faced the issue of actual governance. Charan Singh proved to be at loggerheads with the administration, disagreeing on most fundamental policies with Jagjivan Ram. Yashwantrao Chavan proved overall competent as minister of finance, but he upset many who desired more fundamental reform of the Indian economy. Karan Singh proved likewise competent in his portfolio as foreign minister, famously addressing the United Nations in Hindi, and his technocratic mode of running the foreign ministry received particular praise. But what surprised many was that Vajpayee, despite being formerly a member of the Hindu nationalist Jan Sangh, proved surprisingly competent and willing to work in the cabinet despite Jagjivan Ram's intense loathing of Hindu nationalism and Brahminism.

It was in 1983 that this cabinet faced its first scandal. Subramanian Swamy was dismissed from the cabinet and this, Jagjivan Ram stated, was because he made anti-Muslim statements. But Swamy denied this, alleging that Jagjivan Ram had conspired with Vajpayee to sideline him. By 1984, he aligned with the Sanjay Congress - with Sanjay Gandhi imprisoned over charges of gross corruption, his wife Maneka Gandhi became its leader and she proved quite willing to work with Hindu nationalists despite being a Sikh. The bickering between Charan Singh and Jagjivan Ram and its sheer scale was leaked to the press, creating a scandal that the two hastily tried to tape over and dismiss. But the cabinet truly collapsed when, in 1984, Jagjivan Ram announced the implementation of caste-based reservations in government jobs and university spaces. The result was a massive wave of protest, particularly by upper-caste students who felt their future jobs were on the line, and these protests included self-immolation. Charan Singh, a member of the Jat caste, accused Jagjivan Ram of being anti-Jat for giving them insufficient reservations, and he left the cabinet and created his own party. The Hindu nationalists Vajpayee and Advani also left the cabinet to create their own party, as their Brahmin-Bania base were suddenly angered. In an attempt to crush these splitters, Jagjivan Ram decided to hold an election. This proved a mistake. Not only was his majority in Parliament massively narrowed, but the Sanjay Congress rose from 27 seats to 116, thanks to Maneka Gandhi's competence and open toying with Hindu nationalism. And looking past the horizon, India's finances were getting worse and worse, aggravated by Sanjay Gandhi's years of theft from the treasury. Jagjivan Ram was to face a few more severe challenges by the time his tenure was done....
 

Qaz_plm

SLP's only Clown egirl
Location
Inbetween dreams and reality
Pronouns
She/her
Britain as Japan(with some liberties take )
(a remake of this)
1932-1940:Arthur Harris(Military)
1940-1945:Oswald Mosley(Imperial)
1945-1945:Prince Henry Windsor(Royal family)
1945-1947:Archibald Sinclair(Liberal)
1947-1948:Ian Paisley(Conservative)
1948-1954:Clement Attlee(Social Democratic)
1954-1956:Jim Griffiths(Social Democratic)
1956-1957:Hebert Morrison(Social Democratic)
1957-1960:Walter Walker(Social Democratic)
1960-1964:James Callaghan(Social Democratic)
1964-1972:Michael Foot(Social Democratic)
1972-1974:Bob Mellish(Social Democratic)
1974-1976:Dave Steel(Social Democratic)
1976-1978:Denis Healey(Social Democratic)
1978-1980:Harold Wilson ±(Social Democratic)
1980-1982:Ted Heath(Social Democratic)
1982-1987:Arthur Scargill(Social Democratic)
1987-1989:Peter Shore(Social Democratic)
1989-1991:Gordon Brown(Social Democratic)
1991-1993:Roy Jenkins(Social Democratic)
1993-1994:Bryan Gould(Social Democratic)
1994-1996:Anthony Meyer(New Tory)
1996-1998:Tony Blair(Social Democratic)
1998-2000:Michael Howard(Social Democratic)
2000-2001:Ken Clarke(Social Democratic)
2001-2006:David Owen(Social Democratic)
2006-2007:Robin Cook(Social Democratic)
2007-2008:Alistair Darling(Social Democratic)
2008-2009:William Hague(Social Democratic)
2009-2012:Matt Hancock(Tory)
2012-2020:Robin Cook(Social Democratic)
2020-2021:Yvette Cooper(Social Democratic)
 
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Ares96

es wird wieder passieren
Published by SLP
Location
Fubbicktown
Pronouns
he/him
Britain as Japan(with some liberties take )
(a remake of this)
1945-1945:Prince Henry Windsor(Royal family)
1945-1947:Archibald Sinclair(Liberal)
1947-1948:Ian Paisley(Conservative)
1948-1954:Clement Attlee(Social Democratic)
1954-1956:Jim Griffiths(Social Democratic)
1956-1957:Hebert Morrison(Social Democratic)
1957-1960:Walter Walker(Social Democratic)
1960-1964:James Callaghan(Social Democratic)
1964-1972:Michael Foot(Social Democratic)
1972-1974:Bob Mellish(Social Democratic)
1974-1976:Dave Steel(Social Democratic)
1976-1978:Denis Healey(Social Democratic)
1978-1980:Harold Wilson ±(Social Democratic)
1980-1982:Ted Heath(Social Democratic)
1982-1987:Arthur Scargill(Social Democratic)
1987-1989:Peter Shore(Social Democratic)
1989-1991:Gordon Brown(Social Democratic)
1991-1993:Roy Jenkins(Social Democratic)
1993-1994:Bryan Gould(Social Democratic)
1994-1996:Anthony Meyer(New Tory)
1996-1998:Tony Blair(Social Democratic)
1998-2000:Michael Howard(Social Democratic)
2000-2001:Ken Clarke(Social Democratic)
2001-2006:David Owen(Social Democratic)
2006-2007:Robin Cook(Social Democratic)
2007-2008:Alistair Darling(Social Democratic)
2008-2009:William Hague(Social Democratic)
2009-2012:Matt Hancock(Tory)
2012-2020:Robin Cook(Social Democratic)
2020-2021:Yvette Cooper(Social Democratic)
I have so many questions about this
 

Anarcho-Occultist

Well-known member
Chairmen of the National Socialist German Workers' Party (NSDAP)
Anton Drexler 1920-1921
Adolf Hitler 1921-1923

Hermann Esser 1923-1926
Ernst Rohm 1926-1928
Erich Ludendorff 1928-1930
Hermann Goering 1930-1933
Gregor Strasser 1933-1935
Joseph Goebbels 1935-1940
Otto Strasser 1940-1947


The NSDAP is one of the more unusual historical footnotes of Germany in between the world wars. The NSDAP was founded in 1920 by Anton Drexler as a revanchist, far-right, anti-Semitic party seeking retribution for the German defeat in World War I. The NSDAP briefly experienced a period of growth under the second leader, Adolf Hitler, but following his death in an ill-fated attempt to overthrow the Weimar Republic, the NSDAP greatly weakened. Hitler's ally Hermann Esser would take over the party and lead it in the 1925 elections, but was discredited following the triumph of Wilhelm Marx's Center Party. From there, the party would undergo quite a bit of difficulty owing to divisions between various wings of the party. The fight for control between Rohm and Hess in 1926 and the successful ouster of Rohm by supporters of Erich Ludendorff in 1928 weakened the party going into the post-Great Depression elections. Even under the relatively more pragmatic leadership of Hermann Goering in 1933, the party failed to gain ground. Ultimately, the NSDAP would see a bit of a revival in the late 1930's, as fears of the USSR caused the national government to crack down on communists. The 'Strasserist' wing of the NSDAP represented by the Strasser brothers and Joseph Goebbels would seize control of the party claiming that reaching angry members of the working class was the most viable strategy for the NSDAP. Under these three leaders, the NSDAP began to regain some of its lost influence. Ultimately, however, this pivot to the left would lead to the party being banned in 1947 on the basis of suspected Soviet ties just before the USSR launched an invasion of Poland, thus beginning World War II. This has not stopped some of the NSDAP leadership from being staples of German alternate history (especially Otto Strasser and Goebbels, though Gregor Strasser, Goering and Ludendorff sometimes are selected).
 

Beata Beatrix

May God Bless and Keep the Tsar in Quarantine
Location
Portland, OR
Pronouns
she/her/hers
I quite like this, although I've always thought that had Hitler died in 1923 (either by being shot during the putsch or in the suicide attempt at Putzi's house) that Albrecht von Graefe and his DVFP would've taken de facto control of the volkisch movement, considering that the Strasser boys were actually making moves to merge with the DVFP while Hitler was in 'prison'. Von Graefe was pretty crappy, though, and so frankly the most optimistic thing I see in Germany's future is the iron boot of Goerdeler or Von Schleicher, rather than that of Hitler.
 

Ed Costello

My dinners are of moderate size, GARY
Sea Lion Press staff
Published by SLP
Location
The Pool of Life
Pronouns
He/Him
What do you do when you can't sleep? I personally chose to spend an hour painstakingly copying hexadecimal codes into the forum software to bring you this list in all its technicolour glory.


Coalition Coupon Retained [1]

Prime Ministers of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland

1908-1910: H. H. Asquith (Liberal)
1910-1915: H. H. Asquith (Liberal with support from IPP and Labour)

1910 (Jan) def. Arthur Balfour (Conservative), John Redmond (IPP), Arthur Henderson (Labour)
1910 (Dec) def. Arthur Balfour (Conservative), John Redmond (IPP), Arthur Henderson (Labour)

1915-1916: H. H. Asquith (Liberal leading War Coalition with Conservatives and Labour)
1916-1918: David Lloyd George (Liberal leading War Coalition with Conservatives and Labour)

1918-1921: David Lloyd George† (Liberal leading Coalition Coupon with Conservatives and NDLP)

1918 def. Bonar Law (Conservative), Eamon de Valera (Sinn Fein), William Adamson (Labour), H. H. Asquith (Independent Liberal), George Barnes (NDLP)

Prime Ministers of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

1921-1927: Austen Chamberlain (National Conservative leading Coalition Coupon with National Liberals and NDLP)
1923 def. J. R Clynes (Labour), Winston Churchill (National Liberal), Bonar Law† (Independent Conservative), Donald Maclean (Independent Liberal), George Barnes (NDLP), A. V. Alexander (Co-op), Shapurji Saklatvala (CPGB)
1927-1928: Winston Churchill (National Liberal leading Coalition Coupon with National Conservatives and NDLP)
1928-1929: J. R. Clynes (Labour leading ‘Opposition Coalition’ with Independent Liberals, Independent Conservatives, Co-op and Social Credit)

1928 def. Stanley Baldwin (National Conservative), Winston Churchill (National Liberal), Leo Amery (Independent Conservative), Donald Maclean (Independent Liberal), George Barnes (NDLP), A. V. Alexander (Co-op), C. H. Douglas (Social Credit), Walton Newbould (CPGB)
1929-1931: George Barnes (NDLP leading Coalition Coupon with National Liberals, National Conservatives and Social Credit)
1929 def. J. R. Clynes (Labour), Stanley Baldwin (National Conservative), Winston Churchill (National Liberal), Donald Maclean (Independent Liberal), C. H. Douglas (Social Credit), A. V. Alexander (Co-op), Walton Newbould (CPGB), Leo Amery (Independent Conservative)
1931-1935: Sir John Simon (National Conservative leading Coalition Coupon with National Liberals, Social Credit and NDLP)
1932 def. Ramsay Macdonald (Labour), Neville Chamberlain (National Liberal), William Wedgwood Benn (Radical), Oswald Mosley (Social Credit), A. V. Alexander (Co-op), Shapurji Saklatvala (CPGB), John Taylor (NDLP)
1935-1938: Ramsay Macdonald† (Labour leading Popular Front with Radicals, Co-op and CPGB)
1935 def. Sir John Simon (National Conservative), Richard Acland (National Liberal), William Wedgwood Benn (Radical), A. V. Alexander (Co-op), Oswald Mosley (Social Credit), R. Palme Dutt (CPGB), John Taylor (NDLP)
1938-1938: Megan Lloyd George (Radical leading Popular Front with Labour, Co-op and CPGB)
1938-0000: A. V. Alexander (Co-op leading Popular Front with Labour, Radical and CPGB)


Asquith doesn't get back into Parliament after losing his seat in 1918, followed by Lloyd George conveniently dying before he can turn Chanak into a Crisis. Chamberlain and Churchill perpetuate the Coupon as a grand bulwark of anti-socialism, which leads to Interesting Parliamentary Arithmetic where neither Labour nor the National Parties control enough seats to govern alone, necessitating the support of smaller parties to govern and bringing about the gradual evolution of two more-or-less stable coalitions that eventually (i.e. immediately after the end of this list) become parties in their own right.



[1] I'm not even sorry
 

Time Enough

European Pollution Police Force
Pronouns
He/Him
Future Shock: A Dumb List:
So I was thinking the other day...how do we get to this thing below?

1598712038743.png

Whereupon this thing of a list below was spawned, in which I guess politicians across Britain decided to start huffing glue and make incredibly bad choices in leaders...

Prime Ministers of Great Britian:
1970-1978: Ted Heath

1970 (Majority) def: Harold Wilson (Labour), Jeremy Thorpe (Liberal)
1974 (Majority) def: James Callaghan (Labour), Jeremy Thorpe (Liberal)

1978-1979: John Stonehouse (Labour)
1978 (Scottish National Party Confidence & Supply) def: Ted Heath (Conservative), David Steel (Liberal), William Wolfe (Scottish National Party), Tony Benn (Social Democrats)
1979-1982: Louis Mountbatten (Independent- Leading Grand Coalition)
1982-1990: Micheal Heseltine (Conservative)
1982 (Majority) def: Robert Kilroy Silk (Labour), David Steel (Liberal), Roseanna Cunningham (New Scottish Party), Tony Benn (Social Democrats), Neil Kinnock (Workers)
1986 (Coalition with Liberals) def: Robert Kilroy Silk (Labour), Clement Freud (Liberal), Roseanna Cunningham (New Scottish Party), Tony Benn (Social Democrats), Neil Kinnock (Workers)

1990: Malcolm Rifkind (Conservative)
1990-1998: Micheal Meacher (Social Democrats)

1990 (Coalition with Workers) def: Malcolm Rifkind (Conservative), Robert Kilroy Silk (Labour), Paddy Ashdown (Ct Liberal), Roseanna Cunningham (NSP), Neil Kinnock (Workers)
1994 (Majority) def: Norman Tebbitt (Conservative), Robert Kilroy Silk (Labour), Paddy Ashdown (Democrats), Alex Salmond (NSP), Neil Kinnock (Workers)

1998-2006: Margaret Beckett (Social Democrats)
1998 (Majority) def: Norman Tebbitt-Robert Kilroy Silk (Labour-Conservative Alliance), Matthew Taylor (Democrats), Roseanna Cunningham (NSP), John Prescott (Workers)
2002 (Majority) def: John Redwood-Robert Kilroy Silk (Lab-Con Alliance), Matthew Taylor (Democrats), Roaseanna Cunningham (NSP), Ann Black (Workers)

2006-: Kate Hoey (Labour-Conservative Alliance)
2006 (Majority) def: Margaret Beckett (Social Democrats), Matthew Taylor (Democrats), John Swinney (NSP), Ann Black (Workers)
 

Sideways

Halloween costume: Rosie Duffield but less scary
Published by SLP
Location
Teignmouth, Devon
Pronouns
She/Her
Based on a dream what I had

United Kingdom

1945-1956: Clement Atlee (Labour)

World War III broke out when the Berlin Airlift was shot down in 1949, leading to the Soviet invasion of West Germany, another national government and the nuclear bombing of Colchester. America grew less and less discriminating in their reprisal nuclear attacks as Europe fell to communism. By 1954, continental Europe was under Soviet domination and while the Allies dominated the seas all hope was lost of victory.

During the uneasy peace, street fighting broke out in Britain over the starvation rations. However, with Soviet allies mostly interned the leadership tended towards forms of English Trotskyism. As riots spread across the country, much of the government escaped, temporarily, to Canada. However riot and revolution was beginning to spread to the Americas.

Republic of Great Britain

1956-1960: Ted Grant (Leftist Bloc)

For four years, Britain was a bulwark of revolution in the formerly capitalist world, as Revolutionary forces took the main cities in America and the tenor of the revolution there began to change as white, anglo-saxon figures took leading roles and tapped into patriotism. The new alliance of South Africa, Australia, and America found itself fighting a war of reconquest as Maoist and Soviet forces snapped at Africa and Asia. The political situation of the time was chaotic and changeable as pro-capitalist forces attempted to triangulate between the enemies within, without, and beyond all at once.

Oceania

1960-1962: Triumvirate (IngSoc)
Ted Grant (English Socialist Party); James P. Cannon (Socialist Workers' Party); Jack Kavanagh (Workers' League of Australia)

Oceania was founded on a promise of being a cohesive, unitary republic of the sort that had emerged in the Eurasian Soviet Union and the Eastasian People's Republic. But this was a difficult feat. There was no Mao, no Beria, but instead a chaotic handful of leaders in charge of a chaotic handful of parties.

One saving grace was the development of IngSoc as a party and ideology. It was a philosophy that had developed out of World War III and the British revolution - pragmatic, patriotic, entryist, and brutally conformist. IngSoc cells formed within other parties and would aim to convert to an outer party level of understanding, then indoctrinate people into the higher levels of the ideology. IngSoc was always the priority and their agents were willing to go as far as murder of political allies to achieve their goals.

Another useful development was NewSpeak - while English was by far the most common language in Oceania, it was spoken in various different ways and not at all in some areas in South America that Oceania was keen to incorporate. NewSpeak was initially intended as a simpler form of English for use in multilingual settings but soon became an important cultural project in its own right.

1962-1963: 2nd Triumvirate (IngSoc)
Emmanuel Goldstein; Murray Rothbard; Ted Grant

IngSoc finally took control of Oceania in 1962, and by the end of the year all other political parties had been banned.All functions of government were focused into three over arching super-ministries under one of the members of the triumvirate. All former laws were abolished and surprisingly few were put back in place, although the political police force of the Ministry of Love took an increasingly active role in keeping the peace.

1963-1965: 3rd Triumvirate (IngSoc)
Murray Rothbard; William Aaronson; Eric Edgar Cooke

The purges of 1963 saw the establishment of "Immediate Socialism" and Oceania declared an end to all class distinctions and capitalism. How meaningful this was is dubious - the proles were developing into a distinct underclass and society was collapsing. While Emmanuel Goldstein survived the initial purges by seeking shelter in Eurasia, he was assasinated in very short order. A fact that never quite made it into the national news in Oceania, where he developed into a convenient boogeyman figure. In 1965 the national legislature was shut down, leaving full power in the hands of the three ministries.

1965-1967: Collective Leadership (IngSoc)

The purges of '65 and '66 were the largest yet and it became clear that just as no one figure could run such a large and diverse country, nobody could publically be seen to control a part of it without risking themselves in a purge. The figure of Big Brother became more prominent, first as a mascot but increasingly it became common to speak about him as though he was real. By 1966 denying the existence of Big Brother became thought crime.

1967-1992: Big Brother (IngSoc)

Big Brother was officially vested in power in around 1967, although officially it was decided by around 1970 to deny that he had ever not been in power. The 70s were the highpoint of IngSoc, which controlled all organs of power not via intermediaries and personalities, but through sheer force of impersonal dogma. By the 80s, however, the system was collapsing. Prole riots were never reported but were not uncommon, and the economy was in free fall and almost nothing was produced and nobody was able to plan, innovate, record data or analyse trends without attracting the attention of the thought police. By 1987, Oceania was fighting to maintain control of South America. By 1988 it was decided that it was bravely focusing on conquoring South America for the first time. 1990 saw a peace with the two other great powers as Australia was wrecked by rebellions. The one saving grace was that Western Europe was under similar strain and Eastasia, overstretching itself into Africa and Asia, would soon follow suit.

1991 saw the beginning of civil war in America, and Big Brither began to recede from view, more useful as a symbol now that the state was unable to paper over the cracks with doublethink and purges.

People's Republic of Britain

1992-1993: Alan Johnson (IngSoc)

Alan Johnson was never formally the leader of the People's Republic, but as the Republic was coming together he was the most prominent figure. When IngSoc needed someone to negotiate with rebel towns, when it was necessary to negotiate a peace deal with the nasceant French Republic, Alan Johnson was the person in the fore.

As IngSoc receded, this became less true. By 1993, when the first semi-free elections were held (IngSoc controlled regions and company towns were allowed to appoint rather than elect representatives) he was seen to have been replaced. Though he continued to be a senior figure in IngSoc controlled areas, where it was treated as thought crime to believe that Oceania had fallen or the Big Brother was not in charge of increasingly large parts of the world.

1993-2000: David Allan (People's Republican Party)

Former news announcer David Allan was a calming face that the British populance could get behind, but he was not a powerful figure. Across the country standards of living were dropping as formerly party controlled property was "privatised" by whoever took over it. People found themselves suddenly paying "rent" to mob bosses. The election on 1999 was almost entirely appointed rather than elected, but the state struggled on

2000-2004: Tam McGraw (People's Republican Party)
On New Years Eve 1999 David Allan announced, to many people's surprise, that he was standing down. Former prole ganster Tam MacGraw took his place. This was of great concern to some former Party members who felt it would mean more Kleptocracy, but it was in fact quite successful. Over four years much of the remaining IngSoc territory was cleared, leaving the Party in control of little more than small parts of Inner London. The newly privatised properties allowed big gangs to expand into actual businesses, which allowed them to operate in more official ways - not just collecting rent but also making repairs. Not just ignoring the rules, but writing laws to protect their property. By the end of four years, some semblance of the rule of law had been re-established.

2004-2005: Robert Kilroy (People's Republican Party)

Taking over after what was widely considered to be the suicide of Tam MacGraw, Kilroy continued to expand the private sector and formalise laws, although his time as president was relatively short. In 2005 he did what no leader of Britain had done in sixty years - he lost an election and peacefully handed over power to a rival party.

2005-2011: John Prescott (IngSoc) Coalition with George Galloway (Communist Party PRB)

IngSoc still controlled some areas of London - by now only really the towers of the three ministries and some areas around them - but outside of those areas, the Party had adapted and become a broadly left of centre organisation that did some work in society and could contest elections. This was still a rarity, and the organisation was able to win a slight plurality in the Congress - which became a majority when they agreed to work alongside the Goldsteinist Communists.

Corporations lost their right to vote on people's behalf and IngSoc surprised voters by applying the same rules to their own territories. The few remaining areas that considered themselves to be controlled by Big Brother's world state of Oceania were now relegated to perhaps being allowed seats on London City Council.

During this time the state also introduced basic unemployment benefits, orphanages, and even some level of healthcare insurance.

2011-2017: Richard Littlejohn (People's Republican Party)

The 2011 election was contested mainly on the issue of vagrancy reform. IngSoc's policies of feeding and clothing the itinerant poor had created hotspots for poverty that created crime, disorder and disease. Littlejohn's government promised to clear the soup kitchens and abolish the worst of the orphanages. It was a difficult time for the state. While criminality decreased, starvation greatly increased, and public disorder did break out on a few occasions in protests and even riots.

Nonetheless it was an era of economic success and cultural development, as British businesses started to be seen overseas and the film and music industries were revived by new talents that pushed British culture across the world.

2017-2019: Steven Morrissey (Liberal Democratic Party)

The Liberal Democrats were meant to represent a third way between the handouts of IngSoc and the brutality of the PRP, but under Morrissey, the system never quite worked out. What was meant to happen was a freeze on immigration from deprived areas of Western Europe and a massive housebuilding programme that would employ the poor in building their own new homes. This never quite worked. Companies took the advances on their government contracts then did nothing with them, while even the minimal provisions that existed for social welfare went unmet.

A big part of the problem was that the civil service was mostly PRP and IngSoc loyalists, and finding new allies was hard for Morrissey, after just a year, and hangued on all sides, he handed power over to his party.

2019-2020: Triumvirate (Liberal Democratic Party)
Steven Yaxley; Vincent Cable; Kellie-Jay Minshull

No new President could be decided on, but a number of figures rose to dominance. Moving the seat of government into the old Ministry of Love building, the Triumvirate was able to conveniently replace much of the old bureaucracy in the process. For a strange few months, the upper levels of the seat of government believed themselves to be in a different state to the rest of Britain. But eventually the last few stragglers from Oceania were starved out.

Housing and social welfare commitments were mostly forgotten, and the triumvirate focused instead on whipping up patriotism and finding excuses to attack its ideological enemies in congress. The Liberal Democrat's also started to use government funds to arm their militia. While of course every political party has a militia it was previously understood that these were to be funded privately. Increasingly, the Liberal Democrats took on the function of a politicised police force. This was particularly notable in their breaking of the London transport strike.

2020: Collective Leadership (Liberal Democratic Party)

One by one, the original Triumvirate have been replaced with a confusing array of distant figures. Nobody is quite sure who they are anymore, or if they can still be voted out of office. The democratic organs of government are still in place, technically. But they've never been trusted and increasingly commentators are speaking in terms of if, not when, there's another election. The figure of Big Brother has even been rehabilitated by the party, as a national symbol and a human face of the government.

Despite this, there's no guarantee that the Liberal Democrats would even lose the next election. People are mostly happy. There is freedom of a sort, enough food, and clothes, and supplies. And there's peace. Perhaps this is as good as it gets?
 

Walpurgisnacht

Paul Zion
Location
Banned from the forum
Pronouns
He/Him
"The reason they call it a revolution is that you get back to where you started."
---Apocryphal, attributed to many a cynic​

This was a terrific take on probably the most-taked-on scenario on the Web. Particularly liked the idea of IngSoc's ideals of the Outer and Inner Party emerging from the Militant Tendency doing entryism, the probably suicide of Tam McGraw, and Oceania surviving in the upper levels of MiniLove.
 

Sideways

Halloween costume: Rosie Duffield but less scary
Published by SLP
Location
Teignmouth, Devon
Pronouns
She/Her
This was a terrific take on probably the most-taked-on scenario on the Web. Particularly liked the idea of IngSoc's ideals of the Outer and Inner Party emerging from the Militant Tendency doing entryism, the probably suicide of Tam McGraw, and Oceania surviving in the upper levels of MiniLove.
That was a big part of my dream - I was an outer Party admin in the dying remains of minilove, who was sent to the lower levels because we needed to find someone to authorise a requisition request. The society I found was one of those bad idiocracy style dictatorships - "ah, everyone is stupid now because too much working class breeding so you see this is the real dystopia" and I just was mostly pissed off at the lazy concept. But people were kind of transphobic so I flew a three kilometer long Culture spaceship through London burning my enemies then out to the moon. And that was fun.
 

Charles EP M.

Well-known member
Published by SLP
1929 - 1936: Ramsay Macdonald (coalition, National Labour)

1936 - 1941: Oswald Mosley (BUF minority)

1941 - 1944: Clement Attlee (Lab-Lib coalition)

1944 - 1953: Oswald Mosley (BUF)


Ramsay Macdonald's inglorious health collapse in office was the opening the charismatic Mosley needed - but not enough to win a majority. He was able to get some of his economic plans through by sheer force, and able to push rearmament, but the bulk of his policies were prevented. He negotiated with the King to accept a morganatic marriage and claimed to have "peace in our time" after negotiating with Hitler to allow for demilitarised Czechoslovakia and South Poland rump states under British protection, but the public saw this as a shabby outcome.

The Lab-Lib coalition, however, failed to survive the twin shocks of the Nazi-Soviet War and the Pacific War. The Far East was lost, the Royal Navy humiliated, and the British left criticised as too friendly to Stalin. Mosley regained power, this time with a majority, and was massively transformative: the corporate state, the modern welfare system, the immigration controls, the rationalisation of the Empire that saw unprofitable colonies sold off to friendly powers, and law & order and public decency pushes. The Tories weren't necessary for many people, and Labour was battered by a sea of "investigations". What finally undermined him was Northern Ireland, where (long having sympathies to the catholic Irish) he dissolved the government and aggressively forced reforms (including with aggressive force) to the fury of unionists; a party rebellion was put down but weakened him.

1953 - 1966: Clement Davies (Liberal)

1966 - 1969: Ted Heath (Liberal-Unionist coalition, then Liberal minority from 1969-70)

1970 - 1988: Jeremy Thorpe (Liberal)


The UK had thirty-five years of Liberal government, as the left never got over the battering of Labour and the right-wing was split three ways between this, the BUF, and the Nationalists. Britain was once again famous for social and economic liberalism, the BUF constantly kept out; the Empire ended and Heath, though it cost him majority and then leadership, took the country into the newly formed European Economic Alliance. For thirty-five years, Britain effectively ran Europe and was seen as the Quiet Man of the globe, a nation of stability while American-style capitalist democracy, several brands of communism, and "democratic fascism" fought for dominance.

Underneath the surface, discontent was growing: Thorpe was quietly corrupt but, worse, not a racist AND ever-openly gay. The BUF couldn't topple him for a while but, over and over, it could convince more people that all problems in Britain went to that man. The left continued to fall, the Unionists were eventually devoured by the BUF - it just needed a charismatic man promising change...

1988 - 2002: David Icke (BUF)


Famous sports commentator Icke was that man, bringing in green fascism and quasi-New Age views to liven up the party. He also warned that without action - to fix environment, economy, and social order - "the world will soon end". He also thundered about THOSE IN CHARGE, of corrupt cabals in power that manipulated and raped and fed on us. Icke won, and went about fixing the country.

By the time it was clear he'd meant "the Jews" and fixing the country meant some horrific crackdowns on liberties, it was too late: Ickist fascists were in all branches of government, civil service, and in the new National Crime Agency and army Rapid-Response Security Divisions. He'd called an early election in 1990 to increase his chances and 1995 was, uh, "disputed". Britain decayed into dictatorship and as the world sanctioned it, it became an island under siege. (Northern Ireland became a den of crime and people-smuggling as Britons used it to escape to the Republic and freedom) The Royal Family had to flee, though a "car accident" carrying the Princess Consort was clearly a hit.

By 1999, it was now part of government propaganda that mankind was being preyed upon by shape-shifting reptilian aliens. Purges of their agents were frequent. That year, Icke decided they were in Northern Ireland and he attempted to "purge" it, leading to the Ireland War and a global coalition forcing the army back to British soil. The BUF state was now weakened, right as Icke's madness reached fever pitch. The Second Civil War in '02 achieved early success for the rebels when John Major, a bus driver and leader of the Guns of Brixton Regiment, led an alliance of all London rebel groups in a raid on the Presidential Palace (formerly Buckingham Palace) and forced Icke to retreat to Nottingham.

Following that, the international community recognised the "Round Table" - a loose coalition of various groups - as the legitimate government.

2002 - 2004: John Major (Round Table)

2004 - 2009: John Major (Democratic Union)



It took another year to finally crush the BUF and Icke, and a lot of aid and foreign peacekeepers to keep Britain together long enough for a new election. Major stood down after five more years, making it clear democracy and changes of government were back in Britain
 

Mumby

Always mysterious!
Published by SLP
Location
Municipal Commune of Bourne
Pronouns
He/Him
somebody stop me

American Imperium

1981-1981: Ronald Reagan (Republican)
1980 (with George Bush Sr.) def. Jimmy Carter (Democratic)
1981-1981: George Bush Sr. (Republican), Acting
1981-1983: Ronald Reagan (Republican)
1983-1985: George Bush Sr. (Republican)
1985-1990: Gary Hart (Democratic)
1984 (with Reubin Askew) def. George Bush Sr. (Republican), Jerry Falwell (Moral Conservative)
1988 (with Jesse Jackson) def. Pat Robertson (Republican)

1990-1991: Jesse Jackson (Rainbow)
1991-1992: William S. Lind (Democratic)
1992-2003: William S. Lind (American Solidarity)
1992 (with Paul Weyrich) def. Jesse Jackson (Rainbow)
1996 (with Paul Weyrich) def. unopposed
2000 cancelled

2003-2007: Paul Weyrich (American Solidarity)
2002 (with Oliver North) def. George Bush Jr. (Independent)
2007-2008: Oliver North (American Solidarity)
2008-2009: Oliver North (Independent)
2009-2011: Paul Washington (write-in)
2008 (with Jim DeMint) def. Chuck Baldwin (American Solidarity), Oliver North (Independent), John McCain (Independent)
2011-2014: King Paul (House of Washington)
2014-0000: King Richard (House of Washington)
 

Bolt451

It smells like updanger in here.
somebody stop me

American Imperium

1981-1981: Ronald Reagan (Republican)
1980 (with George Bush Sr.) def. Jimmy Carter (Democratic)
1981-1981: George Bush Sr. (Republican), Acting
1981-1983: Ronald Reagan (Republican)
1983-1985: George Bush Sr. (Republican)
1985-1990: Gary Hart (Democratic)
1984 (with Reubin Askew) def. George Bush Sr. (Republican), Jerry Falwell (Moral Conservative)
1988 (with Jesse Jackson) def. Pat Robertson (Republican)

1990-1991: Jesse Jackson (Rainbow)
1991-1992: William S. Lind (Democratic)
1992-2003: William S. Lind (American Solidarity)
1992 (with Paul Weyrich) def. Jesse Jackson (Rainbow)
1996 (with Paul Weyrich) def. unopposed
2000 cancelled

2003-2007: Paul Weyrich (American Solidarity)
2002 (with Oliver North) def. George Bush Jr. (Independent)
2007-2008: Oliver North (American Solidarity)
2008-2009: Oliver North (Independent)
2009-2011: Paul Washington (write-in)
2008 (with Jim DeMint) def. Chuck Baldwin (American Solidarity), Oliver North (Independent), John McCain (Independent)
2011-2014: King Paul (House of Washington)
2014-0000: King Richard (House of Washington)
I had to look up a few of these people but fucking hell.
 

Bolt451

It smells like updanger in here.
3 Predictions for the next 12 months

1.Boris Bottles It (aka "Hey Wayne, lets do the mega happy ending!" )

2019- November 2019: Boris Johnson (Conservative Minority)
November 2019-June 2020: Jeremy Corbyn (Labour-SNP-PC Coalition with LD, Independent, One Nation, and GPEW Support)

Def: Michael Gove (Conservative) Jo Swinson (Lib Dem) Nicola Sturgeon (SNP) Rory Stewart (One Nation) Nigel Farage (Brexit) Arlene Foster (DUP) Mary Lou MacDonald (SF) Adam Price (Plaid Cymru) Jon Bartley and Sian Berry (GPEW)
2020 January EU Deal Referendum:
Remain: 51% Leave 49%
May: Scottish Independence Referendum
Remain 52.5 Leave: 47.5%
(1)June 2020- Present: Jo Swinson (Liberal Democrat-One Nation-Social Democrat Coalition)
Def: Jeremy Corbyn (Labour) Dominic Raab (Conservative) Jo Swinson (Lib Dem) Tom Watson (Social Democrat) Nicola Sturgeon (SNP) Rory Stewart (One Nation) Nigel Farage (Brexit) Arlene Foster (DUP) Mary Lou MacDonald (SF) Jon Bartley and Sian Berry (GPEW) Adam Price (Plaid Cymru)

(1) First referendum after voting reform

In this (unlikely) scenario Boris goes to Brussels and asks for an extension and immediately resigns as Tory leader. The Opposition hold a vote of no confidence in the government and a general election is held in November. Faced with a Right split between the Pro-Deal One Nation, the floundering Tory party and the pro no-deal Brexit Party Labour get the most seats but fall far short of a majority. They come to an agreement with most parties to hold a second referendum between remain and a Norway style single market deal). They also pass electoral reform. With many pro-no-deal parties boycotting the second referendum the UK votes to remain. Scotland votes to remain in the UK (indyref2 was an agreement for the SNP to support Labour) and the UK goes to the polls again, this time under a Scotland/Wales style Additional member system. Post-election talks between Labour and the Lib Dems break down over Jeremy Corbyn being Prime Minister. Several Labour MPs withdraw from the party to back a Lib-Dem lead centrist government.


2. Crashing the heck out

2019- October 2020: Boris Johnson (Conservative Minority)
October 2020-April 2020 Sajid Javid

April 2020-Present: Jeremy Corbyn (Labour Majority)
Def: Sajid Javid (Conservative) Jo Swinson (Lib Dem) Tom Watson (Social Democrat) Nicola Sturgeon (SNP) Rory Stewart (One Nation) Arlene Foster (DUP) Mary Lou MacDonald (SF) Jon Bartley and Sian Berry (GPEW) Adam Price (Plaid Cymru)

Boris sacrifices himself to avoid asking for an extension. He is arrested for contempt of Parliament in the confusion of it all the UK crashes out of the EU. Sajid Javid is selected as a temporary Prime Minister and eventually is elected leader of the Conservative party. Protests and riots are seen across the country as many see food and medicine shortages and the pound tanks. There’s a surprising amount of cooperation in the months following no-deal to get food and medicine into the country but the fairly impotent Javid government doesn’t get through any legislation over taxation reform. By April with things calmly down slightly the opposition parties call for a general election. While the Liberal Democrat lead Democratic ticket does well Labour secure a small majority. Labour has great plans for Britain, but first they have to secure food supplies and medication.


3.The Long Awaited Unity Government


2019- October 2019: Boris Johnson (Conservative Minority)
October 2019- November 2019: Sir Kier Starmer (Labour leading National Emergency government)
November 2019-Present: Boris Johnson (Conservative Majority)

Def: Jeremy Corbyn (Labour) Jo Swinson (Lib Dem) Nicola Sturgeon (SNP) Rory Stewart (One Nation) Arlene Foster (DUP) Mary Lou MacDonald (SF) Jon Bartley and Sian Berry (GPEW) Adam Price (Plaid Cymru)

Kier Starmer is chosen as Prime minister to head up a National Unity government and goes to Brussels to ask for an extension to the Brexit Deadline. Following this an election is called and Boris Johnson uses the full power of his populist narrative to drain the Brexit Party of support and secure a decent majority and Britain leaves the EU at the end of January 2020. By September 2020 Labour are leading the Conservatives in the polls they lack the seats to call for a general election
Oh

Well then
 

Time Enough

European Pollution Police Force
Pronouns
He/Him
This is based upon @Comisario book version of Walking Back To Happiness, I know he will eventually do a redux but for now this is it.

Walking Back to Happiness ATLF:
1970-1973: Barbara Castle (Labour)
1973-1980: Maurice Macmillan (Conservative)
1973 (Majority) def: Barbara Castle (Labour), Eric Lubbock (Liberal)
1975 (Majority) def: Barabara Castle (Labour), Eric Lubbock (Liberal)

1980-1987: Albert Booth (Labour)
1980 (Majority) def: Maurice Macmillan (Conservative), Jeremy Thorpe (Liberal)
1985 (Majority) def: Francis Pym (Conservative), Jeremy Thorpe, replaced by David Penhaligon (Liberal)

1987-1988: Micheal Meacher (Labour)
1988-1999: Malcolm Rifkind (Conservative)
1988 (Majority) def: Micheal Meacher (Labour), David Penhaligon (Liberal)
1992 (Majority) def: Clare Short (Labour), David Penhaligon (Liberal), Vince Cable (Radicals)
1996 (Majority) def: Peter Hain (Labour), Simon Hughes (Liberal)

1999-2007: Peter Hain (Labour)
1999 (Majority) def: Malcolm Rifkind (Conservative), Simon Hughes (Liberal)
2004 (Majority) def: Ann Widecombe (Conservative), Matthew Taylor (Liberal)

2007-2011: Theresa May (Conservative)
2007 (Coalition with Liberals) def: Peter Hain (Labour), Chris Huhne (Liberal)
2011-2019: Jon Cruddas (Labour)
2011 (Majority) def: Theresa May (Conservative), Ed Davey (Liberal)
2016 (Majority) def: William Hague (Conservative), Lisa Nandy (Liberal)

2019-: David Lammy (Labour)
 
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