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Lists of Heads of Government and Heads of State

36. Lyndon Baines Johnson Democratic Hubert Hoartio Humphrey

Def. Nelson A. Rockefeller Republican William scantron


37.
George Romney Republican John Tower

Def. Hubert Hoartio Humphrey Democratic Edmund Muskie

Def. George Wallace American Independent party Curtis Lemay

Relected

Def. george Macgovern Democratic Sargent Shriver

38.
Henry "Scoop " Jackson Democratic Jimmy Carter

Def. Jim Rodes Republican Charles Percy

Relected ( Died in office 1983)



Def. Ronald Wilson Reagan Republican George Bush




John Anderson Independent Patrick Lucey
39.
Jimmy Carter Democratic Ben Casey snr.



Def. George Bush Republican Richard Cheney




40. Paul Laxalt Republican Bob Dole



Def. Jimmy Carter Democratic Ben Casey snr.
relected




Def. Michael Dukasis Democratic Llloyed Bensen
 

Uhura's Mazda

Derby Lightweight
Published by SLP
Location
Tamaki Makaurau
List of Prime Ministers of New Zealand
1925-1931: Sir Arthur Fell (National)
1931-1934: Thomas Bavin (National)
1934-1936: William Trautmann (Labour)
1936: Sir Bede Clifford (United)
1936-1940: William Trautmann (Labour)
1940-1969: Bob Heffron (Labour)
1969-1974: Ged Baldwin (Progressive)
1974-1978: Garfield Todd (Progressive)
1978: Tom Iremonger (Progressive)
1978-1983: Garfield Todd (Centre)
1983-1984: Des Wilson (Centre)
1984-1987: John Platts-Mills (Labour)
1987-1991: Leo McCarthy (Centre)
1991-1993: Ron Russell (Centre)
1993-2004: Bryan Gould (Labour)
2004-2010: Denise Kingsmill (Labour)
2010-2011: Craig Thomson (Labour)
2011: Darren Cheeseman (Labour)
2011-present: Paul Beresford (Reform)

The union of the Reform and Liberal parties into the National tent in 1925, under the leadership of Sir Arthur Fell, was the first of many rebrands pursued by the anti-Labour forces in New Zealand. Fell himself pursued a protectionist policy, favouring Imperial Preference, and indeed (as his successor's Finance Minister) helped to negotiate the Ottawa Agreement with British PM Stanley Bruce and others. However, the National Government was swept aside following the Great Depression, with a formerly radical Labour Leader taking over and instituting a welfare state.

Even if conservatism had still borne any attraction from the populace at this point in their misery, it would have been cast asunder by the invidious attempt by the Governor-General to thwart Trautmann's nationalisation of the banking sector by calling for Sir Bede Clifford to form a minority government under the United Party (a merger between National and right-wing groups). This government, predictably, fell as soon as Parliament met, and the electorate confirmed their preferences by re-electing Trautmann (and, after his death, his more moderate machine-politician successor) for three decades. This is where the frequent comparisons between New Zealand and the Nordic nations come in.

Finally, a conservative leader popped up who was attractive to the voters of Aotearoa: Ged Baldwin was a proponent of clean and open government, which was much-needed after many years of rorts and stitch-ups between Labour, the trade union movement and their allies in business. Baldwin had also seen off the Social Credit movement which had threatened to replace the conservatives (now 'Progressives') altogether. The next Prime Minister was Baldwin's anointed son, Garfield Todd, but he flew the progressive flag too openly in attempting to institute the Treaty of Waitangi in law, and was deposed by a right-wing rebellion masterminded by Tom Iremonger and Trevor Skeet. Todd and his rump of supporters joined forces with Labour to force an election, which Todd - as flavour of the month - won handily. However, the Centre Party moved too fast for its voters when it replaced Todd with an environmental campaigner.

Fifteen years in bootless Opposition atrophied the Labour Party, but John Platts-Mills set the nation alight with a grandfatherly concern for the poor and unemployed, along with strong foreign policy positions including the banning of nuclear ships from NZ waters. 'Plattsmania' swept Des Wilson from power, with the urban liberals finally accepting that Labour would be just as keen to equalise the status of Maori as the Centre Party had been - a position much changed from the Heffron years. However, Platts-Mills' heavy spending and obsessive focus on irrelevant human rights and foreign policy issues to the exclusion of domestic crises turned the electorate back to the Centre Party, which now turned to swallow the remains of the Progressives.

Labour would not return to Government until the neoliberal reforms of the Centrists went too far - Gould had the economic chops to make a forceful appeal to a traditional social democracy for the new age. However, he grew frustrated with people in his caucus who would not move in line with him and, for instance, favoured a free trade agreement with Australia which he thought doomed to kill the NZ manufacturing sector. Denise Kingsmill took over when he quit, but female leadership has never sat well with unreconstructed elements of the trade union movement, and she was rolled by Craig Thomson - who was almost immediately caught up in masses of fraud allegations.

Since then, the moribund and unpopular Centre Party has risen from the ashes to form the Reform Party, uniting modern liberal conservatives with anti-corruption campaigners like Derryn Hinch, under the leadership of the rather old-fashioned Tory Paul Beresford, who appeals to the dark hunger of Kiwis to be studiously ignored by the Establishment. Some, however, have accused Reform of being much more unreformed than it claims to be, pointing to the series of excuses made for Aidan Burley dressing up as a Nazi. It seems likely that the Reform brand will be as temporary as every previous iteration of Kiwi conservatism.
 

Uhura's Mazda

Derby Lightweight
Published by SLP
Location
Tamaki Makaurau
I think I've spotted the gimmick - they were all NZ-born politicians in other countries, right?
Correct, apart from Bede Clifford, who became a Governor, but I just like the name 'Bede'.

The only ones I found but didn't mention were Rupert Haggen (CCF politician in British Columbia) and Angela Richardson (became a Tory MP this last December).
 

Japhy

You're a real cold sonofabitch, Gunga Din
Published by SLP
Location
Albany, NY
Pronouns
He/Him
The Inglorious Revolution of 1798

Presidents of the United States (Philadelphia, Princeton, New York Government)
1797-1798: John Adams / Thomas Jefferson (Federalist / Republican)

1796: Thomas Pinckney, Oliver Ellsworth (Federalist), Aaron Burr, Samuel Adams (Republican)
1798-1799: John Adams / vacant (Federalist)
1799-1801: Timothy Pickering / vacant (Federalist) [Acting]
1801: George Washington / Rufus King (Federalist)

1800: Timothy Pickering (High Federalist), Charles C. Pinckney (Federalist), John Adams (White Federalist)
1801-1805: Rufus King / vacant (Federalist)
1805-1809: Thomas Truxtun / Samuel D. Purviance (Whiggish)
1804: Rufus King, Alexander Hamilton, John Marshall (Federalist)
President of (the Republic of) the United States of America (Williamsburg Government)
1798: Thomas Jefferson / vacant (Republican) [Acting]


Committee of National Guidance, Republic of the United States of America (Williamsburg Government)
1799: Thomas Jefferson, Samuel Adams, Nathaniel Macon, Pierce Butler, James Wilkinson (Republican), Napoleon Bonaparte (French Republican)


Consul of the Republic of the United States of America (Williamsburg Government)
1799-1800: Napoleon Bonaparte (Republican Union)


De Facto President of the Republic of the United States of America
1800: James Monroe (American Republican)


The crisis with France had been growing between that nation and the United States for several years, though the latter half of the Washington Administration and the first year of the Adams. But there had always been an ocean between the two nations, even as French and Spanish Privateers wracked the shores of the young nation, there had been a degree of faith that the war would not come home. Alexander Hamilton, had dreamed that a war between the two would be fought in ever more distant Spanish Colonies: Florida, Louisiana, Cuba, Mexico, Peru, and Venezuela. The French would never get out of Continental Europe, least their mighty armies be crushed by the Royal Navy and sent to watery graves. But in 1798 the world turned upside down, and the greatest of all the French Generals led an Army of 40,000 men out of Europe and into the openness of the Atlantic. When they landed along the James River, chaos followed.

Washington would rally the Provisional Army of the United States which he had been made Commander-in-Chief of to Harper's Ferry. But even had his new regiments managed their paper strength they would have still been outnumbered almost 4 to 1, they were not so lucky yet. Militia failed to hold Richmond and then the paranoia went wild. Thomas Jefferson released his Declaration on the Rights of Americans, and declared himself the legitimate President of the United States and while large swaths of the Nation rushed to his banner where the invasion was a liberation. Having landed Napoleon's forces in Virginia, the French navy managed to transport 10,000 Haitian troops, under Jean-Jacques Dessalines and land them in the French Occupation zone, creating a political hellstorm that would never quite go away.

Washington, with Alexander Hamilton as his de facto field commander would be forced to fight at the Battle of Federal City, a near rout, and Bladensburg, where the 1st US Cavalry Regiment was obliterated in a daring rear guard action which saw the General's Grandson/Adopted Son/Namesake Coronet "Wash" Custis killed. The speed of Napoleon's fighting was such that Martha Washington was captured in Maryland trying to reach her Husband as he retreated towards the Capital in Philadelphia. The two would never see each other again.

The arrival of the Haitian and French Republican troops saw a violent transformation overcome the Republican zone even before it began to be refereed to as the Republic of the United States. There were Slave revolts, mass escapes, and mass conscription. While this spelt the doom of the plantation system it would also be used as a twisted carrot and stick, where Republican American troops would be offered as protection for those plantations that did swear loyalty to the government in Virginia's old capital, and often confiscation for those who didn't. The Aristocratic Republicans of the South would look on in horror over the following years at these choices and occasionally waxed romantically about the solution having come in the fiery absolutism of war. The slaves killed in mass hysteria would disagree.

Washington's attempt at a surprise attack at Trenton, in homage to 1776 saw the death of Henry Knox, The battle of Cumberland Gap saw the collapse of any attempt to hold the Western frontier. More Haitian troops landed in New Orleans, joined by volunteers from New Spain and the Tribal Nations on the Frontier. The situation was disastrously grim for the Federalists who in their rear were responding to more and more authoritarian actions to maintain themselves. Some degree of British help arrived in North America but Sir John Moore's Army was directed to seize Havana rather then come to the aid of the Former Colonies.

Though 1799 the Republican region transformed itself. First as Jefferson saw the Constitution abrogated and government changed to that of a mass assembly and special committees, and also with Napoleon Bonaparte taking for himself, more and more control. The Corsican General saw for himself grand opportunities in the Americas, Republics in Canada, Mexico, the Carribean and beyond in the French Camp. A system wherein the American Continents would block out British influence and thus further the cause of strangling London's economic dominance of the world. He would send troops: French, Haitian and American down to Spanish Florida to fight British landings there, and into the West, linking up on the Ohio River with his allies landed in New Orleans at last. And he worked, with brutal efficiency to secure the heartland of the New American Republic in Virginia, the Carolina and Georgia. Partisan Warfare became a fact of life that year in a repeat of the Southern Campaign but the outnumbered and unpopular Federalists of the South lacked the appeal of the Patriots of old. Or their mobility, being in many cases the same men now grown older. In the North Alexander Hamilton would lead a contingent of troops on New York when President Adams proposed Peace Negotiations and in purging the Congress of the man's fellow advocates seized de facto control of the levers of government beyond even what he had done as Washington's Secretary of the Treasury. On the front though he remained inactive, and stared down his enemies across the fields of New Jersey without attacking.
 
Last edited:

Avalanches

I was hospitalized for approaching perfection
Location
Tampa, FL
The Inglorious Revolution of 1798

Presidents of the United States (Philadelphia, Princeton, New York Government)
1797-1798: John Adams / Thomas Jefferson (Federalist / Republican)

1796: Thomas Pinckney, Oliver Ellsworth (Federalist), Aaron Burr, Samuel Adams (Republican)
1798-1799: John Adams / vacant (Federalist)
1799-1801: Timothy Pickering / vacant (Federalist) [Acting]
1801: George Washington / Rufus King (Federalist)

1800: Timothy Pickering (High Federalist), Charles C. Pinckney (Federalist), John Adams (White Federalist)
1801-1805: Rufus King / vacant (Federalist)
1805-1809: Thomas Truxtun / Samuel D. Purviance (Whiggish)
1804: Rufus King, Alexander Hamilton, John Marshall (Federalist)
President of (the Republic of) the United States of America (Williamsburg Government)
1798: Thomas Jefferson / vacant (Republican) [Acting]


Committee of National Guidance, Republic of the United States of America (Williamsburg Government)
1799: Thomas Jefferson, Samuel Adams, Nathaniel Macon, Pierce Butler, James Wilkinson (Republican), Napoleon Bonaparte (French Republican)


Consul of the Republic of the United States of America (Williamsburg Government)
1799-1800: Napoleon Bonaparte (Republican Union)


De Facto President of the Republic of the United States of America
1800: James Monroe (American Republican)


The crisis with France had been growing between that nation and the United States for several years, though the latter half of the Washington Administration and the first year of the Adams. But there had always been an ocean between the two nations, even as French and Spanish Privateers wracked the shores of the young nation, there had been a degree of faith that the war would not come home. Alexander Hamilton, had dreamed that a war between the two would be fought in ever more distant Spanish Colonies: Florida, Louisiana, Cuba, Mexico, Peru, and Venezuela. The French would never get out of Continental Europe, least their mighty armies be crushed by the Royal Navy and sent to watery graves. But in 1798 the world turned upside down, and the greatest of all the French Generals led an Army of 40,000 men out of Europe and into the openness of the Atlantic. When they landed along the James River, chaos followed.

Washington would rally the Provisional Army of the United States which he had been made Commander-in-Chief of to Harper's Ferry. But even had his new regiments managed their paper strength they would have still been outnumbered almost 4 to 1, they were not so lucky yet. Militia failed to hold Richmond and then the paranoia went wild. Thomas Jefferson released his Declaration on the Rights of Americans, and declared himself the legitimate President of the United States and while large swaths of the Nation rushed to his banner where the invasion was a liberation. Having landed Napoleon's forces in Virginia, the French navy managed to transport 10,000 Haitian troops, under Jean-Jacques Dessalines and land them in the French Occupation zone, creating a political hellstorm that would never quite go away.

Washington, with Alexander Hamilton as his de facto field commander would be forced to fight at the Battle of Federal City, a near rout, and Bladensburg, where the 1st US Cavalry Regiment was obliterated in a daring rear guard action which saw the General's Grandson/Adopted Son/Namesake Coronet "Wash" Custis killed. The speed of Napoleon's fighting was such that Martha Washington was captured in Maryland trying to reach her Husband as he retreated towards the Capital in Philadelphia. The two would never see each other again.

The arrival of the Haitian and French Republican troops saw a violent transformation overcome the Republican zone even before it began to be refereed to as the Republic of the United States. There were Slave revolts, mass escapes, and mass conscription. While this spelt the doom of the plantation system it would also be used as a twisted carrot and stick, where Republican American troops would be offered as protection for those plantations that did swear loyalty to the government in Virginia's old capital, and often confiscation for those who didn't. The Aristocratic Republicans of the South would look on in horror over the following years at these choices and occasionally waxed romantically about the solution having come in the fiery absolutism of war. The slaves killed in mass hysteria would disagree.

Washington's attempt at a surprise attack at Trenton, in homage to 1776 saw the death of Henry Knox, The battle of Cumberland Gap saw the collapse of any attempt to hold the Western frontier. More Haitian troops landed in New Orleans, joined by volunteers from New Spain and the Tribal Nations on the Frontier. The situation was disastrously grim for the Federalists who in their rear were responding to more and more authoritarian actions to maintain themselves. Some degree of British help arrived in North America but Sir John Moore's Army was directed to seize Havana rather then come to the aid of the Former Colonies.

Though 1799 the Republican region transformed itself. First as Jefferson saw the Constitution abrogated and government changed to that of a mass assembly and special committees, and also with Napoleon Bonaparte taking for himself, more and more control. The Corsican General saw for himself grand opportunities in the Americas, Republics in Canada, Mexico, the Carribean and beyond in the French Camp. A system wherein the American Continents would block out British influence and thus further the cause of strangling London's economic dominance of the world. He would send troops: French, Haitian and American down to Spanish Florida to fight British landings there, and into the West, linking up on the Ohio River with his allies landed in New Orleans at last. And he worked, with brutal efficiency to secure the heartland of the New American Republic in Virginia, the Carolina and Georgia. Partisan Warfare became a fact of life that year in a repeat of the Southern Campaign but the outnumbered and unpopular Federalists of the South lacked the appeal of the Patriots of old. Or their mobility, being in many cases the same men now grown older. In the North Alexander Hamilton would lead a contingent of troops on New York when President Adams proposed Peace Negotiations and in purging the Congress of the man's fellow advocates seized de facto control of the levers of government beyond even what he had done as Washington's Secretary of the Treasury. On the front though he remained inactive, and stared down his enemies across the fields of New Jersey without attacking.
[Insert Sicko Laughing Meme Here]
 

Mumby

Always mysterious!
Published by SLP
Location
Municipal Commune of Bourne
Pronouns
He/Him
i was inspired by Hunters, okay

1969-1974: Richard Nixon (Republican)
1968 (with Spiro Agnew) def. Hubert Humphrey (Democratic), George Wallace (American Independent)
1972 (with Sam Yorty) def. George Wallace (American Independent), George McGovern (Democratic)

1974-1981: Sam Yorty (Republican)
1976 (with Gerald Ford) def. Jerry Brown (Democratic)
1981-1981: Gerald Ford (Republican)
1980 (with Willis Carto) def. Ted Kennedy (Democratic), John B. Anderson (National Unity)
1981-1989: Willis Carto (Republican)
1984 (with Phil Crane) def. John B. Anderson (National Unity), Tom Hayden (Democratic)
 
With apologies to Marilyn Manson:
The Beautiful People
"And I don't want you, and I don't need you./Don't bother to resist or I'll beat you."
38. George Wallace/Sam Yorty 1973-1977

1972: Def. Edmund Muskie/Alan Cranston, Richard Nixon/Spiro Agnew
It's not your fault that you're always wrong
39. George McGovern/Jimmy Carter 1977-1981

1976: Def. Ronald Reagan/Gerald Ford, George Wallace/Sam Yorty
The weak are there to justify the strong.
40. Alexander Haig/Jack Kemp 1981-1989

1980: Def. George McGovern/Jimmy Carter, Sam Yorty/Jesse Helms
1984: Def. Ted Kennedy/Paul Tsongas, Jesse Helms/Larry MacDonald
The beautiful people, the beautiful people/It's all relative to the size of your steeple.
41. Pat Robertson/Trent Lott 1989-1993

1988: Def. Mario Cuomo/Jerry Brown, Jack Kemp/Newt Gingrich
You can't see the forest for the trees/You can't smell your own shit on your knees.
42. Gary Hart/Jesse Jackson 1993-1995

1992: Def. Pat Robertson/Trent Lott, Colin Powell/Jim Jeffords
There's no time to discriminate/Hate every motherfucker/That's in your way
43. Jesse Jackson/Jerry Brown 1995-1997
Hey you, what do you see?/Something beautiful or something free?
44. Ron Paul/Gary Johnson 1997-2001

1996: Def. Trent Lott/Alan Keyes, Jesse Jackson/Jerry Brown
Hey, you, are you trying to be mean?/If you live with the apes man it's hard to be clean
45. Rick Santorum/Mike Huckabee 2001-2005

2000: Def. Bill Bradley/Sam Nunn, Ron Paul/Gary Johnson
The worms will live in every host/It's hard to pick which one they eat the most
46. Joe Lieberman/Joe Biden 2005-2017

2004: Def. Rick Santorum/Mike Huckabee, Jon Huntsman/Connie Mack IV
2008: Def. Mitch Daniels/Kay Bailey Hutchison, Tom Tancredo/Jerry Falwell, Jr.
The horrible people, the horrible people/It's as anatomic as the size of your steeple.
47. Mark Sanford/Bill Weld 2013-2017

2012: Def. Joe Biden/Deval Patrick, Mike Huckabee/Sarah Palin
Capitalism has made it this way/Old-fashioned fascism will take it away!
48. David Duke/Steve King 2017-

2016: Def. Russ Feingold/Greg Orman, Rand Paul/Austin Petersen
2020: Def. Lincoln Chafee/Jim Webb

38. This is meant to be by Wallace/Yorty at their rivals in the election and at counterculture/civil rights protestors respectively
39. McGovern and Carter are two good men who try to do the right thing, but end up reckoning with a lot of bad luck.
40. McGovern's failures allowed Haig to triumph
41. Robertson is kinda your stereotypical televangelist megachurch pastor-the 'steeple' here is meant to be like a church steeple
42. Hart was apparently a bit haughty and full of himself.
43. Jackson has a rather abrasive reputation.
44. Paul has a bold vision for the future.
45. Santorum prides himself on being holier-than-thou, but as a president is somewhat corrupt and thoroughly hypocritical
46. Lieberman embodies a stale establishment that nobody really likes
47. Joke about sex scandals ('anatomic as the size of your steeple')
48. Duke is a fascist.
 

Ares96

Obsessive Pendant
Published by SLP
Location
Fubbicktown
Pronouns
he/him
To steal @Uhura's Mazda's brand for a moment...

A Little Country
1970-72: Arnold Nordmeyer (Labour-Social Credit coalition)
1970: Labour (37), Reform (18), United (16), Democratic Labour (5), Social Credit (5), People's Movement (3)
1972-74: Norman Kirk (Labour-Social Credit coalition)
1974-78: Norman Kirk (Labour minority)
1974: Labour (38), Reform (19), United (18), Democratic Labour (5), Social Credit (5), People's Movement (2)
1976: Labour (36), Reform (18), United (18), Democratic Labour (10), Social Credit (7), Liberal (3)

1978-81: Bruce Beetham (United-Reform-Social Credit coalition)
1978: Labour (33), United (19), Reform (18), Social Credit (14), Democratic Labour (6), Left Socialist (4)
1981-82: Norman Kirk (Labour minority)
1981: Labour (37), United (16), Reform (16), Social Credit (14), Democratic Labour (9)
1982-83: David Lange (Labour minority)
1983-85: Jack Marshall (Reform minority)
1983: Labour (25), NZ Party (15), Reform (12), Social Credit (11), United (9), Centre (7), Democratic Labour (6), Christian Heritage (4), Communist (3), Land League (3)
1985-87: David Lange (Labour minority)
1985: Labour (29), Reform (23), NZ Party (13), Social Credit (7), United (5), Christian Heritage (6), Democratic Labour (5), Communist (4), Centre (2), Left Socialist (2)
1987-89: David Lange (Labour-Reform "Worker-Peasant" coalition)
1987: Labour (36), NZ Party (15), Reform (12), United (8), Christian Heritage (6), Democratic Labour (4), Communist (4), Social Credit (3), Centre (3), Land League (3), Left Socialist (3)
1989-92: David Lange (Labour minority)
1989: Labour (38), Reform (12), United (12), NZ Party (11), Democratic Labour (6), Social Credit (6), Left Socialist (3), Centre (3), Land League (3), Christian Heritage (3)
1991: Labour (33), United (15), Democratic Labour (12), Reform (11), NZ Party (9), Centre (9), Social Credit (5), Christian Heritage (3), Left Socialist (2)

1992-98: Bill Birch (United-Reform-Centre-Christian Heritage coalition)
1994: Labour (32), United (24), Reform (12), Democratic Labour (12), Social Credit (6), Centre (4), NZ Party (3), Christian Heritage (3), Left Socialist (3)
1997: Labour (30), United (21), Democratic Labour (15), Reform (11), Social Credit (6), Centre (5), NZ Party (5), Christian Heritage (2), Common Course (2)

1998-2000: Bill Birch (United-Reform-Social Credit coalition)
1998: Labour (31), United (20), Democratic Labour (14), Reform (12), NZ Party (9), Social Credit (6), Centre (5), Christian Heritage (2)
2000-03: Bill Birch (United-Reform coalition)
2000: Labour (39), United (17), Reform (16), Democratic Labour (9), NZ Party (7), Centre (5), Social Credit (4), Christian Heritage (2)
2003-04: Michael Cullen (Labour-Centre-Social Credit-Christian Heritage coalition)
2004-06: Michael Cullen (Labour-Social Credit-Centre coalition)
2004: Labour (35), Reform (24), United (15), Democratic Labour (7), NZ Party (6), Left Unity (5), Social Credit (4), Centre (3)
2006-11: Michael Cullen (Labour-Social Credit coalition)
2008: Labour (35), Reform (24), United (9), People's Party (7), Democratic Labour (7), Centre (5), Social Credit (4), Left Unity (3), Christian Heritage (2), NZ Party (2)
2011-: Bill English (Reform-United coalition with People's Party support)
2011: Reform (32), Labour (29), People's Party (13), United (9), Democratic Labour (7), Social Credit (5), Left Unity (2), Christian Heritage (2)
 
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theev

Well-known member
Gone Fishing
Pronouns
he/him
dark green

1961-1965: John F. Kennedy/Lyndon B. Johnson (Democratic)
1960 def. Richard Nixon/Henry Cabot Lodge Jr. (Republican), various unpledged southern electors
1965-1969: John F. Kennedy/Terry Sanford (Democratic)
1964 def. Jim Rhodes/Gerald Ford (Republican), Ross Barnett/George Wallace (Dixiecrat)
1969-1977: George Romney/George Bush (Republican)
1968 def. Terry Sanford/Robert F. Kennedy (Democratic), George Wallace/Lester Maddox (Dixiecrat)
1972 def. Robert F. Kennedy/James E. Carter (Democratic), Lester Maddox/John Rarick (Dixiecrat)

1977-1977: Lyndon B. Johnson/Hubert Humphrey (Democratic)
1976 def. Ronald Reagan/Otto Passman (Ecology), Nelson Rockefeller/Howard Baker (Republican), Eugene McCarthy/various (Independent)
1977-1978: Hubert Humphrey/vacant (Democratic)
1978-1981: Mo Udall/vacant (Democratic)
1981-1981: Ronald Reagan/Jesse Helms (Ecology)
1980 def. Ed Muskie/John Glenn (Democratic), Charles Mathias/John B. Anderson (Republican), Barry Commoner/Ralph Nader (Citizens)
1981-1981: Jesse Helms/vacant (Ecology)
1981-1989: Jesse Helms/James G. Watt (Ecology)
1984 def. Alan Cranston/George McGovern (Democratic), John B. Anderson/Larry Pressler (Republican)
1989-1997: Joe Biden/Bill Clinton (Democratic)
1988 def. James G. Watt/Pat Robertson (Ecology), Lee Iaccoca/Alan K. Simpson (Republican), Ron Paul/David Koch (Geolibertarian)
1992 def. Pat Buchanan/Howard Phillips (Ecology), Ross Perot/various (Republican)

1997-2005: George Wallace Jr./Bob Dornan (Ecology)
1996 def. Jay Rockefeller/Harris Wofford (Democratic)
2000 def. Donald Trump/Nancy Pelosi (Democratic), Ron Paul/David Nolan (Geolibertarian)

2005-2009: Wesley Clark/Peter Navarro (Democratic)
2004 def. Dennis Prager/Trent Lott (Ecology), Pat Buchanan/James P. Hoffa (American)
2009-2013: George Allen/Rick Santorum (Ecology)
2008 def. Wesley Clark/Peter Navarro (Democratic)
2013-2021: Peter Navarro/Rod Blagojevich (Democratic)
2012 def. George Allen/Rick Santorum (Ecology)
2016 def. Mike Huckabee/John Bolton (Ecology), Rand Paul/Kevin Zeese (Geolibertarian)

2021-0000: David Duke/Michael Flynn (Ecology)
2020 def. Rod Blagojevich/Jim Webb (Democratic), Rand Paul/John McAfee (Geolibertarian), Roseanne Barr/Cynthia McKinney (Citizens)

Kennedy - Given a strong mandate following his re-election, he became a foreign policy oriented president, much to the chagrin of friends and foes alike. With Fulbright at State and Bobby at Defense, JFK felt comfortable enough pursuing UN reform, foreign aid missions, and the US-Soviet Lunar Landing (1968). But all of that would be derailed by the revelation of Kennedy's infidelity and drug use in late 1967. In the end, even the lunar landing would not be enough to prevent the election of Kennedy's successor.

Romney - The Last Republican President would oversee the unwinding of Kennedy's international reform projects. Secretary General Waldheim organized the International Parliament to take seriously the dual threats of climate change and overpopulation as the Sino-Soviet Nuclear War (1970), disorder on the Indian sub-continent, and Africa's First World War (1975-1982) flung a carefully created international order into the chaos of the modern world. President Romney's inability to manage these problems would end the electoral hopes of his hand-picked successor.

Johnson - Choosing to elevate the conservative-splinter Ecology Party as his main electoral opposition due to their being perceived as easier to defeat, Johnson would go on to win a strong mandate. He would then lead a strong 100 days and die just months into his presidency.

Humphrey - A largely forgotten President, Humphrey spent much of his administration fighting serious illness (although he attempted to cover-up that fact).

Udall - Speaker Udall ascended to the Presidency under grim circumstances. He found his agenda blocked by a hostile congress that was far more insistent on investigating the cover-up of his predecessor's illness. Unfortunately, in early 1980 Udall himself would be forced out of the Presidential race due to a severe illness of his own.

Reagan - The Founder of the Ecology Party, Reagan would also become that group's martyr when he was assassinated in March, 1981 by followers of Reverend Jim Jones. Reagan's killers cited his polarizing political stances as the reason for their assassination.

Helms - The archetype of the modern Ecologist President, Helms changed the nation. His War on Drugs irreversibly changed the criminal justice system as he took a hardline stance. On the foreign policy stage, Helms was equally hardline. Recently, it was revealed that President Helms and his national security team led by Alexander Haig at State and John Kirk Singlaub at Defense deliberately provoked nuclear conflicts in the Indo-Pakistani War (1987), the Collapse of South Africa (1984-1990), and Africa's Second World War (1985-1989). It has been speculated that this may have been tied to the administration's efforts to "combat overpopulation" which it had admittedly prioritized.

Biden - Took America off the ledge that Helms had taken it too but couldn't walk much further away that that. Biden's success was largely a product of the ineptitude of his varied opponents. One of his most lasting impacts was on his own party as stood powerless as more moderate Democrats took control of the party's apparatus.

Wallace Jr. - Oversaw the Era of Plenty as America's status as the world's sole superpower cemented it at the top of a brutal international ladder.

Clark - Oversaw the beginning of the Second Depression (2006-2014) which derailed many of his administration's planned efforts.

Allen - Although he was elected on a platform based around economic recovery, President Allen was far more interested in furthering American involvement in Africa and the Indian sub-continent.

Navarro - The most left-wing President since Udall, Navarro set about solving the Second Depression immediately as he entered office. Additionally, his positions on climate change and overpopulation stood out from those of nearly all his modern predecessors. He dismissed both as "hoaxes."

Duke - An avowed white supremacist (as opposed to Reagan, Helms, Wallace Jr., and Allen who were only suspected to varying degrees) Duke won an incredibly close and controversial election. The former Ambassador to the Cape Republic (Wallace Jr.) and the UN (Allen) has already gone about re-introducing more widespread measures similar to Helms-era sterilization laws.

The future of the nation is grim as it lurches closer and closer to the edge in an already chaotic world...
 

zaffre

when I said "no deal" what I meant was "no, deal"
Location
Massachusetts
The Hand Of History

1961-1969: John F. Kennedy (D-MA) / Lyndon B. Johnson (D-TX) [1]
1960: Richard M. Nixon (R-CA) / Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr. (R-MA)
1964: Bob Dole (R-KS) / William G. Stratton (R-IL) [2]

1969-1973: Lyndon B. Johnson (D-TX) / Hubert H. Humphrey (D-MN) [3]
1968: Charles A. Halleck (R-IN) / Spiro Agnew (R-MD)
1973-1978: John V. Lindsay (R-NY) / H. John Heinz III (R-PA)*
1972: Lyndon B. Johnson (D-TX) / Hubert H. Humphrey (D-MN), Tom McCall (T-OR) / Jacob Javits (T-NY) [4]
1976: Ralph Yarborough (D-TX) / Ed Muskie (D-ME), Paul Weyrich (AIP-WI) / Howard Phillips (AIP-VA) [5]

1978-1978: John V. Lindsay (R-NY)* / Vacant
1978-1979: Margaret Heckler (R-MA) / Vacant
1979-1981: Margaret Heckler (R-MA) / George H. W. Bush (R-TX) [6]
1978: George McGovern (D-SD) / Eugene McCarthy (D-MN), Norma Burgos (PNP-PR) / Various
1981-1982: Barry Farber (R-NY) / Manuel Lujan, Jr. (R-NM)* [7]
1980: George McGovern (D-SD) / Eugene McCarthy (D-MN)
1982-1982: Barry Farber (R-NY) / Vacant
1982-: Barry Farber (R-NY) / Robert "Bob Martinez (R-FL)

[1] JFK casts a what one might call a very long shadow over the modern Democratic Party. In the plus column - a soaring landslide in 1964, making Democracy cool again, and the March 24th, 1967 referendum that lead to state #51, sunny Puerto Rico. In the negative column - a frequently dysfunctional relationship with his #2 and Vietnam, Vietnam, Vietnam.

[2] Dole's meteoric rise was simply a case of too far, too fast - as his party lurched rightward, the second-term congressman's fresh face and debating chops were not enough to shed a reputation as, well, a bit of a hatchet man. Giving the lie to the idea that there are no second acts in politics, Dole's tenure as Sec. of State for Lindsay was...eventful, to say the least.

[3] Spare a tear for LBJ. Heir apparent for so long under a man he eventually despised, getting the top job finally only to face a seemingly unending war and the near-catastrophic collapse of the Bretton Woods system. LBJ's actions saved the world economy from collapse but did little to earn the love of voters - and the man who had wanted the Presidency for so long was thrown out after four years for the Republican golden boy.

[4] Tom McCall talked about this "Third Force" thing a lot as a happy middle ground, and voters thought "seems legit" and then he directed his electors to vote for Lindsay to prevent it going to the House and in exchange Lindsay was kind enough to gut most of McCall's core policy ideas. The Third Force is not doing too hot.

[5] Weyrich, in contrast, won no states for the AIP but indirectly persuaded Lindsay (tired of fending off attacks from his right) to direct congressional Republicans to vote for the Human Life Amendment so that, per Lindsay's reasoning, the core issue could be voted upon in the state legislature's rather than decided in the courts. This was...a miscalculation, and the passage of a constitutional amendment that went against the most central priorities of the Lindsay administration led to a typically cold decision by Lindsay to direct VP Heinz to fall on the sword, followed promptly by himself.

[6] With no provision to appoint a VP (why would there be?), the role would have fallen to Speaker O'Neill, who was, however, aware he was a member of the wrong party. O'Neill directed the Republican caucus in the House to select one of their number to be elected Speaker. They ended up choosing - if not a dominant presence, certainly not a sacrificial lamb. Margaret Heckler simply seemed best placed to thread the needle, having been long-tipped for a cabinet position, an opponent of the Human Life Amendment who was personally anti-abortion, and - considering the population most engaged by the issue - a woman. The safe wisdom was that Heckler would beat McGovern in the subsequent special election like a rug - but it was wrong: Heckler proved an invisible, unpopular presence, McGovern walked the line of abortion more tactfully than most of his pet causes, and for the second time in a decade, no one got a majority, this time due to the typically fractious politics of Puerto Rico. The PNP electors defected to Heckler before it could go the House, unsurprisingly, but her Presidency had emerged from the gate crippled - and a large portion of NASA was about to be moving to San Juan. Heckler did little to prevent the (by no means certain) decision that the next election would still be in 1980 instead of 1982, and her decision to run again proved (sigh) abortive in the face of the new Republican champion.

[7] Farber's political odyssey had been - odd, to say the least. A long-time reporter, amateur linguist, and all around talk show star, the one-time moderate morphed into something else entirely in his stint as congressman, iconic time as Mayor of NYC, and tenure in the Senate - and he trampled McGovern's second try in 1980 with a laser-tight focus on the abortion ban matched to a wacky persona and McGovern ill-fated decision to challenge the HLA outright. Farber's determination to corral his own party has already led to the unprecedented resignation of Vice President Lujan, just a year in. But with the last Democratic victory in 1968, all the way back in the Kennedy presidency, and four losses in a row, the question isn't what "Barry" has going for him - it's what even stands in his way.
 

Avalanches

I was hospitalized for approaching perfection
Location
Tampa, FL
The Hand Of History

1961-1969: John F. Kennedy (D-MA) / Lyndon B. Johnson (D-TX) [1]
1960: Richard M. Nixon (R-CA) / Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr. (R-MA)
1964: Bob Dole (R-KS) / William G. Stratton (R-IL) [2]

1969-1973: Lyndon B. Johnson (D-TX) / Hubert H. Humphrey (D-MN) [3]
1968: Charles A. Halleck (R-IN) / Spiro Agnew (R-MD)
1973-1978: John V. Lindsay (R-NY) / H. John Heinz III (R-PA)*
1972: Lyndon B. Johnson (D-TX) / Hubert H. Humphrey (D-MN), Tom McCall (T-OR) / Jacob Javits (T-NY) [4]
1976: Ralph Yarborough (D-TX) / Ed Muskie (D-ME), Paul Weyrich (AIP-WI) / Howard Phillips (AIP-VA) [5]

1978-1978: John V. Lindsay (R-NY)* / Vacant
1978-1979: Margaret Heckler (R-MA) / Vacant
1979-1981: Margaret Heckler (R-MA) / George H. W. Bush (R-TX) [6]
1978: George McGovern (D-SD) / Eugene McCarthy (D-MN), Norma Burgos (PNP-PR) / Various
1981-1982: Barry Farber (R-NY) / Manuel Lujan, Jr. (R-NM)* [7]
1980: George McGovern (D-SD) / Eugene McCarthy (D-MN)
1982-1982: Barry Farber (R-NY) / Vacant
1982-: Barry Farber (R-NY) / Robert "Bob Martinez (R-FL)

[1] JFK casts a what one might call a very long shadow over the modern Democratic Party. In the plus column - a soaring landslide in 1964, making Democracy cool again, and the March 24th, 1967 referendum that lead to state #51, sunny Puerto Rico. In the negative column - a frequently dysfunctional relationship with his #2 and Vietnam, Vietnam, Vietnam.

[2] Dole's meteoric rise was simply a case of too far, too fast - as his party lurched rightward, the second-term congressman's fresh face and debating chops were not enough to shed a reputation as, well, a bit of a hatchet man. Giving the lie to the idea that there are no second acts in politics, Dole's tenure as Sec. of State for Lindsay was...eventful, to say the least.

[3] Spare a tear for LBJ. Heir apparent for so long under a man he eventually despised, getting the top job finally only to face a seemingly unending war and the near-catastrophic collapse of the Bretton Woods system. LBJ's actions saved the world economy from collapse but did little to earn the love of voters - and the man who had wanted the Presidency for so long was thrown out after four years for the Republican golden boy.

[4] Tom McCall talked about this "Third Force" thing a lot as a happy middle ground, and voters thought "seems legit" and then he directed his electors to vote for Lindsay to prevent it going to the House and in exchange Lindsay was kind enough to gut most of McCall's core policy ideas. The Third Force is not doing too hot.

[5] Weyrich, in contrast, won no states for the AIP but indirectly persuaded Lindsay (tired of fending off attacks from his right) to direct congressional Republicans to vote for the Human Life Amendment so that, per Lindsay's reasoning, the core issue could be voted upon in the state legislature's rather than decided in the courts. This was...a miscalculation, and the passage of a constitutional amendment that went against the most central priorities of the Lindsay administration led to a typically cold decision by Lindsay to direct VP Heinz to fall on the sword, followed promptly by himself.

[6] With no provision to appoint a VP (why would there be?), the role would have fallen to Speaker O'Neill, who was, however, aware he was a member of the wrong party. O'Neill directed the Republican caucus in the House to select one of their number to be elected Speaker. They ended up choosing - if not a dominant presence, certainly not a sacrificial lamb. Margaret Heckler simply seemed best placed to thread the needle, having been long-tipped for a cabinet position, an opponent of the Human Life Amendment who was personally anti-abortion, and - considering the population most engaged by the issue - a woman. The safe wisdom was that Heckler would beat McGovern in the subsequent special election like a rug - but it was wrong: Heckler proved an invisible, unpopular presence, McGovern walked the line of abortion more tactfully than most of his pet causes, and for the second time in a decade, no one got a majority, this time due to the typically fractious politics of Puerto Rico. The PNP electors defected to Heckler before it could go the House, unsurprisingly, but her Presidency had emerged from the gate crippled - and a large portion of NASA was about to be moving to San Juan. Heckler did little to prevent the (by no means certain) decision that the next election would still be in 1980 instead of 1982, and her decision to run again proved (sigh) abortive in the face of the new Republican champion.

[7] Farber's political odyssey had been - odd, to say the least. A long-time reporter, amateur linguist, and all around talk show star, the one-time moderate morphed into something else entirely in his stint as congressman, iconic time as Mayor of NYC, and tenure in the Senate - and he trampled McGovern's second try in 1980 with a laser-tight focus on the abortion ban matched to a wacky persona and McGovern ill-fated decision to challenge the HLA outright. Farber's determination to corral his own party has already led to the unprecedented resignation of Vice President Lujan, just a year in. But with the last Democratic victory in 1968, all the way back in the Kennedy presidency, and four losses in a row, the question isn't what "Barry" has going for him - it's what even stands in his way.
Ah, stole my line.

Farber is *chefs kiss* though.