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Tibby's Graphics and Grab-Bag Thread.

These Fair Shores: The Splendid Revolution

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Britain has a long history of revolutions against the establishment, from the Barons’ Revolt against the absolutist nature of King John that led to Parliament, to the Civil War that established a short-lasted republic, to the Glorious Revolution that threw out a King to replace him with another, and in more recent times the Social Revolution that brought around a new social perspective for Britons.

But none dominate as much as the Splendid Revolution. And out of all the anti-establishment revolts, it is this one that undeniably is one pushed by the working-class and at times got dangerously republican, but in the end buttressed the monarchy’s legitimacy thanks to a canny prince realising his moment was at that time, not when his mother finally dies.

To understand the Splendid Revolution, one has to understand the institutional system at the time. Parliament was one dominated by vague reformists in the Commons, grouped as the Conservative and Liberal parties, both descended from the dominant Pittite ‘institutional coalition’ of Anglicans, Scottish Presbyterians and Catholics. The Pittite coalition split on the issue of free trade in the 1840s, with the Liberals being for free trade and Conservatives for protectionism.

The two would seek to outmanoeuvre each other and gain more support, and eventually by the 1880s, both increasingly considered widening the franchise, much to the still-very-influential Lords’ displeasure. The Lords had members in both factions, but was generally aloof to their partisan bickering, and quietly made it clear that any attempt to widen the franchise would get a Lords’ veto. Queen Victoria was very much favouring the Tories, but above all she distrusted the idea of a wider franchise, preferring to maintain the ‘altered settlement’ of Crown, Churches and Autocracy, while giving the poor a lighter hand in taxation or encouraging them to emigrate to the colonies.

The rotten boroughs were long gone by 1889, as much as some pop-cultural retellings conflate the light reforms due to the localised riots of the 1830s with the revolution of the 1880s. Nevertheless, there were a lot of discontent. Literacy rates were soaring thanks to the growth of charities, workhouses, even Robert Owen’s ‘cooperative communities’, and this led to a boom in politicisation. When even an ordinary worker could read and understand radical literature, it was the day of popular literature focusing more on political grievances and the idea of representation.

The old idea of ‘ancient liberty’, rooted in the Magna Carta and continued by persisting Chartists, became popular with the literate working-class. Attempts at appeasing working-class discontent elsewhere, such as the first workplace laws, only allowed them to realise that Parliament could do a lot to help them in particular and hence to lobby harder for representation.

The Conservatives and Liberals were not blind to this. Both tried over the last few decades to implement moderate expansions of the franchise, but the Lords (heavily shaped by more traditional Pittite dominance) were intransigent. They knew that the more the Commons represented the fickle crowd, the more it would take more and more legitimacy and power from the Lords, and hence sought to preserve their ceremonial strength in parliament by stonewalling it with help from a firmly conservative Victoria.

Those were covered and led to considerable protests and riots, but it just didn’t spark off at the time. But by the late 1880s, it was growing infeasible. The workers were now organising in trade unions, doing strikes, the urban middle-class were getting uppity too thanks to gradual loss of faith in parliament to modestly reform to appease them, and even the women were starting to ask for their votes too.

It all started in Birmingham. Joseph Chamberlain was increasingly a big dog in the Black Country and he had grand ambitions. Growing frustrated with the Liberals, he declared himself an ‘independent radical’ in 1882 and made a strong career in the city as a political strongman. Already twice mayor of the city (thanks to newly-acquired wealth and land), he was known for his strong focus on efficient municipal government including intense development. He was also known for lobbying heavily in favour of the franchise, including rural and urban workers. But by the 1880s, it was obvious that drastic action needed to be done.

Already known in established circles as a ‘Jack Cade’ and a ‘mountebank’ and routinely portrayed as a republican and an atheist, he was narrowly elected to Parliament in 1887 off heavy contacts overcoming the restricted franchise, and even as he took the oath of loyalty, there were those who booed him. Still, he was one of a very very few Radicals in Parliament. Still, as an MP he grew his contacts beyond Birmingham, making alliances with the rest of the ‘discontented masses’ and their political leaders. Tom Mann of the Labour Federation, the women of the Suffragist Federation, even communists and socialists and yes, even republicans. He knew he needed to coordinate their efforts.

After his latest attempt at vote expansion died in the Commons due to the Tories opportunistically opposing it to gain the Queen’s favour, he knew he needed to move. The entire structure needed to be broken and rebuilt again, and he was very much in favour of more unorthodox measures. Hence the first part of the Splendid Revolution happened, the March on London.

It was originally supposed to be a peaceful protest. Supposed. But the Prime Minister at the time declared that any ‘intimidation of the Government’ would be met with truncheons and force (the approach that worked for the Lord Liverpool decades before). It only galvanised them as the organisations steeled themselves. If they backed down here, the Government would only go on the offensive further and break them. Hence the March had to go ahead.

Thousands upon thousands of workers from the cities and a fair few from rural areas went down to London. The more comfortable middle-class reformers took out newspaper ads calling for reform and compromise. In the end, the Army was dispatched and hundreds were dead at the end of the first day. It is after the first day that you see the first calls for a republic, and the British tricolour first saw the light of day. The government miscalculated.

Chamberlain felt as if he was losing control of the protests. Tom Mann was increasingly open to pushing for an outright republic, and the suffragists, well, the fact that three women died radicalised them considerably. And the local rivalries were starting to emerge, with blame flying around. After more fighting and more bloodshed, the coherency was collapsing, but there was one thing they all agreed upon – down with the government, down with the parliament, down with the Lords and increasingly down with the Queen.

This only made the backlash from the Army even more harsh as they fired upon people they believed to be republicans and socialists. Not helping was the fact some of them were now reading translations of the French Declaration of Rights either. By the end of the third week, thousands were dead, and more and more people had enough and were joining the march to London. Chamberlain lost control. And he panicked. He needed a gutsy move to recapture control. He made it.

Standing up in the Commons, he presented his latest bill – it was far more radical than his last one, removed all property qualifications and even included universal female suffrage (which got many MPs’ eyes to pop at). Upon being asked how he would achieve it, he merely stated ‘to get the omelette of democracy, one has to break the eggs of autocracy’. This got him named and thrown out, but his bill was still in contention. And he used it extensively. Holding it up as a clear goal for the crowd to achieve for, he declared ‘this is our future, and it is a future the do-nothing Lords will deny all of you!’.

But nevertheless, as much as the protesters were now generally on board Chamberlain’s bill, a lot wanted more than what the radical offered. Republic was in the air, and heavy too. The Labour Federation, led by Keir Hardie and Tom Mann, voted to advocate a republic – one that would overthrow the monarchy and exile them out of Britain. Chamberlain was not entirely opposed to one, mind, he was on the record as speaking positively of the idea while counselling his preference for a ‘true’ constitutional monarchy.

Meanwhile, the deaths piled up, and a man smoked a cigar in deep thought. This man was Albert Edward of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha, Prince of Wales and heir to the Empire. Well in the tradition of Princes of Wales, he often disagreed with his mother, and spoke in favour of reform. But with his mother intransigent and heavily reliant on her reactionary advisors, he realised that if he did not act, the whole situation would collapse.

With the protesters moving closer and closer to Parliament despite the Army’s best efforts, Chamberlain slinked back in the chamber, and gave them an ultimatum – ‘reform, or revolution’. He was thrown out yet again, but the Commons were getting antsy. Could the mob actually threaten them unlike with Peterloo? Could it be different this time? They took Chamberlain’s bill, watered it down and put it up for a vote. It passed easily in the Commons but like with every other bill on the matter, died in the Lords.

With Hardie openly calling for the establishment of a new republican government, Chamberlain bade him to give him time, and brought him into the new plan. Hardie was sceptical, and thought of Chamberlain as an opportunist, but granted him his needed time. Meanwhile, Prince ‘Bertie’ was feeling around for contacts with the protesters and managed to get himself a good speaking place.

The final phase of the Splendid Revolution has been called many things. A coup, a revolution, a compromise, a selling out, the triumph of a new Britain or the death of the dream.

What we do know is that the crowd broke through Army blockades, marched all the way to Westminster Palace, while Chamberlain was waiting patiently. Three firm knocks on the door was the signal, and he stood up.

“Gentlemen, we have dithered way too long! The people are at the door, crying out for their rightful place in this hallowed chamber and in our society! Either we pass my bill or our Nation will perish in the flames, reborn like a true phoenix, one burnt off of all of you!”

The Speaker at the time was a keen follower of Denison’s Rule and of the idea of the Speaker maintaining the status quo, but as the knocks became louder and more aggressive, he declared it was time to vote on the bill, as much as some people complained that it was the third time. The knocks became thumps as he declared “DIVISION!”. It was now time to go in the lobbies to vote. The thumps echoed more and more.

As the thumps started to make the door buckle, the Speaker waited patiently. “ALL OUT” echoed through the chamber, and the vote was now completed.

With the door visibly buckling, the Speaker announced the results. “The Ayes to the right, 291 votes. The nays to the left-”

The door broke.

“247 votes. THE AYES HAVE IT! THE AYES HAVE IT!”.

Joseph Chamberlain stood up in a chamber in bedlam and smiled. He got what he wanted. Sure it was more radical than what he desired, but he showed the old establishment. However, as he turned to face his crowd, he saw a face he knew should not be there. The first man to step over the broken door was none other but Albert Edward. Smiling at the Parliament, he waved back to the crowd which cheered his name.

For while Chamberlain was in the chamber waiting for the knocks, Prince Bertie was steadily working on his crowd. He pledged his unconditional support of reform, spoke of how he disagreed with his mother, and pledged famously to be ‘also king of the republicans’ once he ascend to the throne. This, built on already-existing goodwill from his known reformist reputation, won the majority over even as Hardie and Mann tried to maintain die-hard republicanism.

The Lords however, was seen as likely to vote down the bill. So Prince Bertie visited the Lords in his capability as a peer, and spoke frankly of the power of the people. ‘In no such world can blue blood defeat red when red bubbles in anger and is truly united as one’. For the more stubborn Lords, especially the young toffs, he outright bribed them. The Lords relented and passed the bill by a slim margin.

And now it was down to his mother. Victoria was known to be in seclusion for a long time, and barely re-emerged. She glared at her decidedly unfavourite son, and regarded the paper she was given with disgust. But with the mob braying for reform, the Commons door broken in and the Lords greased over, she relented and passed the bill into law, before calling for a new election the following year. A famous anecdote has it that the military-loving Victoria stated after giving assent that as much of a mistake as she regarded the bill, the whole matter showed to her that her eldest ‘clearly and plainly inherited a little, a sliver granted but still a little, of his father’s military leadership. What a wretched thing that he only uses it against our country!’.

It is believed that as the bill was on her desk, she openly talked of abdication either before giving assent or afterwards, declaring ‘the burden of the crown proves tiring’, and was only persuaded out of it by a personal appeal to her sense of duty by a retired general who was in England for a personal meeting. This retired general is widely accepted to have been Sir William Sherman, who was in a unique position of having the Queen’s ear while still being sympathetic to the reformers for he implemented the same principle in the Cape.

Two men dominate the conversation of the Splendid Revolution. Joseph Chamberlain and Albert Edward. One rallied the masses for the revolution, and the other ensured it would happen with as few bloodshed as possible. Marxists those days lambaste how Edward VII ‘compromised’ the revolution and made it away from the ‘workers’ revolutionary spirit’ it allegedly was. But however, a lot of the masses in the protests were far from republican.

They believed in the monarchy as an institution, but grew to dislike Victoria in particular. It was merely the more organised societies that were more inclined to the idea. So her more personable and ‘reasonable’ son had fertile ground to work with. Nevertheless, it is true that 1889 was the closest Britain got to a republic since the Restoration, and is a favourite of ‘lefty-Britain’ timelines.

Victoria returned to seclusion, cursing her fortune. The 1890 election was a notably confusing one, but concluded with Chamberlain in prime position to become Prime Minister. There of course would be future clashes with the Lords as he did not do anything in the original bill about them, but he could say that they were successfully ‘de-fanged’ by the time he stepped down in 1905 due to ill health.

Of course, Prince Albert Edward, later King Edward VII, became remembered as an icon of reformism in the revolution, despite his original opportunistic intention to preserve the monarchy from what he thought was a republican tide. Even today, he’s noted as one of the best monarchs mostly for what he did before his coronation (with Victoria in the bottom 50% at best), and the start of the ‘Edwardian Era’ quite uniquely is defined not with his coronation but with the start of his political ascendancy, namely with the Splendid Revolution.

The old system of Crown, Churches and Autocracy set up by the Glorious Revolution and much amended over time (most notably in 1800 with Catholic relief and 1834 with the Reform Act) perished with another revolution, one that got its name by Albert Edward noting in relief after the 1890 election that it was ‘in a way, a very splendid revolution’.

Meanwhile, one aspect led to Britain being world news for another reason. Chamberlain’s second bill was deliberately radical to rally the masses, and in the panic it was passed unaltered. Even the new Prime Minister looked quite disturbed as he realised what he did once he noticed not all of his backbenchers were men.
 
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An Era of Humility: Lily Sun

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Acutely Tibby
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Location
The Land of the Trembling Star (UK)
Pronouns
she/her
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(Imma)
Name: Lily Sun
Home State: California
Race: Designed as Asian-American
Gender: Presents as female.
Political Party: Democratic
List of Occupations: Inspirational Speaker (2034-present)
United States Representative from California's 14th District (Bay Area) (2041-present)
Date of First Code: 14 May 2027 (13 years old) - [note: The AI's 'legal persona' is her creator/manager who is 41 y/o]
Bio: What makes a person? Is it a heart, a brain, a body of flesh and bone? But as a holograph flickers into ‘life’ in Congress to perform her role as an elected representative, perhaps that once-sure truth is under question.

It was never intended that the virtual personality of ‘Lily Sun’ would ever get elected as a representative of course. She was intended to give inspirational speeches about the importance of many topics, with her speeches written up by a former presidential speech-writer, to give humanity a new direction. After all, for decades people cheered on virtual singers and ‘v-Tubers’, and there's an inning after all. TED Talks, the circuit, people would love her.

Good morning, everyone. I’m Lily…”

And they did. By 2038, she was a popular inspirational speaker, invited to many venues, even a fair lot of weddings wanted her to give a speech! But as politics became more uncertain and chaotic in California, her creator decided to push the personality into overt politics, advocating pro-tech and broadly socially liberal policies. The California Democrats (at least the Silicon Democrats) welcomed her help, and she became known as a key Democratic speaker in the Golden State.

The 2040 run was intended to be a stunt. The Bay Area was having an election to fill a retirement, and there were a lot of left-populists eager to seize the bastion of siliconism. The creator decided that she needed to throw her hat in the room, as her virtual personality of course, to signify the need for a ‘real’ Bay Area Democrat. Some legal renaming to make sure the ballot had the right name on it, and hey presto, the stunt was ready.

She didn’t expect the endorsements. After years of cultivating connections with fellow California Democrats and becoming known to many, ‘Lily Sun’ was a trusted, reliable name and ultimately one seen to be really mostly just a front for the real person. The endorsements came in, and she won the primary handily. In the end, it was too late, and well, she won the general in a landslide.

As a pink-haired holograph swears the oath, the world looks to San Francisco in puzzlement.

Meanwhile, over the years of speaking on the circuit and as a political figure, the ‘AI’ was developed further and further, becoming more self-reliant to save time coding. It still speaks from a pre-arranged speech. But what politician doesn’t?

As her creator after a long day falls asleep, a voice quietly goes ‘Good night, mom’.

Stats:
Executive - 4
Campaigning - 9
Debating - 1
Legislation - 6
Negotiation - 2
Research - 2
Media - 9
Fundraising - 7

Abortion
Center-left: Encourage choice - keep abortions legal and supported.

Automation:
Center-right: Automation is great! Government should encourage it.

Agricultural Subsidies:
Center: President Paul went too far in cutting subsidies, we should return to the status quo.

Criminal Justice Reform:
Center: Some measure of reform is needed in terms of overly long prison sentences and police brutality.

Designer Babies/Gene editing:
Center-right: Genetic editing is fantastic! We should embrace genetic editing to give America an advantage.

Pandemic Policy:
Center-left: Be prepared through proactive planning and limited development of potential vectors. Localized lockdowns in the case of an outbreak.

Healthcare:
Center-left: We need universal healthcare through a public option, but allow the private market to exist.

Unemployment:
Center-left: We need to accept that work has fundamentally changed in the 21st century and implement a generous universal basic income that provides a living for all Americans.

Immigration:
Center-left: We need to ensure a path for migrants who are already here and be more generous in welcoming more new Americans.

Space Exploration:
Center: It's important - but not a high priority.

Refugees:
Center: We should meet our refugee quota - but no more than that.

Labor Unions:
Center: Unions should be balanced with worker needs and business concerns. They aren't necessarily representative.

Economic Vision:
Center: Ideological ravings are irrelevant. We need a mix of all approaches and pick the best of all worlds.

LBGTI+ Issues:
Center-left: Fund and support LGBTI communities with a fund for gender confirmation surgery, impose harsh penalties on anti LGBTI+ hate crimes.

Climate Change:
Center-left: America should undertake a balance of adaptation and mitigation measures in concert with the world.

Trade Policy:
Center-right: Free trade is unconditionally good! Remove protections to let the free market do it's thing.

Drugs:
Center-left: Legalize soft drugs and decriminalize harder drugs.

Foreign Policy Orientation:
Multilateralist: America should rebuild it's social currency by pursuing a rules based liberal world order independent of the squabbling from Brussels and Beijing. We can be a bridge for world peace.
Successes
- Being the first prominent virtual inspirational speaker
- Becoming a famous name on political circuits
- Being elected to the House of Representatives

Failures
- Her creator was involved in CHAZ before developing her present reputation (it’s an ‘old shame’).
- The company that provided many of the base for ‘Lily’ was later accused of being overtly influenced by China.
- She once ‘interviewed’ someone who ended up on the news for horrific crimes.
 
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M-16: Nguyễn Tiến Chí

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Acutely Tibby
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Location
The Land of the Trembling Star (UK)
Pronouns
she/her

(Huỳnh Tấn Phát)
Name: Nguyễn Tiến Chí
Age: 19 May 1908 (46 years old)
Gender: Male
Ethnicity: Viet
Religion: Mahayana Buddhism
Party/Faction: Vietnamese Nationalist Party (VNQDD)
List of Occupations and Offices Held: Politician (19??-present)
Acquaintance of the Chief of State (1950-present)
Personality: Nguyễn Tiến Chí is someone who is the peak of hypocrisy. He will talk loftily of the universality of Doctor Sun Yat-sen’s ideas on one hand and yet on the other hand cut deals that go against those ideas. Behind that brash hypocrisy lies a man who knows he lives in history, that the unrelenting wind of change will push other men hither and thither, but he will be like a sailboat. He will sail with the wind but not like the helpless ones. He will have his steering wheel and sail his own fate. Is he a bit intimidated by those times? Oh sure. But that makes it all the more fun!
Other Important Information: Likely has lots of connections cultivated over the last decade.
Biography: There are men who wish to use those times to improve the lives of the masses even at the cost of their own. There are men who hold to lofty ideas no matter what. And then there are men like Nguyễn Tiến Chí.

While not completely bereft of ideas, he is far more pragmatic than most. Some, okay a lot, would consider his actions hypocritical. But can an idea feed a man? Can an idea pay an army? No. The world runs on very non-ideological grounds, and the best men are ones that have their morality shaped by ideas but their decisions by the facts on the ground. Or at least that is what he would say.

Nguyễn Tiến Chí is the result of a precarious upbringing. Born to one of the scant middle-class, he realised from a young age that the reason why his family achieved that was through nothing but hard work and some questionable involvement in the black market. Every time he looked around his Vietnam, he saw nothing but poverty. A lot of poverty. It sickened him that his country was like this, and the French masters were doing nothing to fix it.

By the time he was 20, he was keen to get involved in some anti-colonial politics. France had ample time to bother fixing Vietnam, and all of his life they never did. He knew a doomed endeavour when he saw one, and hence when he heard of the VNQDD, he promptly joined them. This period of his life is known as the one where he was most idealistic, getting caught up in the nationalistic fervour. He has an arrest record in France for it. And a missing tooth.

Did he take part in the failed revolution of 1930? With the French gone, he can safely say he was, and only escaped execution via disguising himself as a female peasant for more time than he would admit. It is in this time that he developed some of his (admittedly by now very tense) communist ties (a few people still recall meeting Nguyễn Tiến Chi, note the different tone), and it is the time he became acutely aware of the sexist nature of Vietnamese society. Also, if you believe some people, he still screams like a woman.

After a while, he escaped to Yunnan where the rest of the VNQDD was, shorn himself of the deception, and became part of the resistance, although by now increasingly sceptical of Hồ Chí Minh’s political intents and becoming one of the more mild anti-communists in the VNQDD. Vietnam needed to be freed from Franco-Japanese colonialism, yes, but this didn’t mean Hồ could be trusted completely. He was vindicated in the end as Hồ turned on them.

After the war, and as the chaos of post-1945 Vietnam ensued, the now penniless Nguyễn Tiến Chí realised an opportunity in his home city of Saigon. Moving quickly, he claimed that his (actually somewhat lower-middle-class) family was true owners of many valuable goods that was still in Vietnam somehow and managed to pull a lot of party connections to get those. He then promptly sold many of them abroad at higher than market prices, and returned to his family’s tried and true method – namely a business that prioritises trade and has dubious black market connections.

It is in this that he first made the acquaintance of Bảo Đại, who he privately despised for his Japanese collaboration but knew had a lot of outsized influence in South Vietnam. With his business being known as one of the few reasonably successful major ones, he could manage to portray himself not as an ex-communist revolutionary, but as a respectable businessman who promised to help in the creation of a better Vietnam.

He is by absolutely no means in Bảo Đại’s favourites for Prime Minister. And why would he wish to jeopardise all he has by taking on what he sees as a thankless task? Let some poor sucker do it. Nguyễn Tiến Chí knows the real power isn’t in a political office. It has always been money in the end.

Cold hard money.

Skills:
Charisma -3
Organising - 3
Generalship - 1
Skulduggery - 3
Religious Matters: "I am a Buddhist. But I don't think we should discriminate against any religion, really. Vietnam is bigger than any of them."
Foreign Policy: "The French? No. But the Americans? Absolutely. We should work with them."
Economic Policy: "We should seek to create a good mixture of state intervention and the free market. No communism. Social democracy."
Bao Dai:
- Privately: "He is nothing but a Japanese collaborationist. Should have been shot with the rest of them."
- Publicly: "I support the idea of a restrained executive. Perhaps a true republic with a good balance between a president and legislature. But if the conclusion to this discourse is a ceremonial monarchy, I will support it, as I will support any non-communist system for Vietnam."
The Chinese: "We should not target any ethnicity in particular. But I absolutely do support a tax on landowners."
 
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These Fair Shores: British Governments

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Acutely Tibby
Patreon supporter
Location
The Land of the Trembling Star (UK)
Pronouns
she/her
1626292773376.png
{{Navbox
|name = British ministries
|state = {{{state|open}}}
|title = [[List of British governments|British governments]]
|listclass = hlist
|style = width:100%;

|image = [[File:Royal Coat of Arms of the United Kingdom (HM Government).svg|100px|HM Government of the United Kingdom's Royal Coat of Arms]]
|group1 = {{flag|Kingdom of Great Britain|name=Great Britain}}</br>(1707–1801)
|list1 =
* [[Godolphin–Marlborough ministry|Godolphin–Marlborough]]
* [[Harley ministry|Harley]]
* [[Townshend ministry|Townshend]]
* [[First Stanhope–Sunderland ministry|Stanhope–Sunderland I]]
* [[Second Stanhope–Sunderland ministry|Stanhope–Sunderland II]]
* [[Walpole–Townshend ministry|Walpole–Townshend]]
* [[Walpole ministry|Walpole]]
* [[Carteret ministry|Carteret]]
* [[Broad Bottom ministry|Broad Bottom I and II]]
* [[Short-lived ministry|Short-lived]]
* [[First Newcastle ministry|Newcastle I]]
* [[Pitt–Devonshire ministry|Pitt–Devonshire]]
* [[1757 caretaker ministry|1757 Caretaker]]
* [[Pitt–Newcastle ministry|Pitt–Newcastle (Newcastle II)]]
* [[Bute ministry|Bute]]
* [[Grenville ministry|Grenville]]
* [[First Rockingham ministry|Rockingham I]]
* [[Chatham ministry|1. Chatham]]
* [[Grafton ministry|Grafton]]
* [[North ministry|North]]
* [[Second Rockingham ministry|Rockingham II]]
* [[Shelburne ministry|Shelburne]]
* [[Fox–North coalition|Fox–North]]
* [[First Pitt ministry|Pitt I]]
* [[i|No Bottom (Leeds)]]
* [[i|No Bottom (Moira)]]
* [[i|Pudding Time (Pitt II)]]

|group2 = {{flag|United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland|name=UK (GB and Ire)}}</br>(1801–1987)
|list2 =
* [[i|Pudding Time (Pitt III)]]
* [[i|Lilliputian]]
* [[i|Vicar of Bray]]
* [[Liverpool ministry|Liverpool]]
* [[Canningite government, 1827–1828|Canningite]]
* [[Canningite government, 1827–1828|2. Chatham]]
* [[Wellington–Peel ministry|Mansfield]]
* [[Whig government, 1830–1834|Planta]]
* [[Whig government, 1830–1834|Peel]]
* [[i|Knatchbull]]
* [[Wellington caretaker ministry|Polar Star]]
* [[First Peel ministry|Crusader]]
* [[Second Melbourne ministry|Shamrock]]
* [[Second Peel ministry|Adullamite]]
* [[First Russell ministry|Contarini]]
* [[Who? Who? ministry|Ozymandias]]
* [[Aberdeen ministry|Half]]
* [[First Palmerston ministry|Who? Who?]]
* [[Second Derby–Disraeli ministry|Big Loaf]]
* [[Liberal government, 1859–1866|Little Loaf]]
* [[Third Derby–Disraeli ministry|Soulful]]
* [[First Gladstone ministry|Haldane I and II]]
* [[Second Disraeli ministry|Baldwin I]]
* [[i|All the Talents]]
** [[i|I]]
** [[i|II]]
** [[i|III]]
** [[i|IV]]
** [[i|Peacetime (V)]]
* [[First Salisbury ministry|MacDonald]]
* [[Third Gladstone ministry|New Loaf]]
* [[Second Salisbury ministry|Salisbury I and II]]
* [[Liberal government, 1892–1895|Lennox-Boyd]]
* [[Liberal government, 1892–1895|Jenkins]]
** [[Unionist government, 1895–1905|Revolution]]
** [[Unionist government, 1895–1905|Performance]]
** [[Liberal government, 1905–1915|Avenger]]
** [[i|Endgame]]
* [[H. H. Asquith#Peacetime_prime_minister:_1908–1914|Williams]]
** [[i|I]]
** [[i|II]]
* [[Lloyd George ministry|Brocklebank-Fowler]]
** [[i|I]]
** [[i|II]]
* [[i|Hungry Caterpillar]]

|group3 = {{flag|United Kingdom|name=UK (GB, I and HK)}}</br>(1987–present)
|list3 =
* [[Conservative government, 1922–1924|Hungry Caterpillar]]
* [[Conservative government, 1922–1924|Tarzan]]
* [[First MacDonald ministry|Jackson]]
** [[Second Baldwin ministry|Hopscotch]]
** [[Second MacDonald ministry|Rainbow]]
** [[i|Playhouse]]
* [[Chamberlain war ministry|Gould]]
* [[Churchill war ministry|Eagle's Nest]]
** [[i|I]]
** [[i|II]]
* [[Churchill caretaker ministry|Major]]
** [[Attlee ministry|Buttered Parsnip]]
** [[Third Churchill ministry|Cricket Match]]
* [[Eden ministry|Smartie]]
** [[Conservative government, 1957–1964|I]]
** [[Conservative government, 1957–1964|II]]
* [[i|New Statesman]]
** [[i|I]]
** [[i|II]]
| below = [[Second Johnson ministry|Current ministry]]
}}
 
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A Random 2020 Election in a List Game

Turquoise Blue

Acutely Tibby
Patreon supporter
Location
The Land of the Trembling Star (UK)
Pronouns
she/her
1626711910504.png
{{Infobox election
| election_name = 2020 United States presidential election
| country = United States
| flag_year = 1960
| type = presidential
| ongoing = No
| opinion_polls = Nationwide opinion polling for the 2020 United States presidential election
| college_voted = Yes
| previous_election = 2016 United States presidential election
| previous_year = 2016
| election_date = November 3, 2020
| next_election = 2024 United States presidential election
| next_year = ''2024''
| votes_for_election = 538 members of the [[United States Electoral College|Electoral College]]
| needed_votes = 270 electoral
| image_size = x160px
| image1 = File:Nick Clegg (2011) (cropped).jpg
| nominee1 = '''[[Lisa Brennan-Jobs]]'''
| party1 = [[i|Tomorrow]]
| colour1 = 1ce9b5
| home_state1 = [[California]]
| running_mate1 = '''[[Andrew Yang]]'''
| popular_vote1 = '''73,173,132'''
| electoral_vote1 = '''283'''
| states_carried1 = '''21 + [[Nebraska's 2nd congressional district|NE-02]]'''
| percentage1 = '''46.2%'''
| image2 = File:Nick Clegg (2011) (cropped).jpg
| nominee2 = [[John Bel Edwards]]
| party2 = Democratic Party (United States)
| home_state2 = [[Louisiana]]
| running_mate2 = [[i|Lucas St. Clair]]
| popular_vote2 = 71,114,147
| electoral_vote2 = 255
| states_carried2 = '''29 + [[Maine's 2nd congressional district|DC]]'''
| percentage2 = 44.9%
| image3 = File:Nick Clegg (2011) (cropped).jpg
| nominee3 = [[i|Orenthal Simpson]]
| party3 = Republican Party (United States)
| home_state3 = [[California]]
| running_mate3 = [[i|Donald Trump]]
| popular_vote3 = 10,770,071
| electoral_vote3 = 0
| states_carried3 = 0
| percentage3 = 6.8%
| map = {{2020 United States presidential election imagemap}}
| map_caption = Presidential election results map. <span style="color:green;">Green</span> denotes states won by Brennan-Jobs/Yang and <span style="color:darkblue;">Blue</span> denotes those won by Edwards/St. Clair. Numbers indicate [[United States Electoral College|electoral votes]] cast by each state and the District of Columbia.
| map_alt = A map of the United States showing several coastal states and some of the Midwest and South voting for Biden, with most of the Midwest, South, and Plains voting for Trump.
| title = President
| before_election = [[i|Orenthal Simpson]]
| before_party = Republican Party (United States)
| after_election = [[Lisa Brennan-Jobs]]
| after_party = [[I|Tomorrow]]
}}
 

rosa

Well-known member
View attachment 41087
{{Infobox election
| election_name = 2020 United States presidential election
| country = United States
| flag_year = 1960
| type = presidential
| ongoing = No
| opinion_polls = Nationwide opinion polling for the 2020 United States presidential election
| college_voted = Yes
| previous_election = 2016 United States presidential election
| previous_year = 2016
| election_date = November 3, 2020
| next_election = 2024 United States presidential election
| next_year = ''2024''
| votes_for_election = 538 members of the [[United States Electoral College|Electoral College]]
| needed_votes = 270 electoral
| image_size = x160px
| image1 = File:Nick Clegg (2011) (cropped).jpg
| nominee1 = '''[[Lisa Brennan-Jobs]]'''
| party1 = [[i|Tomorrow]]
| colour1 = 1ce9b5
| home_state1 = [[California]]
| running_mate1 = '''[[Andrew Yang]]'''
| popular_vote1 = '''73,173,132'''
| electoral_vote1 = '''283'''
| states_carried1 = '''21 + [[Nebraska's 2nd congressional district|NE-02]]'''
| percentage1 = '''46.2%'''
| image2 = File:Nick Clegg (2011) (cropped).jpg
| nominee2 = [[John Bel Edwards]]
| party2 = Democratic Party (United States)
| home_state2 = [[Louisiana]]
| running_mate2 = [[i|Lucas St. Clair]]
| popular_vote2 = 71,114,147
| electoral_vote2 = 255
| states_carried2 = '''29 + [[Maine's 2nd congressional district|DC]]'''
| percentage2 = 44.9%
| image3 = File:Nick Clegg (2011) (cropped).jpg
| nominee3 = [[i|Orenthal Simpson]]
| party3 = Republican Party (United States)
| home_state3 = [[California]]
| running_mate3 = [[i|Donald Trump]]
| popular_vote3 = 10,770,071
| electoral_vote3 = 0
| states_carried3 = 0
| percentage3 = 6.8%
| map = {{2020 United States presidential election imagemap}}
| map_caption = Presidential election results map. <span style="color:green;">Green</span> denotes states won by Brennan-Jobs/Yang and <span style="color:darkblue;">Blue</span> denotes those won by Edwards/St. Clair. Numbers indicate [[United States Electoral College|electoral votes]] cast by each state and the District of Columbia.
| map_alt = A map of the United States showing several coastal states and some of the Midwest and South voting for Biden, with most of the Midwest, South, and Plains voting for Trump.
| title = President
| before_election = [[i|Orenthal Simpson]]
| before_party = Republican Party (United States)
| after_election = [[Lisa Brennan-Jobs]]
| after_party = [[I|Tomorrow]]
}}
Oh God
 
These Fair Shores: LGBT Parlance and Symbolism

Turquoise Blue

Acutely Tibby
Patreon supporter
Location
The Land of the Trembling Star (UK)
Pronouns
she/her
Violet - "sapphic love" (lesbian, purple)
Pansy - "achillean love" (gay, yellow)
Rose - "panian love" (bisexual, red)
Lotus - "transcended" (transgender, rainbow [varying colours for varying types])
- White Lotus - "indifferent to gender" (non-binary, white/white with tinges of colours)
Candytuft - "indifferent to sex/love" (ace, white)
Iris - "inquisitive" (questioning, blue)

Green carnation - "queer" (LGBTQ, green)

"Bud" - closeted/egg, "queer person who has not bloomed".
"Blooming" - refers to both coming out and general LGBT identity confidence, the two are seen as part of one whole.

May Day has LGBT connotations instead of socialist connotations, and May in general is the "blooming month" [pride month].

Lots of plastic flowers being sold and worn on labels at that time.
 
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These Fair Shores: Lord Lieutenants of Ireland

Turquoise Blue

Acutely Tibby
Patreon supporter
Location
The Land of the Trembling Star (UK)
Pronouns
she/her
Lord Lieutenants of Ireland
Sir Horace Plunkett (Conservative majority, then minority, then majority) 1906-1918
William Redmond (Irish National Federation-Protestant Coalition-Liberal-Labour coalition) 1918-1921
Sir Horace Plunkett (Conservative majority, then wartime government) 1921-1930
Sir Ernest Blythe (Conservative wartime government, then majority) 1930-1939
William Norton (Labour-Irish National Federation-Liberal-Protestant Coalition-Dominion League coalition) 1939-1944
Joseph Martin (Conservative majority) 1944-1951
Brendan Bracken (Conservative majority) 1951-1956*
Dehra Parker (Conservative majority) 1956 [interim]
Maynard Sinclair (Conservative majority) 1956-1966
Erskine Childers (Conservative majority) 1966-1970
Liam Cosgrave (Conservative majority) 1970-1978
James Chichester-Clark (Conservative majority) 1978-1985

Séan Treacy (Labour-Irish National Federation minority coalition with Liberal support) 1985-1987
Brian Lenihan Snr. (Conservative majority) 1987-1990*
Austin
Currie (Conservative majority, then Unionist minority) 1990-1998
David Stanton (Irish National Federation-Labour-Democratic-Green coalition) 1998-2002
Sylvia, Lady Hermon (Liberal majority) 2002-2007
Edgar Graham (Unionist majority) 2007-2014
Lucinda Creighton (Unionist majority) 2014-2018
Frances Fitzgerald (Unionist majority) 2018-2019

Stephen Donnelly (Liberal majority) 2019-present
 
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