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Lists of Heads of Government and Heads of State

Mumby

Always mysterious!
Published by SLP
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Royal Prerogative, Part 1

My POD here is Prince David goes off to fight in WW1 and either ends up dead or MIA, in any case he isn't about to inherit the throne. His brother, Prince Albert, is the heir apparent from then on out and when George V passes away in 1936 he inherits the throne with little fuss. Without the Abdication Crisis of OTL, my theory goes that the soft power of the monarchy, retained by Victoria through to George V but virtually eliminated by the clash between the King and his Cabinet in 1936, is retained.

1940-1945: Edward Wood (Conservative leading War Government with Labour, Liberal Nationals, Liberals and National Labour)

My assumption is that between accession in 1936 and Chamberlain's resignation in the Norway Crisis, there is little room for butterflies or decisions to make. However, the King does have a choice between Churchill and Halifax in 1940 and IOTL he harboured a certain distrust for the ambitious Churchill and ITTL plumps for Halifax who resigns his peerage and wins an unopposed seat to govern from the Commons. The war proceeds much as IOTL though is perhaps less mythologised after the fact with a less charismatic Prime Minister. Another consequence of the King's influence is the War Government holds together through VJ day up to a general election in October 1945.

1945-1952: Clement Attlee (Labour)
1945 (Majority) def. Edward Wood (National - Conservatives, Liberal Nationals), Archibald Sinclair (Liberal)
1950 (Majority) def. Anthony Eden (Conservative and National Liberal), Clement Davies (Liberal)


Again the butterflies remain constrained, Labour's ideas on the economy still have the advantages of wartime implementation that they had IOTL, and while Wood is a less charismatic figure than Churchill he also isn't going to tell everyone in the country that Clem will implement the Gestapo, so I forsee a majority similar to OTL. Attlee was very close with the King and was influence by his words IOTL, and would continue to be the case ITTL I think. Wood stands aside after his defeat and Eden takes the leadership. The King's health is moderately worse ITTL and he does not plan to go overseas in 1951 so no snap election is held. His death in 1952 does lead to a snap election though.

1952-1956: Anthony Eden (Conservative)
1952 (Coalition with Liberals) def. Clement Attlee (Labour), Clement Davies (Liberal)
1954 (Majority) def. Clement Attlee (Labour), Clement Davies (Liberal)

Hopes remain high for Labour in 1952, but the party's internescine conflict leads to them losing their majority. The Tories emerge the largest party and form a coalition with the Liberals. This rather unstable arrangement carries on for a year after the young Queen's coronation, a boost in national contentment that allows the Conservatives to gain a healthy majority. Prince David's death in the 1910s has not butterflied away Eden's regular health complaints however, and is as reliant on Benzedrine as he was IOTL. One of the consequences of Wood's time in office is a less hostile attitude to the Soviets, and the prospect of Britain (and possibly France) as a Third Force in between the two superpowers is an idea more universally admired in the absence of the Americophile Churchill. Maintenance of control of the Middle East would be vital to the continuation of a British Empire, and it is likely that something similar to the Suez Crisis would happen. However, before the ball can get rolling as far as it did IOTL, the Queen intervenes and in light of Eden's mental temperament, he is advised to stand aside.
 

Thande

UP THE WORKERS & Ukrainians
Published by SLP
Royal Prerogative, Part 1

My POD here is Prince David goes off to fight in WW1 and either ends up dead or MIA, in any case he isn't about to inherit the throne. His brother, Prince Albert, is the heir apparent from then on out and when George V passes away in 1936 he inherits the throne with little fuss. Without the Abdication Crisis of OTL, my theory goes that the soft power of the monarchy, retained by Victoria through to George V but virtually eliminated by the clash between the King and his Cabinet in 1936, is retained.

1940-1945: Edward Wood (Conservative leading War Government with Labour, Liberal Nationals, Liberals and National Labour)

My assumption is that between accession in 1936 and Chamberlain's resignation in the Norway Crisis, there is little room for butterflies or decisions to make. However, the King does have a choice between Churchill and Halifax in 1940 and IOTL he harboured a certain distrust for the ambitious Churchill and ITTL plumps for Halifax who resigns his peerage and wins an unopposed seat to govern from the Commons. The war proceeds much as IOTL though is perhaps less mythologised after the fact with a less charismatic Prime Minister. Another consequence of the King's influence is the War Government holds together through VJ day up to a general election in October 1945.

1945-1952: Clement Attlee (Labour)
1945 (Majority) def. Edward Wood (National - Conservatives, Liberal Nationals), Archibald Sinclair (Liberal)
1950 (Majority) def. Anthony Eden (Conservative and National Liberal), Clement Davies (Liberal)


Again the butterflies remain constrained, Labour's ideas on the economy still have the advantages of wartime implementation that they had IOTL, and while Wood is a less charismatic figure than Churchill he also isn't going to tell everyone in the country that Clem will implement the Gestapo, so I forsee a majority similar to OTL. Attlee was very close with the King and was influence by his words IOTL, and would continue to be the case ITTL I think. Wood stands aside after his defeat and Eden takes the leadership. The King's health is moderately worse ITTL and he does not plan to go overseas in 1951 so no snap election is held. His death in 1952 does lead to a snap election though.

1952-1956: Anthony Eden (Conservative)
1952 (Coalition with Liberals) def. Clement Attlee (Labour), Clement Davies (Liberal)
1954 (Majority) def. Clement Attlee (Labour), Clement Davies (Liberal)

Hopes remain high for Labour in 1952, but the party's internescine conflict leads to them losing their majority. The Tories emerge the largest party and form a coalition with the Liberals. This rather unstable arrangement carries on for a year after the young Queen's coronation, a boost in national contentment that allows the Conservatives to gain a healthy majority. Prince David's death in the 1910s has not butterflied away Eden's regular health complaints however, and is as reliant on Benzedrine as he was IOTL. One of the consequences of Wood's time in office is a less hostile attitude to the Soviets, and the prospect of Britain (and possibly France) as a Third Force in between the two superpowers is an idea more universally admired in the absence of the Americophile Churchill. Maintenance of control of the Middle East would be vital to the continuation of a British Empire, and it is likely that something similar to the Suez Crisis would happen. However, before the ball can get rolling as far as it did IOTL, the Queen intervenes and in light of Eden's mental temperament, he is advised to stand aside.
Interesting Bob.

I suspect a TLIAD based on an expansion of this might draw some interest given how The Crown has made a bigger audience aware of this period and the personalities and OTL balance of power in it.
 

Mumby

Always mysterious!
Published by SLP
Location
Municipal Commune of Bourne
Pronouns
He/Him
Royal Prerogative, Part 2

1956-1963: Rab Butler (Conservative)
1958 (Majority) def. Nye (Labour), Jo Grimond (Liberal)

As IOTL, the Queen consulted with Lord Salisbury on the choice of her next Prime Minister, but ITTL the calculations are rather different. Butler's reputation, marred by association with appeasement IOTL, is rather better in this world thanks to his association with the wartime Prime Minister Edward Wood. On the advice of Salisbury backed by Conservative grandees she plumps for Butler, a known quantity and head of the domestic brief under Eden, ahead of the maverick and former radical Harold Macmillan. Butler presides over a good economy, enabling a renewed though somewhat reduced majority in 1958. Butler's premiership is soon dogged by backbench rebellion on his social reforms, like the abolition of corporal and capital punishment, the decriminalisation of homosexual relationships, and the decolonisation of Africa. He is able to pass these reforms mostly with the support of the opposition parties, but despite that no rebellion emerges large enough to remove him outright.

1963-1971: Tony Greenwood (Labour)
1963 (Majority) def. Rab Butler (Conservative), Jo Grimond (Liberal)
1964 (Majority) def. Iain Macleod (Conservative), Duncan Sandys (Independent Tory), Jo Grimond (Liberal)
1969 (Majority) def. Enoch Powell (Conservative), Jeremy Thorpe (Liberal), Ted Heath (Independent Tory)


Butler is an uninspiring campaigner, especially compared to the charismatic handsome young leader of the Labour Party. With a narrow majority, it seemed he may have little time to implement his agenda, but Butler's retirement from the position of Tory Leader opened up the great chasm between the liberal leadership and the reactionary backbenches for all to see. A snap election was held in 1964 which Labour won comfortably against a bitterly divided opposition. Greenwood's premiership would see a return to the independent foreign policy tack, rejecting American overtures to assist in foreign interventions. This was somewhat complicated by the traditional alignment with France being impossible thanks to the putschist government which had emerged at the end of the 1950s. While both countries espoused independence from the Cold War, they found themselves on the frontlines of it, though more in their former (or soon to be former) empires than in the metropoles proper. Nevertheless, Tony Greenwood's premiership defined the 1960s, from its social advances to the economic adjustment and growth at its start to the malaise at its end. 1969 was if anything more bitter than 1964 as Enoch Powell had seized the leadership after Macleod's death in 1968 and this time it was the moderates turn to split. Greenwood stepped down in 1971, retiring as economic malaise turned to strife.

1971-1973: Jim Callaghan (Labour majority)

The 'keeper of the cloth cap' was entrusted with guiding Britain through the economic inflation and the crisis of demand for higher wages meaning nothing when the value of those wages reduced. And he failed. Good old fashioned Keynesianism as advanced for decades would no longer past muster, it seemed. While the economy began to grow again in 1973, Callaghan tried to press home his advantage.

1973-1974: Enoch Powell (Conservative)
1973 (Minority) def. Jim Callaghan (Labour), Jeremy Thorpe (Liberal-National Democrat Alliance)

The result of the 1973 election confirmed nothing however, while Enoch Powell emerged as leader of the largest party, the emergent Alliance had won many more seats than expected. While the Queen invited Powell to form a minority government, the contentious Labour leadership election of 1973 along with discontent at Powell's monetarist economic polices within his own party provided the conditions for a new one.

1974-1977: Jeremy Thorpe (Liberal)
1974 (Alliance with NDP and DLP) def. Michael Foot (Labour), Enoch Powell (Conservative)

The victory of Michael Foot in the Labour leadership saw the breakaway of the right of the party under Roy Jenkins. Joined by more Conservative defectors to the NDP, the Alliance was now in a position to call for a vote of no confidence. Thorpe's government was implicitly backed by the Queen who found Powell's economic policies distasteful to say nothing of his racial views. The Alliance alone had a comfortable majority, seeing the evisceration of the Tories, but remained internally divided between the three component parties. Thorpe's government attempted to steer back to a Keynesian economic agenda, but out of necessity almost, found itself implementing a watered down version of Powell's monetarism. Members of the National Democrats and Democratic Labour did leave the Alliance over Thorpe's time in office, withering away his majority.

1977-1982: Tony Benn (Labour)
1977 (Majority) def. Jeremy Thorpe (Liberal-National Democrat-Democratic Labour Alliance), numerous Independent Democrat candidates, Enoch Powell (Unionist)

Thorpe's government lost its majority, and he called a snap election before a confidence vote could be called. This went badly as rising unemployment thanks to the monetarist policy of the Alliance led to a reaction, and Tony Benn's Labour won a majority. The Alliance in opposition was ironically far more cohesive than it had been in government, having lost or removed its problem members it would go on to formalise the Alliance as the Democratic Centre Party. Meanwhile the rump Conservatives had realigned with the Northern Ireland Unionists and gained a couple of seats though they languished behind the mess of Independent Democrats who had left the Alliance during its time in government.
 

Turquoise Blue

Onfortuinlijk Tibby
Patreon supporter
Location
UK (for now), Netherlands (in the future)
Pronouns
she/her
The Big Switch

Paul Hellyer (Liberal minority, then majority) 1968-1972
1968: def. Robert Stanfield (Progressive Conservative), Tommy Douglas (New Democratic) and Real Caouette (Ralliement creditiste)
Robert Stanfield (Progressive Conservative majority, then minority) 1972-1979
1972: def. Paul Hellyer (Liberal), David Lewis (New Democratic) and Real Caouette (Social Credit)
1976: def. Pierre Trudeau (Liberal), David Lewis (New Democratic) and Fabien Roy (Social Credit)

Pierre Trudeau (Liberal majority) 1979-1991*
1979: def. Robert Stanfield (Progressive Conservative), Bill Vander Zalm (Social Credit) and Ed Broadbent (New Democratic)
1984: def. Flora MacDonald (Progressive Conservative), Bill Vander Zalm (Social Credit) and John Paul Harney (New Democratic)
1988: def. Flora MacDonald (Progressive Conservative), John Paul Harney (New Democratic) and Bill Vander Zalm (Social Credit)

Sheila Copps (Liberal majority, then minority) 1991-1993
1991: def. Jean Charest (Progressive Conservative), John Paul Harney (New Democratic) and Bill Vander Zalm (Social Credit)
Jean Charest (Progressive Conservative majority) 1993-2002
1993: def. Sheila Copps (Liberal), Dave Barrett (New Democratic), Bill Vander Zalm (Social Credit) and Phil Edmonston (Parti Socialiste)
1997: def. Sheila Copps (Liberal), Preston Manning (Social Credit), Gaétan Nadeau (Parti Socialiste) and Dave Barrett (New Democratic)
2001: def. Pierre Pettigrew (Liberal), Preston Manning (Social Credit), Gaétan Nadeau (Parti Socialiste) and Jordan Peterson (New Democratic)

Bernard Lord (Progressive Conservative majority) 2002-2004
Pierre Pettigrew (Liberal minority, then majority) 2004-2011
2004: def. Bernard Lord (Progressive Conservative), Jordan Peterson (New Democratic), Gilles Duceppe (Parti Socialiste) and Stephen Harper (Social Credit)
2007: def. Bernard Lord (Progressive Conservative), Jordan Peterson (New Democratic), Stephen Harper (Social Credit) and Gilles Duceppe (Parti Socialiste)

Tom Mulcair (Progressive Conservative minority) 2011-2015
2011: def. Jordan Peterson (New Democratic), Pierre Pettigrew (Liberal) and Gilles Duceppe (Social Democratic)
Jordan Peterson (New Democratic majority) 2015-
2015: def. Justin Trudeau (Liberal), Tom Mulcair (Progressive Conservative) and Gilles Duceppe (Social Democratic)

As the NDP completes its ideological metamorphosis into a firmly right-wing populist party, the party of the "true Canadians", namely the farmers and "right kind" of workers, it increasingly sneers at the social movements that it once used to enjoy the support of. The SDL, one half of the omelette that the ambitious Duceppe tried to cook, enjoys those movements' support now, although many do vote for the now firmly "left" [in a certain sense] Liberals. Meanwhile, the Progressive Conservatives, now under their new leader Dominic Cardy, is hollowed out in their desire for centrism and for power and now the people increasingly ask themselves "why vote Tory?"

As Peterson announces his cabinet, some old Social Credit names pop up, such as Maxime Bernier, the last leader of the Soc-Creds and the one who led it to merge into the NDP - such a thing considered once unimaginable. Peterson's speech includes many talk of "alienation". And it was Western alienation, and increasingly Ontario alienation, that fuelled his success, albeit he ended up winning some Quebec seats anyway

It may be the days of the Orange Crush, but it tastes bitter, deeply bitter
 
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lerk

Well-known member
There was a post on AH.com talking about Huey Long becoming an American Putin after a worse Great Depression, and I found it interesting enough to make a list about it (no, it isn't an analogue if you're wondering) (yes, this is probably implausible).

1933: Al Smith/Albert Ritchie (Democratic Party) [1]
1932 def: Herbert Hoover/Charles Curtis (Republican Party), Norman Thomas/James Maurer (Socialist Party)
1933-1937: Albert Ritchie/vacant (Democratic Party) [2]
1937: Huey Long/Burton K. Wheeler (Democratic Party) [3]

1936 def: Frederick Steiwer/Alf Landon (Republican Party), Norman Thomas/Upton Sinclair (Socialist Party), Albert Ritchie/Dan Moody (Independent)
1937-1938: Douglas MacArthur/vacant (Nonpartisan/Military Junta) [4]
1938-1949: Huey Long/Burton K. Wheeler (Democratic Party) [5]

1940 def: Frank Gannett/Thomas Dewey (Republican Party)
1944 def: Scattered opposition
1949-1958: Huey Long/William Langer (Democratic Party) [5]
1948 def: Joseph W. Martin, Jr. /B. Caroll Reece (Republican Party)
1952 def: Styles Bridges/Everett Dirksen (Republican Party)
1956 def: Thomas Dewey/George Mickelson (Republican Party), Robert Welch/Robert Stoddard (Independent)
1958-1961: Lyndon B. Johnson/vacant (Democratic Party) [6]
1961-1969: Lyndon B. Johnson/Forrest H. Anderson (Democratic Party) [6]

1960 def: Wayne Morse/Thomas Kuchel (Republican Party)
1964 def: Thomas Kuchel/George Aiken (Republican Party), Eric Hass/Vincent Hallilan (Socialist Party)
1969-1970: Tom McCall/F. Ray Keyser Jr. (Republican Party) [7]
1968 def: W. Cleon Skousen/Robert Welch (Liberty), Orval Faubus/Lee Pressman (Socialist Party), Lyndon B. Johnson/Forrest H. Anderson (Democratic Party)
1970-1977: Tom McCall/Richard Snelling (Republican Party) [7]
1972: William Guy/Walter Mondale (Farmer-Labor), Elmer Taft Benson/Henry Grover (Liberty), Orval Faubus/Corliss Lamont (Socialist Party), Russell Long/Robert Byrd (American People's Party)

1 - After the sudden death of New York governor Franklin Roosevelt due to a plane crash as he was going to the Chicago convention, most delegates were left with only one choice: former New York governor and 1928 nominee Al Smith. Smith in his convention speech promised to end the depression through a series of progressive reforms, to the cheers of many. While questions were raised over his religion, it wasn't as effective as an attack as it was in 1928. He won in a landslide, yet his presidency wasn't as reformist as many thought it would be, with the only reform that people remember being the repeal of prohibition. He was killed by a member of the far-right Silver Shirts on May 23rd, just two months after his inauguration.

2 - Ritchie was more of a conservative than Smith was, leading to not much getting done. He cracked down on the Silver Shirts, but radicalism was growing on both the far-right and far-left due to the depression. Many states were forced to declare bankruptcy, the US dollar was slowly becoming worthless, and a famine was predicted to occur by 1939 if current trends persisted. He was defeated in the 1936 Democratic convention by populist Lousiana Senator Huey Long, who, like Smith vowed to defeat the depression. Ritchie made his own independent bid which got only 3% of the popular vote, yet in some states got 20% of the vote. The GOP rebounded, but couldn't defeat Long. The Socialist Party also got their best result, but they were relegated to third place.

3 - Huey Long's economic plans, such as strict regulation of the banks, the creation of a public works project and the passing of laws meant to stimulate economic recovery did indeed lead to the end of the depression in the United States. However, his authoritarian tendencies led to massive opposition from the right, who saw Long as no better than a communist. Plans were hatched for a military coup which would topple Long and put in his place a "National Emergency Council" consisting of generals and businessmen.

4 - The coup took place on December 26th (the date in which it occurred led to it being described erroneously as the "Christmas Coup") as Huey Long and Burton K. Wheeler were in Louisiana and Montana respectively. They were both arrested, and General Douglas MacArthur took power. This led to a massive backlash from Long's supporters. MacArthur would be killed by anti-coup officers, which led to the coup's unraveling.

5 - Long would return to power on January 3rd, now with his position being more powerful. He would order investigations into the Republican Party and would declare the Liberty League to be a treasonous organization. Many businessmen and pro-coup generals either kill themselves, fled to Portugal (the right-wing Estado Novo would attract numerous rightists from America, which would lead to international incidents between America and Portugal) or be arrested, tried and executed. Nobody from the GOP was indicted, yet they were massively weakened by the investigations and only won Vermont in 1940. Long continued his economic reforms, with some examples being the creation of Social Security and implementation of universal healthcare. When the Supreme Court was ruling much of his plans unconstitutional, Long successfully led a campaign to put four more justices on the supreme court.

America would eventually be dragged into the Second World War against Germany, Italy, Japan and (briefly) Afghanistan following an incident which an American freighter was destroyed by a German submarine on January 5th, 1942. Long used the war to strengthen his position, and did so by creating state-run media and having them run a campaign which would pressure the Republican Party into not running a candidate, which they eventually did following a convention with over 170 ballots (opinion polling in 1944 showed that over 65% of Americans believed that the Republican Party shouldn't run a nominee).

The war ended with the creation of the atomic bomb in March of 1946. It was used on the German cities of Cologne and Munich, and the Japanese cities of Kokura and Nagoya. Germany and Japan promptly surrendered, and were partitioned. Germany was divided into Bayern, Rhineland, Saxony, Judea (a Soviet-backed Jewish state in East Prussia which would receive a lot of settlement following the defeat of Israel in the 1948 Palestine uprising) and a rump German state consisting of the rest (Danzig and East Pomerania was given to Poland). Japan would be divided into Okinawa, a communist northern Japan consisting of Hokkaido and North Honshu, Kyushu and a rump Japanese state consisting of Honshu and Shikoku.

Huey Long's last decade would be a time of prosperity. The economy was booming, standards of living were high and crime was down. Because of this, turnout was low, leading to a prosperous last few elections for Long. Both Huey Long and William Langer would die in a plane crash, leading to the ascension of Lyndon B. Johnson, speaker of the house. Both Long and Langer's funeral was attended by 500,000 people. Today, Huey Long is a controversial figure, with some praising him for him ending the depression and winning the war, while others hating him for his dictatorial tendencies. One thing is for sure - An America without Long would be unrecognizable.

6 - Johnson's presidency would mark the end of Democratic rule. He was less authoritarian than Long, but he wanted the Democrats to remain in power as long as possible. He tried to gain popularity by liberalizing the media, but that exposed Johnson to a number of attacks from channels which had a pro-Republican or pro-Socialist bent. Alongside this, there was a renewed call for the end of segregation in the south, which Democratic governors tried to stifle, but that only led to a bigger backlash. Privately, Johnson's sympathies laid with those fighting for civil rights, but he realized that being open about it would lead to the collapse of the Democratic Party. This moderation was at first seen as a good strategy, yet when white supremacists began to attack civil rights activists it began to lose popularity. Yet, despite this, Johnson wanted to keep the Democratic coalition alive. The 1964 elections were the freest in 28 years, yet inertia along with a divided opposition led to a Johnson victory.

In 1967 there was a scandal surrounding one of Johnson's 1964 campaign manager Bobby Baker about allegations of favoritism. Further investigation, along with the revelation of numerous documents leading back to the 1930s, revealed much more. Revelations of the internment of Japanese nationals during the Second World War (along with the squalid living conditions they were placed under), harassment of Republican senators and Supreme Court justices pressuring them to either vote a certain way or to resign, connections that the government had with organized crime, along with a lot more corruption and graft than had been expected led to a total collapse of popularity for the Democratic Party. As this was after the midterms, Johnson could not be impeached, yet it had terrible effects for the Democrats in 1948.

7 - Governor McCall of Oregon won the 1968 election in a landslide, with the Democratic Party being essentially shut out of the electoral college. His first 100 days were as eventful as Long's, which included the beginning of an investigation of the Democratic Party, along with numerous amendments being proposed to limit the power of the presidency, such as an amendment relegating the president to one term (McCall was grandfathered out of this), a five term limit for representatives and a three term limit for senators. Alongside this, there was an amendment which would abolish the electoral college, and an amendment which establishes procedures for appointing a new vice president along with procedures of what to do in case the sitting president can't perform their duties. The 1970 Civil Rights Act and 1970 Voting Rights Act ended segregation in all forms and gave voting rights to African-Americans, yet it incensed white supremacists. One group, which took its name from the reconstruction-era White League, was the largest of the white supremacist groups and issued a "declaration of war" shortly after the passage of the two acts. This led to numerous violence across the country, along with the assassination of Vice President F. Ray Keyser. The 1972 elections were an easy win for McCall due to a more organized campaign, yet it would mark the beginning of a new party system in America. By the time the 1976 elections are rolling around, white supremacist terrorism has died down, and civil rights has become an accepted reality. McCall leaves the presidency a popular man, but while the future seems bright now, America has gone through plenty of surprises. Who knows where it'll be in ten years?

Republican: Liberalism. Prevalent in New England and the West Coast.
Farmer-Labor: Populism, Social Democracy. Prevalent in the Plains and Mountain states.
Liberty: Paleoconservatism (has a sizable moderate conservative faction). Prevalent in the South and Plains states.
Socialism: Socialism, pacifism. Prevalent in New York, the Midwest and Appalachia.
American People's Party: Longism. Prevalent in Texas, Louisiana and Mississippi
 

Mumby

Always mysterious!
Published by SLP
Location
Municipal Commune of Bourne
Pronouns
He/Him
Royal Prerogative, Part 3

1977-1982: Tony Benn (Labour)
1977 (Majority) def. Jeremy Thorpe (Liberal-National Democrat-Democratic Labour Alliance), numerous Independent Democrat candidates, Enoch Powell (Unionist)

Benn's was a controversial Prime Minister, not least due to the acrimonious relationship 10 Downing Street and the Palace during his premiership. The conflict between Her Majesty and Her Government led to much feverish speculation by the press which found countless opportunities to unearth Benn's republicanism, the Queen's disquiet at his socialist - near autarkic - economic policy, and the perceived close relationship between the Democratic Centre and the Palace. Nevertheless, Benn's time in government saw a new relationship with the unions, an end to wild inflation and a break with Keynesianism that didn't lead to monetarism. Despite all that, the promises of new sunlit uplands were not resolved, the unification of Democratic Centre under a new leader, the re-emergence of division in the Labour ranks, and Benn's poor handling of Northern Ireland came back to bite him as he lost his majority in 1982.

1982-1993: Shirley Williams (Democratic Centre)
1982 (Minority, with Continuity and Independent Democratic confidence and supply) def. Tony Benn (Labour), Ian Paisley (Unionist), numerous Independent and Continuity Democrat candidates
1985 (Majority) def. Tony Benn (Labour), Ian Paisley (Unionist), Maurice Macmillan (One Nation)
1989 (Majority) def. Tony Benn (Labour), N/A (Green), Ian Paisley (Unionist), Christopher Brocklebank-Fowler (One Nation)


Where Thorpe's premiership had come as a surprise and then been short, Williams was expected and just as Greenwood defined the 60s, Williams would define the 1980s. This was helped by Britain's successful role in intervening alongside the United States to overthrow the fascist dictatorship of Argentina in 1984, and the seeming ossification of the parties of left and right behind leaders it seemed impossible to budge. The remaining Independent Democrats either returned to the fold of the centre, or rallied by the rebranded 'Continuity' NDP, while the embarassing meltdown of French military regime's nuclear power plant at Gravelines led to the sudden emergence of the Green Party. The Williams era was also characterised by an odd integration of Bennite economic policies, turning the principle of industrial democracy into the idea of a 'nation of shareholders'. As Williams time as Prime Minister drew to a close however, exploitation of this led to people selling their shares for a quick buck and theoretical public ownership of industry slowly passed into the hands of corporate cartels. While unions proved effective at getting their members to keep their shares, union membership was falling internationally. Not only this but the government was struck by scandals, as was the monarchy, culminating in the annus horribilis of 1992. Williams resigned to make way for her successor, though for many it appeared she had jumped before she could be pushed.

1993-1999: David Owen (Democratic Centre)
1994 (Minority, with One Nation confidence and supply) def. Michael Meacher (Labour), Sara Parkin (Green), Ian Paisley (Unionist), Christopher Brocklebank Fowler (One Nation)

Few expected Owen to win the 1994 election, but Meacher's occasionally strange statements proved enough to just push him over the line, and one confidence and supply deal with One Nation later, he was able to secure a narrow hold on power. This was improved slightly by a resolution to the Troubles in Northern Ireland, with the creation of the Ulster Free State - a member of the Commonwealth and theoretically still part of the UK, but in reality an independent sovereign countries that sent non-voting delegates to the legislatures of both the United Kingdom and the Irish Republic. This removed a large chunk of the Unionists representation in the Commons, and a leadership crisis that strengthened Owen's grip on power - the Free State's consistently febrile political atmosphere has been blamed on Owen's deal which some say was little more than a ploy to stay in power. Owen's premiership was groundbreaking in other respects; the Cold War came to an end as the Warsaw Pact crumbled and the USSR reformed economically (politically, less so); and the French endured another revolution returning to democracy for the first time since the 1950s. It was however, also a time where scandals - political, personal and royal - surfaced continually perpetually threatening to overturn the government and the monarchy alike. Owen's relationship with the Queen was poor, with him tending not to heed her advice and pursue his own objectives, a gulf re-emerged between Downing Street and the Palace.
 

Mumby

Always mysterious!
Published by SLP
Location
Municipal Commune of Bourne
Pronouns
He/Him
Royal Prerogative, Part 4

1999-2001: Alan Milburn (Labour)
1999 (Majority) def. David Owen (Democratic Centre), Sara Parkin / Richard Body (Alliance 2000), Christopher Brocklebank-Fowler (One Nation), Independent Unionists
2001 (Minority) def. Michael Heseltine (Democratic Centre), Margaret Wright / Teddy Goldsmith (Alliance 2000), Roger Knapman (Conservative), Malcolm Rifkind (One Nation)


Milburn had begun his political journey as an avowed Bennite, but during the long years in the wilderness he had compromised and had come to acept the unity of capital and labour that had come about through the Williams years tinkering with Benn's industrial democracy. However, Milburn's attempt to steer away from that ideological course came to naught as while he won a narrow majority, the real story of the night was the surge of the Greens, rebranded as Alliance 2000 with the defection of shire Tories from the collapsing Unionists and compromised One Nation. Milburn's small majority, coupled with his lack of action in socialising the economy (and indeed extended the relationship of the market within the state), led to growing rebellions on his backbenches. Frustrated, he prepared for a snap election, confident that a growing economy would see him win a second term and with a Parliament more conducive to his project. This singularly failed, as the BSE crisis dawned. Poor management of the rural and environmental issue saw the Alliance grow further, denying any party a majority. While Milburn flailed for a few months searching out an ally, ultimately he was forced to ask the Queen to dissolve Parliament.

2001-2006: Michael Heseltine (Democratic Centre)
2001 (Coalition with Alliance 2000) def. Alan Milburn (Labour), Teddy Goldsmith (Alliance 2000), Michael Ancram (Conservative)
2005 (Coalition with Alliance 2000) def. Jeremy Corbyn (Labour), Caroline Lucas (Alliance 2000), Edward Leigh (Conservative)


The country went to the polls for a second time, reaffirming what everyone knew. The Alliance held the balance of power, and it was clear Milburn could no longer continue as Prime Minister. Heseltine, a former Conservative then National Democrat, was now Prime Minister though the price was heavy. The introduction of a more proportional electoral system and the implementation of stringent environmental laws. Meanwhile on the right, realignment continued apace, as the remaining Unionists and One Nation reformed the Conservative Party. The economy continued to grow despite these restrictions, and with the opening up of Europe, Heseltine's time in office seemed to be an era of optimism where the world appeared to come together in a common effort to fight climate change. The government achieved a renewed majority in 2005 as Labour retreated back into Bennism, and the Conservatives reasserted their hard right nature. Heseltine stepped aside voluntarily in 2006.

2006-2007: Nick Boles (Democratic Centre-Alliance 2000 Coalition)

Mere months into his premiership, the Second Great Depression began and Boles' instincts as a man of the classical liberal right of the DCP saw cuts that gouged into the Alliance's green infrastructure and ecological education projects, something that eventually became a compromise too far, leading to an Alliance split and the collapse of the Coalition.

2007-2015: Michael Meacher (Labour)
2007 (Coalition with Greens) def. Nick Boles (Democratic Centre), Derek Wall (Green), Edward Leigh (Conservative), Caroline Lucas (Ecologist)
2011 (Coalition with Greens) def. Ed Davey (Democratic Centre), Derek Wall (Green), Zac Goldsmith (Conservation)


A former Leader, ostensibly only in that position due to exhaustion of Corbyn and the unwillingness of others to put themselves forward as a sacrificial lamb to Heseltine, Meacher found himself as Prime Minister, propped up by the ecosocialists who had pushed the DCP out of Downing Street. Still less expected was that Meacher would become the most electorally successful Labour leader since Greenwood. With the Second Great Depression biting at their heels, Meacher and Wall set to work, cutting apart the failing cartels that dominated British industry, and bringing about a new dawn that was tinged with red and green. Meanwhile, the ostensibly moderate pragmatic centrists grasped for a line and seized upon hard uncompromising classical liberalism - an offer made distinctly unpalatable after six years. Meacher would win a reduced majority in 2011, but this was mostly due to the growth of the Conservation party, the result of the absorption of Lucas' Ecologists. Meacher would go on to die in office, one of the first to do so for over a century.
 

Sideways

Гуси 🦢
Published by SLP
Location
Teignmouth, Devon
Pronouns
She/Her
That was awesome Mumby, though I hear rumours that Derek Wall has jumped ship from the Greens OTL and as a strongly factional Green I can't see him surviving the Hesseltine years without defecting. My pick in this kind of situation would be someone like Will Duckworth or Andrew Cooper - to the left of the party but sufficiently tied to the party's centre that years of right wing ascendancy in the party wouldn't get rid of them
 

Mumby

Always mysterious!
Published by SLP
Location
Municipal Commune of Bourne
Pronouns
He/Him
I'm probably going to finish that up with Part 6 tomorrow, we'll see how it goes, to do what I want to do, I might need a Part 7.

@Sideways : That is really helpful, but I am quite keen on using Wall as he seems somewhat ideal for some of my ideas. Besides, I can somewhat explain things away with my POD some decades before his birth.
 

Turquoise Blue

Onfortuinlijk Tibby
Patreon supporter
Location
UK (for now), Netherlands (in the future)
Pronouns
she/her
Cosmic Socialism
("The Writer" in OTL actually rejected his far-right beliefs and identified as a socialist and a liberal just before his death. This is based off that)

John Nance Garner (Democratic) 1933-1941
1932: def. Herbert Hoover (Republican)
1936: def. William E. Borah (Republican), Huey Long (Commonwealth) and Norman Thomas (Socialist)
"The Bad Beginning"

The election of Cactus Jack was an end to Progressivism. The Progressive Era was over. What was in, was measured responses to the New Deal, vague assurances that "prosperity" was around the corner, federal agencies being allowed to implement stuff

It felt like it wasn't enough. But in 1936, the economy was sluggishly recovering, people were starting to go back to work, and although there was still a lot of anger fuelling both the Commonwealth and Socialist parties, they never quite broke through

Meanwhile, a writer had a feverish dream in which he faced a void that offered him a choice between two realities - life or death. He chose life. He knew that he wasted many years believing horrendous reactionary thoughts, and wanted the rest of his life to be one atoning for his sins. The void he would later call "the Great Void" and write as "the God they believe in, the cosmic force beyond even their understanding"

Garner's second term was very much like his first. But there was too slow a recovery. People were still getting angry. They wanted a change

Arthur Vanderberg (Republican) 1941-1943*
1940: def. Millard Tydings (Democratic), Huey Long (Commonwealth) and Upton Sinclair (Socialist)
"The Rambling Reactionary"
Unfortunately, the election was split four ways and the arch-reactionary Arthur Vanderberg won with only 37% of the vote. Vanderberg followed a path of strict isolationism and tried to repeal many of what scraps Garner implemented. With the Democrats, Commonwealth and Socialists gaining in the midterms, he looked done for. That was until he met a Japanese ambassador which stabbed him with a sword, killing him

Meanwhile, the writer was getting more and more reports of what Hitler was doing, and was even more appalled than ever. While he still believed in the segregation of the races and in "scientific racism", reports of the Nazi deeds towards the Jews made him more firmly than ever reject what he saw as reactionary filth, namely fascism. He increasingly perceived the Commonwealth Party as such. On Election Day, one of the few days where he could get past his fear of social interaction, he went to the polls and voted for Socialists, both up and down the ballot. They might have been demagogues, but at least they believed in fighting for the working man and establishing a "just society"

Hamilton Fish (Republican) 1943-1949
1944: def. Huey Long (Commonwealth), Henry S. Breckinridge (Democratic) and Upton Sinclair (Socialist)
"Fish Out Of Water"
Hamilton Fish III, a staunch isolationist, took power at the moment his firm isolationism became unpalatable. Still, Fish was a man of firm principles. His Republicans refused to impeach him, but he was increasingly the "Who in the White House" as some called him. The 1944 election was seen as a Democratic win, but the Democrats had a bitter convention that led to random New York name Henry Breckinridge winning

In the end, the four-way split benefited the Republicans, barely, as Fish won with 33% of the vote. The war was over by 1947 with Hitler shooting himself and all of Europe falling to the Soviet Union. The writer, a firm Anglophile, was appalled by reports of Britain being taken over by Soviet forces and being changed into the "Socialist Republic of Britain". More than ever, he held a burning hatred for the Republicans

Joseph P. Kennedy (Democratic) 1949-1953
1948: def. John L. Lewis (Independent/Socialist), Hamilton Fish (Republican) and Huey Long* (Commonwealth)
"Maker of History"
America's first Catholic president would also prove its most virulently anti-Semitic for decades. For the writer, who was married to a Jewish woman, this only made him more certain of his loyalty to the Socialist Party. The Democrats were anti-Semites, the Republicans were friends of the commies and Commonwealth was fascist. Kennedy, elected on a 36% mandate against the unexpectedly strong campaign of John L. Lewis, was firmly against any idea of recognition of a "State of Israel", claiming that it would "encourage the Jew to make trouble here in America"

With reports of the Holocaust coming out, Kennedy's virulent anti-Semitism became more and more unpalatable to many Americans. The economy did improve to pre-Depression levels as many people were fed, but they were unhappy once more. They wanted a change

George S. Patton (Republican) 1953-1961
1952: def. Darlington Hoopes (Socialist), Joseph P. Kennedy (Democratic) and Earl Long (Commonwealth)
1956: def. Darlington Hoopes (Socialist) and John Sparkman (Democratic)
"The Grand Shogun"
Patton was elected on his wartime record in a landslide over the unpopular Democratic administration, the Socialist Party and Earl Long's attempt at keeping together his brother's Commonwealth Party. As president, he charted a firmly conservative path. Which most Americans were content with, for the time being. Not the writer, as he believed that socialism needed to happen. So he started writing more political articles. He was already accustomed to doing such since the end of the war, against the Kennedy administration, but under Patton it intensified as he criticised Patton's every move and called for America to vote Socialist in the midterms

Unfortunately for a man who struggled to come out of his shell, this got the attention of the Rhode Island Socialist Party, which entreated him to run for Governor. Of course he said no. But they were insistent. In the end, they got his consent provided it was made clear he would not campaign, and if he won, he would resign at once. He did not campaign, such was his promise. But when he won in a landslide, the Socialist Party pressured him to not resign. In the end, he made it clear that the only way he would be Governor is if the Assembly stays out of his way and nobody try to pressure him into any ceremonial stuff. He would sign bills. He would veto them. He would sometimes have talks with people. That was it

In 1956, Patton won an easy victory and the Governor in 1958 did too. Turns out after a couple of... colourful characters, Rhode Island liked the idea of a quiet governor and elected him back in for another term. Deciding to retire in 1962, he would find out Fate had another plan in mind...

H. P. Lovecraft (Socialist) 1961-1963*
1960: def. Richard Nixon (Republican), Strom Thurmond (Democratic), Estes Kefauver (New Commonwealth) and Barry Goldwater (Freedom)
"A Series of Unfortunate Events"
The writer blinked as he stared at the Chief Justice which started the oath: "Do you, Howard Philips Lovecraft, do solemnly swear..."
The writer mindlessly repeated those words. What point was there in resisting? He tried all he could. He even wrote a letter to the SNC Chair imploring him to not nominate him. He even put in an article in The New York Times telling people to not vote for him. But...

President Lovecraft would prove woefully incapable for the job, like anyone with any foresight would tell you. While not quite the recluse he once was, he hated talking to people. A debate with Nixon was shot down, his presence in campaign rallies were cut to the bare minimum and lasting the least amount of time. And yet he still won with 28% of the vote. He was minded to resign, but then he remembered the Great Void. He chose life for a reason. Staying in the Oval Office for days on end, he made it clear to Congress that his main role would be to sign or veto bills, and diplomats would be relied on for major foreign policy. That and his vice-president, a man who did most of the talking for them on the trail

A nuclear crisis that could end all of humanity? What luck that it happened under President Lovecraft!? The Cuban Missile Crisis drove Lovecraft to the brink of madness as he froze. In the end, his vice-president intervened and ensured that the Soviets backed down with a compromise

Lovecraft was still publicly a popular president, even if not a likeable man. People saw him as cold, distant, aristocratic. Which he doubtlessly was. But the bills he signed were welcomed by them. Better support for the working class? A welcome change in the middle of a recession, for sure. Civil rights was still a sticking point between Lovecraft and his supporters on one hand, and his vice president and his supporters on the other. Seeing it as a "nuisance" and still firmly opposed to it due to his lingering belief in scientific segregationism, Lovecraft was increasingly willing to sign a heavily watered down, ineffective Civil Rights Bill to shut them all up when it happened

The Great Void was once more before President Lovecraft, holding only a single orb. Death. The President understood. He made his second choice

Ronald Reagan (Socialist) 1963-
"Ronald Reagan?! The Actor?!"
Ronald Wilson Reagan was in many ways the opposite of the slain President. Charismatic and personable to Lovecraft's cold and distant. Folksy and "of the people" to Lovecraft's aristocratic paternalism. But Reagan would make a new Lovecraft. Portraying him as a man with many doubts, many fears, yet with much courage and much love for his country, for his people. The Lovecraft that Reagan presented was a man with an immense heart, yet one that struggled to show his emotions on his sleeve. The Lovecraft Reagan made is the one that has gone down in history

As Reagan's legacy has dimmed given his unpopular presidency, Lovecraft is remembered more fondly as this awkward, frosty, yet compassionate president who managed to do all he could for his country before he was taken away before his time. It's... somewhat different from the real Lovecraft
 
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Mumby

Always mysterious!
Published by SLP
Location
Municipal Commune of Bourne
Pronouns
He/Him
Royal Prerogative, Part 5

2015-2016: Derek Wall (Labour-Green Coalition)

The sudden and untimely death took everyone as a surprise, not least because there were mere months left in the life of Parliament, and barely enough time for a leadership election that turned out to be quite bloody. In lieu of a Labour candidate all could agree, the Coalition ended up being led by a Green. Wall's time in office was short and controversial, not least for having one of the worst relationships between a Prime Minister and a Monarch in memory. However, he did leave a legacy before the Coalition went down to defeat, the permanent break up of the industrial cartels and the reassertion of local government power.

2016-2018: Liz Truss (Democratic Centre)
2016 (Coalition with Conservation) def. Andrew Murray (Labour), Zac Goldsmith (Conservation), Derek Wall (Green), Mike Hookem (British Workers')
2018-2025: Liz Truss (Team Truss: Unity)
2021 (Coalition with Conservation and BWP) def. Andrew Murray (Labour), Zac Goldsmith (Conservation), Norman Lamb (Democratic Centre), Aimee Challenor (Green), Mike Hookem (British Workers')

Truss courted controversy from the start, as she formed a coalition with the Tories, the first time they had been in government since Enoch Powell. Truss was a libertarian at heart, and just as Williams had changed Bennite industrial democracy, so she transformed Wallist ecosocialism. British farming enjoyed a boom, but that did nothing for the ecology of the countryside. Pollution was reduced, at the insistence of her coalition partners, but if there was one they could agree on it was that the welfare state was bloated and needed to be cut down to size. She endured a leadership challenge but after much hurried negotiation was able to stay in power even after the challenge with the aid of Conservation and the newborn British Workers' Party, born out of frustration with the 'Stalinists' who had taken power in the party and the continued overtures to the Greens which meant liberalism and political correctness. She stepped aside after nine years in power, and 'Team Truss' quickly collapsed without her particular brand of charisma.

2025-2029: Zac Goldsmith (Conservation)
2026 (Coalition with BWP and Unity) def. Clive Lewis (Labour), Jo Swinson (Democratic Centre), Aimee Challenor (Green), Anne Marie Waters (British Workers'), Michael Gove (Unity)

The collapse of Unity meant little as the British Workers' Party grew more, and the Democratic Centre declined, but for the first time in over half a century, the Tories were the largest party. A fragile coalition was formed, but one sturdy enough to hold together. Goldsmith's coalition could agree on little other than than that Labour, the DCP and the Greens were all snowflake libs who wanted to destroy Britain. How to defend Britain was harder to agree on. The Queen died in 2028, and Goldsmith decided to imitate Anthony Eden, calling a snap election in the warm afterglow of a coronation to shore up his lead.
 

Mumby

Always mysterious!
Published by SLP
Location
Municipal Commune of Bourne
Pronouns
He/Him
Royal Prerogative, Part 6

2029-2031: Laura Pidcock (Labour)
2029 (Popular Front with Democratic Centre and Greens) def. Zac Goldsmith (Conservation), Layla Moran (Democratic Centre), Aimee Challenor (Green), Anne Marie Waters (British Workers')

Instead, Unity vanished into the history books and the parties of the liberal, ecological and socialist left united together. But Pidcock soon found that she had not counted in the change of the occupant of the throne. Elizabeth II had intervened occasionally, not without controversy, but Charles III was far more determined to put his position to use. He proved to be a canny politician, continually holding up Pidcock's plans for a new era of housebuilding as the scheme for vertical living was decried by the King. The King's refusal to assent to one such bill led to the collapse of her government, and he summoned Goldsmith to the Palace to form a minority government.

2031-2032: Zac Goldsmith (Conservation leading King's Government with British Workers')
2032-2034: Zac Goldsmith (Conservation leading Government of Environmental Preparedness with Pragmatic Centre and 'King's Greens')

At first, the only parliamentary arithmetic was the King's Government of only those parties willing to accede to the King's naked monarchical will. After a few short months however, it became clear that the King had not asserted his ancient rights in order to kick the Muslims out and the BWP left in a huff. His true purpose became clear as a Government of Environmental Preparedness was formed, taking defectors from across the spectrum, to do what was necessary to make Britain Green without fear of electoral disfavour. Two years was a very short time however and no majority existed to extend Parliament beyond what the Septennial Act allowed.

2034-2039: Laura Pidcock (Labour-Constitutional Alliance)
2034 (Majority) def. Zac Goldsmith (Conservation-Environmental Preparedness), Anne Marie Waters (British Workers')

In the face of a return to some half-forgotten age of deference to the crown, it should have come as no surprise that even under a proportional electoral system that the Government of Environmental Preparedness could not last. It helped that the BWP ran separately in protest at the King's liberalism, 'Defender of Faiths' schtick and tree-hugger-ishness. The King momentarily considered inviting Goldsmith to the Palace anyway but it was obvious that his policies had no popular mandate. Pidcock was restored to Downing Street and the King has abdicated in favour of his son King William V. A Bill to abolish the monarchy is expected to be introduced to Parliament any day now.
 

Mumby

Always mysterious!
Published by SLP
Location
Municipal Commune of Bourne
Pronouns
He/Him
And finally

Royal Prerogative: Complete and Uncut Edition
Part 1, 1940-1956
Part 2, 1956-1977
Part 3, 1977-1999
Part 4, 1999-2015
Part 5, 2015-2029
Part 6, 2029-2034


Prime Ministers of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

1940-1945: Edward Wood (Conservative leading War Government with Labour, Liberal Nationals, Liberals and National Labour)
1945-1952: Clement Attlee (Labour)
1945 (Majority) def. Edward Wood (National - Conservatives, Liberal Nationals), Archibald Sinclair (Liberal)
1950 (Majority) def. Anthony Eden (Conservative and National Liberal), Clement Davies (Liberal)

1952-1956: Anthony Eden (Conservative)
1952 (Coalition with Liberals) def. Clement Attlee (Labour), Clement Davies (Liberal)
1954 (Majority) def. Clement Attlee (Labour), Clement Davies (Liberal)

1956-1963: Rab Butler (Conservative)
1958 (Majority) def. Nye Bevan (Labour), Jo Grimond (Liberal)
1963-1971: Tony Greenwood (Labour)
1963 (Majority) def. Rab Butler (Conservative), Jo Grimond (Liberal)
1964 (Majority) def. Iain Macleod (Conservative), Duncan Sandys (Independent Tory), Jo Grimond (Liberal)
1969 (Majority) def. Enoch Powell (Conservative), Jeremy Thorpe (Liberal), Ted Heath (Independent Tory)

1971-1973: Jim Callaghan (Labour majority)
1973-1974: Enoch Powell (Conservative)
1973 (Minority) def. Jim Callaghan (Labour), Jeremy Thorpe (Liberal-National Democrat Alliance)
1974-1977: Jeremy Thorpe (Liberal)
1974 (Alliance with NDP and DLP) def. Michael Foot (Labour), Enoch Powell (Conservative)
1977-1982: Tony Benn (Labour)
1977 (Majority) def. Jeremy Thorpe (Liberal-National Democrat-Democratic Labour Alliance), numerous Independent Democrat candidates, Enoch Powell (Unionist)
1982-1993: Shirley Williams (Democratic Centre)
1982 (Minority, with Continuity and Independent Democratic confidence and supply) def. Tony Benn (Labour), Ian Paisley (Unionist), numerous Independent and Continuity Democrat candidates
1985 (Majority) def. Tony Benn (Labour), Ian Paisley (Unionist), Maurice Macmillan (One Nation)
1989 (Majority) def. Tony Benn (Labour), N/A (Green), Ian Paisley (Unionist), Christopher Brocklebank-Fowler (One Nation)

1993-1997: David Owen (Democratic Centre)
1994 (Minority, with One Nation confidence and supply) def. Michael Meacher (Labour), Sara Parkin (Green), Ian Paisley (Unionist), Christopher Brocklebank-Fowler (One Nation)

Prime Ministers of the Kingdom of Great Britain

1997-1999: David Owen (Democratic Centre minority, with One Nation confidence and supply)
1999-2001: Alan Milburn (Labour)
1999 (Majority) def. David Owen (Democratic Centre), Sara Parkin / Richard Body (Alliance 2000), Christopher Brocklebank-Fowler (One Nation), Independent Unionists
2001 (Minority) def. Michael Heseltine (Democratic Centre), Margaret Wright / Teddy Goldsmith (Alliance 2000), Roger Knapman (Conservative), Malcolm Rifkind (One Nation)

2001-2006: Michael Heseltine (Democratic Centre)
2001 (Coalition with Alliance 2000) def. Alan Milburn (Labour), Teddy Goldsmith (Alliance 2000), Michael Ancram (Conservative)
2005 (Coalition with Alliance 2000) def. Jeremy Corbyn (Labour), Caroline Lucas (Alliance 2000), Edward Leigh (Conservative)

2006-2007: Nick Boles (Democratic Centre-Alliance 2000 Coalition)
2007-2015: Michael Meacher (Labour)
2007 (Coalition with Greens) def. Nick Boles (Democratic Centre), Derek Wall (Green), Edward Leigh (Conservative), Caroline Lucas (Ecologist)
2011 (Coalition with Greens) def. Ed Davey (Democratic Centre), Derek Wall (Green), Zac Goldsmith (Conservation)

2015-2016: Derek Wall (Labour-Green Coalition)
2016-2018: Liz Truss (Democratic Centre)
2016 (Coalition with Conservation) def. Andrew Murray (Labour), Zac Goldsmith (Conservation), Derek Wall (Green), Mike Hookem (British Workers')
2018-2025: Liz Truss (Team Truss: Unity)
2021 (Coalition with Conservation and BWP) def. Andrew Murray (Labour), Zac Goldsmith (Conservation), Norman Lamb (Democratic Centre), Aimee Challenor (Green), Mike Hookem (British Workers')
2025-2029: Zac Goldsmith (Conservation)
2026 (Coalition with BWP and Unity) def. Clive Lewis (Labour), Jo Swinson (Democratic Centre), Aimee Challenor (Green), Anne Marie Waters (British Workers'), Michael Gove (Unity)
2029-2031: Laura Pidcock (Labour)
2029 (Popular Front with Democratic Centre and Greens) def. Zac Goldsmith (Conservation), Layla Moran (Democratic Centre), Aimee Challenor (Green), Anne Marie Waters (British Workers')
2031-2032: Zac Goldsmith (Conservation leading King's Government with British Workers')
2032-2034: Zac Goldsmith (Conservation leading Government of Environmental Preparedness with Pragmatic Centre and 'King's Greens')
2034-2039: Laura Pidcock (Labour-Constitutional Alliance)
2034 (Majority) def. Zac Goldsmith (Conservation-Environmental Preparedness), Anne Marie Waters (British Workers')

Monarchs of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

1936-1952: King George VI (Windsor)
1952-1997: Queen Elizabeth II (Windsor)

Monarchs of the Kingdom of Great Britain

1997-2028: Queen Elizabeth II (Windsor)
2028-2034: King Charles III (Windsor)
2034-0000: King William V (Windsor)
 
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Zachanassian

*pedantic gay sounds*
Location
Crabtown USA
Cosmic Socialism
H.P. Lovecraft as America's first Socialist President is such an out-there idea, but you make it work. The idea of Ronald Reagan sacrificing his own Presidency as to rehabilitate that of his predecessor's is definitely an intriguing idea, and I wouldn't say no if you wanted to expand on this idea any.
Royal Prerogative: Complete and Uncut Edition
Obviously, I'm looking in at this from the outside, but this was definitely a fun series. Especially having a "Green Tory" party is an interesting take and it's something I kind of wish was more common in AH as it definitely makes sens ("England's Green and Pleasant Land" and all that).
 

Mumby

Always mysterious!
Published by SLP
Location
Municipal Commune of Bourne
Pronouns
He/Him
@Mumby fantastic stuff. Conservation is a new and interesting take on a party and I like the different attitudes of monarchs
H.P. Lovecraft as America's first Socialist President is such an out-there idea, but you make it work. The idea of Ronald Reagan sacrificing his own Presidency as to rehabilitate that of his predecessor's is definitely an intriguing idea, and I wouldn't say no if you wanted to expand on this idea any.
Obviously, I'm looking in at this from the outside, but this was definitely a fun series. Especially having a "Green Tory" party is an interesting take and it's something I kind of wish was more common in AH as it definitely makes sens ("England's Green and Pleasant Land" and all that).
The idea of a Green Tory Party is one I have played with before, I did one where they are called the Preservative Party, because of something @Makemakean said about 'Conservative' sounding like a party concerned about jams, jellies and marmalade to Swedish ears.
 

Bolt451

Anxious millenial cowgirl
Location
Sandford, Gloucestershire
Pronouns
She/Her
The idea of a Green Tory Party is one I have played with before, I did one where they are called the Preservative Party, because of something @Makemakean said about 'Conservative' sounding like a party concerned about jams, jellies and marmalade to Swedish ears.
Brilliant :) and Goldsmith and Lucas (the latter who comes from a Tory background IIRC) are spot on for that.

I was trying to get a Centrist Green Party in this future history ATL.
 
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