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Lists of Heads of Government and Heads of State

Sideways

Гуси 🦢
Published by SLP
Location
Teignmouth, Devon
Pronouns
She/Her
"Hell, if you wanted to go back in time, you could have an earlier AIDS/HIV epidemic happen right during the tail end of the Summer of Love. In that world, young people are overloading the healthcare system in a panic instead of the old, so you'd see a mass of young people organizing for universal healthcare (during the heyday of late-20th-century activism) fighting against older folks who are saying "I told you so" with their ballots. That could create an interesting scenario where political polarization is at an equal magnitude to OTL's present, but it's broken across generational lines with boomers of all people being shifted to the left permanently."
-Me
The problem I see with this is that the 1960s were not evenly distributed. America may be different I guess but my parents studied in London at the time and talked about what a shock it was too see the values and fashions of what we think of as the 60s now. I wonder how many people, especially in small towns and very religious communities, would actually become more socially conservative
 

Charles EP M.

Well-known member
Published by SLP
The problem I see with this is that the 1960s were not evenly distributed. America may be different I guess but my parents studied in London at the time and talked about what a shock it was too see the values and fashions of what we think of as the 60s now. I wonder how many people, especially in small towns and very religious communities, would actually become more socially conservative
Oh lord, that's true - "we legalised gay sex and look, within months there was a Gay Plague." Eeesh.
 

Luke_Starkiller

Well-known member
The problem I see with this is that the 1960s were not evenly distributed. America may be different I guess but my parents studied in London at the time and talked about what a shock it was too see the values and fashions of what we think of as the 60s now. I wonder how many people, especially in small towns and very religious communities, would actually become more socially conservative
Yeah, that's the point, hence the twelve straight years of Republican presidencies. The fiscal policies of the late 60s and 70s are what breaks this rule apart, and Gore Vidal, a pseudo-political leader who rode the wave of HIV-related discontent to federal office representing an increasingly-less-red California, becomes president on a platform of taking us back to the good old days of Kennedy. After twelve years of malaise, malcontent, and increasing pseudo-martial law decrees against protestors, a lot of the young people who were sympathetic to the ideals of the civil rights and Vietnam protests but didn't actively protest (i.e. Joe Biden) start to shift left.

tl;dr imagine a "Ford wins '76->Dem '80s" tl but with a little more "lawh'n'ordah" mixed in.
 

Uhura's Mazda

Gauchalist
Published by SLP
Location
Tamaki Makaurau
List of Prime Ministers of United Kingdom
2015-2016:
David Cameron (Conservative)
2015 def: Ed Miliband (Labour), Nicola Sturgeon (SNP), Nick Clegg (Liberal Democrats), Leanne Wood (Plaid Cymru), Nigel Farage (UKIP), Natalie Bennett (Green)
2016: Theresa May (Conservative)
2016-2021:
Theresa May (Democracy)
2017 def: Nigel Farage (Reform), Keir Starmer/Nicola Sturgeon/Tim Farron/Leanne Wood/Caroline Lucas (Progressive Alliance), Jeremy Corbyn (Socialist), Norman Lamb (Radical)
2021-0000: Andy Burnham (Democracy)

The aftermath of the EU referendum, in which the UK voted narrowly to leave, was a time of great upheaval in British politics. Despite the best efforts of Prime Minister Cameron and the left-wing Leader of the Opposition, Andy Burnham, the country rejected their united but uninspiring vision of more of the same, in favour of the mystery-box offered by various fractious Leave campaigns. Cameron resigned instantly; Burnham did not. But the experience of sharing a platform in the Remain campaign set some strategists thinking, and the election of Theresa May as the new Tory leader signalled a turn towards Christian-democratic, positive thinking from the Conservatives. Within months, May and Burnham had negotiated a merger between the Conservative and Labour parties in favour of a broadly centrist social vision and a Norway-style soft Brexit.

This was not plain sailing. On the Tory side, the hardcore Brexiteers swept out of the party to join forces with Nigel Farage under the label of the 'Reform' party, a blatant piece of nomenclative larceny from the Canadians. Meanwhile, the Labour Party conference rejected a merger with the hated Tories - although as two thirds of their MPs had already signed up, this was (as one sexist wag put it) a case of locking the stable door after Jess Philips had bolted. The remnants of the Labour Party, formed of Stop-Brexit activists and Labour-Till-I-Die types, chose Keir Starmer (decidedly of that first mould), a brand-new MP, as their new frontman, and he engaged positively with the rising tide of debate around a 'Progressive Alliance' of anti-Brexit parties. However, he didn't impress in any other respect, notably failing to prevent the ludicrous multicephalous leadership structure. The PA came off in the end - but at the cost of further fractures in the political scene, with Norman Lamb heading a splinter group of relative conservatives and Brexit moderates out of the Lib Dems. They called themselves the Radical Party, not because of any sort of radicalism, but because they were getting back to the roots of Liberalism. Lib Dem humour is a little bit sui generis.

Labour split once more over the Progressive Alliance issue, with a small group of tribalists and leftists seeking to register as 'Real Labour' or 'Provisional Labour'. However, these efforts were denied by the Electoral Commission as the proposals was too close to the name of the Labour Party, which was a protected designation of the PA. This, argued the Real Labour group, was precisely the point they were trying to make. Instead, they had to call themselves the Socialist Party of the United Kingdom, although this precipitated another split when the non-socialists walked out. The remnant Socialists elected Jeremy Corbyn as leader, since they thought it had been unfair that he'd narrowly failed to be nominated for the Labour leadership in 2015.

With Article 50 finally submitted and planning for Brexit creaking into action, Theresa May called a general election to electorally validate 'Democracy' ('Democratic Party' was taken) and hopefully get rid of some of the tiresome grouplets on the Opposition benches. Although there had been fears that Labour voters wouldn't take to the new party, the rubbishness of the organisations headed by Starmer and Corbyn pushed them towards the May-Burnham axis. Their far-sighted social care funding policy was a particular vote-winner among the youth, but retirees departed for the shores of the Reform Party, who came second with 145 seats. A strong parliamentary majority, however, was dealt to May.

Since then, the effects of Brexit and of the Uncommon Cold pandemic have ensured that May's tenure of the top job will be remembered as one of the most ill-fated and unpleasant in modern history, and the smile on her face as she handed over to Andy Burnham (this was prearranged at the foundation of Democracy, and in order to prevent Blair-Brown shenanigans, May had unveiled a large stone carved with the pledge 'I will resign in favour of Andy in five years' - it became known as the Granite Pact) spoke volumes. Next year, Burnham will face fresh challenges from the Right, as Boris Johnson succeeds the retiring (but never shy) Farage. The Left, however, shouldn't trouble the scorers too much: the Socialists have collapsed in an acrimonious shit-fight about anti-semitism and other forms of racism, while the Progressive Alliance has suffered a split from a minority group called the 'Transgressive Alliance', whose accusations of transphobia against the PA have taken on a rather indecorous and uncivil character.

Turning our attention to Northern Ireland,
 

Bolt451

Anxious millenial cowgirl
Location
Sandford, Gloucestershire
Pronouns
She/Her
List of Prime Ministers of United Kingdom
2015-2016:
David Cameron (Conservative)
2015 def: Ed Miliband (Labour), Nicola Sturgeon (SNP), Nick Clegg (Liberal Democrats), Leanne Wood (Plaid Cymru), Nigel Farage (UKIP), Natalie Bennett (Green)
2016: Theresa May (Conservative)
2016-2021:
Theresa May (Democracy)
2017 def: Nigel Farage (Reform), Keir Starmer/Nicola Sturgeon/Tim Farron/Leanne Wood/Caroline Lucas (Progressive Alliance), Jeremy Corbyn (Socialist), Norman Lamb (Radical)
2021-0000: Andy Burnham (Democracy)

The aftermath of the EU referendum, in which the UK voted narrowly to leave, was a time of great upheaval in British politics. Despite the best efforts of Prime Minister Cameron and the left-wing Leader of the Opposition, Andy Burnham, the country rejected their united but uninspiring vision of more of the same, in favour of the mystery-box offered by various fractious Leave campaigns. Cameron resigned instantly; Burnham did not. But the experience of sharing a platform in the Remain campaign set some strategists thinking, and the election of Theresa May as the new Tory leader signalled a turn towards Christian-democratic, positive thinking from the Conservatives. Within months, May and Burnham had negotiated a merger between the Conservative and Labour parties in favour of a broadly centrist social vision and a Norway-style soft Brexit.

This was not plain sailing. On the Tory side, the hardcore Brexiteers swept out of the party to join forces with Nigel Farage under the label of the 'Reform' party, a blatant piece of nomenclative larceny from the Canadians. Meanwhile, the Labour Party conference rejected a merger with the hated Tories - although as two thirds of their MPs had already signed up, this was (as one sexist wag put it) a case of locking the stable door after Jess Philips had bolted. The remnants of the Labour Party, formed of Stop-Brexit activists and Labour-Till-I-Die types, chose Keir Starmer (decidedly of that first mould), a brand-new MP, as their new frontman, and he engaged positively with the rising tide of debate around a 'Progressive Alliance' of anti-Brexit parties. However, he didn't impress in any other respect, notably failing to prevent the ludicrous multicephalous leadership structure. The PA came off in the end - but at the cost of further fractures in the political scene, with Norman Lamb heading a splinter group of relative conservatives and Brexit moderates out of the Lib Dems. They called themselves the Radical Party, not because of any sort of radicalism, but because they were getting back to the roots of Liberalism. Lib Dem humour is a little bit sui generis.

Labour split once more over the Progressive Alliance issue, with a small group of tribalists and leftists seeking to register as 'Real Labour' or 'Provisional Labour'. However, these efforts were denied by the Electoral Commission as the proposals was too close to the name of the Labour Party, which was a protected designation of the PA. This, argued the Real Labour group, was precisely the point they were trying to make. Instead, they had to call themselves the Socialist Party of the United Kingdom, although this precipitated another split when the non-socialists walked out. The remnant Socialists elected Jeremy Corbyn as leader, since they thought it had been unfair that he'd narrowly failed to be nominated for the Labour leadership in 2015.

With Article 50 finally submitted and planning for Brexit creaking into action, Theresa May called a general election to electorally validate 'Democracy' ('Democratic Party' was taken) and hopefully get rid of some of the tiresome grouplets on the Opposition benches. Although there had been fears that Labour voters wouldn't take to the new party, the rubbishness of the organisations headed by Starmer and Corbyn pushed them towards the May-Burnham axis. Their far-sighted social care funding policy was a particular vote-winner among the youth, but retirees departed for the shores of the Reform Party, who came second with 145 seats. A strong parliamentary majority, however, was dealt to May.

Since then, the effects of Brexit and of the Uncommon Cold pandemic have ensured that May's tenure of the top job will be remembered as one of the most ill-fated and unpleasant in modern history, and the smile on her face as she handed over to Andy Burnham (this was prearranged at the foundation of Democracy, and in order to prevent Blair-Brown shenanigans, May had unveiled a large stone carved with the pledge 'I will resign in favour of Andy in five years' - it became known as the Granite Pact) spoke volumes. Next year, Burnham will face fresh challenges from the Right, as Boris Johnson succeeds the retiring (but never shy) Farage. The Left, however, shouldn't trouble the scorers too much: the Socialists have collapsed in an acrimonious shit-fight about anti-semitism and other forms of racism, while the Progressive Alliance has suffered a split from a minority group called the 'Transgressive Alliance', whose accusations of transphobia against the PA have taken on a rather indecorous and uncivil character.

Turning our attention to Northern Ireland,
That's bloody brilliant.
 

Sideways

Гуси 🦢
Published by SLP
Location
Teignmouth, Devon
Pronouns
She/Her
this was prearranged at the foundation of Democracy, and in order to prevent Blair-Brown shenanigans, May had unveiled a large stone carved with the pledge 'I will resign in favour of Andy in five years' - it became known as the Granite Pact) spoke volumes. Next year, Burnham will face fresh challenges from the Right, as Boris Johnson succeeds the retiring (but never shy) Farage. The Left, however, shouldn't trouble the scorers too much: the Socialists have collapsed in an acrimonious shit-fight about anti-semitism and other forms of racism, while the Progressive Alliance has suffered a split from a minority group called the 'Transgressive Alliance', whose accusations of transphobia against the PA have taken on a rather indecorous and uncivil character.

Turning our attention to Northern Ireland,
Internal screaming
 

rpryor03

Active member
The Mother of Presidents
2021-2025: Former Vice President Joe Biden of Delaware/Senator Kamala Harris of California
2025-2029:
Senator Cory Booker of New Jersey/Representative Susie Lee of Nevada
2024 def: Former UN Ambassador Nikki Haley of South Carolina/Senator Frank LaRose of Ohio
2029-2037: Senator Frank LaRose of Ohio/Governor Kimberly Yee of Arizona
2028 def: President Cory Booker of New Jersey/Vice President Susie Lee of Nevada
2032 def: Governor Garlin Gilchrist of Michigan/Former Attorney General Nanette Diaz Barragan of California
2037-2041: Vice President Kimberly Yee of Arizona/House Majority Leader Rodney Davis of Illinois
2036 def: Senator Jon Ossoff of Georgia/Governor Lizzie Fletcher of Texas (Democratic), Representative Carlos Ramirez-Rosa of Illinois/Former Delegate Lee Carter of Virginia (Independent Socialists)
2041-2049: Governor Morgan Harper of Ohio/Representative Chokwe Antar Lumumba of Mississippi
2040 def: President Kimberly Yee of Arizona/Vice President Rodney Davis of Illinois
2044 def: Senate Minority Leader Josh Hawley of Missouri/Senator Chris Sununu of New Hampshire

2049-205x: Vice President Chokwe Antar Lumumba of Mississippi/Senator Sara Jacobs of California
2048 def: Liberty University President Madison Cawthorn of North Carolina/Governor Rick Loughery of Pennsylvania

Governors of Ohio
2019-2023: State Attorney General Mike DeWine of Cedarville
2018 def: Former CFPB Director Richard Cordray of Columbus
2023-2031: Former US Representative Jim Renacci of Wadsworth
2022 def: Mayor Nan Whaley of Dayton
2026 def: Former US Representative Tim Ryan of Howland

2031-2039: US Representative Morgan Harper of Columbus
2030 def: Lieutenant Governor Candice Keller of Middletown
2034 def: Former State Auditor Robert Sprague of Findlay

2039-2047: State Senate President Niraj Antani of Miamisburg
2038 def: Lieutenant Governor Kerry McCormack of Cleveland
2042 def: City Councilman Evan Holt of Cincinnati

2047-205x: Lieutenant Governor Christina Hagan of Marlboro Township
2046 def: Former White House Staffer Ross DiBello of Cleveland

Senators from Ohio, Class I
2007-2031: US Representative Sherrod Brown of Cleveland
2006 def: Senator Mike DeWine of Cedarville
2012 def: State Treasurer Josh Mandel of Beachwood
2018 def: US Representative Jim Renacci of Wadsworth
2024 def: Venture Capitalist JD Vance of Middletown

2031-2037: Former Mayor Aftab Pureval of Cincinnati
2030 def: Former Lieutenant Governor Jon Husted of Upper Arlington
2037-205x: US Representative Nick Santucci of Howland
2036 def: Senator Aftab Pureval of Cincinnati
2042 def: Former Mayor Justin Bibb of Cleveland
2048 def: State Senator Aisia Jones of Cleveland


Senators from Ohio, Class III
2011-2023: Former OMB Director Rob Portman of Terrace Park
2010 def: Lieutenant Governor Lee Fisher of Cleveland
2016 def: Former Governor Ted Strickland of Portsmouth

2023-2029: Ohio Secretary of State Frank LaRose of Hudson
2022 def: US Representative Tim Ryan of Howland
2028 def: City Attorney Zach Klein of Columbus

2029-2031: Ohio Secretary of State Dave Yost of Columbus (appt.)
2031-205x: Philanthropist LeBron James of Akron
2030(s) def: Senator Dave Yost of Columbus
2034 def: US Representative Christian Pancake of Defiance
2040 def: State Senate Majority Leader Al Cutrona of Canfield
2046 def: County Commissioner Tom Zawistowski Jr of Ravenna
 

Blackentheborg

Huey Long enjoyer
Location
the Blitz House
Pronouns
He/Him
Career of Pete Buttigieg

2010: Democratic Party candidate for Indiana State Treasurer

lost to Richard Mourdock (Republican)
2011: Democratic Party candidate for Mayor of South Bend
defeated Michael J. Hamann, Ryan Dvorak, Barrett Berry, Felipe N. Merino
2012-2020: Mayor of South Bend, Indiana

'11 - defeated Norris W. Curry, Jr (Republican), Patrick M. Farrell (Libertarian)
'15 - defeated
Kelly Jones (Republican)
2020: Democratic Party primary candidate for President

lost to Joe Biden, Bernie Sanders, Kamala Harris, Elizabeth Warren, Michael Bloomberg, Amy Klobuchar, Tulsi Gabbard
2021-2022: United States Secretary of Transportation

appointed by President Joe Biden
2022-2024: Ambassador to the United Nations

appointed by President Joe Biden, replacing Linda Thomas-Greenfield (resigned)
2024-2025: United States Secretary of Veterans Affairs
appointed by President Joe Biden, replacing Denis McDonough (fired)
2024: Democratic Party primary candidate for President
lost to Kamala Harris, Lee Carter
2024: Democratic Party nominee for Vice President

nominated with Presidential Nominee Kamala Harris
2025-2026: Vice President of the United States
Kamala Harris/
Pete Buttigieg defeated James Lankford/Ron DeSantis, Lee Carter/Omar Hardy
2026-2029: President of the United States

replacing Kamala Harris (deceased)
2028: Democratic Party candidate for President
defeated Carlos Ramirez-Rosa, Kyrsten Sinema
Kristi Noem/Daniel Cameron
defeated Pete Buttigieg/Gretchen Whitmer
2029-present: Private citizen
 
Last edited:

Luke_Starkiller

Well-known member
The Mother of Presidents
2021-2025: Former Vice President Joe Biden of Delaware/Senator Kamala Harris of California
2025-2029:
Senator Cory Booker of New Jersey/Representative Susie Lee of Nevada
2024 def: Former UN Ambassador Nikki Haley of South Carolina/Senator Frank LaRose of Ohio
2029-2037: Senator Frank LaRose of Ohio/Governor Kimberly Yee of Arizona
2028 def: President Cory Booker of New Jersey/Vice President Susie Lee of Nevada
2032 def: Governor Garlin Gilchrist of Michigan/Former Attorney General Nanette Diaz Barragan of California
2037-2041: Vice President Kimberly Yee of Arizona/House Majority Leader Rodney Davis of Illinois
2036 def: Senator Jon Ossoff of Georgia/Governor Lizzie Fletcher of Texas (Democratic), Representative Carlos Ramirez-Rosa of Illinois/Former Delegate Lee Carter of Virginia (Independent Socialists)
2041-2049: Governor Morgan Harper of Ohio/Representative Chokwe Antar Lumumba of Mississippi
2040 def: President Kimberly Yee of Arizona/Vice President Rodney Davis of Illinois
2044 def: Senate Minority Leader Josh Hawley of Missouri/Senator Chris Sununu of New Hampshire

2049-205x: Vice President Chokwe Antar Lumumba of Mississippi/Senator Sara Jacobs of California
2048 def: Liberty University President Madison Cawthorn of North Carolina/Governor Rick Loughery of Pennsylvania

Governors of Ohio
2019-2023: State Attorney General Mike DeWine of Cedarville
2018 def: Former CFPB Director Richard Cordray of Columbus
2023-2031: Former US Representative Jim Renacci of Wadsworth
2022 def: Mayor Nan Whaley of Dayton
2026 def: Former US Representative Tim Ryan of Howland

2031-2039: US Representative Morgan Harper of Columbus
2030 def: Lieutenant Governor Candice Keller of Middletown
2034 def: Former State Auditor Robert Sprague of Findlay

2039-2047: State Senate President Niraj Antani of Miamisburg
2038 def: Lieutenant Governor Kerry McCormack of Cleveland
2042 def: City Councilman Evan Holt of Cincinnati

2047-205x: Lieutenant Governor Christina Hagan of Marlboro Township
2046 def: Former White House Staffer Ross DiBello of Cleveland

Senators from Ohio, Class I
2007-2031: US Representative Sherrod Brown of Cleveland
2006 def: Senator Mike DeWine of Cedarville
2012 def: State Treasurer Josh Mandel of Beachwood
2018 def: US Representative Jim Renacci of Wadsworth
2024 def: Venture Capitalist JD Vance of Middletown

2031-2037: Former Mayor Aftab Pureval of Cincinnati
2030 def: Former Lieutenant Governor Jon Husted of Upper Arlington
2037-205x: US Representative Nick Santucci of Howland
2036 def: Senator Aftab Pureval of Cincinnati
2042 def: Former Mayor Justin Bibb of Cleveland
2048 def: State Senator Aisia Jones of Cleveland


Senators from Ohio, Class III
2011-2023: Former OMB Director Rob Portman of Terrace Park
2010 def: Lieutenant Governor Lee Fisher of Cleveland
2016 def: Former Governor Ted Strickland of Portsmouth

2023-2029: Ohio Secretary of State Frank LaRose of Hudson
2022 def: US Representative Tim Ryan of Howland
2028 def: City Attorney Zach Klein of Columbus

2029-2031: Ohio Secretary of State Dave Yost of Columbus (appt.)
2031-205x: Philanthropist LeBron James of Akron
2030(s) def: Senator Dave Yost of Columbus
2034 def: US Representative Christian Pancake of Defiance
2040 def: State Senate Majority Leader Al Cutrona of Canfield
2046 def: County Commissioner Tom Zawistowski Jr of Ravenna
Is LaRose running now? I was always surprised that he wasn't tbh
 

TheHatMan98

Well-known member
Monarch of the UK
Victoria (1837-1872)
[1]
Albert I (1872-1910)
Albert II (1910-1927)
George V (1927-1930)
[2]
Albert III (1930-1941) [3]
Prince Regent David, Duke of York and Ross (Acting 1941-1950)
Mary III (1941-1992)
[4]
William V (1992-Present)

[1] Assassinated by Republicans, succeeded by her eldest son.
[2] Abdicated to marry Princess Françoise d'Orléans, succeeded by his brother.
[3] Killed during the London Blitz, led to the fall of the Davidson government, succeeded by his eldest daughter, brother recalled from active service to act as regent.
[4] Abdicated due to ill health and age.


Prime Minister of the UK
1868-1872: William Ewart Gladstone (Liberal)
1868 (Majority) def. Benjamin Disraeli (Conservative)

1872-1881: Benjamin Disraeli (Conservative)†
1872 (Majority) def. W.E. Gladstone (Liberal), Isaac Butt (Home Rule)
1878 (Majority) def. Spencer Cavendish, Marquess of Hartington (Liberal), Isaac Butt (Home Rule)


1881-1882: Stafford Northcote (Conservative)

1882-1890: William Ewart Gladstone (Liberal)
1882 (Majority) def. Stafford Northcote (Conservative), Charles Stewart Parnell (Irish Parliamentary Party)
1888* (Minority, S&C from IPP) def. Robert Gascoyne-Cecil, Marquess of Salisbury (Conservative), Joseph Chamberlain (Liberal Unionist), Charles Stewart Parnell (Irish Parliamentary Party)


1890-1891: William Harcourt (Liberal)

1891-1902: Robert Gascoyne-Cecil, Marquess of Salisbury (Conservative)
1891 (Majority) def. William Harcourt (Liberal), John Redmond (IPP), Joseph Chamberlain (Liberal Unionist)
1897 (Majority, with Liberal Unionist) def. Henry Campbell-Bannerman (Liberal), John Redmond (IPP), Joseph Chamberlain (Liberal Unionist), Kier Hardie (Independent Labour Party), H.M. Hyndman (Social Democratic Federation)


1902-1908: Lord Randolph Churchill (Conservative)
1903 (Minority) def. Henry Campbell-Bannerman (Liberal), John Redmond (IPP), Kier Hardie (Labour Representation Committee)

1908-1916: Archibald Primrose, Earl of Rosebery (Liberal, later leading Wartime Coalition)
1908 (Majority) def. Lord Randolph Churchill (Conservative), John Redmond (IPP), Arthur Henderson (Labour Party)
1914 (Minority) def. Gerald Balfour (Conservative Party), John Redmond (IPP), Ramsay MacDonald (Labour), Walter Long (Irish Unionist Party)
1915 (National Coalition) def. Gerald Balfour (Conservative Party), John Redmond (IPP), Arthur Henderson (Labour), Walter Long (Irish Unionist Party)


1916-1924: J.E.B. Seely (Liberal, later Coupon Liberal, later National)
1916 (Wartime Coalition) def. Gerald Balfour (Conservative Party), John Redmond (IPP), Arthur Henderson (Labour), Walter Long (Irish Unionist Party)
1918 (Coalition) def. Austen Chamberlain (Coupon Conservatives), David Lloyd George (Independent Liberals), John Redmond (IPP), Eric Geddes (Independent Conservatives), Arthur Henderson (Labour), Walter Long (Irish Unionist Party)
1922 (Majority) def. J.R. Clynes (Labour), Eric Geddes (Continuation Conservative Party), Michael Collins (IPP), David Lloyd George (Continuation Liberal Party), Walter Long (Irish Unionist Party), Arthur Griffith (Irish Liberation Party)


1924-1926: Austen Chamberlain (National)

1926-1930 J.R. Clynes (Labour)
1926 (Minority, Liberal & IPP supply and confidence) def. Austen Chamberlain (National), David Lloyd George (Liberal), Edward Carson (British Unionist Party), Michael Collins (IPP), Arthur Griffith (ILP)

1930-1936: Winston Churchill (National)
1930 (Majority) def. J.R. Clynes (Labour), David Lloyd George (Liberal), Harry Pollitt (CPGB), Neil Francis Hawkins (British Fascists)
1935 (Majority) def. Herbert Morrison (Labour), William Wedgwood Benn (Liberal), Stafford Cripps (Popular Party), Harry Pollitt (CPGB), Neil Francis Hawkins (British Fascists)


1936-1941: J.C.C. Davidson (National)
1940 (Wartime Government) def. Christopher Addison (Progressive Party), Stafford Cripps (Popular), Harry Pollitt (CPGB)

1941-1949: Oliver Lyttelton (National)
1941 (Wartime Government) def. Christopher Addison (Progressive Party), Stafford Cripps (Popular), Harry Pollitt (CPGB)
1945 (Majority) def. Christopher Addison (Progressive Party), Stafford Cripps (Popular), Harry Pollitt (CPGB)


1949-1956: Hugh Dalton (Progressive)
1949 (Majority) def. Oliver Lyttelton (National), Stafford Cripps (Popular)
1953 (Majority) def. Selwyn Lloyd (National), Aneurin Bevan (Popular)
1955 (Minority, Popular supply & confidence) def. Selwyn Lloyd (National), Aneurin Bevan (Popular)


1956-1964: R.A. Butler (National)
1956 (Majority) def. Hugh Dalton (Progressive), Aneurin Bevan (Popular)
1960 (Majority) def. Megan Lloyd George (Progressive), Richard Crossman (Popular)


1964-1966: Duncan Sandys (National)
1964 (Minority) def. Megan Lloyd George (Progressive), Richard Crossman (Popular)

1966-1971: Douglas Jay (Progressive)
1966 (Majority) def. Duncan Sandys (National), Richard Crossman (Popular), Enoch Powell (New Tory)
1970 (Majority) def. Reginald Maudling (National), Enoch Powell (New Tory), Richard Crossman (Popular), Edward Heath (Centre Party)


1971-1974: Denis Healy (Progressive)

1974-1980: Maurice Macmillan (National)
1974 (Minority) def. Denis Healy (Progressive), Edward Heath (Centre), Enoch Powell (New Tory), Michael Foot (Popular)
1975 (Coalition, with Centre) def. Denis Healy (Progressive), Edward Heath (Centre), Enoch Powell (New Tory), Michael Foot (Popular)


1980-1987: Denis Healy (Progressive)
1980 (Majority) def. Maurice Macmillan (National), Edward Heath (Centre), Michael Foot (Popular), Enoch Powell (New Tory)
1985 (Majority) def. Edward Heath (Centre), Michael Heseltine (National), Tony Benn (Popular)


1987-1990: Denzil Davies (Progressive)

1990-????: Menzies Campbell (Centre)
1990 (Minority) def. Denzil Davies (Progressive), Norman Tebbit/Malcolm Rifkind (Tory-National Alliance)
 
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