• Hi Guest!

    The costs of running this forum are covered by Sea Lion Press. If you'd like to help support the company and the forum, visit patreon.com/sealionpress

Airesien's Test Thread

Airesien

Well-known member
Tried out one of those randomly-generated lists, and this is what happened:

2023–2025: Alexandra Phillips (Reform)
2023 (Majority)
def. Keir Starmer (Labour), Boris Johnson (Conservative), Nicola Sturgeon (SNP), Ed Davey (Liberal Democrat), Jonathan Bartley & Siân Berry (Green)
2025 Scottish independence referendum: yes (55.4%) def. no (44.6%)

2025–2034: Priti Patel (Conservative)
2026 (Majority)
def. Keir Starmer (Labour), Nicola Sturgeon (SNP), Layla Moran (Liberal Democrat), Siân Berry (Green), Alexandra Phillips (Reform)
2029 (Majority) def. Lisa Nandy (Labour), Layla Moran (Liberal Democrat), Siân Berry (Green), Rhun ap Iorwerth (Plaid Cymru)

2034–2039: Lloyd Russell-Moyle (Labour)
2034 ('Progressive' Coalition with Liberal Democrat, Green and Plaid Cymru) def. Priti Patel (Conservative), Layla Moran (Liberal Democrat), Siân Berry & Scott Ainslie (Green), Rhun ap Iorwerth (Plaid Cymru)
2036 Northern Ireland border poll: Join the Republic of Ireland (56.5%) def. Remain in the United Kingdom (43.5%)

2037 EFTA referendum: no (60.6%) def. yes (39.4%)

2039–2040: Helen Whately (Conservative)
2039 (Minority) def. Lloyd Russell-Moyle (Labour), Siân Berry & Scott Ainslie (Green), Layla Moran (Liberal Democrat), Rhun ap Iorwerth (Plaid Cymru)
2040: Clive Lewis (Labour) ✝
2040 (Coalition with Green)
def. Helen Whately (Conservative), Siân Berry & Scott Ainslie (Green), Ian Sollom (Liberal Democrat), Rhun ap Iorwerth (Plaid Cymru)
2040–Present: Conor McGinn (Labour)
 

Airesien

Well-known member
1964–1974: Harold Wilson (Labour)
1964 (Majority)
def. Alec Douglas-Home (Conservative), Jo Grimond (Liberal)
1966 (Majority) def. Edward Heath (Conservative), Jo Grimond (Liberal)
1970 (Majority) def. Edward Heath (Conservative), Emlyn Hooson (Liberal)

1974–1975: Barbara Castle (Labour majority)
1975–1977: Keith Joseph (Conservative)
1975 (Minority)
def. Barbara Castle (Labour), Emlyn Hooson (Liberal), William Wolfe (Scottish National)
1977–1980: James Callaghan (Labour)
1977 (Minority with Liberal confidence and supply)
def. Keith Joseph (Conservative), David Steel (Liberal)
1980–1989: William Whitelaw (Conservative)
1980 (Majority)
def. James Callaghan (Labour), David Steel (Liberal)
1982 EEC referendum: yes def. no
1984 (Majority) def. Roy Jenkins (Labour), David Steel (Liberal), Tony Benn (Democratic Labour)
1988 (Majority) def. John Smith (Labour), David Alton (Liberal), Tony Benn (Democratic Labour)

1989–1993: Kenneth Baker (Conservative majority)
1993–1994: John Smith (Labour)
1993 (Minority with Scottish National & SDLP confidence and supply)
def. Kenneth Baker (Conservative), David Alton (Liberal), Tony Benn (Democratic Labour), Alex Salmond (Scottish National)
1993 Scottish Assembly referendum: yes def. no
1993 Welsh Assembly referendum: no def. yes

1994–: Gordon Brown (Labour)
1996 (Majority) def. Malcolm Rifkind (Conservative), David Alton (Liberal), Tony Benn (Democratic Labour)
 
Last edited:

Airesien

Well-known member
Candidates for the 1974 Labour leadership election
  • Roy Jenkins, Chancellor and MP for Birmingham Stetchford
  • Barbara Castle, Home Secretary, Deputy Leader of the Labour Party and MP for Blackburn
  • Tony Crosland, Environment Secretary and MP for Great Grimsby
  • James Callaghan, Foreign Secretary and MP for Cardiff South East
  • Michael Foot, Minister for Local Government and MP for Ebbw Vale
  • Peter Shore, Employment Secretary and MP for Stepney
 

Airesien

Well-known member
Labour leadership: Peter Taylor elected with huge mandate
The Guardian | 12 September 2015


Peter Taylor has promised to "bring Labour back" after his stunning landslide victory in the leadership contest.

The 56 year old left-winger swept aside his opponents in a landslide victory, in which he took 66.9% of the 422,000 votes cast in the first round.

Initially considered a 200–1 outsider, Taylor's nearest opponent, Andy Burnham, took just 24.7% of the vote, whilst the 'Blairite' candidate Chuka Umunna finished last with just 8.4% of the vote.

In his victory speech, Taylor said that he would lead not as "New Labour or Old Labour" but as "Real Labour": "We are bringing Labour back" he told a cagey conference hall, filled mostly with delegates who expected one of his two opponents to win the leadership.

The ballot was the first in the party's history to be held under a 'one man, one vote' system, meaning that all eligible voters had one vote which counted the same. Previously contests had been held under the 'electoral college' system, giving more weight to votes of union affiliates and MPs.

The MP for Nottingham North campaigned on a left-wing platform, advocating nationalisation of key industries, a four day week and unilateral nuclear disarmament, a platform that critics have said is unelectable.

In his speech, Taylor said: "It is time to ensure that Labour offers voters a real choice; the austerity and inequality offered by the Tories, or hope and change that only a Labour government can deliver. I promise, comrades, that is what my leadership will offer."

Attention now turns to Taylor's Shadow Cabinet, with key figures on the right of the party, such as Yvette Cooper, Tristram Hunt and Chris Leslie all ruling themselves out of serving under him quickly after his victory was confirmed. Copeland MP Jamie Reed, who was a Shadow Health Minister under the interim leadership of Harriet Harman, published his resignation letter on Twitter before Taylor had even finished his speech to conference.

Defeated candidates Burnham and Umunna both indicated that they could serve in Taylor's Shadow Cabinet if asked, and it is expected that Taylor will try to put together a broad shadow cabinet, although he has also promised to promote talent from the left-wing of the party, which has been increasingly ostracised throughout the New Labour years.

Another key question is who Taylor will appoint as his Shadow Chancellor, with sources suggesting he is considering Jon Trickett or Ian Lavery for the role, two MPs firmly on the left of the party.

Despite backing Andy Burnham for the role publicly, interim leader Harriet Harman said that it was the responsibility of every Labour MP to get behind the leader. Ed Miliband, the outgoing permanent leader, also echoed these sentiments, telling colleagues to "trust the decision made by the membership".

The reaction from Conservatives was immediate: Prime Minister David Cameron tweeted that "the Labour Party is now a threat to our national security, our economic security and your family's security."

Taylor's victory is all the more remarkable given his outsider status at the start of the campaign. He struggled to secure the support of the minimum number of MPs required to get on the ballot in the first place, only doing so because others lent him their vote. His campaign was boosted both by endorsements from key trade unions, including Unite, and an insurgent social media campaign, which encouraged thousands to pay £3 to take part in the vote. It's believed that his campaign has more than doubled the electorate eligible to vote in the contest.

While his supporters will be jubilant about his leadership taking taking the party leftward, his triumph will be deeply disappointing to the parliamentary party, which overwhelmingly backed other candidates.

Despite talk over the summer among Labour MPs about the possibility of challenging Taylor's election if he won, this threat to his authority appears to have somewhat dissipated given the scale of his victory. Both Burnham and Umunna's campaign have ruled out issuing a legal challenge to the results.

Who is Peter Taylor?

Peter Taylor first entered Parliament in 1987 as a 28 year old, taking the seat of Nottingham North back from the Conservatives. He has been re-elected in every election since with healthy majorities and currently has a majority of almost 12,000.

He won selection as Labour candidate for the seat with the personal support of Tony Benn and throughout his parliamentary career has been known as a full-blooded Bennite, advocating policies and positions such as unilateral nuclear disarmament and left-wing Euroscepticism.

He has never served in either the Shadow Cabinet or in Government before, although he did lead the Socialist Campaign Group caucus of MPs from 2001 until 2005. A passionate opponent of the Iraq War, he gained a small left-wing following after his speech decrying the march to war in 2003, a speech that has been retrieved and shared online thousands of times by supporters.

Since 2003, he has been a forceful critic of the United States and NATO, although he hasn't advocated leaving the alliance publicly. He is also a passionate supporter of Palestine, having led the parliamentary group for Palestine for over a decade, and remains a Eurosceptic from the left, describing the European Union as a "globalist capitalist project".
 
Last edited:

Airesien

Well-known member
2010–0000: David Cameron (Conservative)
2010 (Coalition with Liberal Democrat)
def. Gordon Brown (Labour), Nick Clegg (Liberal Democrat)
2015 (Majority) def. Ed Miliband (Labour), Nicola Sturgeon (SNP), Nick Clegg (Liberal Democrat)

2016 European Union referendum:

Leaders of the Labour Party

2010–2015: Ed Miliband
2010 LE
def. David Miliband, Ed Balls, Andy Burnham, Diane Abbott
2015 GE: 232 seats (Conservative majority)

2015–: Peter Taylor
2015 LE
def. Andy Burnham, Chuka Umunna
 

Time Enough

"Enthusiastic Cis Male Partner"
Pronouns
He/Him
Is Peter Taylor a real person? Because if so where has this Nottinghamshire legend been all my life.
 

Airesien

Well-known member
screenshot-en.wikipedia.org-2020.08.02-21_01_21.png
screenshot-en.wikipedia.org-2020.08.02-21_02_03.png
Shadow Cabinet of Peter Taylor
September 2015


Leader of the Opposition and Leader of the Labour Party
Peter Taylor
Deputy Leader of the Labour Party and Chair of the Labour Party
Tom Watson
Shadow Chancellor of the Exchequer
Jon Trickett
Shadow Secretary of State for the Home Department
Andy Burnham
Shadow Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs and Shadow First Secretary
Hilary Benn
Shadow Secretary of State for Justice
Angela Eagle
Shadow Secretary of State for Health
Grahame Morris
Shadow Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills
Chuka Umunna
Shadow Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
Heidi Alexander
Shadow Secretary of State for Education
Lucy Powell
Shadow Secretary of State for Defence
Chris Bryant
Shadow Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government
John McDonnell
Shadow Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change
Lisa Nandy
Shadow Secretary of State for Transport
Lilian Greenwood
Shadow Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Barry Gardiner
Shadow Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport
Michael Dugher
Shadow Secretary of State for International Development
Diane Abbott
Shadow Secretary of State for Scotland
Ian Murray
Shadow Secretary of State for Wales
Owen Smith
Shadow Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
John Healey
Shadow Leader of the Commons
Ian Lavery
Shadow Minister for Women and Equalities
Emily Thornberry
Leader of the Opposition in the House of Lords
Baroness Smith of Basildon
Shadow Chief Whip
Nick Brown
Shadow Chief Secretary to the Treasury
Maria Eagle
 

Airesien

Well-known member
What if Major was Labour?

1976–1977: James Callaghan (Labour majority)
1977–1978: James Callaghan (Labour minority)

1978–1982: James Callaghan (Labour)

1978 (Minority with Liberal support) def. Margaret Thatcher (Conservative), David Steel (Liberal)
1982–1983: Denis Healey (Labour minority)
1983–1987: Denis Healey (Labour)
1983 (Majority)
def. Margaret Thatcher (Conservative), David Steel (Liberal)
1987–1988: Neil Kinnock (Labour)
1988–1993: Michael Heseltine (Conservative)
1988 (Majority)
def. Neil Kinnock (Labour), David Penhaligon (Liberal)
1993–2004: Roy Major (Labour)
1993 (Coalition with Liberal)
def. Michael Heseltine (Conservative), David Penhaligon (Liberal)
1998 (Majority) def. Michael Portillo (Conservative), David Penhaligon (Liberal)
2002 (Minority with UUP and SDLP support) def. William Hague (Conservative), Menzies Campbell (Liberal)

2004–0000: Tony Blair (Labour)
 

Time Enough

"Enthusiastic Cis Male Partner"
Pronouns
He/Him
What if Major was Labour?

1976–1977: James Callaghan (Labour majority)
1977–1978: James Callaghan (Labour minority)

1978–1982: James Callaghan (Labour)

1978 (Minority with Liberal support) def. Margaret Thatcher (Conservative), David Steel (Liberal)
1982–1983: Denis Healey (Labour minority)
1983–1987: Denis Healey (Labour)
1983 (Majority)
def. Margaret Thatcher (Conservative), David Steel (Liberal)
1987–1988: Neil Kinnock (Labour)
1988–1993: Michael Heseltine (Conservative)
1988 (Majority)
def. Neil Kinnock (Labour), David Penhaligon (Liberal)
1993–2004: Roy Major (Labour)
1993 (Coalition with Liberal)
def. Michael Heseltine (Conservative), David Penhaligon (Liberal)
1998 (Majority) def. Michael Portillo (Conservative), David Penhaligon (Liberal)
2002 (Minority with UUP and SDLP support) def. William Hague (Conservative), Menzies Campbell (Liberal)

2004–0000: Tony Blair (Labour)
I did something similar so these are like the to sides of a different coin:
1979-1990: Margaret Thatcher (Conservative)
1979 (Majority) def: James Callaghan (Labour), David Steel (Liberal), William Wolfe (SNP), Gwynfor Evans (Plaid Cymru), Harry West (UUP), Gerry Fitt (SDLP), Ian Paisley (DUP)
1984 (Majority) def: Micheal Foot (Labour), David Steel-Shirley Williams (Liberal-SDP Alliance),Gordon Wilson (SNP), Dafydd Wigley (Plaid Cymru), James Molyneaux (UUP), John Hume (SDLP), Ian Paisley (DUP)
1988
(Majority) def: John Major (Labour), Paddy Ashdown (Social Liberals), Jim Sillars (SNP), Dafydd Wigley (Plaid Cymru), James Molyneaux (UUP), John Hume (SDLP), Ian Paisley (DUP), David Owen ('Continuity' SDP)
1990-2001: John Major (Labour)
1990 (Majority) def: Margaret Thatcher (Conservative), Paddy Ashdown (Social Liberals), Jim Sillars (SNP), Dafydd Elis-Thomas (Plaid Cymru), James Molyneaux (UUP), John Hume (SDLP), Ian Paisley (DUP), David Owen (New SDP)
1994 (Majority) def: Norman Tebbitt (Conservative), Paddy Ashdown (Social Liberals), Margo MacDonald (SNP), Dafydd Elis-Thomas (Plaid Cymru), James Molyneaux (UUP), Paul Arthur (SDLP), Ian Paisley (DUP), Jimmy Goldsmith (Referendum)
1997 (Coalition with Soc Libs) def: John Redwood (Conservative), Paddy Ashdown (Social Liberals), Ken Clarke (‘Euro’ Conservative), Margo MacDonald (SNP), Dafydd Elis-Thomas (Plaid Cymru), David Trimble (UUP), Paul Arthur (SDLP), Ian Paisley (DUP), Jimmy Goldsmith (Referendum)

2001-2005: John Bercow (Conservative)
2001 (Majority) def: John Major (Labour), Simon Hughes (Social Liberals), Ken Clarke (‘Euro’ Conservative), Margo MacDonald (SNP), Elfyn Llwyd (Plaid Cymru), David Trimble (UUP), Paul Arthur (SDLP), Ian Paisley (DUP), Robert-Kilroy Silk (Britain First!)
2005-2010: Harriet Harman (Labour)
2005 (Majority) def: John Bercow (Conservative), Simon Hughes (Social Liberals), Ken Clarke (‘Euro’ Conservative), Roseanna Cunningham (SNP), Elfyn Llwyd (Plaid Cymru), David Trimble (UUP), Paul Arthur (SDLP), Ian Paisley (DUP), Robert-Kilroy Silk (Britain First!)
2010-2014: Ken Clarke (Conservative)
2010 (Majority) def: Harriet Harman (Labour), David Laws (Social Liberals), Roseanna Cunningham (SNP), Elfyn Llwyd (Plaid Cymru), Sylvia Hermon (UUP), Mark Durkan (SDLP), Peter Robinson (DUP), Robert-Kilroy Silk (Britain First!), Caroline Lucas (Green Party)
2014 (Coalition with Soc Libs) def: Ed Balls (Labour), Vince Cable (Social Liberals), Jeane Freeman (SNP), Leanne Wood (Plaid Cymru), Sylvia Hermon (UUP), Karen McKevitt (SDLP), Peter Robinson (DUP), Robert-Kilroy Silk (Britain First!), Natalie Bennett (Green)

2014-2016: Philip Hammond (Conservative)
2016-2024: Ed Miliband (Labour)
2016 (Majority) def: Philip Hammond (Conservative), Vince Cable (Social Liberals), Jeane Freeman (SNP), Leanne Wood (Plaid Cymru), Sylvia Hermon (UUP), Karen McKevitt (SDLP), Nigel Dodds (DUP), Paul Nuttall (Britian First!), Natalie Bennett (Green)
2020 (Majority) def: Jeremy Hunt (Conservative), Munira Wilson (Social Liberals), Alison Thewliss (SNP), Leanne Wood (Plaid Cymru), Sylvia Hermon (UUP), Clarie Hanna (SDLP), Arlene Foster (DUP), Ann Widdecombe (Britain First!), Amelia Womack-Caroline Lucas (Green)
2023 (Majority) def: Liz Truss (Conservative), Munira Wilson (Social Liberals), Alison Thewliss (SNP), Adam Price (Plaid Cymru), Sylvia Hermon (UUP), Clarie Hanna (SDLP), Arlene Foster (DUP), Catherine Blaiklock (Britain First!), Caroline Lucas-Alexandra Phillips (Green)

2024-: Sarah Owen (Labour)
Though I question how the UUP and the SDLP work together in your world.
 

Airesien

Well-known member
I did something similar so these are like the to sides of a different coin:

Though I question how the UUP and the SDLP work together in your world.
Yours is definitely better than mine! It’s less working together and more that the SDLP will more often than not support Labour in Parliament and have traditionally followed the Labour whip, so with the tight margins here they support the Government on most issues as a matter of course. Major also needs the support of another party and manages to get agreement with the UUP for support on budgetary and confidence motions in exchange for some hefty funding for NI. But the UUP don’t support the Government on everything.
 

Airesien

Well-known member
2020 Republican primary candidates

  1. Chris Christie
  2. Liz Cheney
  3. Marco Rubio
  4. Mike Pence
  5. Mo Brooks
  6. Nikki Haley
  7. Rand Paul
  8. Rick Scott
  9. Scott Walker
  10. Ted Cruz
  11. Vernon Jones
 
Top