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Lists of Heads of Government and Heads of State

Second Ptolemaic Dynasty
Nice work, Bob, this is a pretty interesting format idea!

I would have gone with Democrats for Change when it comes to David Cameron, but that said, this is all truly inspired.
In retrospect, you're right--I just really like 'Constitutionalists' as a term for UK conservative parties.

Honestly, I really lucked out with the SNP leader names.
 

Turquoise Blue

Ambiguously Tibby
Patreon supporter
Location
Kemr, FK
John F. Kennedy (Democratic) 1961-1963*
1960: def. Richard Nixon (Republican)
Lyndon B. Johnson (League of Brotherhood and Justice) 1963-1969
1964: def. Barry Goldwater (Buck Government!)
Richard Nixon (Republican for Nixon) 1969-1974*
1968: def. Hubert H. Humphrey (Honesty, Humility, Humphrey), George Wallace (Greatness Within)
1972: def. George McGovern (Goodness Movement)
Gerald Ford (Great Fortitude) 1974-1977
Jimmy Carter (Jimmy Cares) 1977-1981

1976: def. Gerald Ford (Great Fortitude)
Ronald Reagan (Republican for Reagan) 1981-1989
1980: def. Jimmy Carter (Jimmy Cares), John B. Anderson (Join for a Bold America)
1984: def. Walter Mondale (With Modernity)
George H. W. Bush (Great and Brave) 1989-1993
1988: def. Michael Dukakis (Modern Democratic)
Bill Clinton (Be Change) 1993-2001
1992: def. George H. W. Bush (Great and Brave), Ross Perot (Ready for Perot)
1996: def. Bob Dole (Bold with Dole), Ross Perot (Ready for Perot)
George W. Bush (Great, Wise, Brave) 2001-2009
2000: def. Al Gore (America's Greens)
2004: def. John Kerry (Justice and Knowledge)
Barack Obama (Bloc for Obama) 2009-2017
2008: def. John McCain (John's Movement)
2012: def. Mitt Romney (Mitt's Republican)
Donald Trump (Donald Trump's) 2017-
2016: def. Hillary Clinton (Hillary's Coalition)

By the end, it's just lazily "name and maybe a word". Trump doesn't even bother with a word.
 

Ciclavex

Baron Ciclavex of Wales-on-Schuylkill
Moderator
Patreon supporter
Location
New Sweden
I guess I’m going to do this. Instead of being an exploration of some different idea that I’ll probably never put to TL, like these usually are for me, these are from my story Fashions Made Sacred. It’s not so much “spoilery”, because all of it takes place well in the past of the actual story, but if fair warning if you wanted to avoid things like this.

The Most High, Most Noble and Most Excellent Princes, the Kings of France and of Navarre, by the Grace of God in Their Most Christian Majesty (House of Bourbon — 1589-present)
1589-1610: Henry IV
1610-1643: Louis XIII
1643-1709: Louis XIV [1]
1709-1744: Louis XV [2]
1744-1752: Louis XVI [3]
1752-1787: Louis XVII [4]
1787-1848: Louis XVIII [5]
1848-1889: Henri V [6]
1889-1925: Francis III [7]
1925-1952: Henri VI [8]
1952-1997: Francis IV [9]
1997-0000: Christine [10]
0000-0000:
Charles Pepin Louis Philip Henry Francis, Dauphin of Viennois
0000-0000: Marie Louise Aphrodite Francine Henrietta Christine, Duchess of Cyprus

Royal Consorts of the Kingdom of France and Navarre (1589-present — by birthright style)
1589-1599: Princess Margaret of France (House of Angoulême)
1600-1610: Princess Maria of Tuscany (House of Medici)
1615-1643: Archduchess Anne, Infanta of Spain (House of Hapsburg)
1660-1683: Archduchess Maria Theresa, Infanta of Spain (House of Hapsburg)

1709-1744: Lady Maria Adelaide of Savoy (House of Savoy)
1752-1775: Infanta Maria of Portugal (House of Braganza)
1795-1804: Princess Elisabeth of Poland (House of Wettin)
1808-1848: Princess Caroline of Bavaria (House of Wittelsbach)
1848-1889: Archduchess Maria Christina, Princess of Venice (House of Hapsburg)
1889-1925: Lady Maria Josepha Bescos Panadero (Bescos political family)
1925-1952: Princess Lucretia of Italy (House of Guelph)
1957-1992: Princess Eleonora of Saxony (in pretense) (House of Wettin)
1997-0000: Philippe, Duke of Orleans (House of Orleans)

0000-0000: Princess Maria Louisa of Peru (House of Potosi)

[1] Louis XIV, so-called the "sun king", went for one last, great war to assert the dominance of France through all of Europe, seeking the crowning jewel: to place his grandson, Philip, on the Spanish throne, starting the War of the Spanish Succession. But the longest-reigning monarch France has ever seen would not live to see that his reach had exceeded his grasp; he died - due probably to what historians have identified as complications from diabetes - and left the kingdom to a different grandson to set back in place.

[2] Louis XV, who had been only the Duke of Burgundy until mere months before his grandfather's death, was left the task of getting out of what the Sun King had left him -- a country left low in finances, low on morale, low on soldiers, and with the armies of Austria, the Netherlands, England and Sweden bearing down upon him. Louis was forced into a humiliating peace for France, surrendering even the hard-won territory of Alsace for breathing room. Louis turned to his nobility, who tended to dominate his administration, to maintain stability. However, the same nobility resisted any attempt to claw back the incomes which his grandfather and his other predecessors had ceded to them. Expensive adventurism in America and India cost the state far more than it brought in, and Louis found that he was never able to have the peace he desperately needed, though perhaps which he did not want -- his grandfather had left France astride all of Europe, and he found maintaining her place in the world to be as expensive as gaining it in the first place, and not as profitable as it might seem.

[3] Louis XVI inherited a kingdom with trouble upon trouble, expense upon expense, but he had known what he was getting into; he had been an active dauphin, and, on taking the throne, took swift action to curb the power of the nobility, and strengthen the Crown: he called the first Estates-General in over a hundred years to reform the Constitution, and strip away the most odious noble taxation privileges. In what is now considered the first modern Estates-General, the king granted new privileges to the estates of clergy and commons to gain their support in reining in the high nobility, and even managed to win some of the petty nobility's support against the great magnates of the French kingdom. Louis also called the second modern Estates-General, barely a year before his own death, and began to slowly eke France into a modern society.

[4] Louis XVII was a weaker man than his father, with less personality, less strength, and lesser all around, but, if there was one thing he excelled in, it was management; Louis continued his father's policy of avoiding new wars - a policy much beloved by the Estates-Generals he began to call with increasing regularity - and focused on putting the kingdom on sound financial foundations. In his thirty-five years on the throne, France fought only one major war - one forced upon Louis by outside circumstance - and, over time, found its modern constitution begin to take shape, as the Estates-General evolved from an irregular constitutional convention into the real, modern legislative body that it is today.

[5] If Louis XVI called the modern Estates-General, and Louis XVII made it, Louis XVIII was the man to embrace the body. A strong, reserved monarch, Louis, on taking the throne from his grandfather, quickly made himself the darling of the Estates-General, and he wielded it to redraw the internal borders of the French state, to break down tariff boundaries inside, and unify systems of administration across the ancient kingdom. Not since Francis I had the internal mechanisms of the state been so overhauled, both dramatically and successfully, and, over a reign of decades, France began to take the shape that it has today. He expertly utilized the Estates-General's support to finally bring the parlements - the last great bastion of noble power outside of the Estates-General - to heel, and reform the parlements into something resembling their modern form. It was Louis XVIII, also, who brought France into the Great German War, relying on the reforms he and his grandfather had made to keep the country on its feet. His intervention saved the Holy Roman Empire, and helped to secure France's dominant power over the rest of Europe for the rest of his life, and, indeed, for a century thereafter. However, his reign also saw the loss of Saint-Domingue to its slave revolt - the crown jewel of the French colonial empire - which he ultimately, wisely, ceded to its own destiny. However, it would be left to his son to abolish that hated, despicable practice in France's other colonies, which he never would himself.

[6] Henry V, the son of Louis XVIII, was his father's reverse in nearly every way. He was a warmonger, who quarreled constantly with his ministers and the Estates-General. He squandered as much of his father's legacy as he could get his hands on, and brought France into countless conflicts, both to conquer new, unprofitable, restive and resistant colonies, as well as to play games of rivalry with other colonial powers; indeed, he nearly brought the Old Alliance to an end more than once by his hazardous foreign and colonial policies. Nevertheless, his father had placed the kingdom on very sound footing, such that Henry was unable to completely unmake it; his influence slowly dwindled in his own kingdom, to the point that, nearer the end of his reign, he could not even bring to bear the political capital to block his son's scandalous choice in matrimony.

[7] Francis III was a cooler, more reserved man than his father, despite his (well-deserved) reputation for rocking the boat. Francis was a conservative man, but not unthinking, and he was more subtle in his ways in managing the kingdom than his father had been. To his detriment, he did continue to seek to expand and consolidate France's colonial ambitions, but, to his credit, he worked to avoid the wars that his father had actively sought out. Despite his conservatism, Francis' reign is seen as an era of modernization, due to the influence of his consort's radically American zenobian ideals, which reverberated across the realm and, indeed, the continent.

[8] Henry VI, like his grandfather, was a far more active monarch than his father, Francis, had been, but in quite a different direction; Henry was an arch-modernizer, who spearheaded massive reforms in administration and social policy in his kingdom, though now tempered by his conservative Estates-General, rather than pressed on by its radicals as his father had been. It was he who ended the firm law of agnatic primogeniture from the kingdom; it was he who admitted women to military academies, and whose influence helped lead the Council of Turin to formally endorse contraception. It was he who abolished the property requirement to vote for the Third Estate. He left his mark on the land; unfortunately, he also left his mark on other lands, across the globe, as his harsh colonial policies meant to maintain his father's and grandfather's gains have left a gaping black mark on his record, which can never be totally expunged. And, in his zeal for internal and "internal" (read: colonial) affairs left Europe vacant, for Poland and Batavia to rise and challenge the consensus France had tried to maintain. Louis XVIII's system of French continental dominance came finally crashing to the ground in Henry's reign.

[9] Francis IV is remembered as broadly conservative, but we should remember that this is in the context of his father's radical reforms; Francis would be considered a radical in any time before his own. His over forty years on the throne saw, finally, the dismantling of the French colonial empire, and the end of France's great colonial crimes in America, in India and in Africa. His time in office saw wide-reaching military reforms, hand-in-hand with colonial withdrawal; it also saw the rapidly-increasing pace of technological achievement, which, initially, had seemed to be ready to usher in a new era of eternal progress... and saw it instead culminate in the Global War. He stayed in Paris for the months-long siege of the French capital, but would die in the aftermath, leaving France in its darkest hour in other hands...

[10] Christine stepped up to take her father's place in the heart of the crisis, and proved an able wartime leader. She has seen vast reforms to the judiciary for the first time in over a century, which she herself has championed and pushed for; indeed, there is no question, that it is that which she would like to be her legacy, in making the country more just than she left it. But, sadly, for now, what she is known for is her wartime service, and the possibility of having to repeat it. Since the day the sky turned bright over the Pacific, and Acapulco ceased to exist in an instant, the pall of originalistic war has lain across the world. The bombers await only the Queen's word for Cracovia, for Vilnius and Antwerp to erupt in original fire -- and wait hours, if not minutes, for Paris to vanish in response. If we make it through this...

Well.

Maybe the judicial reforms will be her legacy...
 

Uhura's Mazda

Martinet of the Marshes
Published by SLP
Location
Tamaki Makaurau
Peter Shore defeats Healey for the Labour leadership. He does away with the electoral college and moves against Militant and the fans of unilateral disarmament while launching savage critiques of the new monetarist doctrines. With the Falklands butterflied and the Gang of Three slightly less unhappy, he leads Labour to victory against the unpopular Thatcher Government. However, upon reaching Number Ten, he finds he doesn't have the numbers to leave Europe without a referendum and has to fight a nail-biting referendum campaign. With Britain already knitted into the European economy fairly closely after just a decade of EEC membership, the two years of transitional deal negotiations go predictably badly and he is forced out after spending all his political capital on the Withdrawal Agreement. It falls to David Owen (who campaigned for Union but promised to uphold the decision of the British people) to attempt to halt the economic decline fuelled by Shore's foreign policy and Foot's Treasury tenure with City-oriented 'Social Market' reforms.

In the meantime, the culture war set off first by Thatcherism, then by Shoreism, and finally by the Owenite betrayal of the policies which got Shore elected in the first place, has all but destroyed the old order. Alienated by Peter Shore, the New Social Movements have given Labour up as a bad job and flocked to the reformed Communist Party, while the socially conservative end of the Thatcherites have united with extremist Labour Eurosceptics (mistrustful of Owen's dangerous level of Europhilia) behind the banner of the rejuvenated National Front. The changing party system reflects the febrile discontent in British society in the late 80s, as even the Yuppies take to the streets with painfully middle-class placards.

The return of a Tory Government does little to staunch the tide of feeling, though, and still less to rebuild Britain. It turns out that the Commonwealth nations have got on with their own affairs since we abandoned them for Europe in the 70s. And Defence cutbacks force us to meekly accept the fait accompli of the new Spanish junta's seizure of Gibraltar, inciting a revolt of Tory MPs. The defectors join forces with a national-populist splinter from the National Front to form the National Unionist Party, which briefly holds the balance of power before meekly returning to the fold in return for a few minor concessions. Nothing ever changes, even when everything is changing.

Well, nothing changes until 1992, anyway. After that, party names start to get so stupid that most Britons are now too embarrassed even to write them down.

1983-1986: Peter Shore (Labour)
1983 def: Margaret Thatcher (Conservative), Roy Jenkins (Liberal), David Penhaligon (Real Liberal)
1984 EEC referendum: 52% Independence, 48% Union

1986-1988: David Owen (Labour)
1988-1991: Peter Carington (Conservative)
1988 def: David Owen (Labour), Andrew Brons (National Front), David Penhaligon (Liberal), Nina Temple (Social Party)
1991-1992: Peter Carington (Conservative with National Unionist support)
1992-1994: Nick Griffin (New Greatness)
1992 def: Bryan Gould (Labour), Peter Carington (Conservative), David Icke (Social Party), Paddy Ashdown (Liberal)
 

Skinny87

Strong sexual man in milk, screaming
Patreon supporter
Peter Shore defeats Healey for the Labour leadership. He does away with the electoral college and moves against Militant and the fans of unilateral disarmament while launching savage critiques of the new monetarist doctrines. With the Falklands butterflied and the Gang of Three slightly less unhappy, he leads Labour to victory against the unpopular Thatcher Government. However, upon reaching Number Ten, he finds he doesn't have the numbers to leave Europe without a referendum and has to fight a nail-biting referendum campaign. With Britain already knitted into the European economy fairly closely after just a decade of EEC membership, the two years of transitional deal negotiations go predictably badly and he is forced out after spending all his political capital on the Withdrawal Agreement. It falls to David Owen (who campaigned for Union but promised to uphold the decision of the British people) to attempt to halt the economic decline fuelled by Shore's foreign policy and Foot's Treasury tenure with City-oriented 'Social Market' reforms.

In the meantime, the culture war set off first by Thatcherism, then by Shoreism, and finally by the Owenite betrayal of the policies which got Shore elected in the first place, has all but destroyed the old order. Alienated by Peter Shore, the New Social Movements have given Labour up as a bad job and flocked to the reformed Communist Party, while the socially conservative end of the Thatcherites have united with extremist Labour Eurosceptics (mistrustful of Owen's dangerous level of Europhilia) behind the banner of the rejuvenated National Front. The changing party system reflects the febrile discontent in British society in the late 80s, as even the Yuppies take to the streets with painfully middle-class placards.

The return of a Tory Government does little to staunch the tide of feeling, though, and still less to rebuild Britain. It turns out that the Commonwealth nations have got on with their own affairs since we abandoned them for Europe in the 70s. And Defence cutbacks force us to meekly accept the fait accompli of the new Spanish junta's seizure of Gibraltar, inciting a revolt of Tory MPs. The defectors join forces with a national-populist splinter from the National Front to form the National Unionist Party, which briefly holds the balance of power before meekly returning to the fold in return for a few minor concessions. Nothing ever changes, even when everything is changing.

Well, nothing changes until 1992, anyway. After that, party names start to get so stupid that most Britons are now too embarrassed even to write them down.

1983-1986: Peter Shore (Labour)
1983 def: Margaret Thatcher (Conservative), Roy Jenkins (Liberal), David Penhaligon (Real Liberal)
1984 EEC referendum: 52% Independence, 48% Union

1986-1988: David Owen (Labour)
1988-1991: Peter Carington (Conservative)
1988 def: David Owen (Labour), Andrew Brons (National Front), David Penhaligon (Liberal), Nina Temple (Social Party)
1991-1992: Peter Carington (Conservative with National Unionist support)
1992-1994: Nick Griffin (New Greatness)
1992 def: Bryan Gould (Labour), Peter Carington (Conservative), David Icke (Social Party), Paddy Ashdown (Liberal)
Nick's National Front
 

Yokai Man

Well-known member
Peter Shore defeats Healey for the Labour leadership. He does away with the electoral college and moves against Militant and the fans of unilateral disarmament while launching savage critiques of the new monetarist doctrines. With the Falklands butterflied and the Gang of Three slightly less unhappy, he leads Labour to victory against the unpopular Thatcher Government. However, upon reaching Number Ten, he finds he doesn't have the numbers to leave Europe without a referendum and has to fight a nail-biting referendum campaign. With Britain already knitted into the European economy fairly closely after just a decade of EEC membership, the two years of transitional deal negotiations go predictably badly and he is forced out after spending all his political capital on the Withdrawal Agreement. It falls to David Owen (who campaigned for Union but promised to uphold the decision of the British people) to attempt to halt the economic decline fuelled by Shore's foreign policy and Foot's Treasury tenure with City-oriented 'Social Market' reforms.

In the meantime, the culture war set off first by Thatcherism, then by Shoreism, and finally by the Owenite betrayal of the policies which got Shore elected in the first place, has all but destroyed the old order. Alienated by Peter Shore, the New Social Movements have given Labour up as a bad job and flocked to the reformed Communist Party, while the socially conservative end of the Thatcherites have united with extremist Labour Eurosceptics (mistrustful of Owen's dangerous level of Europhilia) behind the banner of the rejuvenated National Front. The changing party system reflects the febrile discontent in British society in the late 80s, as even the Yuppies take to the streets with painfully middle-class placards.

The return of a Tory Government does little to staunch the tide of feeling, though, and still less to rebuild Britain. It turns out that the Commonwealth nations have got on with their own affairs since we abandoned them for Europe in the 70s. And Defence cutbacks force us to meekly accept the fait accompli of the new Spanish junta's seizure of Gibraltar, inciting a revolt of Tory MPs. The defectors join forces with a national-populist splinter from the National Front to form the National Unionist Party, which briefly holds the balance of power before meekly returning to the fold in return for a few minor concessions. Nothing ever changes, even when everything is changing.

Well, nothing changes until 1992, anyway. After that, party names start to get so stupid that most Britons are now too embarrassed even to write them down.

1983-1986: Peter Shore (Labour)
1983 def: Margaret Thatcher (Conservative), Roy Jenkins (Liberal), David Penhaligon (Real Liberal)
1984 EEC referendum: 52% Independence, 48% Union

1986-1988: David Owen (Labour)
1988-1991: Peter Carington (Conservative)
1988 def: David Owen (Labour), Andrew Brons (National Front), David Penhaligon (Liberal), Nina Temple (Social Party)
1991-1992: Peter Carington (Conservative with National Unionist support)
1992-1994:
Nick Griffin (New Greatness)
1992 def: Bryan Gould (Labour), Peter Carington (Conservative), David Icke (Social Party), Paddy Ashdown (Liberal)
finally

a Britain that my antisemitic,homophobic,Romanian nationalist dad could love
 

Mumby

'I love the pun he will go far'
Published by SLP
based on that terrible tim montgomerie graphic

R E A L I G N M E N T

Prime Ministers of the United Kingdom

1979-1989: Margaret Thatcher (Liberal)
1979 (Coalition with Nationals) def. Michael Foot (Solidarity), Willie Whitelaw (National), Enoch Powell (Freedom)
1982 (Majority) def. Michael Foot (Solidarity), Geoffrey Dickens (Freedom), Willie Whitelaw (National)
1985 (Coalition with Freedom) def. Tony Benn (Solidarity), Geoffrey Dickens (Freedom), Norman St John-Stevas (National)

1989-1990: Margaret Thatcher (Freedom minority)
1990-1997: John Major (Liberal)
1990 (Coalition with Nationals) def. Tony Benn (Solidarity), Margaret Thatcher (Freedom), Michael Heseltine (National)
1994 (Majority) def. Tony Benn (Solidarity), Michael Heseltine (National), Norman Tebbit (Freedom)

1997-2007: Tony Blair (Liberal)
1999 (Majority) def. Alex Salmond (Solidarity), Malcolm Rifkind (National), Norman Tebbit (Freedom)
2003 (Minority, with National confidence and supply) def. Vince Cable (Solidarity), Malcolm Rifkind (National), John Redwood (Freedom)

2007-2010: Gordon Brown (Solidarity)
2007 (Minority) def. David Cameron (National), Tony Blair (Liberal), John Redwood (Freedom)
2010-2016: David Cameron (National)
2010 (Majority) def. Gordon Brown (Solidarity), Nigel Farage (Freedom), Nick Clegg (Liberal)
2014 (Majority) def. Alex Salmond (Solidarity), Nigel Farage (Freedom), George Osborne (Liberal)

2016-0000: Theresa May (National)
2019 (Coalition with Freedom) def. Ted Miliband (Solidarity), Nigel Farage (Freedom), David Miliband (Liberal)

Party Rundown

National - Polls for the next election are looking rough, as the Freedomites surge. Most recently the West Country Council fell to a Freedom led coalition, outpolling the Tories and leaving the Liberals in the dust. It took the Tories ninety years to get back into power, it looks like that might not last much longer

Solidarity - Looking forward to a breakthrough if Freedom splits the right vote enough, but there's been another outburst of tabloid panic over Solidarity's communist affiliates, and obviously David got his oar in. Of course that same election in the West Country showed a shocking percentage of the young voting Solidarity - no doubt helped along by all those cifs on Senatter drooling over Gordon Brown - but you know what turnout in that demographics like.

Freedom - Nigel Farage may be currently under investigation for literal crimes, but with his hands around the throat of the government, it isn't expected for that to lead anywhere. More important possibly is how many young people - possibly turned off by how mainstream youth adoration of Gordon Brown is - are joining their grandparents to moon over Margaret Thatcher.

Liberal - At least David gets them in the paper a lot, but its difficult for them to get a word in edgeways about actual issues when every single party can point at them and blame them for Britain's travails given their dominance for most of the last century.
 
John F. Kennedy (Democratic) 1961-1963*
1960: def. Richard Nixon (Republican)
Lyndon B. Johnson (League of Brotherhood and Justice) 1963-1969
1964: def. Barry Goldwater (Buck Government!)
Richard Nixon (Republican for Nixon) 1969-1974*
1968: def. Hubert H. Humphrey (Honesty, Humility, Humphrey), George Wallace (Greatness Within)
1972: def. George McGovern (Goodness Movement)
Gerald Ford (Great Fortitude) 1974-1977
Jimmy Carter (Jimmy Cares) 1977-1981

1976: def. Gerald Ford (Great Fortitude)
Ronald Reagan (Republican for Reagan) 1981-1989
1980: def. Jimmy Carter (Jimmy Cares), John B. Anderson (Join for a Bold America)
1984: def. Walter Mondale (With Modernity)
George H. W. Bush (Great and Brave) 1989-1993
1988: def. Michael Dukakis (Modern Democratic)
Bill Clinton (Be Change) 1993-2001
1992: def. George H. W. Bush (Great and Brave), Ross Perot (Ready for Perot)
1996: def. Bob Dole (Bold with Dole), Ross Perot (Ready for Perot)
George W. Bush (Great, Wise, Brave) 2001-2009
2000: def. Al Gore (America's Greens)
2004: def. John Kerry (Justice and Knowledge)
Barack Obama (Bloc for Obama) 2009-2017
2008: def. John McCain (John's Movement)
2012: def. Mitt Romney (Mitt's Republican)
Donald Trump (Donald Trump's) 2017-
2016: def. Hillary Clinton (Hillary's Coalition)

By the end, it's just lazily "name and maybe a word". Trump doesn't even bother with a word.
Reminds me of a list of mine from a while ago:

2001-2001: Al Gore/Joe Lieberman (Democratic)
2000: George W. Bush/Dick Cheney (Republican)
2001-2001: Joe Lieberman/Vacant (Democratic)
2001-2005: Joe Lieberman/Dick Gephardt (Democratic)
2005-2009: Joe Lieberman/John McCain (America for Lieberman)

2004: Rick Santorum/Rudy Giuliani (Republican) , Howard Dean/Kathleen Sebelius (Democratic)
2009-2013: Donald Trump/David Petraeus (Team Trump)
2008: Mitt Romney/Meg Whitman (Republican) , John Edwards/Chris Dodd (Democratic)
2013-2017: Ron Paul/Paul Ryan (Paul!)
2012: Donald Trump/David Petraeus (Team Trump) , Anthony Weiner/Mark Warner (Democratic) , Mike Ditka/Sarah Palin (Republican)
2017-2021: Mark Cuban/Jim Webb (Mark Cuban for President 2016)
2016: Ron Paul/Paul Ryan (Paul!) , Bernie Sanders/Elizabeth Warren (Bernie!) , Donald Trump/Jim Justice (Team Trump)
2021-2023: Bernie Sanders/Elizabeth Warren (Bernie!)
2020: Rand Paul/Justin Amash (Paul!) , Donald Trump/Michael Flynn (Team Trump) , Mark Cuban/Joe Scarborough (Mark Cuban for President 2020) , Jim Webb/Joe Manchin (Jim Webb)
2023-2023: Elizabeth Warren/Vacant (Bernie!)
2023-2025: Elizabeth Warren/George Clooney (Bernie! and Liz!)
2025-2029: Rand Paul/Austin Peterson (Paul!)

2024: Elizabeth Warren/George Clooney (Bernie! and Liz!) , Donald Trump Jr./Scott Brown (Team Trump) , Mark Cuban/Scott Walker (Make Mark Cuban President Again) , Jim Webb/Joe Manchin (Jim Webb)
2029-0000: Mark Zuckerberg/Jeff Bezos (Zuckerberg/Bezos)
2028: Rand Paul/Austin Peterson (Paul!) , Donald Trump Jr./Curt Schilling (Team Trump) , George Clooney/Lawrence Lessig (Bernie! and Liz! and Clooney! Too) , Tulsi Gabbard/Edward Snowden (Tulsi!) , Mark Cuban/John Delaney (Make Mark Cuban President Again)
2032: Tulsi Gabbard/Kshama Sawant (Tulsi!) , Rand Paul/Caiden Cowger (Paul!) , Ivanka Trump/Stephen Miller (Team Trump) , Mark Cuban/Martin O'Malley (Make Mark Cuban President Again)
 

Mumby

'I love the pun he will go far'
Published by SLP
i suppose i could do a prequel...
1908-1911: H.H. Asquith (Liberal)
1910 (Coalition with Conservatives & Liberal Unionists) def. Arthur Balfour (Conservative & Liberal Unionist), John Redmond (Irish Parliamentary), Arthur Henderson (Labour), William O'Brien (All-For-Ireland)
1911-1912: David Lloyd George (Liberal-Conservative-Liberal Unionist coalition)
1912-1917: Walter Long (Conservative)
1912 (Pact with Liberal Unionists) def. David Lloyd George (Liberal & Reform Unionist), John Redmond (Irish Parliamentary), George Barnes (Labour), William O'Brien (All-For-Ireland)
1915 Formation of War Cabinet

1917-1926: David Lloyd George (Liberal)
1917 Formation of War Government with National Unionists, Labour and IPP
1920 (National Government with National Unionists and NDLP) def. Arthur Griffith (Sinn Fein), William Adamson (Labour), Walter Long (Conservative), John Dillon (Irish Parliamentary)
1924 (Majority) def. Stanley Baldwin (National & Conservative Unionist), J.R. Clynes (Labour), Albert Inkpin (Communist)

1926-1930: Reginald McKenna (Liberal)
1929 (Minority, with SDP confidence and supply) def. George Lansbury (People's Front - Labour and Communists), Stanley Baldwin (National), Max Aitken, 1st Baron Beaverbrook (Empire Free Trade Crusade), Philip Snowden (Social Democrat)
1930-1936: Oswald Mosley (Liberal)
1932 (Majority) def. George Lansbury (Solidarity), Duff Cooper (National)
1936-1939: David Lloyd George (Liberal)
1937 (Coalition with Nationals) def. Stafford Cripps (Solidarity), Herbert Samuel (Independent Liberal), Duff Cooper (National)
1939-1946: Winston Churchill (Liberal)
1940 Formation of War Government with Solidarity and Nationals
1946-1949: Stafford Cripps (Solidarity)
1946 (Minority) def. Winston Churchill (Liberal), Anthony Eden (National)
1949-1952: Winston Churchill (Liberal)
1946 (Coalition with Nationals) def. Stafford Cripps (Solidarity), Anthony Eden (National)
1952-1964: Hugh Gaitskell (Liberal)
1953 (Majority) def. Nye Bevan (Solidarity), Anthony Eden (National)
1957 (Majority) def. Nye Bevan (Solidarity), Alec Douglas-Home (National)
1961 (Majority) def. Tony Greenwood (Solidarity), Alec Douglas-Home (National)

1964-1973: Reginald Maudling (Liberal)
1966 (Majority) def. Tony Greenwood (Solidarity), Quintin Hogg (National)
1971 (Coalition with Solidarity) def. Michael Foot (Solidarity), Enoch Powell (National)

1973-1974: Keith Joseph (Liberal minority, with National confidence and supply)
1974-1979: Michael Foot (Solidarity)
1974 (Majority) def. Keith Joseph (Liberal), Enoch Powell (Freedom), Willie Whitelaw (National)

Here you go.

Basically, the Conservatives end up falling into the trap the Liberals did IOTL, while Labour has the Communists affiliate in a popular front leading to a centrist split that the party never quite recovers from - resulting in the establishment of the Solidarity Coalition of leftist parties being the main centre-left party but like the Italian Communists they very rarely get the opportunity to break through. This means that the Liberals are able to occupy a dominant party position for most of the 20th century, with most political conflict taking place within the party rather than across Parliament, to a certain extent.

This state of affairs is upended by the great crises of the 70s as Maudling's corruption is revealed while the country endures an economic slump, and the Nationals are split by Enoch Powell's openly racialist turn. This grim state of affairs allows Michael Foot to break through and establish the first majority Solidarity government in the country's history. This doesn't last long however, as Foot becomes the target of anti-socialist espionage by both America and the European Monetary Union, to say nothing of Edward IX's manoeuvres alongside the Dominions. This results in Margaret Thatcher's comfortable victory in 1979 and the realignment of the country behind her singular vision.
 

Mumby

'I love the pun he will go far'
Published by SLP
Reminds me of a list of mine from a while ago:

2001-2001: Al Gore/Joe Lieberman (Democratic)
2000: George W. Bush/Dick Cheney (Republican)
2001-2001: Joe Lieberman/Vacant (Democratic)
2001-2005: Joe Lieberman/Dick Gephardt (Democratic)
2005-2009: Joe Lieberman/John McCain (America for Lieberman)

2004: Rick Santorum/Rudy Giuliani (Republican) , Howard Dean/Kathleen Sebelius (Democratic)
2009-2013: Donald Trump/David Petraeus (Team Trump)
2008: Mitt Romney/Meg Whitman (Republican) , John Edwards/Chris Dodd (Democratic)
2013-2017: Ron Paul/Paul Ryan (Paul!)
2012: Donald Trump/David Petraeus (Team Trump) , Anthony Weiner/Mark Warner (Democratic) , Mike Ditka/Sarah Palin (Republican)
2017-2021: Mark Cuban/Jim Webb (Mark Cuban for President 2016)
2016: Ron Paul/Paul Ryan (Paul!) , Bernie Sanders/Elizabeth Warren (Bernie!) , Donald Trump/Jim Justice (Team Trump)
2021-2023: Bernie Sanders/Elizabeth Warren (Bernie!)
2020: Rand Paul/Justin Amash (Paul!) , Donald Trump/Michael Flynn (Team Trump) , Mark Cuban/Joe Scarborough (Mark Cuban for President 2020) , Jim Webb/Joe Manchin (Jim Webb)
2023-2023: Elizabeth Warren/Vacant (Bernie!)
2023-2025: Elizabeth Warren/George Clooney (Bernie! and Liz!)
2025-2029: Rand Paul/Austin Peterson (Paul!)

2024: Elizabeth Warren/George Clooney (Bernie! and Liz!) , Donald Trump Jr./Scott Brown (Team Trump) , Mark Cuban/Scott Walker (Make Mark Cuban President Again) , Jim Webb/Joe Manchin (Jim Webb)
2029-0000: Mark Zuckerberg/Jeff Bezos (Zuckerberg/Bezos)
2028: Rand Paul/Austin Peterson (Paul!) , Donald Trump Jr./Curt Schilling (Team Trump) , George Clooney/Lawrence Lessig (Bernie! and Liz! and Clooney! Too) , Tulsi Gabbard/Edward Snowden (Tulsi!) , Mark Cuban/John Delaney (Make Mark Cuban President Again)
2032: Tulsi Gabbard/Kshama Sawant (Tulsi!) , Rand Paul/Caiden Cowger (Paul!) , Ivanka Trump/Stephen Miller (Team Trump) , Mark Cuban/Martin O'Malley (Make Mark Cuban President Again)
This is a thing of beauty.
 
based on that terrible tim montgomerie graphic

R E A L I G N M E N T

Prime Ministers of the United Kingdom

1979-1989: Margaret Thatcher (Liberal)
1979 (Coalition with Nationals) def. Michael Foot (Solidarity), Willie Whitelaw (National), Enoch Powell (Freedom)
1982 (Majority) def. Michael Foot (Solidarity), Geoffrey Dickens (Freedom), Willie Whitelaw (National)
1985 (Coalition with Freedom) def. Tony Benn (Solidarity), Geoffrey Dickens (Freedom), Norman St John-Stevas (National)

1989-1990: Margaret Thatcher (Freedom minority)
1990-1997: John Major (Liberal)
1990 (Coalition with Nationals) def. Tony Benn (Solidarity), Margaret Thatcher (Freedom), Michael Heseltine (National)
1994 (Majority) def. Tony Benn (Solidarity), Michael Heseltine (National), Norman Tebbit (Freedom)

1997-2007: Tony Blair (Liberal)
1999 (Majority) def. Alex Salmond (Solidarity), Malcolm Rifkind (National), Norman Tebbit (Freedom)
2003 (Minority, with National confidence and supply) def. Vince Cable (Solidarity), Malcolm Rifkind (National), John Redwood (Freedom)

2007-2010: Gordon Brown (Solidarity)
2007 (Minority) def. David Cameron (National), Tony Blair (Liberal), John Redwood (Freedom)
2010-2016: David Cameron (National)
2010 (Majority) def. Gordon Brown (Solidarity), Nigel Farage (Freedom), Nick Clegg (Liberal)
2014 (Majority) def. Alex Salmond (Solidarity), Nigel Farage (Freedom), George Osborne (Liberal)

2016-0000: Theresa May (National)
2019 (Coalition with Freedom) def. Ted Miliband (Solidarity), Nigel Farage (Freedom), David Miliband (Liberal)

Party Rundown

National - Polls for the next election are looking rough, as the Freedomites surge. Most recently the West Country Council fell to a Freedom led coalition, outpolling the Tories and leaving the Liberals in the dust. It took the Tories ninety years to get back into power, it looks like that might not last much longer

Solidarity - Looking forward to a breakthrough if Freedom splits the right vote enough, but there's been another outburst of tabloid panic over Solidarity's communist affiliates, and obviously David got his oar in. Of course that same election in the West Country showed a shocking percentage of the young voting Solidarity - no doubt helped along by all those cifs on Senatter drooling over Gordon Brown - but you know what turnout in that demographics like.

Freedom - Nigel Farage may be currently under investigation for literal crimes, but with his hands around the throat of the government, it isn't expected for that to lead anywhere. More important possibly is how many young people - possibly turned off by how mainstream youth adoration of Gordon Brown is - are joining their grandparents to moon over Margaret Thatcher.

Liberal - At least David gets them in the paper a lot, but its difficult for them to get a word in edgeways about actual issues when every single party can point at them and blame them for Britain's travails given their dominance for most of the last century.
My favourite thing about that graphic was that Montgomerie decided that the Tory Party was so divided that it should be broken into three different parties whilst also thinking that the left was so similar that Gordon Brown and Vince Cable would be comfortable in the same party as Caroline Lucas.
 

Callan

Absolutely Dire
Published by SLP
Location
Toronto
My favourite thing about that graphic was that Montgomerie decided that the Tory Party was so divided that it should be broken into three different parties whilst also thinking that the left was so similar that Gordon Brown and Vince Cable would be comfortable in the same party as Caroline Lucas.
It’s basically the inverse of how Benn seemed to categorise everyone in the Labour Party as either being “Socialist” or “Might as well fuck off to join the Liberals and Tories in another National Government”.
 

Oppo

Mike Pence’s hair
The Road to American Socialism

Presidents of the United States

2001-2001: George W. Bush (Republican)
2000 (with Dick Cheney) def. Al Gore (Democratic), Ralph Nader (Green)
2001-2003: Strom Thurmond (Republican)
2003-2009: Trent Lott (Republican)
2004 (with John Ashcroft) def. Hillary Clinton (Democratic), Ralph Nader (Green)
2009-2015: Tupac Shakur (Democratic)
2008 (with Samuel Bowles) def. Trent Lott (Republican), Michael Bloomberg (Independent)
2012 (with Samuel Bowles) def. Ron Paul ('Convention' Republican), Condoleezza Rice ('Majority' Republican)


Chairmen of the People’s Congress

2015-2019: Samuel Bowles (New Republic Alliance)
2015 (Alliance) def. Jon Huntsman (Capitalist Democracy), Jello Biafra (Green), Mike Gravel (Libertarian Socialist), Tom Daschle (‘Continuity’ Democratic), Cornel West (Black Coalition)
2019-0000: Shaun King (United Left)
2019 (Majority) def. Elizabeth Warren (SDP), Andrew Yang (Capitalist Democracy)

Tupac survives his infamous night on September 13, 1996, without major injuries. Shortly after, he follows in the footsteps of Dr. Dre and leaves Death Row Records to create his own label. As with Ice Cube and Will Smith, Pac remains huge in the movie business as well.

On September 11, 2001, President Bush, Vice President Cheney, and Speaker Hastert are killed during Prime Minister John Howard’s address to Congress. A centenarian and senile Strom Thurmond ascends to the Oval Office, easily swayed by an increasingly far-right cabinet. The U.S. launches military interventions against Afghanistan, Libya, Sudan, and Iraq. While their dictators are removed from power, U.S. troops remain in each country as a force against radical insurgents.

Thurmond remains in office until his death in 2003, replaced by Trent Lott. Playing to fears of terrorism, Lott narrowly wins over Clinton in the 2004 presidential election. Lott’s attempts at taking out North Korea are a tactical failure as bombs destroy Seoul. The reunified Korean government falls into financial collapse due to the difficulties of reunification. A global recession and the disastrous Anglo-Israeli-Iranian War end one of the worst presidential terms in history.

With the surge of leftism in America, Tupac decides to run for president as a way to implement his socialist philosophy. With hard-hitting attacks, he defeats the establishment favorites of Al Gore and John Edwards. In the general election, Shakur defeats Lott and Bloomberg in a landslide. A radical cabinet is established, with Mike Gravel as Secretary of State, Robert Reich as Secretary of the Treasury, Eleanor Holmes Norton as Attorney General, and George Lee Butler as Secretary of Defense.

Using Shakur's downballot coattails, legislation is passed pulling all US troops from the Middle East and Korea. Universal health care and a national dividend are passed as part of the president's campaign against income inequality. By the 2012 presidential election, Shakur wins in a landslide due to the improved economy and the divided Republican Party.

Following the election, the Democratic majority in Congress agreed to call a new Constitutional Convention (one of the major campaign promises of in 2012). Directed by Gravel and Bowles, the new Constitution abolished the presidency and transitioned the United States into a parliamentary system with elements of direct democracy.

In the past two decades, America has gone from the reactionary right to the socialist left. The new Seventh Party System is divided on how much of America's former imperialist past should be abandoned and what the USA's relationship with capitalism is.
 

Turquoise Blue

Ambiguously Tibby
Patreon supporter
Location
Kemr, FK
The Strange Death and Rebirth of Tory Britain

2016-2020: Theresa May (Conservative majority, then minority)
2017 (min.): def. Jeremy Corbyn (Labour), Nicola Sturgeon (SNP), Tim Farron (Liberal Democrat)
2020-2027: Jeremy Corbyn (Labour majority)
2020 (maj.): def. Theresa May (Conservative), Nigel Farage (Brexit), Vince Cable (Liberal Democrat), Nicola Sturgeon (SNP), Heidi Allen (Progress and Renewal)
2025 (maj.): def. Tom Tugendhat (Conservative), Julia Reid (Brexit), Chuka Umunna (Progress and Renewal), Jo Swinson (Liberal Democrat)

2027-2041: Rebecca Long-Bailey (Labour majority)
2028 (maj.): def. Julia Reid (Brexit), Chuka Umunna (Progress and Renewal), Tom Tugendhat (Conservative), Jo Swinson (Liberal Democrat)
2032 (maj.): def. Chuka Umunna (Progress and Renewal), Jacob Rees-Mogg (Brexit), Caroline Johnson (Conservative), Jo Swinson (Liberal Democrat)
2037 (maj.): def. Jacob Rees-Mogg (Brexit), Chuka Umunna (Progress and Renewal), Caroline Johnson (Conservative),
Callum Littlemore (Liberal Democrat)
2041-2044: Lily Madigan (Labour majority)
2041 (maj.): def. Gavin Shuker (Progress and Renewal), Leo Harriman (Patriotic Conservative), Callum Littlemore (Liberal Democrat)
2044-2046: Gavin Shuker (Progress and Renewal minority supported by Liberal Democrats and "Blairite" Labour)
2046-2051: Lily Madigan (Labour minority)
2046 (min.): def. Gavin Shuker (Progress and Renewal), Leo Harriman (Patriotic Conservative), Callum Littlemore (Liberal Democrat)
2051-0000: Margot Bradford (Progress and Renewal-Liberal Democrat coalition, then National Renewal majority)
2051 (coal.): def. Lily Madigan (Labour), Callum Littlemore (Liberal Democrat), Leo Harriman (Patriotic Conservative)
2055 (coal.): def. Lily Madigan (Labour), Callum Littlemore (Liberal Democrat), various (Patriotic Conservative)
2059 (maj.): def. Sam Lewis (Labour), Tony Echeverria (Liberal Democrat)


One of the most consequential responses of all was at the 2051 debate when the embattled Prime Minister Lily Madigan brought out the "Tory" label and applied it to Progress and Renewal, trying to conjure up a time of austerity and of poverty under the Tories and declared that "if you do not want a return to Tory failures, vote Labour". That would have worked in 2020. But it was 2051, and all the Progress and Renewal leader, the young and charismatic Margot Bradford, could say was a light laugh and a declaration that "if all that makes you a Tory is that you disagree with Labour, then I guess we're Tories then".

With the last rump of the old Tories fast crumbling, the voters rallied behind the new Tories, eager for a change from the Madigan years. Within the decade, the party quietly absorbed the old Tories in an mostly unnoticed event before rebranding as National Renewal, more firmly stepping themselves into the role of the new Tories.

The Labour Party in the 2020s did the impossible, kill off the Tory Party for good. But in 2051, it did another impossible, bring them back. And this time, with a gang of cheering students behind Prime Minister Bradford, the new Tories seem here to stay for quite a while as Labour falls into infighting and factional bickering. Some, including new Lib Dem leader Tony Echeverria, entertain ideas of Labour splitting like the old Tories did and letting them surpass them. What a difference thirty years make.
 
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Uhura's Mazda

Martinet of the Marshes
Published by SLP
Location
Tamaki Makaurau
Italy but more stable

1992-1995: Giuliano Amato (Quadripartito: DC, PSI, PSDI, PLI)
1992 def: Achille Occhetto (Democratic Party of the Left), Bettino Craxi (Italian Socialist Party), Sergio Garavini (Communist Refoundation Party), Gianfranco Fini (Italian Social Movement), Giorgio La Malfa (Italian Republican Party), Antonio Cariglia (Italian Democratic Socialist Party), Renato Altissimo (Italian Liberal Party), Francesco Rutelli (Federation of the Greens), Marco Pannella (Pannella List), Leoluca Orlando (The Network)
1995: Giulio Andreotti (Quadripartito: DC, PSI, PSDI, PLI)
1995-1996: Pier Ferdinando Casini (Pentapartito: DC, PSI, PSDI, PLI, PRI)
1996-1997: Sergio Matarella (Pentapartito: DC, PSI, PSDI, PLI, PRI)

1996 def: Achille Occhetto (Democratic Party of the Left), Bettino Craxi (Italian Socialist Party), Giorgio La Malfa (Italian Republican Party), Pino Rauti (Italian Social Movement), Fausto Bertinotti (Communist Refoundation Party), Francesco Rutelli (Federation of the Greens), Carlo Vizzini (Italian Democratic Socialist Party), Leoluca Orlando (The Network), Alfredo Biondi (Italian Liberal Party), Marco Pannella (Pannella List)
1997-1998: Silvio Berlusconi (Quadripartito: DC, PSI, PSDI, PLI)
1998-2000: Mariotto Segni (Pentapartito: DC, PSI, PSDI, PLI, PRI)

1999 def: Giorgio Napolitano (Democratic Party of the Left), Nicola Capria (Italian Socialist Party), Alessandra Mussolini (Italian Social Movement), Edo Ronchi (Federation of the Greens), Fausto Bertinotti (Communist Refoundation Party), Valerio Zanone (Italian Liberal Party), Enrico Ferri (Italian Democratic Socialist Party), Giorgio La Malfa (Italian Republican Party), Leoluca Orlando (The Network), Emma Bonino (Bonino List)
2000-2002: Romano Prodi (Pentapartito: DC, PSI, PSDI, PLI, PRI)
2002-2003: Silvio Berlusconi (Quadripartito: DC, PSI, PSDI, PLI)
2003-2006: Roberto Formigoni (Quadripartito: DC, PSI, PSDI, PLI)

2004 def: Giorgio Napolitano (Democratic Party of the Left), Bobo Craxi (Italian Socialist Party), Alessandra Mussolini (Italian Social Movement), Luciana Sbarbati (Italian Republican Party), Edo Ronchi (Federation of the Greens), Oliviero Diliberto (Communist Refoundation Party), Enrico Ferri (Italian Democratic Socialist Party), Antonio Di Pietro (The Network), Emma Bonino (Bonino List), Enrico Costa (Italian Liberal Party)
2006-2008: Giuseppe Cossiga (Centrism: DC, PSDI, PLI, PRI)
2008-2009: Walter Veltroni (Left: PDS, PSI, PRI, Bonino, FdV)

2008 def: Claudio Scajola (Christian Democracy), Bobo Craxi (Italian Socialist Party), Roberto Fiore (Italian Social Movement), Emma Bonino (Bonino List), Angelo Bonelli (Federation of the Greens), Enrico Ferri (Italian Democratic Socialist Party), Oliviero Diliberto (Communist Refoundation Party), Luciana Sbarbati (Italian Republican Party), Antonio Di Pietro (The Network), Enrico Costa (Italian Liberal Party)
2009-2011: Massimo D’Alema (Left: PDS, PSI, PRI, Bonino, FdV)
2009 def: Dario Franceschini (Christian Democracy), Gianfranco Fini (Italian Social Movement), Oliviero Diliberto (Communist Refoundation Party), Franco Frattini (Italian Socialist Party), Emma Bonino (Bonino List), Enrico Ferri (Italian Democratic Socialist Party), Angelo Bonelli (Federation of the Greens), Luciana Sbarbati (Italian Republican Party), Enrico Costa (Italian Liberal Party)
2011-2013: Guido Crosetto (Organic Centre-Left: DC, PSI, PSDI, PRI)
2011 def: Anna Finocchiaro (Democratic Party of the Left), Franco Frattini (Italian Socialist Party), Alessandra Mussolini (Italian Social Movement), Franco Bruno (Italian Democratic Socialist Party), Luciana Sbarbati (Italian Republican Party), Paolo Ferrero (Communist Refoundation Party), Angelo Bonelli (Federation of the Greens), Enrico Costa (Italian Liberal Party), Emma Bonino (Bonino List)
2013-2014: Silvio Berlusconi (Organic Centre-Left: DC, PSI, PSDI, PRI)
2014-2016: Matteo Renzi (Pentapartito: DC, PSI, PSDI, PLI, PRI)

2015 def: Gianni Cuperlo (Democratic Party of the Left), Beppe Grillo (Federation of the Greens), Matteo Salvini (Italian Social Movement), Franco Bruno (Italian Democratic Socialist Party), Silvio Berlusconi (Italian Socialist Party), Enrico Costa (Italian Liberal Party), Eleonora Forenza (Communist Refoundation Party), Enzo Bianco (Italian Republican Party), Marco Cappato (Cappato List)
2016-2018: Giovanni Toti (Pentapartito Nuovo: DC, FdV, PSDI, Cappato, PRI)
2018-: Roberto Maroni (Right: DC, MSI, PSDI, PLI)
 

Ciclavex

Baron Ciclavex of Wales-on-Schuylkill
Moderator
Patreon supporter
Location
New Sweden
Gender Neutral Britain:

or, what if equal primogeniture were introduced in 1701?

(Yes, I know marriages, births, deaths and so on would have gone differently, just go with it)

Monarchs of Great Britain/the United Kingdom (1707-)
1707-1714: Anne (House of Stuart)
1714-1727: George I (House of Hanover)

1727-1760: George II (House of Hanover)
1760-1813: Augusta (House of Hanover)
1813-1864: William IV (House of Wuerttemberg)

1864-1887: Mary III (House of Wuerttemberg)
1887-1898: Catherine (House of Wuerttemberg)
1898-1921: William V (House of Wuerttemberg)

1921-1965: Pauline (House of Wuerttemberg)
1965-2000: Frederick (House of Wied-Neuwied)
2000-
0000: Alexander IV (House of Wied-Neuwied)