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Lists of Heads of Government and Heads of State

Mumby

Always mysterious!
Published by SLP
Location
Municipal Commune of Bourne
Pronouns
He/Him
The Wobbly War

1913-1913: Theodore Roosevelt (Progressive)
1912 (with Hiram Johnson) def. Woodrow Wilson (Democratic), William Howard Taft (Republican), Eugene Debs (Socialist)
1913-1914: Theodore Roosevelt (Progressive / Republican)
1914-1914: Hiram Johnson (Progressive)
1914-1914: John J. Pershing (Nonpartisan / Military Junta)
1914-1915: de jure vacant, de facto collective government by the Organizing Committee of the General Strike
1915-1917: Hiram Johnson (Progressive / Socialist)
1917-1921: Eugene Debs (Socialist)
1916 (with Bill Haywood) def. Hiram Johnson (Progressive), various regional 'Constitutionalist' tickets
1921-1929: Bill Haywood (Socialist)
1920 (with Lucy Parsons) def. Robert M. La Follette Sr. (Progressive), Emma Goldman (Independent), various regionalist tickets
1924 (with Lucy Parsons) def. Robert M. La Follette Sr. (Progressive), Earl Browder (Jeffersonian Socialist), various regionalist and abstentionist tickets


The US becomes the only country where a general strike to prevent entry into WW1 actually works - this incidentally also gives the French and British the opportunity to clear out their gold reserves - collapsing the value of the dollar. This might have helped the Entente extract goods and war materiel from American industry - if the IWW wasn't in charge and in the process of abolishing wage slavery. This was in fact made easier by the collapse in the value of the dollar and soaring inflation.

Amendments were added to the existing Constitution to enshrine socialism in the United States - and indirectly ban counter-revolutionary parties. The political right ends up channelling itself into tolerated regionalist movements, while the national stage tends to be dominated by the Socialists and other revolutionary (or semi revolutionary parties). The Anarchists put up a fairly substantial abstentionist ticket, while the Jeffersonians have become a thorn in the IWW's side with their calls for a more substantial watering of the nation's roots with blood.
 

Nyvis

Token Marxist
Location
Paris
Pronouns
She/Her
The Wobbly War

1913-1913: Theodore Roosevelt (Progressive)
1912 (with Hiram Johnson) def. Woodrow Wilson (Democratic), William Howard Taft (Republican), Eugene Debs (Socialist)
1913-1914: Theodore Roosevelt (Progressive / Republican)
1914-1914: Hiram Johnson (Progressive)
1914-1914: John J. Pershing (Nonpartisan / Military Junta)
1914-1915: de jure vacant, de facto collective government by the Organizing Committee of the General Strike
1915-1917: Hiram Johnson (Progressive / Socialist)
1917-1921: Eugene Debs (Socialist)
1916 (with Bill Haywood) def. Hiram Johnson (Progressive), various regional 'Constitutionalist' tickets
1921-1929: Bill Haywood (Socialist)
1920 (with Lucy Parsons) def. Robert M. La Follette Sr. (Progressive), Emma Goldman (Independent), various regionalist tickets
1924 (with Lucy Parsons) def. Robert M. La Follette Sr. (Progressive), Earl Browder (Jeffersonian Socialist), various regionalist and abstentionist tickets


The US becomes the only country where a general strike to prevent entry into WW1 actually works - this incidentally also gives the French and British the opportunity to clear out their gold reserves - collapsing the value of the dollar. This might have helped the Entente extract goods and war materiel from American industry - if the IWW wasn't in charge and in the process of abolishing wage slavery. This was in fact made easier by the collapse in the value of the dollar and soaring inflation.

Amendments were added to the existing Constitution to enshrine socialism in the United States - and indirectly ban counter-revolutionary parties. The political right ends up channelling itself into tolerated regionalist movements, while the national stage tends to be dominated by the Socialists and other revolutionary (or semi revolutionary parties). The Anarchists put up a fairly substantial abstentionist ticket, while the Jeffersonians have become a thorn in the IWW's side with their calls for a more substantial watering of the nation's roots with blood.
Does Roosevelt try to pull the US into WW1 from its start here? I can see that not flying with the population considering they're really not threatened whatsoever and have no stake in the game but on the other hand in 14 no one has any idea about how murderous this war would be.
 

Mumby

Always mysterious!
Published by SLP
Location
Municipal Commune of Bourne
Pronouns
He/Him
Does Roosevelt try to pull the US into WW1 from its start here? I can see that not flying with the population considering they're really not threatened whatsoever and have no stake in the game but on the other hand in 14 no one has any idea about how murderous this war would be.
Yeah pretty much.

I imagined that Roosevelt is initially brought down by a mixture of industrial action - but in reality it's mostly pressure from within his own party. But that spooks a certain segment of American society and a military coup happens, which puts a shot in the arm of existing industrial action.
 

Luke_Starkiller

Well-known member
'Solidarity USA', or how Lyndon LaRouche killed the Democratic Party

EDIT: I'd like to apologize to the Red-Green colorblind community

40) 1981-1989: Fmr. Gov. Ronald Reagan / Fmr. UN Ambassador George Bush (Republican)
def. 1980: Pres. Jimmy Carter / Vice Pres. Walter Mondale (Democratic), Rep. John B. Anderson / Fmr. Gov. Patrick Lucey (Independent)
def. 1984: Fmr. Vice Pres. Walter Mondale / Rep. Geraldine Ferraro (Democratic)

41) 1989-1997: Vice Pres. George Bush / Sen. Dan Quayle (Republican)
def. 1988: Gov. Michael Dukakis / Sen. Lloyd Bentsen (Democratic)
def. 1992: Fmr. Gov. Jerry Brown / Mayor Sheila Jones (Democratic), Businessman Ross Perot / Sen. David Boren (Independent)

42) 1997-2001: Vice Pres. Dan Quayle / Rep. Bill Paxon (Republican)
def. 1996: Gov. Adlai Stevenson III / Sen. Bill Bradley (Solidarity), Businessman Ross Perot / Rep. Bernadine Healy (Reform), Fmr. Mayor Sheila Jones / Sen. Ernest Hollings ("Free" Democratic)
43) 2001-2009: Rep. Dick Gephardt / Sen. Jay Rockefeller (Solidarity)
def. 2000: Pres. Dan Quayle / Vice Pres. Bill Paxon (Republican), Businessman Donald Trump / Fmr. Gov. Dick Lamm (Reform), State Party Chair Janice Hart / State Sen. Mel Logan (Democratic)
def. 2004: Sen. John McCain / Sen. John Ensign (Republican), City Councilman Pete Navarro / State Rep. Lawrence Freeman (Reform-Democratic)

44) 2009-2013: Sen. David Beasley / Rep. Tom Cole (Republican)
def. 2008: Gov. Paul Wellstone / Gov. Brian Schweitzer (Solidarity), Mayor Michael Bloomberg / Fmr. Sen. Sam Nunn (Independent)
45) 2013-2017: Sen. Robert Reich / Sen. Amy Klobuchar (Solidarity)
def. 2012: Pres. David Beasley / Vice Pres. Tom Cole (Republican)
46) 2017-2021: Gov. Pete Coors / Sen. Mike Huckabee (Republican)
def. 2016: Pres. Robert Reich / Vice Pres. Amy Klobuchar (Solidarity); Fmr. Mayor Michael Bloomberg / Rep. Gary Locke (Americans Elect)
47) 2021-0000: Gov. Sherrod Brown / Sen. Jenny Durkan (Solidarity)
def. 2020: Vice Pres. Mike Huckabee / Sen. J.C. Watts (Republican), Governor Mike Dell / Rep. David Jolly (Americans Elect), Commentator Alex Jones / State Rep. Kshama Sawant (Democracy Reborn)


The year is 1986. In a shocking turn of events, LaRouche-backed candidates for Lt. Governor and Secretary of State for Illinois wrest the Democratic Party nomination from more established candidates. Disgusted by his new bedfellows, Adlai Stevenson, the Democratic nominee for governor, jumps ship and creates an alternative in the form of the "Solidarity Party", a left-liberal ticket with decidedly anti-LaRouche sympathies. Predictably, this split ticket wouldn't win in November. However, this wouldn't be the last attempted power grab by the LaRoucheites.

The Democrats would continue to struggle through their wilderness period. The 1988 election would see Governor Dukakis of Massachusetts fail to beat Vice President Bush. The defeat of this more technocratic form of liberalism left a yearning in the party faithful for a candidate and an ideology that would lead them to greatness once again.

In Chicago, one year later, another battle between LaRoucheites and traditional liberals played out. After the death of Mayor Harold Washington, a special election was called to fill his office. Heir-apparent Richard Daley's shot at the job disintegrated after a drunken hit-and-run failed to be hidden from the public eye. Councilman Ed Vrydolak would attempt to take the Democratic nomination for himself, but the LaRoucheite infestation was just too strong- accomplished musician and community organizer Sheila Jones would miraculously sew up the city's black vote on a populist but vaguely conspiratorial platform. Of course, when you're running against one of the most entrenched councilmen in the city (one with a nickname like "Fast Eddie", no less) in your primary, a conspiratorial but anti-establishment battle cry doesn't hurt. Vrydolak would do as he did in 1987 and jump to the Solidarity Party, which was by now a vessel for establishment Democrats pushed out of the party by lunatics. Despite tight polling, Jones (and the insidious movement behind her) would narrowly win the mayoralty of America's Second City.

Going into 1992, the void for ideological leadership in the Democratic Party was seeking to be filled. Bill Clinton, champion of the DLC wing, looked to be the frontrunner until some.... unsavory revelations about his character made their way to the surface. Jerry Brown somehow picked up the torch with his ideological incoherency and narrowly beat away Paul Tsongas and Bob Kerrey. After being talked out of picking Jesse Jackson as his running mate, he turned to a similar candidate: Sheila Jones. While it polling showed that Brown could best Bush, at least for a while, Ross Perot hopped back into the race after hearing the various insane things that dripped out of Mayor Jones' mouth. As a result of these two ideologically-similar candidates being in the race against the conservative Bush, they stole votes from each other, allowing the incumbent president to walk to victory yet again.

However, the most important thing after the election wasn't that the Democrats had a fourth straight loss. Instead, it was that the LaRoucheites had hooked their teeth into a still-desperate Democratic Party via Sheila Jones, and with the party more demoralized than ever, they planned to strike.

It started with fielding congressional candidates who ran against entrenched incumbents. The strategy of running populists against an ineffective party structure and an unbeaten Republican opposition worked well, allowing them to snag key races when they weren't throwing them to the Republicans on accident. Establishment Democrats began following the lead of Adlai Stevenson, who took back the governor's office on his Solidarity Party ticket. With a solid chunk of their caucus replaced by conspiracy theorists, many of the remaining Democrats hopped over to the Solidarity Party in hopes that shedding the Big D from their names would give them the chance to reinvent themselves.

To some extent, they were right. As the new party was led out of the Midwest, the brand of left-liberalism was decidedly more laborist and social-democratic than the fiscally conservative faction that had cropped up in recent years. However, this operation would take a couple years to get underway. A split liberal opposition meant a stronger conservative plurality, and the Republicans were able to team up with some of the more conservative LaRoucheites to push moralistic bills through Congress. The Simpsons in its original form would be the first of many casualties, though libertarians and moderates in the party were able to form a firewall preventing DOMA from passing.

The consequences of the left-wing split would rear their head in 1996, when Vice President Quayle would narrowly become president. However, while the next four years would be dark for any non-theocrats or non-tycoons, the Solidarity Party found footing in a respectable second-place finish, as Ross Perot's centrist haven took third and Sheila Jones showed enough of her true colors to plummet down to fourth. The addition of longtime Democratic senator Ernest Hollings to her ticket was planned to be a sop to the establishment, and while some southerners who were still sketched out by the Republicans bought into it, most saw the doddering coot for what he was.

The Solidarites (Solidaritans? Solidaricrats?) would have their first big victory in 1998, when backlash towards the Quayle administration allowed some center-left recruits (though not the Third Way type) to snatch seats back from Republicans and "Democrats" alike. After twenty years of Republican governance, every good job being shipped overseas, and all good late-night television being watered down, the American people were finally ready to take a chance on the Solidaritans (note to self: figure out demonym ASAP) on the presidential level. Rep. Gephardt represented the laborist, pro-working and middle class agenda of the new party better than anyone else, and his Vice President, while equally liberal, had a last name that made a decent amount of moderate business-types comfortable.

The Gephardt administration would quickly undo NAFTA and replace it with a system of bilateral, worker-friendly trade deals and would undo the mistake of letting China into the WTO. These successes were hampered by an unorganized Congress, but hey, it wasn't four more years of Quayle! Ross Perot's Reform Party, despite having a substantial amount of seats in Congress, quickly found itself becoming a vanity project for yet another brash multi-millionaire, which would ultimately spell its doom.

In 2004, John McCain would attempt to reimagine the Republican party according to his maverick ideals, but he was dragged down by his running mate's "extracurricular activities". Meanwhile, Los Angeles City Councilman Peter Navarro would wed the crank wing of the Reform Party to the Democrats as a last-ditch bid to save America's main isolationist party as the Reform Party's members gradually flocked back to the moderate branches of both large parties.

From thereon, things have more or less levelled out as the laborist Solidarites and neocon-theocrat Republicans trade blows while Michael Bloomberg's Americans Elect Party represents the "fiscally conservative, socially liberal" Finance Bros of the country. Granted, there are hiccups. The Solidarity Party frequently struggles to maintain a balance between the kitchen-table-issues focused (read: play down divisive social issues), midwestern populist wing and the grassroots but swing-voter-alienating coastal activist wing, while the Republicans are engulfed in a civil war between more socially-moderate business-types and the hardline Christian right wing. This recently came to a head when President Coors stood down from re-election after spending all his political capital within his party refusing to veto the Freedom To Marry Act in 2017. This has led to more moderate Republicans looking in the direction of Americans Elect than ever, though hardline conservatives blame them for President Brown's rise to power.

Meanwhile, Lyndon LaRouche's legacy has been taken up by crackpot podcaster Alex Jones, though whether or not he can stage a hostile takeover of one of the major parties like his predecessor remains to be seen...

Solidarity Party: center-left to left-wing, left-populism, social liberalism, laborism, social democracy (factions), protectionism, global liberalism (factions)
Republican Party: right-wing, social conservatism, neoconservatism, fiscal conservatism, christian right, libertarianism (factions), civil libertarianism (factions),
Americans Elect Party: centrism, fiscal conservatism, technocracy, social moderatism, social liberalism (factions)
Democracy Reborn Movement: larouchism, national socialism, ultranationalism, economic democracy (factions)
 
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Blackentheborg

Huey Long enjoyer
Location
the Blitz House
Pronouns
He/Him
What if those behind the Business Plot ignored Butler and went right to another General...

Presidents of the United States of America
1933-1934: Franklin D. Roosevelt (Democratic)

(with John Nance Garner) defeated Herbert Hoover/Charles Curtis
1934-1937: Franklin D. Roosevelt (de jure)
1937-1940: Charles Lindenberg(American Liberty League)

(with Alf Landon) defeated Franklin D. Roosevelt/Henry Wallace, William Borah/Frederick Steiwer, William Lemke/various (unrecognized faithless electors)
1940-1941: Alf Landon
1941-1945: Smedley Butler (National Restoration, then Independent)

(with James Van Zandt) defeated Gerald L.K. Smith/Albert Jay Nock
1945-???: Will Rogers (Independent)

Jungle primary: (with Milo Reno) defeated Everett Dirksen, Wilbert "Pappy" O'Daniel, Joseph Rauh Jr., Upton Sinclair, Harry S. Truman

Secretaries of General Affairs
1934-1935: George Van Horn Moseley
1935-1938: Hugh Samuel Johnson
1938-1941: Jakob Raskob
1941-1942: Rexford Tugwell
1942: [office abolished]
 
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TheNixonator

Politically Illiterate
Political Career of Henry George:
1887-1891: Mayor (Labor) of New York City
1886 def. Abram Hewitt (Democratic) and Theodore Roosevelt (Republican)
1891-1892: Private citizen
1892-1897: Governor (Democratic) of New York
1891 def. Jacob Sloat Fassett (Republican)
1897-1901: President (Democratic) of the United States
1896 (with William J. Bryan) def. William McKinley (Republican)
1901-1905: President (Commonwealth) of the United States
1900 (with William J. Bryan) def. Cushman K. Davis (Republican) and J. Hamilton Lewis (Democratic)
 

rosa

Well-known member
Political Career of Henry George:
1887-1891: Mayor (Labor) of New York City
1886 def. Abram Hewitt (Democratic) and Theodore Roosevelt (Republican)
1891-1892: Private citizen
1892-1897: Governor (Democratic) of New York
1891 def. Jacob Sloat Fassett (Republican)
1897-1901: President (Democratic) of the United States
1896 (with William J. Bryan) def. William McKinley (Republican)
1901-1905: President (Commonwealth) of the United States
1900 (with William J. Bryan) def. Cushman K. Davis (Republican) and J. Hamilton Lewis (Democratic)
I dig it. Reminds me of one I did a while back
 

Luke_Starkiller

Well-known member
Political Career of Henry George:
1887-1891: Mayor (Labor) of New York City
1886 def. Abram Hewitt (Democratic) and Theodore Roosevelt (Republican)
1891-1892: Private citizen
1892-1897: Governor (Democratic) of New York
1891 def. Jacob Sloat Fassett (Republican)
1897-1901: President (Democratic) of the United States
1896 (with William J. Bryan) def. William McKinley (Republican)
1901-1905: President (Commonwealth) of the United States
1900 (with William J. Bryan) def. Cushman K. Davis (Republican) and J. Hamilton Lewis (Democratic)
Does Newton D. Baker and/or Paul Douglas end up as Commonwealth candidates for president?
 

TheNixonator

Politically Illiterate
1861-1862: Jefferson Davis (Nonpartisan) [Provisional]
1862-1868: Jefferson Davis (Nonpartisan)
1861 (with Alexander Stephens) def. scattered opposition
1868-1874: Alexander Stephens (Southern Rights)
1867 (with Thomas Bragg) def. Robert Toombs (Whig)
1874-1880: Thomas Bragg (Southern Rights)
1873 (with Isham G. Harris) def. Joseph E. Brown (Whig)
1880-1886: Lucius Lamar (Southern Rights)
1879 (with John H. Reagan) def. Robert M. Patton (Whig)
1886-1892: James Longstreet (Whig)
1885 (with Zebulon Vance) def. Judah P. Benjamin (Southern Rights)
1892-1898: Wade Hampton III (Southern Rights)
1891 (with Pendleton Murrah) def. Thomas H. Watts (Whig)
1898-1904: John Y. Brown (Southern Rights)
1897 (with Joseph Wheeler) def. John Brown Gordon (Whig)
1904-1910: Henry W. Grady (Whig)
1903 (with Jim Hogg) def. Stephen Mallory II (Southern Rights)
1910-1916: Thomas S. Martin (Conservative)
1909 (with John Sewell) def. Jeff Davis (Agrarian Labor)
1916-1922: Jefferson B. Snyder (Conservative)
1915 (with Lee Cruce) def. Benjamin Tillman (Agrarian Labor)
1921-1921: Charles Culberson¹ (Conservative) [As President-Elect]
1921 (with Locke Craig) def. James K. Vardaman (Agrarian Labor)

1921-1923: Confederate Civil War
Redneck militias def. National Government
1923-1924: James K. Vardaman² (Agrarian Labor)
Replaced Culbertson - 1923 Constitutional Convention held

¹ Overthrown by Rednecks.
² Presidency abolished.
List of Chiefs of the Confederacy:
1924-1930: James K. Vardaman¹ (Nonpartisan)
(De-facto Agrarian Labor)

1930-1939: William Joseph Simmons² (Nonpartisan)
(De-facto Agrarian Labor)

1939-1956: William H. Murray¹ (Nonpartisan)
(De-facto Agrarian Labor)

1956-1959: Gerald L. K. Smith³ (Nonpartisan)
(De-facto Agrarian Labor)

1959-1972: James K. Vardaman Jr.¹ (Nonpartisan)
(De-facto Agrarian Labor)

1972-1987: James Earl Carter² (Nonpartisan)
(De-facto People’s)

1987-1999: Mike Gillich Jr. (Nonpartisan)
(De-facto Agrarian Labor)

1999: Collapse of Confederacy

¹ Died of natural causes.
² Forced out of office.
³ Declared mentally unfit to serve as Chief.
⁴ Assassinated.
 
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Time Enough

"Enthusiastic Cis Male Partner"
Pronouns
He/Him
35392B69-DF5F-46E6-AB1D-562F8E3ADB0A.jpeg
1964-1969: Harold Wilson (Labour)
1964 (Majority) def: Alec-Douglas Home (Conservative), Jo Grimond (Liberal)
1969-1975: Peter Thorneycroft (Conservative)
1969 (Majority) def: Harold Wilson (Labour), Emlyn Hooson (Liberal)
1973 (Majority) def: Anthony Crosland (Labour), Emlyn Hooson (Liberal)

1975-1976: Maurice Macmillan (Conservative)
1976-1983: Airey Neave (Conservative)

1977 (Majority) def: Anthony Crosland (Labour), Emlyn Hooson (Liberal)
1981 (Majority) def: Jack Dormand (Labour), David Penhaligon (Liberal), Jim Sillars (SLP), Dick Marquand (New Democratic)

1983-1985: Jack Dormand (Labour)
1983 (Liberal Confidence & Supply) def: Airey Neave (Conservative), David Penhaligon (Liberal), Jim Sillars (SNLA)
1985-1990: Peter Walker (Conservative)
1985 (Majority) def: Jack Dormand (Labour), David Penhaligon (Liberal), Jim Sillars (SNLA)
1990-: Ken Coates (Labour)
1990 (Majority) def: Peter Walker (Conservative), Malcolm Bruce (Liberal), Maria Fyfe (SNLA)
1994 (Majority) def: Edwina Currie (Conservative), Malcolm Bruce (Liberal), Maria Fyfe-Alex Salmond (SNLA)


“Switching on the telly you will see a slew of Cool Britannia programs right now. From reruns of Shane Meadows This Is England 90’ to Rave! to new Phoebe Waller-Bridge show World In My Eyes a slew of bright, neon coloured, amphetamine fuelled and slightly gaudy shows about life in Britain at the turn of 1990 is all the rage it seems.

But the constant theme in all these shows is the appearance of Ken Coates in the background, especially in This Is England where veteran actor David Haig plays a brief part as the former PM on the campaign trail in the run up to the election. It could be said that nothing defined the year 1990 than the idea of the hope that Coates presented.

Whilst it’s easy to explain his appearances away as just nostalgia, it would also be mentioned that Coates captured the zeitgeist of 1990 more than Peter Walker did. Whilst Walker was shaking hands with King Charles III and standing awkwardly around with Conservative candidates in Leeds, Coates was laughing it up with Alfred Molina and Ian MacKellan or speaking to a packed stadiums on the road of Red Wedge. Ken, a man turning 60 spoke to the Youth Culture and the Homeowners in there 30s and 40s with equal enthusiasm.

It wasn’t surprising when Ken became the symbol of the young rave culture. A combination of anti-conformism and hedonism dominated the culture but as Ken went on the war path the culture changed from the celebration of individualism to more collective aspirations, which whilst eventually leading to the embarrassing 93’ Rave for Peace group did also lead to the eventual victory of Norman Cook for Labour Deputy Leadership in 2020 with the support of another prominent ‘Acid Trot’ called Gear Stomper.

Ken embodied a change in the mood of Britain from dower grimness to something more colourful, something which Television is keen to play up...”

-An Excerpt from Coates Culture; Ken Coates, Cool Britannia and it’s lasting impact, Robert Barry, 2021, Tribune
 

Time Enough

"Enthusiastic Cis Male Partner"
Pronouns
He/Him
The idea of Ken Coates being the not shite Corbyn of the Acid House Generation works too well I realise and is a stupidly fun idea.

Also I like the idea of David Haig as Ken Coates more and more.
 

Venocara

[Space for something nice and patriotic]
Pronouns
He/him
List of Chiefs of the Confederacy:
1924-1930: James K. Vardaman¹ (Nonpartisan)
(De-facto Agrarian Labor)

1930-1939: William Joseph Simmons² (Nonpartisan)
(De-facto Agrarian Labor)

1939-1956: William H. Murray¹ (Nonpartisan)
(De-facto Agrarian Labor)

1956-1959: Gerald L. K. Smith³ (Nonpartisan)
(De-facto Agrarian Labor)

1959-1972: James K. Vardaman Jr.¹ (Nonpartisan)
(De-facto Agrarian Labor)

1972-1987: James Earl Carter² (Nonpartisan)
(De-facto People’s)

1987-1999: Mike Gillich Jr. (Nonpartisan)
(De-facto Agrarian Labor)

1999: Collapse of Confederacy

¹ Died of natural causes.
² Forced out of office.
³ Declared mentally unfit to serve as Chief.
⁴ Assassinated.
You’ve got some really good lists, but I think especially for those of us not well-versed in American history a description/summary in addition to the list would be great.
 

Time Enough

"Enthusiastic Cis Male Partner"
Pronouns
He/Him
This list is wonderful! We need more associated cultural/political movements in AH. Coates is of course a very underrated guy with a unique left Labour brand.
Amusingly this was partial inspired by some of the posts in the Ted Kennedy TL which discuss culture etc.

As for Coates, the more I read up and find on him the more fascinating he is. There is a sense he took a lot of the lessons of 60s and the struggles for Workers Control rather well. Also it’s interesting that the thing that broke the camels back was not just Blair’s New Labour but specifically Welfare Reform. Also thankfully unlike his fellow comrade Hugh Kerr he didn’t eventually decide to join Alba (because he was dead yes, but still).
 

Oppo

Aldo Moppo
Pronouns
he/him
Inspired by a conversation with @cikka

The Black Friars


JANUARY 1976: Former Oklahoma Senator Fred Harris wins the Iowa caucus. While receiving fewer votes than for uncommitted delegates, Harris has outpolled Mo Udall and Birch Bayh in his quest for the Democratic nomination. Harris' victory can be attributed to his substantial ground game in the state, which involved him travelling in an RV and asking to stay at supporters' homes. Harris' staunchly progressive platform includes support for employee ownership and the abolishment of the CIA.

Fred Harris, the Oklahoma Senator who has been conducting a grass-roots campaign for the Democratic Presidential nomination, touring small towns, campuses, and big cities in an ordinary camper, has been characterized by some observers as a "folksy Ted Kennedy," by others as an "intellectual George Wallace."

JUNE 1976: In a shock upset, the Communist Party of Enrico Berlinguer wins the Italian general election. While Berlinguer's PCI has distanced themselves from Moscow, his victory has scared NATO and the Vatican. While Berlinguer's chances of forming a government were slim, an attempted Anglo-American coup inspired DC statesman Aldo Moro to support a Communist government in the interest of national stability.

Foreign Office planners wrote in May 1976 that "a clean surgical coup" to remove the Communists from power "would be attractive in many ways", according to documents obtained from the British national archives and published yesterday by the Italian newspaper La Repubblica.

AUGUST 1976: The Republican convention nominates a ticket of Ronald Reagan and Jim Rhodes. With neither Reagan or Ford securing a majority before the convention, both candidates played for uncommitted delegates. In the end, the "fall of Italy" to communism was enough to convince Republicans that four more years of Ford could not be trusted.

NOVEMBER 1976: The ticket of Fred Harris and John Glenn wins the general election, ending eight years of Republican rule over the White House.

FEBRUARY 1977: The Harris administration expresses its desire to remove US troops from South Korea. While the plan would save $3 billion and not alter the military balance in the Korean peninsula, it was strongly opposed by the military establishment.

FEBRUARY 1978: A bill to abolish the CIA pushed by the Harris administration fails to make it past a Senate filibuster. Harris' investment of a large amount of political capital on the issue puzzled political observers and certainly ruffled feathers with the intelligence community.

MARCH 1978: Italian Prime Minister Enrico Berlinguer is kidnapped by the far-left Red Brigades ahead of a vote of no confidence in his government. While the Red Bridges had ramped up their attacks on the Eurocommunist PCI, many suspected that certain forces in Italy wished to push Berlinguer aside. Sure enough, an all-party government of national unity was formed, with Ugo La Malfa (a centrist known as The Needle) taking the helm. While the Red Brigades initially intended to release him, Berlinguer was found dead outside of PCI headquarters.

INTERVIEWER. What about Euro-Communism? Do you accept the claims by some of the Communist parties that they believe in democracy and are not controlled by the Soviet Union?
THATCHER: All Communism worries me. Fundamentally, it's not very different wherever it occurs, because it is a creed which allows only one political view.

NOVEMBER 1978: The Labour Party of Prime Minister Jim Callaghan wins reelection against the Conservatives of Margaret Thatcher. While initial polls projected a hung parliament, a strong Labour campaign gave the party a continued majority.

MARCH 1979: Leader of the Opposition Margaret Thatcher is killed by the Irish National Liberation Army in a car bomb attack. Airey Neave is subsequently named as her successor over the more moderate Francis Pym.

Italian Prime Minister Ugo La Malfa dies of a cerebral haemorrhage. His all-party government is replaced by Foreign Minister Aldo Moro, who heads a Christian Democracy government with Communist support.

MAY 1979: President Fred Harris is assassinated by a drifter named Raymond Lee Harvey, who implicated himself in a conspiracy with three Latino men. John Glenn takes the oath of office, becoming the 40th president.

JULY 1979: President Glenn abandons his predecessor's plan to withdraw troops from Korea, citing an increasing change in the military situation in favour of the North.

AUGUST 1980: The Italian general election signifies a clear return to Christian Democracy rule, with Gulio Andreotti leading a centre-right government. Support for the Communist Party significantly decreased after the Bologna massacre, with the Moro government being seen as incapable of putting an end to the Years of Lead.

"It was a political massacre, or more accurately a State massacre," said the Assize Court judges in their written explanation.

NOVEMBER 1980: The young, Italian-American and charismatic Senator Buddy Cianci of Rhode Island defeats President Glenn. Cianci's success comes from an ability to capitalize on an economic downturn and his ability to brand himself as a new, modern Republican.

MARCH 1981: President Cianci is shot and killed by a man named John Hinckley, a stalker of actress Jodi Foster. Alexander Haig is sworn in as the 42nd president.
Ledeen's right-wing Italian connections—including alleged ties to the P2 masonic lodge that rocked Italy in the early 1980s—have long been a source of speculation and intrigue, but he returned to Washington in 1981 as 'anti-terrorism' advisor to the new secretary of state, Al Haig

JUNE 1981: A referendum approves major changes to the Italian constitution. Pushed by the majority of Christian Democracy, the Democratic Revival Plan called for a strengthening of the Prime Minister, consolidation of the media, judicial reform, and the abolition of provinces.

SEPTEMBER 1981: The fears of the British political establishment come true as Tony Benn defeats Denis Healey for the leadership of the Labour Party. Immediately, a number of Labour MPs formed the Democratic Party, resulting in a loss of confidence for the Benn ministry.

Airey Neave, MP - one of Mrs Thatcher's closest allies - discussed with former security-service agents plans for an undercover 'army of resistance' in case of a Labour victory...Tracey was asked to consider whether he would join a team, consisting of various intelligence and security specialists, which would 'make sure Benn was stopped'

DECEMBER 1981: Despite the defections of key figures to the Democratic and Liberal parties, the Labour Party wins the most seats in the 1981 election. While Tony Benn is expected to continue his service as Prime Minister, he is severely wounded in an assassination attempt. While Benn is recovering from his wounds, Airey Neave's Conservatives agree to an agreement with the Democratic and Liberal parties to keep their socialist adversary out of power. Benn is eventually forced to resign as leader of the Labour Party, with Peter Shore taking his place.

Benn, however, discounted the validity of the story, writing in his diary: "No one will believe for a moment that Airey Neave would have done such a thing."

APRIL 1982: The Argentinean military junta invades the Falkland Islands. While the government of Airey Neave is pleased with this well-timed moment to rally around the flag, he is rather displeased with President Haig's desire to side with Argentina. Only a select few would know just how close Haig's ties to the Argentinean junta were...

1974 - 1977: Gerald Ford / Nelson Rockefeller (Republican)
1977 - 1979: Fred Harris / John Glenn (Democratic)
1976 def. Ronald Reagan / Jim Rhodes (Republican)
1979 - 1979: John Glenn / Vacant (Democratic)
1979 - 1981: John Glenn / L. Richardson Preyer (Democratic)
1981 - 1981: Buddy Cianci / Alexander Haig (Republican)
1980 def. John Glenn / L. Richardson Preyer (Democratic)
1981 - 1981: Alexander Haig / Vacant (Republican)
1981 - 0000: Alexander Haig / Guy Vander Jagt (Republican)
1984 def. Mo Udall / Bob Graham (Democratic)

1974 - 1976: Aldo Moro (Christian Democracy coalition with Republicans)
1976 - 1978: Enrico Berlinguer (Communist)
1976 (Minority) def. Benigno Zaccagnini (Christian Democracy), Francesco De Martino (Socialist)
1978 - 1979: Ugo La Malfa (Republican leading Unity Government)
1979 - 1980: Aldo Moro (Christian Democracy coalition with Communists)
1980 - 0000: Giulio Andreotti (Christian Democracy)
1980 (Minority) def. Giancarlo Pajetta (Communist), Giorgio Almirante (MSI), Enrico Manca (Socialist)
1985 (Centre-Right Alliance) def. Aldo Moro (Centre-Left Alliance), Armando Cossutta (Communist)


1974 - 1976: Harold Wilson (Labour)
Feb. 1974 (Minority) def. Edward Heath (Conservative), Jeremy Thorpe (Liberal), William Wolfe (SNP)
Oct. 1974 (Majority) def. Edward Heath (Conservative), Jeremy Thorpe (Liberal)
, William Wolfe (SNP)
1976 - 1981: James Callaghan (Labour)
1978 (Majority) def. Margaret Thatcher (Conservative), David Steel (Liberal)
1981 - 1981: Tony Benn (Labour)
1981 (Minority) def. Airey Neave (Conservative), David Owen (SDP), David Steel (Liberal)
1981 - 0000: Airey Neave (Conservative)
1982 (Majority) def. Peter Shore (Labour), David Steel (Liberal), David Owen (SDP)
 
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