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Lists of Heads of Government and Heads of State

Sideways

A jpeg stock photo of gas station flowers
Published by SLP
Location
Teignmouth, Devon
Pronouns
She/Her
But change is afoot. The charade is falling apart, as Prince William undertakes a palace coup, holding in his hands the receipts of bloody assassinations. Now in power, William shows no sign of seeking to restore true parliamentary democracy. But the founding articles of the modern British state have been aired in public. The naked display of Royal power has rankled, and a client media establishment finds it difficult to adapt without totally revealing their abject surrender to monarchical authority, or fall afoul of Palace disapproval.
I kind of want to see a sequel called "For God, Harry and Socialism" where the British republic finds an unusual founding father and William "I can't quite forgive my sister in law for mentioning racism" Windsor gets schooled
 

Time Enough

"Enthusiastic Cis Male Partner"
Pronouns
He/Him
Not used enough at all
I remember reading up on him and I was like ‘He’s a perfect Third Party person if I’ve ever seen one’.

Like going from Jesse Jackson to Republican within a couple of years and then still being weird then means he’s kind of perfect for it.
 

Oppo

Erik Ƭ̵̬̊
Pronouns
he/him
HS2-punk 2019

2016 - 2019: Theresa May (Conservative)
2017 (Minority) def. Jeremy Corbyn (Labour), Nicola Sturgeon (SNP), Tim Farron (Liberal Democrats)
2017 - Conservatives form supply and confidence deal with DUP
2019 - 2019: Rory Stewart (Conservative minority with ChangeUK confidence)
2019 - 2020: Nigel Farage (Brexit)
2019 (Minority) def. Jeremy Corbyn (Labour), Rory Stewart (Conservative), Jo Swinson (LibDem-ChangeUK), Nicola Sturgeon (SNP)
2019 - Steve Baker of the European Research Group and other Tory MPs cross the floor, granting the Brexit Party a majority
2019 - Prime Minister Farage announces the cancellation of the HS2 program
2020 - The United Kingdom leaves the European Union on WTO terms
2020 - 2026: Rebecca Long-Bailey (Labour)
2020 - A Government of National Unity is formed due to Farage's opposition to a lockdown. A majority for the opposition is secured after George Galloway splits from the Brexit Party to form the WPGB, agreeing to support the GNU if they expand a rebooted HS2 program into Scotland.
2021 (Minority) def. Nigel Farage (Reform), Chuka Umunna (ChangeUK-LibDem), Rory Stewart (Conservative), Nicola Sturgeon (SNP)
2021 - Labour form supply and confidence deal with SNP, expanding Scotland's access to high-speed rail and granting increased powers to the devolved government
2022 - Death of Elizabeth II, coronation of George VII
2026 Monarchy Referendum - Keep (53%)
2026 (Minority) def. James Glancy (Reform), Nicola Sturgeon (SNP), Sarah Green (Liberal Democrats), Ruth Davidson (Progressive), Zack Polanski (Green)

2026 - 0000: James Glancy (Reform leading Coalition of the 53% with Liberal Democrats & Greens with Alba confidence)
2026 - Prime Minister Glancy announces the cancellation of the rebooted HS2 program, citing environmental and financial concerns
2030 European Union Referendum - Out (54%)
 
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Wolfram

a single, distant, very loud, yeehaw
Location
the Velvet Coffin, Texas
Pronouns
he/him
I remember reading up on him and I was like ‘He’s a perfect Third Party person if I’ve ever seen one’.

Like going from Jesse Jackson to Republican within a couple of years and then still being weird then means he’s kind of perfect for it.
I don't think his political journey is all that weird within the context of El Paso politics, which like San Antonio has been dominated by clientelist politicians, in this era mostly but not exclusively Anglos, winning on the basis of Anglo business establishment money and Hispanic voters who generally don't want to rock the boat too much. O'Rourke (who was already a Republican when he worked on the Jackson campaign, though there's no party registration in Texas and most municipal offices are nonpartisan) was willing to work with the machine but always kind of out of step with it, which drew him towards progressive causes, but the only people with the resources to really challenge the machine were the Anglo Republicans who ran a competitor operation. Beto had a pretty similar arc - the 2006 progressive wave that elected him to City Council was financed with the money of, among others, his Republican gentrifier father-in-law.

That said, I feel like "successful El Paso politician" and "Reform Party running mate to Donald Trump" are kind of incompatible - the Reform Party's whole thing is cutting off the international trade that El Paso needs to survive (any fiscal-conservative cuts to military spending will also very much not help).
 

Time Enough

"Enthusiastic Cis Male Partner"
Pronouns
He/Him
That said, I feel like "successful El Paso politician" and "Reform Party running mate to Donald Trump" are kind of incompatible - the Reform Party's whole thing is cutting off the international trade that El Paso needs to survive (any fiscal-conservative cuts to military spending will also very much not help).
Interesting and thank you, I do have the sense then that he seems like the type that would be a big part of a 88’ Lee Iacocca Democratic Party (*light bulb*) or a possible Reformesque vehicle lead by someone like Harvey Milk or another Progressive/Civil Libertarian, Low On Taxes, Not Anti-NAFTA type.
 

Wolfram

a single, distant, very loud, yeehaw
Location
the Velvet Coffin, Texas
Pronouns
he/him
Interesting and thank you, I do have the sense then that he seems like the type that would be a big part of a 88’ Lee Iacocca Democratic Party (*light bulb*) or a possible Reformesque vehicle lead by someone like Harvey Milk or another Progressive/Civil Libertarian, Low On Taxes, Not Anti-NAFTA type.
I definitely think that's right.
 

Sideways

A jpeg stock photo of gas station flowers
Published by SLP
Location
Teignmouth, Devon
Pronouns
She/Her
Based on a True Story

Don't ask me why, but today I've been wondering what stories a shitty science fiction writer from 1969 might glean from a view of my life in the year of our Lord two thousand and twenty-one. Whether he could fill in blanks from my conversations and twitter threads to form a coherent view of the world as it is today, this is his story.

1970-1979: Edward Heath (Conservative)

Edward Heath bought in decimal currency and began the steady reform of the United Kingdom, his anti-immigration policies were the first attempt to deal with over-population and also sought to end the growing support that was going to his rival, Enoch Powell.

1979-1988: Tony Benn (Labour)

The return to a technocratic government seeking to harness "the white heat of technology". London swarmed with new, advanced buildings. The world began to change in this time with the introduction of the first television phones - which combined phone, video technology, and games system. The first ones took up a large amount of space. These were connected through the Post Office's new Network, which, when joined with similar systems around the world would form the International Network - or Inter-Net.

1988-1992: Gordon Campbell (Conservative)

Scottish devolution was bought in and the government that sought to regain control of mass overpopulation in urban areas. Unfortunately, their main priority was to protect those areas that were not yet over populated. They banned building outside of urban areas, such that property prices rocketed. This price rise never stopped, and by 2020 a simple home in rural areas can cost half a million pounds. Gay marriage was legalised in an attempt to encourage couples into non-breeding relationships.

1992-1997: Les Huckfield (Labour)

The Huckfield government sought to head off the rise of homosexuality, however the world was, perhaps, finding another way to deal with the excess human population. At this time toxins in the air and water started to cause people to undergo The Transition, a process that changed a small number of people into the opposite gender.

1997-2001: Alan Haselhurst (Conservative)

The late 90s was a time of massive change, as The Transition started to impact society the middle east fell into chaos. Conservative Islamic governments sought to wipe out the interlopers, earning the ire of an unlikely alliance of Israel with the two more liberal, modern Muslim states - Turkey and Egypt. They fought together against the USSR backed countries of Iran, Iraq and Afghanistan. Under his time in office, TV Phones shrunk to the size of desktop phones and could record data using microfilm cassette tapes.

2001-2004: Boris Johnson (National Government)

The initial contests of the war went badly with the loss of Syria and Palestine to the Islamo-Marxists, and this lead to the formation of a national government, headed by a charismatic young MP. People feared World War III was coming, when it didn't, they lost interest, and the total war government fell.

2004-2014: Michael Gove (Labour)

A somewhat ridiculous leader, Gove is remembered mostly for his gaffes such as a promise to "make every school above average". Mobile TV phones began to appear, although at first were in black and white. They were made possible by Screen Touch Technology which did away with the need for mechanical keyboards.

2014-2019: Matthew Hancock (Conservative)

The Transition Wars began to spread to Britain. Both the transitioned and their enemies had pro-peace factions (the Campaign for an Inborn Sisterhood (CIS) and Pride) - they also had extremist groups (Gender Crisis, The Extinction Rebellion Faction, The Stone Wall, and The Trans Safety Network) conflict was growing in the UK and abroad.

This was not a major issue to Hancock, who is best known for his affairs with models and popular music stars, all of which is largely tolerated in the permissive moral atmosphere of the 2010s.

2019-202X: Matthew Hancock (National Government)

The COVID Virus began to spread, killing millions. In 2021, for the first time, a cure has been found, but people still have to wear masks and submit to a brutal regime that tracks their every step.

In the Middle East, Turkey has some territory left in Afghanistan, but the Caliphate is growing in power, in fact they have forced the allies out of Iraq and in early 2021 they shut down the Suez canal. Few in Europe and America even think about the war anymore.

In Europe, Transitioned terrorists have been blamed for a brutal attack on the Women's Institute Spa resort but are denying involvement, claiming it was carried out by TERF. However violence is growing. As is superstition. Despite marvellous technology such as private spaceflight, colour TV phones and video typewriters, a new Dark Age of superstition and fear seems to be falling on the world - many now believe in witchcraft. The population of the Transitioned is growing year on year and nobody knows if COVID has finally been defeated or if it will come back, worse and stronger than ever.

Can COVID and The Transition be cured? What secrets do The Stone Wall hold? What is the True Purpose of the Mysterious Vaccine? Find out in

No. No. Nope. No. This story is too fantastical and perverted. It would never be publishable anyway. This is one to put in the bottom of the drawer and write this whole experience off as a bad nightmare.
 
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Uhura's Mazda

The Housewives' Choice
Published by SLP
Location
Tamaki Makaurau
List of Prime Ministers of New Zealand
1906-1912: Sir Joseph Ward (Liberal Party)
1912-1919: Sir Francis Bell (Liberal Party - Reform)
1919-1920: William Macdonald (Liberal Party - Radical)
1920-1927: Sir Francis Fisher (Liberal Party - Reform)
1927-1932: Sir Tom Seddon (Liberal Party - Seddonist)
1932-1933: Harry Atmore (Liberal Party - Radical)
1933-1943: Sir Gordon Coates (Liberal Party - Seddonist)
1943-1946: Col. John A. Lee (Liberal Party - Seddonist)
1946-1953: Sir William Bell (Liberal Party - Reform)
1953-1961: Sir Walter Nash (Liberal Party - Radical)
1961-1965: Sir Ralph Hanan (Liberal Party - Reform)
1965-1966: Sir Ormond Wilson (Liberal Party - Radical)
1966-1966: Leon Götz (League of Independents)
1966-1969: Sir John Ormond (League of Independents)
1969-: Sir Basil Arthur (Liberal Party - Seddonist)

With the demise of Richard Seddon in 1906, the Liberal Government lost the unity that came from his strength of personality. Various factions began to maneouvre for ministerial positions in Ward’s Cabinet – and at the same time, the drifting away of the labour movement from the Liberal Party posed problems on an electoral level. To combat this, Ward passed an innovative constitutional reform: instead of First Past the Post, New Zealand would now use a form of proportional representation in which voters cast their ballots for a particular faction within the party of their choice. To retain the local connection, the country was divided into five multi-member electorates (one for the Maori seats, two each for the main islands). The existing single-member divisions were retained, and the MHRs elected were allocated to a local seat according to an arcane mathematical formula. These districts have yet to be redrawn.

Since the first couple of elections, in which large numbers of labour (and also Opposition) supporters came into the Liberal fold in the hope of capturing the Government (or at least of gaining a seat in Cabinet), the factional array within the Liberal Party has been relatively consistent – although the organisational bodies of the factions have been in a state of almost constant flux. By way of example, the ‘Radical’ wing have operated as, variously, the Radical Party, the New Liberals, the United Radical and Labour Alliance, the Wardite Front, and the Radical Left Movement. There have also been ephemeral splinters from the Radical faction which have survived for a few months around an election and then been integrated into either the Radicals or another large faction.

The front-ranking factions of the Liberal Party are the Radicals, Reformers and Seddonists. The former are the heirs of Ward and Vogel: believers in boosting economic growth through public works (and latterly social spending) funded by borrowing, and in protecting economic diversity by means of tariffs. The Reformers, meanwhile, are friendlier towards free enterprise and free trade, but have more of a focus on administrative probity and constitutional reform. Finally, the Seddonists are an amorphous group, united largely by populist rhetoric and a shared strategy of gaining office through judicious manipulation of the balance of power. And of course there are major exceptions and caveats to all of these brief characterisations.

Ward’s leadership, although initially accepted by much of the Party, rapidly became untenable as the growing power of the factions hamstrung his ability to legislate. He was forced out in 1912 by an alliance of sectors mainly united by a belief in freehold land tenure, and replaced by the arrogant Legislative Councillor Sir Francis Dillon Bell – who tempered his aloof and anti-democratic persona with a welcome disinterest in most matters of contention in politics. Instead, he extended Ward’s electoral system to the upper house, took politics out of civil service appointments, and introduced the key constitutional plank of the Reformers: the Elective Executive. Under this model, the members of the two Houses chose the Cabinet through a single transferable vote election at the start of each parliamentary term, thus ensuring not only that every faction was represented in the Executive (or was able to bargain with another faction for a quid pro quo) but also that there would be Ministers from what was still known as ‘The Opposition’. This worked fairly well as long as there was broad policy consensus – for instance during the First World War – but less well during times of crisis, when the reaction time of the Government was not quick enough to deal with a developing situation.

As such, when Tom Seddon’s expansionist but simplistic economic policy ran up against the realities of the Depression, the Government moved too slowly and in the wrong direction, by choosing as their new chief Harry Atmore, a Radical with interests in educational and monetary reform. He devised a programme inspired by the writings of C. H. Douglas, but found his Cabinet much less happy to follow his lead than to elect him leader. One of the first actions of Gordon Coates after Atmore's resignation was to repeal the Elective Executive Act, and this allowed him to govern decisively over the span of more than a decade. Coates instituted social security legislation, nationalised the Reserve Bank and the Bank of New Zealand (Atmore was still Finance Minister, after all), established state marketing of meat and dairy, and ensured further development of secondary industries through insulation. He was also effective as a symbol of national unity in the early stages of the Second World War, although his health failed him in the final years of his premiership.

The Reformers returned to office after the War with the people behind them: keen to join in with the post-war consumer bonanza, they supported the Reformist pledge to lower the trade barriers built up over the previous decades. However, Sir William Bell had to deal with a recalcitrant Cabinet on this matter, and used what political capital he had on the abolition of the Legislative Council, the passage of entrenching legislation around constitutional matters, and the re-creation of the Elective Executive.

There followed two decades of consensus politics, based around a social contract of full employment and social welfare, enabled by almost autarchic import policies, the proceeds of wool exports, and high taxes. This all collapsed in 1965, when the wool market collapsed under the watch of Ralph Hanan, a man who had always aspired to economic liberalisation but only succeeded in abolishing the death penalty and legalising homosexuality. His successor, the Radical Ormond Wilson, represented an assumption that the wool price would soon return to its normal level and that in the meantime the need was for Keynesian countercyclical spending. But the price did not improve, and in 1966, for the first time in almost eighty years, the Opposition returned to the Government benches as senior partner.

The League of Independents were a repository of conservatives, reactionaries, mavericks and misfits, and were headed by Leon Gotz, an eyepatch-wearing ex-rubber-planter and outdoorsman who believed in decisive government and free enterprise. He immediately made moves towards the repeal of the Elective Executive Act, but this had been entrenched by William Bell and therefore needed a two-thirds majority of the House or a successful referendum – and Gotz didn’t have the numbers even with the support of the diminutive Socialist and Communist parties. Neither did he have the opportunity to pass any major legislation, as his first foreign visit (to Rhodesia) ended in tragedy: he was mauled to death by a lion.

The new Prime Minister was from a minority populist faction of the League - and was the only member of the major Government party to be acceptable to the Liberals. This may have had something to do with the fact that Jack Ormond was the cousin of Radical leader Ormond Wilson. The new premier, a brusque and abrasive ex-fascist, concurred with the economic nationalist perspective of much of the Liberal Party, and was skilled at working across party lines even as he arranged the Elective Executive Referendum. In a few short years, Ormond set the stage for economic recovery by encouraging sales to new markets and industrial diversification with tax breaks and rewards, while also negotiating hard for continued access to Britain in the context of the UK’s integration into the EEC.

However, the economic recovery didn’t come quickly enough, and the electorate were dismayed at, yet again, receiving statist solutions despite voting for market liberalisation. At the 1969 election, Jack Ormond won his referendum – but lost the premiership. For the first time in twenty years, the Liberals ruled alone.
 

Alex Richards

A musical Hubble Space Telescope
Patreon supporter
Published by SLP
Location
Derbyshire
Can COVID and The Transition be cured? What secrets do The Stone Wall hold? What is the True Purpose of the Mysterious Vaccine? Find out in

No. No. Nope. No. This story is too fantastical and perverted. It would never be publishable anyway. This is one to put in the bottom of the drawer and write this whole experience off as a bad nightmare.
This is delightfully bonkers.
 

Time Enough

"Enthusiastic Cis Male Partner"
Pronouns
He/Him
Can COVID and The Transition be cured? What secrets do The Stone Wall hold? What is the True Purpose of the Mysterious Vaccine? Find out in

No. No. Nope. No. This story is too fantastical and perverted. It would never be publishable anyway. This is one to put in the bottom of the drawer and write this whole experience off as a bad nightmare.
9/10, no J.G.Ballard leading a Pro-Nuclear Ecology Party or something similar.

Joking aside, wonderfully batshit.
 

Time Enough

"Enthusiastic Cis Male Partner"
Pronouns
He/Him
World In My Eyes:

1979-1985: William Whitelaw (Conservative)
1979 (Majority) def: James Callaghan (Labour), David Steel (Liberal)
1983 (Majority) def: Micheal Foot (Labour), David Steel-Roy Jenkins (Liberal-SDP Alliance)

1985-1987: Cecil Parkinson (Conservative)
1987-1990: Timothy Riason (Conservative)

1987 (Majority) def: Neil Kinnock (Labour), David Steel-Shirley Williams (Liberal-SDP Alliance)
1990-1999: Bryan Gould (Labour)
1990 (Majority) def: Timothy Riason (Conservative), Malcolm Bruce (Liberal Democrats), David Owen (Reform)
1994 (Majority) def: John Moore (Conservative), Paddy Ashdown (Liberal Democrats), David Alton (Reform)

1999-2006: Michael Howard (Conservative)
1999 (Majority) def: Bryan Gould (Labour), Paddy Ashdown (Liberal Democrats), Tony Blair (Millennium)
2004 (Majority) def: Ian Willmore (Labour), Don Foster (Liberal Democrats), Tony Blair (Millennium 04’)

2006-2010: Peter Ainsworth (Conservative)
2006 (Majority) def: Ian Willmore (Labour), Don Foster (Liberal Democrats), Gisela Stuart (Millennium)
2010-: Tom Harris (Labour)
2010 (Coalition with Liberal Democrats) def: Peter Ainsworth (Conservative), Adrian Sanders (Liberal Democrats), Ron Davies-Lynne Jones (Forward!)

—//—

1981-1989: John Connolly (Republican)
1980 (With Paul Laxalt) def: Jimmy Carter/Walter Mondale (Democratic), John B. Anderson/Patrick Lucey (Independent)
1984 (With Paul Laxalt) def: Gary Hart/Reubin Askew (Democratic), John B.Anderson/Frank Fasai (Unity)

1989-1993: Dick Lamm (Democratic-Unity)
1989 (With Cybil Sheppard) def: Paul Laxalt/Kay A. Orr (Republican), Dick Lamm/Cybil Sheppard (Unity)
1993-1997: Dick Lamm (Democratic)
1993 (With Marcy Kaptur) def: Pete Du Pont VI/Lamar Alexander (Republican), Cybil Sheppard/Various (Unity)
1997-2005: Pete Wilson (Republican)
1997 (With Tommy Thompson) def: Marcy Kaptur/Dick Gephardt (Democratic), Lowell Weicker/Evan Bayh (Unity)
2000 (With Tommy Thompson) def: Henry Cisneros/Lewis F. Payne (Democratic), John Norquist/Pat LaMarche (Green)

2005-2009: Michael Bloomberg (Independent)
2004 (With Ron Brown) def: Paul Wellstone/Bill Lipinski (Democratic), Rick Santorum/Elizabeth Dole (Republican), John Norquist/Pat LaMarche (Green)
2009-: Russ Feingold (Democratic)
2008 (With Kathleen Sebelius) def: John McCain/Jeb Bush (Republican), Michael Bloomberg/Ron Brown (Independent)

William Whitelaw and John Connolly seemed to represent an older form of Conservativism, one less obsessed with freeing the market and more about law, order and stability. Oh sure, they still adopted Monetarist measures but mentions Globalisation and Japanese Corporations would ooze out of Connolly’s mouth in a disgusted manner. Whitelaw was less bothered by this, though his party would have it’s discussions about interconnecting to world finance...which would combust when Cecil Parkinson was caught with a love child.

Lamm and Gould would continue this line of questioning though in a more Centre-Left, Civil Libertarian manner. Free Markets and Trade Agreements would destroy the Environment/Trade Unions/Internet Socialism was the logic. Not everyone agreed, but they didn’t win elections, only those who ran against Free Movement, Free Trade and a laundry list of Anti-Globalisation talking points cared to win.

There was a shift in the Mid 00’s, Peter Ainsworth ran on a more Europhile message to crush the Millennium Movement and Bloomberg’s Prescription of Centrist Globalisation cut through in the middle of a economic lag for America. But both would be embroiled in scandals, job losses and unpopular wars.

Now it’s 2010, Russ Feingold’s Left Libertarian message cut through and he’s now in the White House, dealing with the aftermath of Bloomberg’s shambles. He talks about rebuilding America and he may succeed, though bubbling forces on the Right have decided that the Centrists Globalists are holding them back.

Meanwhile in Britain, Tom Harris has managed to form a coalition with the Liberal Democrats on a message that combined Eurosceptcism with Third Way Economics as he proclaims he will Modernise Britain to be a Global Powerhouse...not sure how but I’m sure he’ll figure it out.
 

Sideways

A jpeg stock photo of gas station flowers
Published by SLP
Location
Teignmouth, Devon
Pronouns
She/Her
9/10, no J.G.Ballard leading a Pro-Nuclear Ecology Party or something similar.

Joking aside, wonderfully batshit.
Ooo that would fit well. The writer would likely know of him though and it would fit in well with the late 60s FH theme. I'm assuming the writer is not smart, hence baby of the house and recent head of the Young Conservatives as PMs and him not linking Stonewall to the recent riots which he likely doesn't know much about. Maybe a Bonham-Carter running the liberals? Some kind of Enoch Powellist pseudo UKIP. Retro-futurism is kinda fun.
 

Alex Richards

A musical Hubble Space Telescope
Patreon supporter
Published by SLP
Location
Derbyshire
Ooo that would fit well. The writer would likely know of him though and it would fit in well with the late 60s FH theme. I'm assuming the writer is not smart, hence baby of the house and recent head of the Young Conservatives as PMs and him not linking Stonewall to the recent riots which he likely doesn't know much about. Maybe a Bonham-Carter running the liberals? Some kind of Enoch Powellist pseudo UKIP. Retro-futurism is kinda fun.
I think that's the sort of period where it would just be assumed the Liberals just die entirely.
 

Time Enough

"Enthusiastic Cis Male Partner"
Pronouns
He/Him
Ooo that would fit well. The writer would likely know of him though and it would fit in well with the late 60s FH theme.
It would indeed, especially since this would still be the Ballard of the Drowned World fame and not...Crash Ballard.
I'm assuming the writer is not smart, hence baby of the house and recent head of the Young Conservatives as PMs and him not linking Stonewall to the recent riots which he likely doesn't know much about.
Didn’t notice but it makes sense, I’m surprised he didn’t use someone like Dick Marsh who would be this big flashy persona for the whole ‘White Heat’ stuff.
Retro-futurism is kinda fun.
One day I’ll get to work on my Gouldite Cyberpunk story with essentially Revolutionary Communist Party as the baddies, one day.
It has big ‘Mid 90s: Strange Days’ energy to it.
 
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