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Lists of Heads of Government and Heads of State

Alex Richards

A musical Hubble Space Telescope
Patreon supporter
Published by SLP
Location
Derbyshire
Dearie me.

Well maybe it spells better luck for the Spanish Hapsburg line if they have to look to other candidates for their weddings?
I was worried that I'd overegged it with the Tyrolean branch just dying, and then I worked out what the family tree would be for Karl Ferdinand and just went 'oh.'

The scary thing is, only the existence of Maria Magdalena of Bavaria and Leopold marrying Maria Anna of Spain are ahistorical here.

Family Tree.png
 

Charles EP M.

Well-known member
Published by SLP
I looked up Command & Conquer lore while bored and thus, I inflict:


1929 - 1931: Ramsay MacDonald (Labour with Liberal support)
def. 2004 Stanley Baldwin (Conservative)

1931 - 1934: Oswald Mosley (Labour with Liberal support)

1934 - 1940: Neville Chamberlain (Conservative)
def. 1934 Oswald Mosley (Labour)
def. 1934 George Lansbury (1937)


1940 - 1941: Anthony Eden (Conservative)

1942 - 1947: Clement Attlee (Labour)
def. 1941 Anthony Eden (Conservative)


The Great Depression knocked over scores of governments and leaders in the world, and MacDonald fell to an internal party coup as Mosley declared he could save the country with Keynes's methods. The economy was, indeed, patched up by aggressive state spending and rationalisation, but Mosley's imperious personality and centralisation of power made him many enemies. The right increasingly compared him to Stalin, the disgruntled left to "Mad Dog Musso", the bellicose dictator of Italy. Neville Chamberlain promised to balance the books and be a more genial leader, and could boast a successful role in the previous Tory government. He hoped to focus on domestic issues but, to the displeasure of Mosley's replacement Lansbury, continued Mosley's rearming policy.

This paid off with the Spanish War. Britain and France had been willing to let it be a civil war until Italy and Stalin both stuck their oars in - unwilling to let Gibraltar be faced with a fascist or communist state on its borders, Chamberlain backed up the republican government and sent the Royal Navy down. This escalated to a wider conflict with Britain, Germany, Spain, and Greece (with French support) all united against Italy, humiliating and deposing the fascists. This would be the later core of the Allied Nations, but Chamberlain would grow ill and not live to see it. Eden could not live up to this and fell to Attlee's rejuvenated Labour Party, which promised to - and did - build a New Jerusalem.

But in 1946, as plans were made for the election, Stalin launched an invasion of the rest of Europe - hoping to span from "coast to coast", due to dreams and the words of obscure advisors. Attlee and his European allies had expected the USSR to try something, but the apocalyptic scale of the attack caught them off guard. By early 1947, Britain stood alone and Attlee ordered the King and a preliminary government to evacuate to Canada as a precaution - a wise one, as Attlee and most of his War Ministry would have to flee to Northern Ireland, only to be caught by Soviet troops attacking that island as well.


1947 - 1954: Arthur Greenwood (Government In Exile, then National Coalition, then Labour)
def. 1949 Winston Churchill (Conservative)

1954 - 1964: Arthur Harris (Conservative)
def. 1954 Arthur Greenwood (Labour)

def. 1959 Herbert Morrison (Labour)

1964 - 1977: Barbara Castle (Labour)
def. 1964 Arthur Harris (Conservative)

def. 1967 Iain Macleod (Conservative)
def. 1972 Margaret Bray (Conservative), Jeremy Thorpe (Liberal)

Arthur Greenwood was a man who would not surrender, but he was also an alcoholic and ravaged by the 'black dog' as the weight of everything weighed on him. To his great luck, Stalin died almost immediately after conquering Britain and command of the Soviet Union & its great empire went to one of his key military commanders - and the mind it takes to command and conquer the battlefield is not the same it takes to run a continent's bureaucracy. Britain and Ireland, still only recently beaten, rose up in Americas-backed rebellion and Greenwood came back to run a national government. Long-delayed elections were finally held and the great liberator won.

Much like his Soviet counterpart, running the country and supporting the wars in Europe proved beyond him as his alcoholism took full control - but who was going to coup him? Eventually, he lost to the Tories' new leader, ferocious war hero Arthur Harris, who signed up to the US-founded United Nations and kept Britain in as the war turned from rebellion to UN tanks storming into Russian soil. Harris, like Chamberlain, Attlee and Greenwood before him, was a hero.

But then he was still in office as the world staggered from war and deprivation, and knowing Britain was the sole wealthy power in Europe by dint of its great empire. Greenwood had created two dominions out of India, leading inexorably to independence, and Harris had to lump that, but he was putting a harsh stop to anymore. After liberating Europe, British soldiers were now clamping down hard in Asia and Africa, and this slowly put the UK at odds with its allies and friendless at the United Nations. The economy began to feel the pressure, too many young men on national service came back wounded or with bad stories or not at all, and immigrants from the colonies were more prominent and made the whole thing feel sordid to more & more people. Castle came in with a more socially liberal government and began to decolonise (faster than expected), reviving Britain's reputation and economy.

Castle's time was a Golden Age of peace, prosperity, progress, and power, but all things end: the rising economy of India, the revived Russia, a growing disconnect with America, all of this would start reducing Britain's prominence. The Brotherhood of Nod would also begin to start operating front groups on British soil, causing various clashes with Special Branch. The good times were over and Britain needed to adapt.


1977 - 1984: Jeremy Thorpe (Liberal Unionists)
def. 1977 Barbara Castle (Labour), Cecil Parkinson (Conservative)
def. 1979 Michael Foot (Labour), Cecil Parkinson (Conservative)


1984 - 1989: John Major (Liberal Unionists)

def.1984 David Owen (Labour)

1989 - 1994: Gordon Brown (Labour)
def.1989 John Major (Liberal Unionists)

1994 - 1999: Alex Johnson (Liberal Unionists)
def.1994
Gordon Brown (Labour), George Galloway (People's Party)

The Liberals had been steadily rebuilding for decades, and Thorpe finished it off by taking advantage of a Tory split between traditionalists and the new monetarists. He would go on to liberalise the economy and get more involved in international institutions so Britain would retain its place in the world - one of several factions that would make the United Nations an ever more connected organisation. Major would continue this. Much of the world became ever more linked, economically, politically, and technologically. Labour would grow to accept this new change, while the Tories became the party that opposed it - and unfortunately for them, Parkinson proved unable to harness any discontent.

Galloway would be the one who would find a way to do that, forever keeping a third party snapping at everyone's heels. Outside of Britain, the growing Brotherhood of Nod would pull it off, having a number of countries withdraw from the UN entirely. In response to this, the UN - with Johnson eagerly agreeing - established a joint special operations force, the Global Defence Initiative. Johnson helped wrangle some key defence contracts for Britain and a central base.

1995 would also see the Tiberium meteorite land in Italy. When it happened, Johnson was entertaining friendly newspaper moguls on a yacht. He didn't know this was the start of events that would see his very office cease to exist.
 

KingCrawa

Prayed for by a Brace of Monks
I looked up Command & Conquer lore while bored and thus, I inflict:


1929 - 1931: Ramsay MacDonald (Labour with Liberal support)
def. 2004 Stanley Baldwin (Conservative)

1931 - 1934: Oswald Mosley (Labour with Liberal support)

1934 - 1940: Neville Chamberlain (Conservative)
def. 1934 Oswald Mosley (Labour)
def. 1934 George Lansbury (1937)


1940 - 1941: Anthony Eden (Conservative)

1942 - 1947: Clement Attlee (Labour)
def. 1941 Anthony Eden (Conservative)


The Great Depression knocked over scores of governments and leaders in the world, and MacDonald fell to an internal party coup as Mosley declared he could save the country with Keynes's methods. The economy was, indeed, patched up by aggressive state spending and rationalisation, but Mosley's imperious personality and centralisation of power made him many enemies. The right increasingly compared him to Stalin, the disgruntled left to "Mad Dog Musso", the bellicose dictator of Italy. Neville Chamberlain promised to balance the books and be a more genial leader, and could boast a successful role in the previous Tory government. He hoped to focus on domestic issues but, to the displeasure of Mosley's replacement Lansbury, continued Mosley's rearming policy.

This paid off with the Spanish War. Britain and France had been willing to let it be a civil war until Italy and Stalin both stuck their oars in - unwilling to let Gibraltar be faced with a fascist or communist state on its borders, Chamberlain backed up the republican government and sent the Royal Navy down. This escalated to a wider conflict with Britain, Germany, Spain, and Greece (with French support) all united against Italy, humiliating and deposing the fascists. This would be the later core of the Allied Nations, but Chamberlain would grow ill and not live to see it. Eden could not live up to this and fell to Attlee's rejuvenated Labour Party, which promised to - and did - build a New Jerusalem.

But in 1946, as plans were made for the election, Stalin launched an invasion of the rest of Europe - hoping to span from "coast to coast", due to dreams and the words of obscure advisors. Attlee and his European allies had expected the USSR to try something, but the apocalyptic scale of the attack caught them off guard. By early 1947, Britain stood alone and Attlee ordered the King and a preliminary government to evacuate to Canada as a precaution - a wise one, as Attlee and most of his War Ministry would have to flee to Northern Ireland, only to be caught by Soviet troops attacking that island as well.


1947 - 1954: Arthur Greenwood (Government In Exile, then National Coalition, then Labour)
def. 1949 Winston Churchill (Conservative)

1954 - 1964: Arthur Harris (Conservative)
def. 1954 Arthur Greenwood (Labour)

def. 1959 Herbert Morrison (Labour)

1964 - 1977: Barbara Castle (Labour)
def. 1964 Arthur Harris (Conservative)

def. 1967 Iain Macleod (Conservative)
def. 1972 Margaret Bray (Conservative), Jeremy Thorpe (Liberal)

Arthur Greenwood was a man who would not surrender, but he was also an alcoholic and ravaged by the 'black dog' as the weight of everything weighed on him. To his great luck, Stalin died almost immediately after conquering Britain and command of the Soviet Union & its great empire went to one of his key military commanders - and the mind it takes to command and conquer the battlefield is not the same it takes to run a continent's bureaucracy. Britain and Ireland, still only recently beaten, rose up in Americas-backed rebellion and Greenwood came back to run a national government. Long-delayed elections were finally held and the great liberator won.

Much like his Soviet counterpart, running the country and supporting the wars in Europe proved beyond him as his alcoholism took full control - but who was going to coup him? Eventually, he lost to the Tories' new leader, ferocious war hero Arthur Harris, who signed up to the US-founded United Nations and kept Britain in as the war turned from rebellion to UN tanks storming into Russian soil. Harris, like Chamberlain, Attlee and Greenwood before him, was a hero.

But then he was still in office as the world staggered from war and deprivation, and knowing Britain was the sole wealthy power in Europe by dint of its great empire. Greenwood had created two dominions out of India, leading inexorably to independence, and Harris had to lump that, but he was putting a harsh stop to anymore. After liberating Europe, British soldiers were now clamping down hard in Asia and Africa, and this slowly put the UK at odds with its allies and friendless at the United Nations. The economy began to feel the pressure, too many young men on national service came back wounded or with bad stories or not at all, and immigrants from the colonies were more prominent and made the whole thing feel sordid to more & more people. Castle came in with a more socially liberal government and began to decolonise (faster than expected), reviving Britain's reputation and economy.

Castle's time was a Golden Age of peace, prosperity, progress, and power, but all things end: the rising economy of India, the revived Russia, a growing disconnect with America, all of this would start reducing Britain's prominence. The Brotherhood of Nod would also begin to start operating front groups on British soil, causing various clashes with Special Branch. The good times were over and Britain needed to adapt.


1977 - 1984: Jeremy Thorpe (Liberal Unionists)
def. 1977 Barbara Castle (Labour), Cecil Parkinson (Conservative)
def. 1979 Michael Foot (Labour), Cecil Parkinson (Conservative)


1984 - 1989: John Major (Liberal Unionists)

def.1984 David Owen (Labour)

1989 - 1994: Gordon Brown (Labour)
def.1989 John Major (Liberal Unionists)

1994 - 1999: Alex Johnson (Liberal Unionists)
def.1994
Gordon Brown (Labour), George Galloway (People's Party)

The Liberals had been steadily rebuilding for decades, and Thorpe finished it off by taking advantage of a Tory split between traditionalists and the new monetarists. He would go on to liberalise the economy and get more involved in international institutions so Britain would retain its place in the world - one of several factions that would make the United Nations an ever more connected organisation. Major would continue this. Much of the world became ever more linked, economically, politically, and technologically. Labour would grow to accept this new change, while the Tories became the party that opposed it - and unfortunately for them, Parkinson proved unable to harness any discontent.

Galloway would be the one who would find a way to do that, forever keeping a third party snapping at everyone's heels. Outside of Britain, the growing Brotherhood of Nod would pull it off, having a number of countries withdraw from the UN entirely. In response to this, the UN - with Johnson eagerly agreeing - established a joint special operations force, the Global Defence Initiative. Johnson helped wrangle some key defence contracts for Britain and a central base.

1995 would also see the Tiberium meteorite land in Italy. When it happened, Johnson was entertaining friendly newspaper moguls on a yacht. He didn't know this was the start of events that would see his very office cease to exist.
No WW2 here?
 

Thande

Directly Elected Mayor of the Western Hemisphere
Published by SLP
A random, and not particularly clever, idea - I was just curious what the result would be and whether it would produce a vaguely plausible-looking 'random PM list'. I've (unrealistically) left the election results and OTL midterm switchovers the same and I only show the Conservative and Labour leaders for reasons that'll become clear - so no this isn't a strict two-party UK, I'm just mentioning the Liberals or other parties. I've also ignored peerages because I'm not keeping track of changing titles.

1945-1951: Ernest Bevin (Labour)
1945 def: Anthony Eden (Conservative)
1950 def: Anthony Eden (Conservative)

1951-1951: James Chuter Ede (Labour)
1951-1954: David Maxwell Fyfe (Conservative)
1951 def: James Chuter Ede (Labour)
1954-1955: Rab Butler (Conservative)
1955 def: Kenneth Younger (Labour)
1955-1963: Selwyn Lloyd (Conservative)
1959 def: Patrick Gordon-Walker (Labour)
1963-1964: Henry Brooke (Conservative)
1964-1967: James Callaghan (Labour)
1964 def: Henry Brooke (Conservative)
1966 def: Iain Macleod (Conservative)

1967-1968: George Brown (Labour)
1968-1970: James Callaghan (Labour)
1970-1974: Alec Douglas-Home (Conservative)
1970 def: James Callaghan (Labour)
1974-1976: Roy Jenkins (Labour)
1974a def: Jim Prior (Conservative)
1974b def: Keith Joseph (Conservative)

1976-1979: Denis Healey (Labour)
1979-1982: Peter Carington (Conservative)
1979 def: Denis Healey (Labour)
1982-1983: Willie Whitelaw (Conservative)
1983 def: Roy Hattersley (Labour)
1983-1989: Nigel Lawson (Conservative)
1987 def: Roy Hattersley (Labour)
1989-1990: Douglas Hurd (Conservative)
1990-1993: Norman Lamont (Conservative)
1992 def: John Smith (Labour)
1993-1997: Douglas Hurd (Conservative)
1997-2001: Jack Straw (Labour)
1997 def: Douglas Hurd (Conservative)
2001-2007: Gordon Brown (Labour)
2001 def: Michael Portillo (Conservative)
2005 def: Oliver Letwin (Conservative)

2007-2010: David Miliband (Labour)
2010-2016: Theresa May (Conservative)
2010 def: David Miliband (Labour)
2015 def: Yvette Cooper (Labour)

2016-2019: Philip Hammond (Conservative)
2017 def: John McDonnell (Labour)
2019-????: Dominic Raab (Conservative)
2019 def: Emily Thornberry (Labour)


The gimmick is that it cycles through OTL holders of the other three Great Offices of state in the order Foreign->Home->Exchequer, following changeover dates if those happened midterm.

There are too many changeovers to really be plausible unless weird things are happening (reminiscent of Curse of Maggie) but I like that some of these do look vaguely plausible, like Brown->Miliband->May. Also both Jim Callaghan and Douglas Hurd pulling a Grover Cleveland (or Kevin Rudd) suggests to me a UK that works on Australian backstabbing spills at the drop of a hat type rules.
 

Bolt451

BOOK IT, TONY!
Location
Sandford, Gloucestershire
Pronouns
She/Her
I looked up Command & Conquer lore while bored and thus, I inflict:


1929 - 1931: Ramsay MacDonald (Labour with Liberal support)
def. 2004 Stanley Baldwin (Conservative)

1931 - 1934: Oswald Mosley (Labour with Liberal support)

1934 - 1940: Neville Chamberlain (Conservative)
def. 1934 Oswald Mosley (Labour)
def. 1934 George Lansbury (1937)


1940 - 1941: Anthony Eden (Conservative)

1942 - 1947: Clement Attlee (Labour)
def. 1941 Anthony Eden (Conservative)


The Great Depression knocked over scores of governments and leaders in the world, and MacDonald fell to an internal party coup as Mosley declared he could save the country with Keynes's methods. The economy was, indeed, patched up by aggressive state spending and rationalisation, but Mosley's imperious personality and centralisation of power made him many enemies. The right increasingly compared him to Stalin, the disgruntled left to "Mad Dog Musso", the bellicose dictator of Italy. Neville Chamberlain promised to balance the books and be a more genial leader, and could boast a successful role in the previous Tory government. He hoped to focus on domestic issues but, to the displeasure of Mosley's replacement Lansbury, continued Mosley's rearming policy.

This paid off with the Spanish War. Britain and France had been willing to let it be a civil war until Italy and Stalin both stuck their oars in - unwilling to let Gibraltar be faced with a fascist or communist state on its borders, Chamberlain backed up the republican government and sent the Royal Navy down. This escalated to a wider conflict with Britain, Germany, Spain, and Greece (with French support) all united against Italy, humiliating and deposing the fascists. This would be the later core of the Allied Nations, but Chamberlain would grow ill and not live to see it. Eden could not live up to this and fell to Attlee's rejuvenated Labour Party, which promised to - and did - build a New Jerusalem.

But in 1946, as plans were made for the election, Stalin launched an invasion of the rest of Europe - hoping to span from "coast to coast", due to dreams and the words of obscure advisors. Attlee and his European allies had expected the USSR to try something, but the apocalyptic scale of the attack caught them off guard. By early 1947, Britain stood alone and Attlee ordered the King and a preliminary government to evacuate to Canada as a precaution - a wise one, as Attlee and most of his War Ministry would have to flee to Northern Ireland, only to be caught by Soviet troops attacking that island as well.


1947 - 1954: Arthur Greenwood (Government In Exile, then National Coalition, then Labour)
def. 1949 Winston Churchill (Conservative)

1954 - 1964: Arthur Harris (Conservative)
def. 1954 Arthur Greenwood (Labour)

def. 1959 Herbert Morrison (Labour)

1964 - 1977: Barbara Castle (Labour)
def. 1964 Arthur Harris (Conservative)

def. 1967 Iain Macleod (Conservative)
def. 1972 Margaret Bray (Conservative), Jeremy Thorpe (Liberal)

Arthur Greenwood was a man who would not surrender, but he was also an alcoholic and ravaged by the 'black dog' as the weight of everything weighed on him. To his great luck, Stalin died almost immediately after conquering Britain and command of the Soviet Union & its great empire went to one of his key military commanders - and the mind it takes to command and conquer the battlefield is not the same it takes to run a continent's bureaucracy. Britain and Ireland, still only recently beaten, rose up in Americas-backed rebellion and Greenwood came back to run a national government. Long-delayed elections were finally held and the great liberator won.

Much like his Soviet counterpart, running the country and supporting the wars in Europe proved beyond him as his alcoholism took full control - but who was going to coup him? Eventually, he lost to the Tories' new leader, ferocious war hero Arthur Harris, who signed up to the US-founded United Nations and kept Britain in as the war turned from rebellion to UN tanks storming into Russian soil. Harris, like Chamberlain, Attlee and Greenwood before him, was a hero.

But then he was still in office as the world staggered from war and deprivation, and knowing Britain was the sole wealthy power in Europe by dint of its great empire. Greenwood had created two dominions out of India, leading inexorably to independence, and Harris had to lump that, but he was putting a harsh stop to anymore. After liberating Europe, British soldiers were now clamping down hard in Asia and Africa, and this slowly put the UK at odds with its allies and friendless at the United Nations. The economy began to feel the pressure, too many young men on national service came back wounded or with bad stories or not at all, and immigrants from the colonies were more prominent and made the whole thing feel sordid to more & more people. Castle came in with a more socially liberal government and began to decolonise (faster than expected), reviving Britain's reputation and economy.

Castle's time was a Golden Age of peace, prosperity, progress, and power, but all things end: the rising economy of India, the revived Russia, a growing disconnect with America, all of this would start reducing Britain's prominence. The Brotherhood of Nod would also begin to start operating front groups on British soil, causing various clashes with Special Branch. The good times were over and Britain needed to adapt.


1977 - 1984: Jeremy Thorpe (Liberal Unionists)
def. 1977 Barbara Castle (Labour), Cecil Parkinson (Conservative)
def. 1979 Michael Foot (Labour), Cecil Parkinson (Conservative)


1984 - 1989: John Major (Liberal Unionists)

def.1984 David Owen (Labour)

1989 - 1994: Gordon Brown (Labour)
def.1989 John Major (Liberal Unionists)

1994 - 1999: Alex Johnson (Liberal Unionists)
def.1994
Gordon Brown (Labour), George Galloway (People's Party)

The Liberals had been steadily rebuilding for decades, and Thorpe finished it off by taking advantage of a Tory split between traditionalists and the new monetarists. He would go on to liberalise the economy and get more involved in international institutions so Britain would retain its place in the world - one of several factions that would make the United Nations an ever more connected organisation. Major would continue this. Much of the world became ever more linked, economically, politically, and technologically. Labour would grow to accept this new change, while the Tories became the party that opposed it - and unfortunately for them, Parkinson proved unable to harness any discontent.

Galloway would be the one who would find a way to do that, forever keeping a third party snapping at everyone's heels. Outside of Britain, the growing Brotherhood of Nod would pull it off, having a number of countries withdraw from the UN entirely. In response to this, the UN - with Johnson eagerly agreeing - established a joint special operations force, the Global Defence Initiative. Johnson helped wrangle some key defence contracts for Britain and a central base.

1995 would also see the Tiberium meteorite land in Italy. When it happened, Johnson was entertaining friendly newspaper moguls on a yacht. He didn't know this was the start of events that would see his very office cease to exist.
Who did Red Alert 2 come under? or are you taking bits to make one unified idea?
 
This was an idea of mine that began as a 'Lloyd George forever' TL but then after the war morphed into a kind of UK-Germany equivalent. Anyway, here's what I have so far.

1908-1915: H.H. Asquith (Liberal) [1]
Jan. 1910 def: Conservative (Arthur Balfour); Irish Parliamentary (John Redmond); Labour (Arthur Henderson); Liberal Unionist (Joseph Chamberlain)
Dec. 1910 def: Conservative (Arthur Balfour); Irish Parliamentary (John Redmond); Labour (George Barnes); Liberal Unionist (Joseph Chamberlain)
1915-1929: David Lloyd George (National Coalition) [2]

1918 def: Irish Parliamentary (John Dillon); Labour (Ramsay MacDonald); Liberal (H.H. Asquith)
1924 def: Labour (Ramsay MacDonald); Liberal (H.H. Asquith); Nationalist (Michael Collins)
1929-1931: Austen Chamberlain (National Coalition) [3]
1929 def: Labour (Ramsay MacDonald); Liberal (Walter Runciman); Nationalist (Michael Collins)
1931-1940: Reginald McKenna (National Coalition) [4]

1931 def: Labour (Ramsay MacDonald); Liberal (Herbert Samuel); Nationalist (Eamon de Valera)
1938 def: Labour (George Lansbury); Liberal (Herbert Samuel); Nationalist (Eamon de Valera)
1940-1945: Winston Churchill (National Coalition) [5]
1945-1949: Herbert Morrison (Labour) [6]
1945 def: National Coalition (Winston Churchill); Liberal (Archibald Sinclair); Communist (Harry Pollitt); Nationalist (Michael Collins)
1949-1956: Anthony Eden (Unionist) [7] (minority 1949-53)
1949 def: Labour (Herbert Morrison); Liberal (Archibald Sinclair); Nationalist (Michael Collins); Communist (Harry Pollitt)
1953 def: Labour (Nye Bevan); Liberal (Clement Davies)
1956-1961: R.A. Butler (Unionist) [8]
1957 def: Labour (Hugh Gaitskell); Liberal (Jo Grimond)
1961-1965: R.A. Butler (Unionist-Liberal)
1961 def: Labour (Hugh Gaitskell); Liberal (Jo Grimond)
1965 def:
Labour (Anthony Crosland); Liberal (Jo Grimond)
1966-1969: Iain Macleod (Unionist-Liberal) [9]
1969-1977: Anthony Crosland (Labour-Liberal) [10]

1969 def: Unionist (Iain Macleod); Liberal (Jeremy Thorpe)
1972 def: Unionist (Anthony Barber); Liberal (Jeremy Thorpe)
1976 def: Unionist (Anthony Nutting); Liberal (John Pardoe)

1977: John Pardoe (Labour-Liberal) (interim) [11]
1977-1982: Peter Shore (Labour-Liberal) [12]

1980 def: Unionist (Brian Faulkner); Liberal (David Steel)
1982-1992: Charles Haughey (Unionist-Liberal) [13]
1983 def: Labour (Peter Shore); Liberal (David Steel); Green (Jonathon Porritt)
1987 def: Labour (John Hume); Liberal (David Owen); Green (Jonathon Porritt)
1990 def: Labour (Bryan Gould); Liberal (David Owen); Green (Jonathon Porritt)

1992-1998: Nicholas Scott (Unionist-Liberal) [14]
1994 def: Labour (John Prescott); Green (Jean Lambert); Liberal (David Owen)
1998-2005: Robin Cook (Labour-Green) [15]
1998 def: Unionist (Nicholas Scott); Green (Keith Taylor); Liberal (Menzies Campbell)
2002 def: Unionist (David Trimble); Green (Keith Taylor); Liberal (Menzies Campbell)

2005-2009: Theresa May (Unionist-Labour-Liberal) [16]
2005 def: Labour (Robin Cook); Liberal (Menzies Campbell); Socialist (George Monbiot); Green (Keith Taylor)
2009-2013: Theresa May (Unionist-Liberal)
2009 def: Labour (David Blunkett); Liberal (Chris Huhne); Socialist (Ken Livingstone); Green (Caroline Lucas)
2013-2017:Ed Miliband (Labour-Green-Socialist) [17]
2013 def: Unionist (Theresa May); Green (Caroline Lucas); Socialist (Ken Livingstone); Liberal (Chris Huhne)
2017- : Amber Rudd (Unionist-Liberal-Green) [18]
2017 def: Labour (Ed Miliband); National (Nigel Farage); Liberal (David Laws); Socialist (Clive Lewis); Green (Sian Berry)

[1] Up until 1914 this is pretty much OTL. Then, in 1914, Britain does not join the Allies (*waves hands as to precisely how this happens*) and the Third Irish Home Rule Act isn't suspended.
[2] A coalition of pro-war Liberals, Conservatives and Liberal Unionists kick Asquith out of government and replace him with a coalition headed by Lloyd George. The UK joins the War, mainly providing naval support until there is a negotiated settlement in 1917. The coalition hangs together through the 1920s, becoming a big tent managerial party with some radical principles on land reform. The success of Home Rule means that the Liberal Unionists gradually dissolve into the Liberals and Conservatives (according to taste) but always under the umbrella of the "National Coalition" (at this stage still an informal title). The UK also changes its name to "The United Kingdoms of Great Britain and Ireland" with the advent of 'home rule' for Scotland, Wales and the English regions.
[3] The Conservatives and conservative Liberals finally get sick of Lloyd George and oust him ahead of the election. Appointing Chamberlain to the leadership keeps the Coalition together but he runs into trouble after his government's poor response to the Wall Street Crash.

[4] McKenna is persuaded to return to government at the head of a technocratic regime which adopts the formal name "National Coalition Party" for the first time. A rump independent Liberal Party remains but the Conservatives and the Unionists are entirely absorbed. Labour does not join but a faction of the Irish Nationalists led by Michael Collins joins. (Another faction, led by Eamon de Valera, does not.) McKenna manages the UK's growth out of the Great Depression with a quasi-Keynesian programme (Lloyd George and his acolytes are still inside the tent) combined with rearmament. However, the Second World War breaks out as OTL and McKenna's dry technocratic tone isn't what the country needs at the moment.
[5] Churchill comes in to do his Churchill thing for the duration of the war. His governing coalition includes Labour members as OTL.
[6] Labour wins a small majority in 1945 and this, combined with their experience of being locked out of government by the Coalition in the 1930s, makes them more skeptical of the structures of the British state. In particular, they replace FPTP with MMP in 1948.
[7] The National Coalition rebrands itself as the "Unionists" and roars back to success, unexpectedly forming a majority. It retains a lot of its big tent nature, however, and continues or deepens many of the welfare reforms of previous National Coalition and Labour governments. Eden, however, is pushed into retirement in 1956 owing to ill-health.
[8] Butler continues the managerial, technocratic programme of his predecessor, in coalition with the Liberals from 1961 onwards. A major diplomatic achievement of his premiership is the founding of the North Atlantic Free Trade Area (NAFTA) with Canada, Newfoundland, Norway, Iceland, Sweden and Denmark in 1960.
[9] Butler is "persuaded" to retire gracefully after 10 years and hand over to his protege Macleod.
[10] A change in Liberal leadership from Grimond to Thorpe means the Liberals are persuaded to enter coalition with Labour after the 1969 election. The agreement continues even after Thorpe is forced to stand down in 1976 up to Crosland's death in 1977.
[11] Pardoe briefly chairs the Cabinet and is given Prime Ministerial briefings while Labour elects a new leader.
[12] Shore adopts a more idiosyncratic left wing and nationalist posture both domestically and internationally. Britain leaves NATO but retains its own independent nuclear deterrent. This, combined with continuing economic woes following the 1970s energy crisis, unnerves the Liberals and they jump ship in 1982.
[13] Haughey becomes the first Irish prime minister since Wellington. His government introduces new tax measures and expanded child support, raising the ire of its right wing. Environmental politics comes to the fore, with the Greens becoming a major parliamentary force. Haughey is eventually forced out over a phone-tapping scandal.
[14] Nicholas Scott, from the left wing of the Unionists, ushers in the "Cool Britannia" 1990s, a period of speedy social liberalisation and economic boom. It's not enough to stave off eventual electoral defeat, however, in 1998.
[15] Labour finally returns to power at the head of a Labour-Green coalition. The government introduces landmark environmental reforms (often working closely with the Gore Administration after 2001) and liberal reforms of citizenship laws but its trades union and labour market reforms alienate many members of its left wing.
[16] Theresa May leads a moderate Unionist government, first in coalition with Labour and the Liberals and then just the latter. Labour is damaged by the new Socialist Party taking votes from its left. The UK (and NAFTA as a whole) weathers the 2008 economic crisis reasonably well and this, combined with her technocratic governing style, leads to May being (quasi-)affectionately known as "Mother Theresa" in the press.
[17] Labour cobbles together a coalition with the Greens and the Socialists which gets a lot done in the areas of welfare reform, financial regulation and the environment. However, widespread distrust between Labour and Socialist activists, combined with an incipient antisemitism scandal in the Socialists, lend the coalition an unstable air and everyone is kind of happy when it's over.
[18] Much of the right of the Unionists joins Nigel Farage's National Party, which finally makes a breakthrough at the federal level. The Unionists, Greens and Liberals go into coalition together, although there are disagreements over immigration policy (among other things), it's held together so far...
 
Why? He's to the right of Ed Miliband on a lot of things. This is an odd choice.
It's a snapshot of that brief moment at around 2016 where Corbynistas hoped Lewis could be Corbyn but less unpopular.
Partly that. My thinking was also that a big divide between Labour and the Socialists would be their different attitudes towards Labour joining the grand coalition with the Unionists in 2005-09. In that context I think someone like Lewis makes sense...

EDIT: Just to add to this, for characters in the Socialists I was looking for people whose politics track left wing but who also don't seem to have much loyalty towards the institutional Labour Party. So, for example, it made sense to me for Ken Livingstone to join the new grouping and I could see John McDonnell as the party's finance spokesman. But I think Corbyn would have stayed. Just to give an example
 
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Charles EP M.

Well-known member
Published by SLP
Who did Red Alert 2 come under? or are you taking bits to make one unified idea?
This is from the fanon idea that Tiberian Dawn comes from a Soviet victory in Red Alert, I assume? (Which I find rather silly, but yours is a nice take on fleshing it out).
Yeah, it's the "Red Alert is prequel to the first one" idea - though Alexander Romanov is probably the Russian leader in this timeline too, he just can't do much militarily.
 

Time Enough

"Enthusiastic Cis Male Partner"
Pronouns
He/Him
General Secretary of the CPGB
1956-1974: John Gollan
1974-1978: Gordon McLennan
1978-1986: Sid French
1986: CPGB dissolved and replaced by Workers Party of Britain (Juche)

Joint-Secretaries of Democratic Left:
1978-1985: Dave Cook-Beatrix Campbell
1985-1988: Beatrix Campbell-Martin Jacques
1988-1996: Martin Jacques-Nina Temple
1994: Red and Green Alliance formed with Derek Wall
1996-2000: Nina Temple-John Peck
2000: Merger of Democratic Left and Green Party into Green-Left

Joint Secretaries of Green-Left:
2000-2005: Derek Wall-Caroline Lucas
2005-2010: Caroline Lucas-George Monbiot
2010-2015: George Monbiot-Natalie Bennett
2015-2020: Natalie Bennett-Maggie Chapman
2020-: Maggie Chapman-Jules Joanne Gleeson

"Nina Temple: The Successful Socialist..."
"Much has been said about Nina Temple, the smart and media savvy secretary who became famous for her sharp criticism of the late Thatcher Government, the Heseltine Government and the subsequent Smith/Brown Governments from a Left Wing perspective and ensured the eventual successful merger of Democratic Left and the Green Party (Wallite strain). But the moment that clarified it for many was her creation of the 1985 New Left Debate, when she was still the Secretary of Media for the Party that really exemplified the utter collapse of the CPGB as the party of the Left and would lay the grounds for DL's first mass council victories. Temple would organise the infamous 'Ireland and Socialism' discussion between Proinsias De Rossa and Michael D. Higgins, the 'Future of Socialism' which included heavy weights like Gerardo Iglesias and a surprisingly spritely Enrico Berlinguer and future Chinese leader Zhao Ziyang. The success of the debates and the surrounding festival has been credited with not only expanding the scope of the Democratic Left from just electoral victory but also allowed them to expand into becoming the dominate voice of the Left which would have a lot of ramifications during the Miliband Austerity years..."
-The Raise of the Left, Laurie Penny, 2019
 
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