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The House of Stuart Sequence

George Kearton

Well-known member
Published by SLP
#1
I thought it might be useful to bring newcomers up-to-date. The aim of the sequence is to relate an imagined history following a successful Jacobite Uprising in 1745.
Volumes one to five are currently available as Kindle books. Volumes six and seven are with SLP for future publication. Volume eight, which will conclude the story in 1945, is about half-written.
Sincere gratitude to Tom, Jack and Ed for all their hard work and to all readers for their enthusiastic support.
 

George Kearton

Well-known member
Published by SLP
#2
I have a very tatty, hand-written 'family tree' for my imagined House of Stuart. Can anyone help by magicking it into a properly laid out computer version please? No payment but an acknowledgment when it is published as an epilogue to volume eight (see earlier post)
 

George Kearton

Well-known member
Published by SLP
#6
Once again, very pleased but slightly gob-smacked! Three volumes in the top two hundred of Kindle AH books and another hovering just outside. Many thanks to SLP and all readers. Volumes one to six published and available, volumes seven and eight with Tom and volume nine now at just under 60,000 words!
 

George Kearton

Well-known member
Published by SLP
#9
Delighted to report that "The House of Stuart Sequence", my nine-volume alternative Jacobite history series, is now complete.
I finished volume nine "The Longest Road" earlier this afternoon. It still needs rereading and correcting for possible typos but, hopefully, will be on its way to SLP shortly.
I have dedicated this final volume to all my fellow SLP authors.
 

Alex Richards

Tends to eat truffles once found
Patreon supporter
Published by SLP
Location
Derbyshire
#15
Reading through A State of Unending War and, and I say this purely in the way of constructive criticism, I think this is the point where the parallelism starts to completely break down in terms of logic. I'm willing to brush aside stuff like a reference to Slavic elites in Albania (there were some, but most Albanians were non-Slavic Muslims, or at least didn't consider themselves to be), but Verdun poses a pretty significant problem.

Verdun was a major fort because it was pretty much right on the border with Germany. Problem is ITTL Germany doesn't exist and France still has Alsace-Lorraine. Which then just leads me to wonder why the major defensive fortifications are being built so far into the country rather than somewhere like Haguenau or Thionville or Saint-Avold.
 

George Kearton

Well-known member
Published by SLP
#16
Reading through A State of Unending War and, and I say this purely in the way of constructive criticism, I think this is the point where the parallelism starts to completely break down in terms of logic. I'm willing to brush aside stuff like a reference to Slavic elites in Albania (there were some, but most Albanians were non-Slavic Muslims, or at least didn't consider themselves to be), but Verdun poses a pretty significant problem.

Verdun was a major fort because it was pretty much right on the border with Germany. Problem is ITTL Germany doesn't exist and France still has Alsace-Lorraine. Which then just leads me to wonder why the major defensive fortifications are being built so far into the country rather than somewhere like Haguenau or Thionville or Saint-Avold.
France would still need defensive positions against the Russians after 1860 - as to their geographic positions when have the French ever followed common sense?
 

Alex Richards

Tends to eat truffles once found
Patreon supporter
Published by SLP
Location
Derbyshire
#17
France would still need defensive positions against the Russians after 1860 - as to their geographic positions when have the French ever followed common sense?
They'd need defensive positions yes, but what government would possibly get away with implementing a defensive strategy that says 'we let the enemy advance 100km into the country and take a major city and significant natural resources without a shot before they meet any defensive barriers'
 

Tabac Iberez

Impetious
Published by SLP
#18
France would still need defensive positions against the Russians after 1860 - as to their geographic positions when have the French ever followed common sense?
Most of the time, really. Elsas and Lorraine are already both ripe for and with fortifications, and with the infastructure there it's plenty attractive to build a bullwark there. It might not be worth it to reintegrate the antique Trace Itallian fortifications, but there's still plenty to work with there.