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WI: Burr in 1800?

Veridian

disasterpiece
Location
the next universe over
Pronouns
She / They
Every aspiring U.S. alt-historian knows of Aaron Burr, and by extension his rather infamous persona. But, for as much of a character he was, Burr came within an inch of the presidency in 1800 - in idiosyncratically Burr fashion, by means of swindling and backroom machine politics.

What if, instead of Jefferson - either by the contingent election going his way or more easily through that one NY elector casting his second ballot for someone else - Burr was elected into the presidency, with an understandably upset Jefferson as vice president? What would the immediate effects be, how would Jefferson and the rest of Burr's enemies react, and what would be the further political ramifications on the young, fragile republic?

First person to crack a reference to that damn play gets to sit in the corner.
 

Beata Beatrix

Herod Agrippa was cancelled by an owl
Location
Portland, OR
Pronouns
she/her/hers
I will say that, um, a peaceful transition of power is rather a bit of an assumption, and was by no means a certainty at the time – Jefferson saw Burr as a new Cataline and as such (I briefly quote this Vox article):
A violent crisis seemed quite possible. "Republican newspapers talked of military intervention," Gordon Wood writes in Empire of Liberty. "The governors of Virginia and Pennsylvania began preparing their state militias for action. Mobs gathered in the capital and threatened to prevent any president from being appointed by statute."
 

zaffre

At the same time, a Space Bug
Location
Massachusetts
What if, instead of Jefferson - either by the contingent election going his way or more easily through that one NY elector casting his second ballot for someone else - Burr was elected into the presidency,
I think these two pathways are (more than marginally) different since the matter became so contentious because it went to a contingent election and Burr transparently tried to backstab his own party by scheming with Federalists and not immediately standing down. If Burr wins via contingent election he's seen as a traitor by a healthy majority of the country, the new Congress, and his own Vice President, and the possible or even likely outcome is blood in the streets.

But if that one New York elector is not idiotic enough to try to cast two votes for him and Burr wins outright - loads of people are going to be unhappy, because the wrong person won, but an obvious procedural failing (and hardly an unprecedented one - Burr’s vote held up so well in 1800 because his supporters were mad that southern electors had abandoned him en masse in 1796) is not nearly as damning, and Jefferson is going to have a harder time arguing that although Burr unambiguously came in first he has to step down. Burr still becomes a lame duck from day one, then, but he does get a day one.
 
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