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Longer-lasting First Triumvirate?

MAC161

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WI, USA
Been reading a book on the most noteworthy generals of the Roman Republic and Empire, and the current chapter discusses the lead-up to and events of the civil war between Caesar and Pompey. One passing background section describes how there was some impetus for a new war with Parthia around the time Caesar and Pompey were starting to square off (just before the former crossed the Rubicon) to avenge Crassus' disastrous defeat in 53 B.C. Some Senators, according to this analysis, apparently thought one or the other (or even both) of the two most powerful/popular generals in Rome should be sent to lead this war, thus defusing the political situation in Italy for a while, or perhaps permanently. In the end, Caesar's opponents were too set on bringing him back for "trial" over his campaigns in Gaul, and Caesar likewise too determined to continue his political and military rise, for conciliation to happen, and the civil war began.

But what if some arrangement had been worked out, preserving the First Triumvirate (or Duumvirate, in this case, unless the agreement somehow included appointing another triumvir?), opening a new campaign against Parthia in the process, and preventing civil war, at least for a while? What would've had to change for this to happen?

One AH element/event coming to mind: Julia, Caesar's daughter married to Pompey in 59 B.C., doesn't die in childbirth, and is still living at the time of the threatened breach between the two leaders, thereby keeping their alliance (somewhat) intact. Marriages of this type were primarily made for political ends, but since sources point to a genuine love between Pompey and Julia, it's possible this (and maybe Julia's giving birth to a living son) would maintain the Caesar-Pompey filial and political ties, and (temporarily) prevent a schism.

Presuming this happens, and the idea of another Parthian war is followed through on, how likely is it both men would be sent to command, possibly in different sectors of imperium? How might this campaign play out with one or both of the two leading Roman generals of the era at the lead? Would a civil war still be inevitable, and how would that look, in the aftermath of a (victorious? defeated? drawn?) Parthian war in the 40s B.C.?
 
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Geordie

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This is an interesting idea. If Caesar goes to Parthia, it just delays the collision that's coming - provided, of course, that he returns alive.

If he loses, his opponents will decide that now, when he's weakened, is the time to strike. Hence a fight. If he wins, they'll panic, and he'll be insistent on his rewards. Hence a fight.

Sending both Pompey and Caesar is interesting. If both survive, they may be closer than ever, although problems on campaign may have driven a wedge between them.
 

Aznavour

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Published by SLP
Kinda seems like a repeat of the Mithridatic War situation between Marius and Sulla. Both would want command and the chance of glory and spoil, particularly Pompey who’s being overshadowed by Caesar’s campaign in Gaul, but at the same time the Senate would not want to either give Caesar the command or send Pompey away while Caesar is right there. Last time that happened, Marius took over the city and murdered everyone.
 

MAC161

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Published by SLP
Location
WI, USA
Sending both Pompey and Caesar is interesting. If both survive, they may be closer than ever, although problems on campaign may have driven a wedge between them.
How's this for a scenario: The Triumvirate is reestablished in a compromise, with a pro-Senate third member (openly or subtly a puppet of both Caesar's and Pompey's opponents) joining the two generals. They then travel to Parthia, with or without this third member (who might remain in Rome, but concerns about his accumulating power at their expense could push them to insist he join them, or to support his campaigning elsewhere, away from his "handlers" in the Senate), and defeat the Parthians, maybe even reclaiming Crassus' lost standards. Afterwards, still desiring power but bound more closely than ever by war and family (esp. with a still-living Julia and her son), Caesar and Pompey return to Rome and take over in a formal duumvirate-style government, ruling as dual princeps senatus or maybe even some form of dictators or consuls for life. Thoughts?
 
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