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Lists of Heads of Government and Heads of State

Blackentheborg

Huey Long enjoyer
Location
the Blitz House
Pronouns
He/Him
I wasn't going to go through the motions again after being told of your additions and making a sock to see it for myself, but since you've decided to post a complete version here, fuck it and fuck you. I love how you've written the I Can't Believe It's Not Edmund character.


This has never been a part of anything I've said or my beliefs.


Which I support.


My religious bigotry only goes so far as Catholicism.


I would never use cringe 'um actually the fifteenth century was the golden age of agricultural England and and' nonsense.


Nice.


But I suppose that's part of it, isn't it? "I'm not calling you a racist, after all, British right."

I mean, for all the unhinged nonsense about how I'm a racist, and I know you've seen it and evidently taken it in, when drunk and all my inhibitions are down, I don't declare my support for the indiscriminate murder of six million people for their ethnicity - unlike you.
What zero yolk does to a mf
 

Cevolian

Well-known member


2019-2022: Boris Johnson (Conservative)
def 2019: (Majority) Jeremy Corbyn (Labour), Nicola Sturgeon (SNP), Jo Swinson (Liberal Democrats), Jonathan Bartley & Sian Berry (Green)
2022-2034: Angela Rayner (Labour)
def 2022: (Minority) Boris Johnson (Conservative), Ed Davey (Liberal Democrats), Nicola Sturgeon (SNP), Alex Salmond (Alba), Jonathan Bartley & Sian Berry (Green)
def 2023:
(Majority) Boris Johnson (Conservative), Ed Davey (Liberal Democrats), Alex Salmond (Alba), Nicola Sturgeon (SNP), Jonathan Bartley & Sian Berry (Green)
def 2027: (Majority) Liz Truss (Conservative), Jane Dodds (Liberal Democrats), Shahrar Ali (Green), Neile Hanvey [replacing Alex Salmond] (Alba), Huzma Yousaf (SNP)
def 2032: (Majority) James Cleverly (Conservative), Luciana Berger (Liberal Democrats), Shahrar Ali (Green), Alex Arthur (Alba), Tamsin Omond & Cleo Lake (SURGE: For A Better Future)

2034-2035: Apsana Begum (Labour)
2035-2042: Wes Streeting (Progressive) [#D917B9]
def 2035:
(Majority) Apsana Begum (Labour), Rishi Sunak (Conservative), Luciana Berger (Liberal Democrats), Alex Arthur (Alba), Tamsin Omond & Magid Magid (SURGE), Shahar Ali (Green)
def 2039: (Majority) Jonathan Reynolds (Labour), Tom Hunt (Conservative), Sarah Green (New Liberals), Alex Arthur (Alba), Magid Magid & Ivi Hohmann (SURGE)
2042-2050: Alex Davies-Jones (Progressive)
def 2042: (Majority) Charlotte Nichols (Labour), Sarah Green (New Liberals), Bim Afolami (Conservative), Michelle Ferns (Alba), Ivi Hohmann & Jack Harries (SURGE)
def 2045: (Minority with Conservative confidence & supply) Omid Miri (Labour), Harley Dalton (New Liberals), Elena Bunbury (Conservative), Tom McIntosh (Alba [abstained])

2050-xxxx: Omid Miri (Labour)
def 2050: (Majority) Alex Davies-Jones (Progressive), Russel Wong (New Liberals), Tom McIntosh & Mason Stuart (Britannia [abstained]), Elena Bunbury (Conservative)

It is important to recognise that the collapse of the Conservatives was inevitable. When Blair made it acceptable for suburban businessmen to vote Labour, he broke the last taboo around the party. Cameron and Johnson might have briefly stolen working-class social conservatives, but their base was hollow and rotting under them. Could any other party have risen to the status of opposition? It is doubtful. The Greens were always too enthralled by the middle-class-granola-eating-uni-student set, a fault-line around which they eventually split. The Liberal Democrats collaborated with Cameron, but even their right-wing was still more fond of capital than culture, and they never quite made themselves isolated from Labour. The SNP, beloved by the chattering classes, were an outside bet, but even Alba was at the time geographically limited and pariahs thanks to the smears on their leader.

So in the end, the only thing that could defeat Labour was itself.

Unlike with the dissolution of the Liberals, both parts of the Conservative Party that abandoned it moved under the same umbrella. The affluent suburbanites and City professionals were swayed by the ideals of "tolerance" and "progress", while the disaffected urbanites and Northern doleseekers preferred the ideals of "charity" and "community". These growing wings had profound differences over faith, nation, and economy, and the inevitable result was fission. If one were to take their pronouncements at first value, you would conclude that of Britain's two parties, one is economically to the left and socially to the right, and the other is the other way around. A more intelligent analysis would reveal the truth.

The Progressives claim the mantle of protecting British businesses from nationalisation or cooperation, but have been just as consistent in courting the trade-union sector as Labour, giving delegates from the Allied Relief and Reconstruction Workers prime speaking time in their last conference. Indeed, as part of their much-vaunted "social justice", this "pro-business" party have established one of the most generous welfare regimes in history, all in the name of funnelling climate refugees from across the globe into the workforce. The Progressives' ideal business sector is one harried round with employment quotas, taxes, and "social responsibilities", a pussycat in the lap of government--not stuffed or declawed, but far from free.

On the other side of the house, we find Labour, claiming the mantle of nation and culture. A simple glance at the Prime Minister should reveal how hollow that is. Despite allegedly championing Britain's "traditional values", government support for gender transition and alternative romantic arrangements is just as high as it is across the rest of the decadent West. The "senators of faith" supposedly set up as a check on this activity is itself compromised, with bishops forced to rub shoulder with imams, rabbis, and scores of other forms of foreign priest. Labour's vision might centre around the villages and terraced streets of a Merrie England, but it certainly doesn't take stock of the ancestry or creed of said Merrie Englanders.

In the early Naughties, British satirists joked about how the two parties had become interchangeable. Now, the joke is the reality. With both parties ultimately seeing themselves as the heirs to Blair, the main hope for the British right lies outside of politics. The Scots have shown us the way, with the luvvie leftie cuts to policing letting Free Caledonia establish itself. Let us return to the Shires, and like our ancestors, build castles against the tide of darkness...

---Norman Edmonds, Our Land: A New Reaction for a New Era
Popping out of internal exile to say this is really good actually.
 

claybaskit

Well-known member
Gone Fishing
1896November 6, 19001904

Mckinley (cropped).jpgWilliamJBryan1902 3x4.jpg
NomineeWilliam McKinleyWilliam Jennings Bryan
PartyRepublicanDemocratic
Alliance"Fusion" Populist
Silver Republican
Home stateOhioNebraska
Running mateTheodore Roosevelt Adali Stevenson
Electoral vote192355
States carried2817
Popular vote5,228,8646,370,932






1904 United States presidential election
476 members of the Electoral College
239 electoral votes needed to win
1900November 8, 19041908
Turnout65.2%[1]
Decrease
8.0 pp
1641613037186.png1642050729413.png
NomineeJames A. O'GormanWilliam Jennings Bryant
PartyRepublicanDemocratic
Home stateNew YorkNew York
Running mateCharles W. FairbanksHenry G. Davis
Electoral vote136340
States carried3213
Popular vote5,630,4577,083,880


1908 United States presidential election
483 members of the Electoral College
242 electoral votes needed to win
1904November 3, 19081912
Turnout65.4%[1]
Increase
0.2 pp
William Howard Taft, Bain bw photo portrait, 1908.jpgUnsuccessful 1908.jpg
NomineeWilliam Howard TaftWilliam Jennings Bryan
PartyRepublicanDemocratic
Home stateOhioNebraska
Running mateJames S. ShermanJohn W. Kern
Electoral vote121362
States carried2917
Popular vote4,678,3957,408,98
1912 United States presidential election
531 members of the Electoral College
266 electoral votes needed to win
1908November 5, 19121916
Turnout58.8%[1]
Decrease
6.6 pp
 

Attachments

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"Enthusiastic Cis Male Partner"
Pronouns
He/Him
After discussing briefly with @CanadianTory the hypothetical British side of A Kinder, Gentler Nation with some changes to his original ideas (no offence);

1979-1991: Margaret Thatcher (Conservative)
1979 (Majority) def: James Callaghan (Labour), David Steel (Liberal), William Wolfe (SNP)
1983 (Majority) def: Michael Foot (Labour), David Steel-Roy Jenkins (Liberal-SDP Alliance)
1987 (Majority) def: Neil Kinnock (Labour), David Steel-David Owen (Liberal-SDP Alliance)

1991-1994: Neil Kinnock (Labour)
1991 (Majority) def: Margaret Thatcher (Conservative), Paddy Ashdown (Liberal Democrats), David Alton (Social Democrats)
1994-1996: Gordon Brown (Labour)
1996-1999: Michael Heseltine (Conservative)
1996 (Majority) def: Gordon Brown (Labour), Paddy Ashdown (Liberal Democrats)
1999-2007: Malcolm Rifikind (Conservative)
2000 (Majority) def: Margaret Beckett (Labour), Simon Hughes (Liberal Democrats)
2004 Euro Referendum: Yes 54%, No 46%
2005 (Majority) def: Tony Blair (Labour), Vince Cable (Liberal Democrats), Ron Davies-Lynne Jones (Forward!)

2007-2010: David Davis (Conservative)
2010-2015: Jon Cruddas (Labour)
2010 (Majority) def: David Davis (Conservative), Vince Cable (Liberal Democrats)
2014 (Majority) def: Stephen Crabb (Conservative), John Leech (Liberal Democrats), Roseanna Cunningham (SNP)

2015-: Yvette Cooper (Labour)
2018 (Majority) def: Nicky Morgan (Conservative), John Leech (Liberal Democrats), Keith Brown (SNP), Tom Harris (Renew)

Quick Summary;
Thatcher manages to cling on to 1991, as Heseltine’s heart suffers problems slightly earlier before he can plunge the knife in. Additionally the Social Democrats manage to stay around a bit longer to dampen some the Liberal Democrat vote but eventually plunge off a cliff in short order. Kinnock wins 91’ but the failure of the ERM and stress cause him to have another series of depressive episodes leading to him resigning, Brown picks up the charge but fails against a revitalised Heseltine.

Heseltine sees the formation of the various British Assemblies, Local Government Reform and various nice One Nation Tory things before his heart gives out again. Rifkind manages to get in on a sympathy vote and a Conservative Right who is constantly stabbing each other. Rifkind oversees Britain joining the Euro and wins 2005 election due to Labour splitting after a contested election that see’s Blair accused of corruption to beat Left standearer Ron Davies.

Rifkind manages to gain 8 years before retiring after a controversy around Foot and Mouth, David Davis gets in embodying a similar drive across the pond with Gary Johnson of a Libertarian Style Governance. This goes, rather poorly.

Jon Cruddas is elected as the Left Wing, Back to Basics, Man of the People character who defeats Davis handily. Cruddas lasts 5 years before a Liberal Democrat surge over Cruddas’s Mild Social Conservatism and reactions to Pandemic Restrictions causes Cruddas to win by a slimmer margin than intended, and bow out whilst still popular.

Yvette Cooper is the return of the Labour Right to the driving wheel, though her flashy, boring policies are a breath of fresh air after the previous few years. 2018 is considered a fairly dull election, with Labour making some gains from Liberal Democrat’s and Conservative’s and Tom Harris’s attempt a Eurosceptic Populist Party crashing and burning.

It seems for the Tories, there last hope remains in Tobias Ellwood.
 

Blackentheborg

Huey Long enjoyer
Location
the Blitz House
Pronouns
He/Him
Rulers of the Kingdom of England
1066–1087: King William I (House of Normandy)
1087-1100: King William II (House of Normandy)
1100-1135: King Robert I (House of Normandy)

Rulers of the Holy Kingdoms of England and Jerusalem
1135–1141: King William III (House of Normandy)
1141-1153: King Elijah I (House of Normandy-Baldwin)

Rulers of the Kingdom of Angevin
1154–1189: King Robert I (House of Normandy-Baldwin)
1189–1199: King Evan I (House of York)
1199-1216: King Tomas I (House of York-Dreux)
1216-1272: King Yanis I (House of Normandy-Dunkeld)

Rulers of the Hanseatic Kalmarunionen
1272-????: King Eric I (Normandy-Sverre)
 

CTTeller

Basil from OMORI in Fawlty Towers, make it happen!
Location
Pinner, London
Rulers of the Kingdom of England
1066–1087: King William I (House of Normandy)
1087-1100: King William II (House of Normandy)
1100-1135: King Robert I (House of Normandy)

Rulers of the Holy Kingdoms of England and Jerusalem
1135–1141: King William III (House of Normandy)
1141-1153: King Elijah I (House of Normandy-Baldwin)

Rulers of the Kingdom of Angevin
1154–1189: King Robert I (House of Normandy-Baldwin)
1189–1199: King Evan I (House of York)
1199-1216: King Tomas I (House of York-Dreux)
1216-1272: King Yanis I (House of Normandy-Dunkeld)

Rulers of the Hanseatic Kalmarunionen
1272-????: King Eric I (Normandy-Sverre)
I'm genuinely not kidding, I read that as the 'House of Yoke' initially instead of York.
 

AndrewH

I was hospitalized for approaching perfection
Location
Tampa, FL
Might update this when I can with expanded ideas or added countries. The original gist was "May '68 on steroids," but kind of went all over in response to various books and academic readings relating to the upheaval of the late 60's in a global context.

United States of America
1969 - 1973: Richard Nixon / Spiro Agnew (Republican)
defeated, 1968: Hubert Humphrey / Ed Muskie (Democratic), George Wallace / Curtis LeMay (AIP)
December, 1968: I had a whole long write-up here that got lost, so I'll provide the gist and see if I can update later. Basically Humphrey decisively breaks with Johnson earlier in the campaign with regards to Vietnam, and the backchannels between Nixon and Johnson open up earlier in response. Wallace absolutely takes it to Humphrey and then later Nixon, and his ballooning "nihilist vote" (as described by Garry Wills) threatens to send the election to Congress - which he partially succeeds in. Wallace overperforms and forces a hung Electoral College, but Nixon's victory in the popular vote and his continued communications with the White House secure his and Agnew's election before Wallace can even get on the phone with Tricky Dick, further inflaming Wallace and large sections of the American protesting public.

1973 - 1977: Richard Nixon / John Anderson (Republican)
defeated, 1972: Hubert Humphrey / Reubin Askew (Democratic), Gene McCarthy / various (Independent)

1977 - present: John Connally / Cap Weinberger (Republican)
defeated, 1976: Fred Harris / Cyrus Vance (Democratic)

January, 1977: Former President Richard Nixon sworn in as Secretary of State

French Republic
1959 - 1968: Charles de Gaulle (UDR)
1968: Pierre Mendès France (Le Front Unique, serving as Prime Minister)
May, 1968: During de Gaulle's flight from Paris during the '68 protests, stating privately "I do not want to give them a chance to attack the Élysée. It would be regrettable if blood were shed in my personal defense. I have decided to leave: nobody attacks an empty palace," and is unable to be convinced by Jacques Massu to immediately return. PM Pompidou, his hand forced by Valery Giscard d'Estaing, announces the resignation of the government in response. Reporters manage to learn that de Gaulle is still conferring with Generals in Baden, Germany. Georges Séguy, who had been previously terrified of a mass crackdown if they attempted a violent seizure of power, seizes the opportunity with the Government and Army stunned and de Gaulle out of the country and occupy the Élysée, and declare a "popular government." The police prefecture put up a half-hearted fight and a handful of students are wounded, but Pompidou is able to negotiate Séguy down to a referendum set for July the 16th on drafting a convention constitutionnelle, fresh Presidential elections on August the 5th, and a temporary government helmed by Pierre Mendès France, with Gaullist ministers allowed to continue as a sign of good faith. The reaction is mixed, and Séguy maintains the occupations of the factories by the CGT until the date of the referendum. While talk of a violent reaction helmed by Massu, de Gaulle or even American intervention persists, de Gaulle accedes to Pompidou, formally resigns the Presidency and remains in Germany (he would later go on to decry the events as 'a coup' after the elections).
Referendum on the Approval of a Proposed Constitutional Convention
52.3% OUI, 46.6% NON: Turnout for the referendum is shockingly low, and even then the Left manages only to squeak out a meager victory over the conservative forces opposed to constitutional reform. Mendès France jams the Convention full of veteran left-wingers, radicals (both in the literal sense and from the Radical Party) and strike leaders (students were remarkably underrepresented), further inflaming tensions in response to the perceived cronyism of the Prime Minister.
1968 - 1972: Georges Pompidou (UDR)
1972 - present: André Lalande (Independent)

People's Republic of China
1943 - 1967: Mao Zedong (CPC)
December, 1966: Marshal He Long attempts to remove Mao from power in response to increasing pressures related to the proposed Cultural Revolution, namely the May 16 Circular drafted by a committee helmed by Chen Boda and personally overseen by Jiang Qiang and the persecution of Luo Ruiqing; fighting is centered around Peking University and the Renmin University of China. While the coup is repelled by Mao's bodyguards, He Long successfully leads a military takeover of Beijing and proclaims a new government despite lack of political support, with the exception of the Mayor of
Shanghai. Mao, who was wounded in the fighting, is forced to flee and takes up residence in Henan. Lin Biao fills the vacuum left by the recovering Helmsman and takes over the immediate governance in conjunction with Zhou Enlai and Deng Xiaoping, while Mao nominally remains in control.
March, 1967: In the midst of mass social upheaval caused by the now on-going Cultural Revolution and the 'December Revolution,' Mao dies as a result of a lingering infection from a grazed wound in the ankle and complications from lifelong smoking.

1966 - 1969: Lin Biao (CPC)
1969 - 1975: Chen Boda / Kang Sheng (CPC)
1975 - 1975: Li Xuefeng (CPC)
1975 - present: Tan Zhenlin (CPC)

Revolution of the Second Front Army
1966 - 1971:
He Long / Cao Diqiu (Party of the December Revolution)
July, 1971: He Long captured and executed attempting to cross border into Burma.
 
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"Enthusiastic Cis Male Partner"
Pronouns
He/Him
Might update this when I can with expanded ideas or added countries. The original gist was "May '68 on steroids," but kind of went all over in response to various books and academic readings relating to the upheaval of the late 60's in a global context.
Ooooh, I do always find the air of 1968 to be rather fascinating. The Cultural Revolution turning into Civil War, Wallace nearly breaking America and France experiencing chaos are fascinating to see.

The British version would probably be the Civil Rights movement in Northern Ireland leading to a more chaotic and fearsome conflict early and more ‘Free Cities’ popping up and a crisis in the Wilson Government or something.
 

Mumby

Always mysterious!
Published by SLP
Location
Municipal Commune of Bourne
Pronouns
He/Him
real dumb idea this

Fully Automated Luxury Cabinet Democracy

Prime Ministers of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

1997-1997: John Smith (Labour)
1997 (Coalition with Liberal Democrats) def. John Major (Conservative), Paddy Ashdown (Liberal Democrat), David Trimble (Ulster Unionist), Alex Salmond (Scottish National)
1997-1997: Margaret Beckett (Labour), Acting
1997-2003: Tony Blair (Labour)
1998 (Majority) def. William Hague (Conservative), Paddy Ashdown (Liberal Democrat), David Trimble (Ulster Unionist), Alex Salmond (Scottish National)
2002 (Majority) def. Iain Duncan Smith (Conservative), Charles Kennedy (Liberal Democrat), David Trimble (Ulster Unionist), Ian Paisley (Democratic Unionist), Alex Neil (Scottish National)

2003-2011: Alan Milburn (Labour)
2006 (Majority) def. Ken Clarke (Conservative), Peter Hain (Liberal Democrat), Ian Paisley (Democratic Unionist), Gerry Adams (Sinn Fein), Alex Neil (Scottish National)
2011-2013: David Davis (Conservative)
2011 (Coalition with Liberal Democrats) def. Alan Milburn (Labour), Peter Hain (Liberal Democrat), Peter Robinson / Andrew Hunter (Democratic Unionist), Gerry Adams (Sinn Fein)

Co-Chairs of the Cabinet of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

2013-2015: David Davis / Peter Hain (Conservative / Liberal Democrat)
2015-2016: Crispin Blunt / Keith Vaz (Conservative / Labour)
2015 GE; Conservative 298, Labour 216, Liberal Democrat 103, Democratic Unionist 13, Sinn Fein 6, Others 14
2016-2017: Crispin Blunt / John Leech (Conservative / Liberal Democrat)
2017-2019: Nicky Morgan / Frank Field (Conservative / Labour)
2019-0000: Louise Harris / Tom Tugendhat (Liberal Democrat / Conservative)
2019 GE; Liberal Democrat 245, Conservative 223, Labour 143, Democratic Unionist 24, Sinn Fein 7, Others 8
 

rosa

Well-known member
real dumb idea this

Fully Automated Luxury Cabinet Democracy

Prime Ministers of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

1997-1997: John Smith (Labour)
1997 (Coalition with Liberal Democrats) def. John Major (Conservative), Paddy Ashdown (Liberal Democrat), David Trimble (Ulster Unionist), Alex Salmond (Scottish National)
1997-1997: Margaret Beckett (Labour), Acting
1997-2003: Tony Blair (Labour)
1998 (Majority) def. William Hague (Conservative), Paddy Ashdown (Liberal Democrat), David Trimble (Ulster Unionist), Alex Salmond (Scottish National)
2002 (Majority) def. Iain Duncan Smith (Conservative), Charles Kennedy (Liberal Democrat), David Trimble (Ulster Unionist), Ian Paisley (Democratic Unionist), Alex Neil (Scottish National)

2003-2011: Alan Milburn (Labour)
2006 (Majority) def. Ken Clarke (Conservative), Peter Hain (Liberal Democrat), Ian Paisley (Democratic Unionist), Gerry Adams (Sinn Fein), Alex Neil (Scottish National)
2011-2013: David Davis (Conservative)
2011 (Coalition with Liberal Democrats) def. Alan Milburn (Labour), Peter Hain (Liberal Democrat), Peter Robinson / Andrew Hunter (Democratic Unionist), Gerry Adams (Sinn Fein)

Co-Chairs of the Cabinet of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

2013-2015: David Davis / Peter Hain (Conservative / Liberal Democrat)
2015-2016: Crispin Blunt / Keith Vaz (Conservative / Labour)
2015 GE; Conservative 298, Labour 216, Liberal Democrat 103, Democratic Unionist 13, Sinn Fein 6, Others 14
2016-2017: Crispin Blunt / John Leech (Conservative / Liberal Democrat)
2017-2019: Nicky Morgan / Frank Field (Conservative / Labour)
2019-0000: Louise Harris / Tom Tugendhat (Liberal Democrat / Conservative)
2019 GE; Liberal Democrat 245, Conservative 223, Labour 143, Democratic Unionist 24, Sinn Fein 7, Others 8
I love the color scheme
 

AnActualFam

Well-known member
Location
Somewhere at Sea
Pronouns
He/Him
This was inspired by a discussion where we talked about the 1990s Albania financial crisis where multiple pyramids schemes destroyed the Albania economy, I decided to put this into a fun US context:

2001-2009 George W. Bush (R-TX)/Dick Cheney (R-WY)
2000 def. Al Gore (D-TN)/Joe Lieberman (D-CT)
2004 def. John Kerry (D-MA)/John Edwards (D-NC)

2009-2017 Russ Feingold (D-WI)/Barack Obama (D-IL)
2008 def. John McCain (R-AZ)/Tim Pawlenty (R-MN)
2012 def. Ron Paul (R-TX)/Rick Santorum (R-PA)

2017-present Barack Obama (D-IL)/Xavier Becerra (D-CA)
2016 def. Mike Huckabee (R-AR)/Karen Handel (R-GA)
2020 def. Marco Rubio (R-FL)/Rob Portman (R-OH)


Bernie Madoff’s legacy is one of hatred. He has constantly been polled as one of the most hated people in US History after his ponzi scheme was revealed. His role in the largest ponzi scheme in history was only exacerbated in the late 2000s when George Bush helped pass a law to “reform” social security and put it into the market. The U.S. government trusted Madoff, the one-time chairman of the NASDAQ with this transaction which was a gigantic mistake.

Even before the bottom fell out, 2006 was a massacre for Republicans destroying social security. This got worse as the 2008 financial crisis led to a run on the bank to pull out the now teetering social security stocks. It was then revealed that they had been caught in Madoff’s scheme and the destruction of social security was guaranteed as millions lost their retirement funds. This created the Second Great Depression around the world. Madoff ironically destroyed the Republican Party for over a generation, with only the Republicans in 2022 finally getting the House of Representatives back after over 16 years out of power, they hope to gain the presidency or the Senate next, which they feel are finally in reach.
 
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