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Lists of Heads of Government and Heads of State

Uhura's Mazda

Forum Poster 'General Fructuoso Rivera'
Published by SLP
Location
Tamaki Makaurau
Electoral History of Eric Robert Poole
  • Anti-Partition League candidate for Glasgow Govan, 1951
  • Clann na Poblachta candidate for Dublin North-East, 1957
  • League of Independent Voters candidate for Vauxhall, Liverpool MBC, 1959
  • League of Independent Voters Councillor for Vauxhall, Liverpool MBC (1960-1968)
  • League of Independent Voters candidate for Liverpool Scotland, 1966
  • National Democratic Party Councillor for Vauxhall, Liverpool MBC (1968-1973)
  • National Democratic Party MP for Liverpool Scotland (1970-1974)
  • National Democratic Party candidate for Liverpool Scotland Exchange, Feb 1974
  • National Democratic Party candidate for Liverpool Scotland Exchange, Oct 1974
  • SNP candidate for Glasgow Garscadden, 1978
  • Unity/Irish Independence Party MP for Mid Ulster (1979-1982)
  • Ecology Party MP for Mid Ulster (1982-1983)
  • Ecology Party candidate for Mid Ulster, 1983
  • Green Progressive Accord/Political Party of Radicals candidate for the Netherlands, 1984
  • Irish Civil Rights Association candidate for Battersea, 1987
  • The Greens candidate for Vauxhall, 1989

A Scottish-born shipbuilder of Irish parentage, Eric Poole (fictional), first became involved in politics in the attention-raising campaign of the Irish Anti-Partition League in several Great British constituencies in 1950, standing on his own account in the more limited attempt which came the next year. With his national sense kindled, he became one of the few people to emigrate from Glasgow to Ireland, and became involved in the left-wing Republican party Clann na Poblachta, where he encountered the ideas of Catholic Social Action, Distributism, monetary reform and environmentalism that would shape all of his future political activities. However, the depressed economic situation of Ireland at that time pushed him to return to Britain - this time to Liverpool, where Poole encountered a small group of Social Credit obsessives organised by Anthony Cooney.

Cooney's circle began to contest local elections in Liverpool under the name of the 'League of Independent Voters', following C. H. Douglas' anti-party precepts. Fortuitously, the choice of this name enabled the group to print leaflets bearing the motto "Vote L.I.V - E. R. Poole", which are generally supposed to be the only reason why Poole won a seat on the Council. Largely taking Catholic and above all Irish voters from Labour, Poole encountered resistance from the Liverpool Protestant Party, and ultimately the local political scene became mired in a bitter struggle between the two groups - especially once the Troubles hotted up. Come 1970, the parliamentary seat of Liverpool Scotland was won with about a quarter of the vote by Poole, beating the Protestants, a new Labour candidate and the Tories. But by this point, he had become so associated with the 'Ulster issue' that he had joined the National Democratic Party, which had been established earlier in the 60s to revitalise mainstream nationalism.

Poole immediately became notorious for his condemnations of human rights abuses by Stormont and, later, the British Army. However, before he'd got his feet under the table of the Commons tearoom, the National Democratic Party had voted to join up with the newly founded SDLP - which didn't want to make trouble by contesting British seats, and therefore rejected Poole's application to join. For the rest of the term, Poole sat under the designation of his own 'continuity' NDP, based entirely on his Liverpudlian machine. Adverse boundary changes and an increasing hostility to Irish nationalism lost him his seat, and Poole next showed up trying to jump on the bandwagon of the SNP surge of the 1970s - right after the peak of the wave.

Now hungry for prominence, and unqualified for any equally remunerative profession, Poole went to Ulster and got involved in the IIP (inheritor of the Nationalist tradition and of some Republican sectors), in whose interest he intimidated the SDLP into standing down in Mid Ulster at the subsequent election. However, the internal contradictions of the IIP were heightened through the H-Block protests and Poole ultimately broke with them over the IIP's abstention from the 1982 constitutional convention elections, fearing that they would also abstain from supporting him at the next election. Instead, he analysed the situation and concluded that the next big thing would be the Green movement. Having espoused afforestation since the 1950s, and considering their sub-anarchist philosophy to be compatible with his continuing distributism and social credit economics, he joined up, thus becoming the country's first green MP. As a bonus, he didn't have to change the colour of his election posters.

After his loss in 1983, Poole essentially became irrelevant to any genuine conception of 'politics'. A Catholic environmentalist party invited him to be a celebrity candidate at the next European elections, but only as a 'Listdouwer'. This got him a mention in the mediocre final series of the Rik Mayall sitcom The New Statesman, which will probably be his most lasting legacy. Finally settling in London, he stood in '87 for the Irish Civil Rights Association (consequently being expelled from the Irish Civil Rights Association, who hadn't been consulted) and was then recruited by the Humanist movement of the Chilean prophet Silo, who encouraged him to stand as a spoiler candidate against the genuine Green Party in the Vauxhall by-election. The latter were increasingly of the opinion that climate change was real, which was somewhat beyond the environmental outlook of Eric Poole. If he hadn't stood, his vote would probably have gone en bloc to David Icke, who would consequently have won the seat.

This was the last political activity taken by Poole, although he continued to write Social Credit pamphlets (and, regrettably, satirical poetry) until his death in 2012.
 

Blackentheborg

Mickey Leland would've won
Location
the Blitz House
Pronouns
He/Him
"No one saves us but ourselves."
The Career of Jerry "Moonbeam" Brown

1970: Democratic Party candidate for California Secretary of State

defeated Hugh M. Burns, Jimmy Campbell
1971–1975: California Secretary of State
defeated James L. Flournoy
1974: Democratic Party candidate for Governor of California

defeated Joseph Alioto, Bob Moretti, William M. Roth, Jerome R. Waldie, Baxter Ward, Herbert Hafif
1975–1983: Governor of California

'74: defeated Houston Flournoy
'78: defeated Evelle Younger, Ed Clark (Independent)

1976: Democratic Party primary candidate for President of the United States
lost to Jimmy Carter, George Wallace, Mo Udall, Henry M. Jackson, Ed Muskie
1980: Democratic Party primary candidate for President of the United States

lost to Jimmy Carter, Ted Kennedy
1982: Democratic Party candidate for Senator of California

lost to Pete Wilson
1983-1988: Private citizen

- Published two books, one on Buddhism
- Married Linda Ronstadt
- briefly served as a Hospice worker at Kalighat Home for the Dying in Calcutta, India

1988: Democratic Party primary candidate for President of the United States
lost to Mike Dukakis, Jesse Jackson, Gary Hart, Joe Biden, Al Gore
1988: Independent candidate for President of the United States
(with Ralph Nader)
lost to George H.W. Bush/Dan Quayle, Mike Dukakis/Lloyd Bentsen
1989-1992: Private citizen, political activist
- Vocal critic of the growing "Third Way" wing of the Democratic Party
- Made various midterm endorsements of independent/third party candidates, including Ralph Nader and
Jesse Jackson
1992: Democratic Party primary candidate for Senator of California [Special]

lost to Dianne Feinstein
1992: Reform Party candidate for President of the United States
(with Dick Lamm)
lost to George H.W. Bush/Dan Quayle, Bill Clinton/Bob Kerrey
1993-1998: Chairman of the Reform Party
'92: defeated Lenora Fulani, Ronald Daniels, Peter Diamondstone, Gloria La Riva
'96: defeated David Cobb, Peter Diamondstone, Muriel Tillinghast, Jacqueline Salit, Philip Toelkes,
Andrew Stack
2001-2002: Private citizen, author

- Used position to cross-endorse 1996 Democratic candidate Bill Bradley for President, gaining subsequent backlash from party membership
- Published three more books, two pamphlets
- Did not speak at the 2000 Reform Party Convention but endorsed candidate Winona DeLuke

2002: Reform Party candidate for Governor of California
lost to Gray Davis, Bill Simon
2003: Reform Party candidate for Governor of California [Recall]

lost to Arnold Schwarzenegger, Cruz Bustamante, Tom McClintock
- cross-endorsed by California Green and Peace and Freedom parties

2004: Policy Advisor to and Campaigner for Bernie Sanders
- Bernie Sanders/Rocky Anderson defeated Ted Stevens/Trent Lott, John Edwards/Bill Richardon
2005-present: United States Secretary of State

appointed by President Bernie Sanders, confirmed by Senate 64-33
 
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Catalunya

Well-known member
2021 - 2025: Joe Biden / Kamala Harris (Democrat)
2020: Donald Trump / Mike Pence (Republican)

2025 - 2033: Kamala Harris / Pete Buttigieg (Democrat)
2024: Ron DeSantis / Mike Pompeo (Republican)
2028: Elise Stefanik / Mike Gallagher (Republican)

2033 - 2041: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez / Chesa Boudin (Democrat)
2032: Madison Cawthorn / Candace Owens (Republican)
2036: Matt Gaetz / Ivanka Trump (Republican)

2041 - 2049: John James / Frank LaRose (Republican)
2040: Chesa Boudin / Brianna Westbrook (Democrat)
2044: Jeremiah Chavez / Mondaire Jones (Democratic-Socialist)

2049 - 2057: Athena Salman / Jon Ossoff (Democratic-Socialist)
2048: Frank LaRose / Benji Backer (Republican), Ron W. Fraterson / Runcan Chadwin (Libertarian)

2052: Oliver L. “Bro” Jackson / Bethany Baldes (Libertarian), William Paul / Lizzie Bond (Republican)
2057 - 2061: Jon Ossoff / Justin Bamberg (Democratic-Socialist)
2056: Oliver L. “Bro” Jackson / Joseph P. Stallcop (Republican), Brace Belden / various (Independent Socialist)

2061 - 2069: Oliver L. “Bro” Jackson / 000-00-0000 (Republican)
2060: Isra Hirsi / Yeezy Larsen (Democratic-Socialist)


America still hasn’t overcome the shock of self-proclaimed Anti-statist “Bro” Jackson’s victory last Tuesday in the 2060 Presidential election. The country known for its left-wing politics and the dominance of Democratic-Socialist party elected the former Congressman from North Carolina over Minnesota Senator Isra Hirsi, the first Muslim woman to appear on a major party ticket. While outgoing Jon Ossoff stated that he’s looking forward to meeting the president-elect, other members of the Democratic-Socialists are far less excited about the upcoming presidency of the man who once advocated for the dissolution of the United States and who spoke at an assembly of post-left anarchist protest groups. Some have even advocated for the refusal to seat the Maine native, but no prior precedent exists to such a move and the 51% of the vote that he received is a clear majority.

President-elect Jackson decries what he describes as a smear campaign against his character and stated that “we are fucking done with Marxism, the state dictating everything we do, and the pointless War against Fascism in Russia”. Such talking points have made him especially popular among young voters. Voters aged 16-21 broke 80-18 for Jackson, while down-ballot Republicans barely got 60%. This is a still a massive feat however for the Republican party, which has increasingly become the party of young voters and shied away from ideologies like conservatism and Trumpism, that were dominant in the party during the 2020s and 2030s especially. The changing of the party coalitions can also be seen down-ballot as Jackson became the first Republican to win the state of Douglas and the first to win the election without winning the State of Utah since the 19th century. Many older Democratic-Socialist voters are still afraid that he’ll bring back the days of Trump and to a lesser extent John James. Millennial- and Gen Z- voters both voted for Senator Hirsi by more than 10%.

The VP-elect is even more unpopular among older voters however. The Vermont governor is even more radical than their boss. They not only is an anti-Statist, but also an outright Anarchist. 000-00-0000 (birth name Florence Mackey) refuses to take the oath of office as they does not consider themselve an American. While some Democratic-Socialists state that this means they cannot officially become the VP, 000-00-0000 disagrees with them and points out that the oath of office is strictly a tradition and not something that they actually has to take in order to become Vice-President. They also refuses to live in the Federal Strict during their vice-presidency and as an Agrarian instead wants to represent America’s rural population by living in a different rural county every 3 months. This move is especially popular among younger voters, which have become increasingly disillusioned with urban metropoles and prefer the isolation and communalism that is more present in Rural America.

Prime-Minister Aldridge of the Commonwealth of Great Britain and European Federation President Murat Onay have congratulated the president-elect and stated that they hope that the United States will continue to be a partner in the war against fascism in Russia and in the promotion of human rights, but neither showed enthusiasm in their message to the president-elect. Other national leaders of American allies like Aztlan, Israel-Palestine, New Zealand and Kurdistan had much more worried reactions to the results of the 2060 US election. Either way it will be interesting to see whether the Democratic-Socialist Senate will pass Jackson’s more radical proposals.
A sequel to my Magnum Opus.

Presidents of the United States of America:

2021 - 2025: Joe Biden / Kamala Harris (Democrat)
2020: Donald Trump / Mike Pence (Republican)

2025 - 2033: Kamala Harris / Pete Buttigieg (Democrat)
2024: Ron DeSantis / Mike Pompeo (Republican)
2028: Elise Stefanik / Mike Gallagher (Republican)

2033 - 2041: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez / Chesa Boudin (Democrat)
2032: Madison Cawthorn / Candace Owens (Republican)
2036: Matt Gaetz / Ivanka Trump (Republican)

2041 - 2049: John James / Frank LaRose (Republican)
2040: Chesa Boudin / Brianna Westbrook (Democrat)
2044: Jeremiah Chavez / Mondaire Jones (Democratic-Socialist)

2049 - 2057: Athena Salman / Jon Ossoff (Democratic-Socialist)
2048: Frank LaRose / Benji Backer (Republican), Ron W. Fraterson / Runcan Chadwin (Libertarian)

2052: Oliver L. “Bro” Jackson / Bethany Baldes (Libertarian), William Paul / Lizzie Bond (Republican)
2057 - 2061: Jon Ossoff / Justin Bamberg (Democratic-Socialist)
2056: Oliver L. “Bro” Jackson / Joseph P. Stallcop (Republican), Brace Belden / various (Independent Socialist)

2061 - 2069: Oliver L. “Bro” Jackson / 000-00-0000 (Republican)
2060: Isra Hirsi / Yeezy Larsen (Democratic-Socialist)
2064: Justin Bamberg / Ziad Ahmed (Democratic-Socialist)
2069 - 2077: ” / Riley Roberts-Ocasio-Cortez (Democratic Socialist)

2068: Alaric Destry / ‘Max Stirner’s drawing’ (Republican)
2072: ‘Max Stirner’s drawing’ / 9613 (Republican)
2077 - 2078: Aya C. Acosta / ‘Sleepy Mike’ (Republican)
2076: Riley Roberts-Ocasio-Cortez / “Killer” Pony Render (Democratic-Socialist)
2078 - 2081: ‘Sleepy Mike’ (Republican) / vacant
2081 - 2085:
‘Sleepy Mike’ / ‘Ayatollah’ Nora Dreher (Republican)
2080: Blake Emerson / Sofia Rodríguez (Democratic-Socialist), Nigel Young / Holly Diamond (Independent)
2085 - 2089: Zaire Bayana / The People (Republican)
2084: Marcus Papandreou / Lea B. Piker (Democratic-Socialist), Nigel Young / Nonprofit Foundation Group Nigel Young (Hardhatters)
2089 - 2093: Barron Trump, Jr. / Jonathan A. Sarker (Democratic-Socialist)
2088: Zaire Bayana / David ‘cringe’ Porter (Republican)
2093 - 2101: Skull-Fucker / Sami-4-3-3-Twombly (Republican)
2092: Barron Trump, Jr. / The Hammer of the People’s will (Democratic-Socialist)
2096: Barron Trump, Jr. / ‘John Brown’s corpse’ (Democratic-Socialist) , ‘Comrade’ Ben / “☭” (Democratic-Socialist / Marxist-Engelsite-Leninist-Stalinist-Maoist-Guzmánist Faction)
2101 - 2102: “☭” / ‘Comrade’ Jeff (Democratic-Socialist)
2100: Sami 4-3-3-Twombly / 000-00-0000 2.0 (Republican)

First Residents of the People’s Republic of America

2102 - 2111: ☭ (The Party)

2102: Independents
2103: Independents
2104: Independents
2105: Independents
2106: Independents
2107: Independents
2108: Independents
2109: Independents
2110: Independents


The ascension of Bro Jackson to the presidency brought with it, the end of the post-postmodernist era of the United States. In its stead antimodernism as the new dominant cultural force across the Americas. This new ideology did not just challenge the democratic socialist fabric of American society, but the very definition of governance itself. The Republican party, finding itself the natural party of government again, dismantled institutions left, right and centre. The America they created became a bastion of anarchism, religious spiritualism, communalism, and agrarianism, and largely abandoned it’s socialist and capitalist past. America freed itself of the worldly boundaries, and finally became an idea first, and a state second.

However, as always the new philosophical currents failed to be the perfect answer to America’s problems. The DSA, long struggling to adapt to this new America, experimented with moderate anarcha-communism in the 2070s, only to abandon it for post-strasserism, and dirtbag-leftism later in the century. As the 22nd century appeared om the horizon, this gradual abandonment of liberalism gave way to the re-emergence of 19th and 20th century communists like Marx, Stalin and Guzmán, and the development of the philosophy of Neomodernism. A new young generation, fed up with the nihilism, hedonism, and focus on the arts and zoology of the America that their elders created, finally came to power in the 22th century, and dismantled the old United States, and replaced it with an authoritarian communist state, which has started to spread the ethereal truth of Marxist-Engelsite-Leninist-Stalinist-Maoist-Guzmánism to the rest of the globe and cosmos.
 

Stuyvesant

Just wait until I actually get my shit together
Location
The Place Beyond The Pines
Pronouns
he/him
Political Career of Theodore “Thee” Roosevelt Jr.

1883-1892: Member of the New York State Assembly (Union)
1889-1892: Speaker of the New York State Assembly (Union)
1892-1893: Private Citizen
1893-1900: Grand Sachem of Tammany Hall
1898-1902: Mayor of New York (Union)
1900: Candidate for the President of the United States, Union Party

def. by Pres. Nelson A Miles
1900: Candidate for the President of the United States, Independent
1900 def. by Nelson A. Miles (Union), Anselm J. McLaurin (Southron), James Watson (Agrarian People's), Davis Ward (Free People's)
1902: Candidate for Mayor of New York, Union Party
def. by Charles Francis Murphy
1902-1905: Private Citizen
1905-1908: Governor of New York (Independent)

1908: Roosevelt attempts to Nullify Presidential Authority following Miles' Auto-Coup, is then removed from office
1908-1909: Unofficial Leader of the Miles Opposition Front
1909: Miles Opposition Front becomes a member of the Coalition of Freedom at the advent of the American Civil War
1909-1912: Commander of Coalition Forces in the East
1912: the Coalition of Freedom disbands following the end of the American Civil War
1912-1914: Governor of New York (Opposition)
1913: Delegate to the Second Philadelphia Constitutional Convention (New York)

1914: 5 States sign the Second Philadelphia Constitution, forming the Philadelphia Government and Richmond Government
1914-1919: Chief Executive of the Philadelphia Government (Opposition)
1914: Elected by Congress as Chief Executive
1919: Roosevelt retires to let the next generation take the torch

1919-1923: Private Citizen
1923: Roosevelt comes out of retirement following the loss of Philadelphia to the Atlantic Combine
1923-1931: Chief Executive of the Buffalo Government (Opposition)
1930: President of the Chicago Constitutional Convention (Buffalo Government)

1931: Roosevelt retires again following the ratification of the 1931 Constitution
1931-1935: Private Citizen
1935: Roosevelt dies at the age of 77

Theodore Roosevelt Jr. (or TJ as his friends called him) was the son of American businessman Theodore Roosevelt Sr. and an American political figure both in the final decades of the 19th Century as well as the American Interconstitutional Era.

Roosevelt truly began his political career during his time studying at Harvard University, becoming a well-known figure among that school’s fraternal organizations. After graduating with honors, he worked at the law firm of former Senator Roscoe Conkling, and he became the older man’s protégé. Conkling later encouraged Roosevelt to seek public office, using some favors to get him elected to the State Assembly.

As an Assemblyman, Roosevelt quickly proved himself an able mover-and-shaker in the New York State political scene, even serving a term as Speaker of the Assembly. Roosevelt’s first great failure would happen following the 1892 Union Party Convention, where he led the Establishment against the candidacy of the populist General Nelson A. Miles. Miles succeeded and turned the considerable powers of the Party apparatus against any would-be rivals, including Roosevelt who was ‘encouraged’ to retire from elected office for the sake of his young family.

He still had many friends despite his ignominious fall from grace and eventually became the leader of the New York political machine in Tammany Hall, from where he orchestrated the Consolidation of the Four Boroughs into one New York City. He then launched a campaign to become the first Mayor of the new expanded City. He then challenged his old enemy President Miles when the latter sought a third term in 1900, though he was soundly defeated in the undemocratic halls of power of the nation’s Dominant Party of Government. Roosevelt never knew how to quit when he was beaten however and ran a quixotic Independent bid against Miles.

For his insult to the Glorious Leader, the Union Party orchestrated a primary challenge against Mayor Roosevelt, and for this second wounding of his pride, he renounced his membership in the Union Party and retired to a law practice. However, in 1905 Roosevelt ran as an Independent for Governor of New York, riding the growing anti-Miles discontent against a scandal-ridden incumbent.

He did not achieve much as Governor due to the Union Party’s stranglehold on the Legislature and Judiciary but spoke against the Authoritarian tendencies of the President [and survived two separate assassination attempts]. Things came to a head following the President’s abrogation of the 1908 Presidential Election and arrest and ‘mysterious death’ of the Anti-Reelectionist candidate Joseph Cannon. Roosevelt followed the example of 19 other State Governors in nullifying Presidential authority considering what international observers called a self-coup.

Roosevelt was removed from office by the New York Militia but was freed from custody by sympathizers in the US Army. He organized a resistance against the President on the East Coast, dubbed the Miles Opposition Front which later joined with the wider Coalition of Freedom in the emerging Civil War. Following the defeat of the Junta in 1912, he was restored to the Governorship and was later one of the primary organizers of the failed Second Philadelphia Convention.

The Governor did not allow his failure to deter him from trying to salvage a semblance of normalcy from the growing Warlordism of the Interconstitutional Era. He combined his State of New York with Pennsylvania and New Jersey into a Philadelphia Government, one of two cliques to maintain civilian government alongside Richmond. After serving a single term as its Chief Executive, he retired to write his memoirs, remarking to a reporter “Politics is young man’s game, and I no longer am one.”

However, Roosevelt came out of retirement for one last ride at the age of 65 following the loss of both Philadelphia and Roosevelt’s own New York City to the Atlantic Combine. He reorganized the government in Buffalo and defeated the Combine despite their Arab backers, bringing peace back to the Mid-Atlantic.

Roosevelt’s last project was the organization of the Great Truce of 1930 and that year’s Chicago Constitutional Convention. The convention saw the drafting of the parliamentary system that the American Republic uses to this day, and with one final victory in his belt, the Old Man of New York finally rested.
 
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Venocara

[Space for something nice and patriotic]
Pronouns
He/him

JUNE 1940: Shortly before the Democratic National Convention, President Franklin D. Roosevelt is injured falling down a flight of stairs. The incident spells doom for Roosevelt's bid for a third term, and the former president retreats to the world of writing before his death in 1952.

JULY 1940: Ambassador Joseph P. Kennedy is nominated by the Democratic National Convention. With Roosevelt and Cordell Hull declining to run at the last minute, Kennedy's wealth afforded him an advantage over his unprepared rivals.

SEPTEMBER 1940: Presidential candidates Willkie and Kennedy face off in the nation's first presidential debate. While a majority believe the eloquent Willkie won, Kennedy's anti-interventionist message has motivated certain segments of the public.

NOVEMBER 1940: The race between Kennedy and Willkie remains too close to call, with Pennslyvania serving as the tipping point state. While Kennedy leads, a recount is declared. Protests break out in opposition, with revisionist historians claiming they were orchestrated by the Bufalino family. Eventually, Kennedy's victory is certified.

President-Elect Kennedy sparks tremendous controversy after claiming "Democracy is finished in England. It may be here." Pollster George Gallup quickly sees a wave of "buyers remorse" in light of Kennedy's comments.

NOVEMBER 1942: The Democratic Party suffers tremendous losses in the 1942 midterm elections. Nineteen days later, President Kennedy is assassinated by an anti-Catholic extremist. The subsequent US entry into World War II has sparked theories from revisionist historians (theories that resonated with war-weary members of the public).

AUGUST 1943: John Fitzgerald Kennedy, son of the former president, is court marshalled after several of his compatriots are killed in a Japanese attack.

SEPTEMBER 1957: Disgraced soldier John Fitzgerald Kennedy is found dead of a drug overdose. He is mourned by former First Lady Rose Kennedy and controversial attorney Bobby Kennedy.

---

1941 - 1942: Joseph Kennedy (Democratic)
1940 (with Jesse H. Jones) def. Wendell Willkie (Republican)
1942 - 1945: Jesse H. Jones (Democratic)
1945 - 1945: Wendell Willkie (Republican)
1944 (with Hanford MacNider) def. Jesse H. Jones (Democratic)
1945 - 1953: Hanford MacNider (Republican)
1948 (with Arthur Vandenberg) def. Alben Barkley (Democratic), A. Phillip Randolph (Socialist)
1953 - 1957: Brien McMahon (Democratic)
1952 (with Averell Harriman) def. Robert Taft (Republican)
1957 - 1959: Harold Stassen (Republican)
1956 (with Allan Dulles) def. Henry J. Kaiser (Democratic), T. Coleman Andrews (Southern Democratic)
1959 - 1965: Allan Dulles (Republican)
1960 (with Goodwin Knight) def. Earl Warren (Liberal Republican), Happy Chandler (Southern Democratic)
1965 - 1968: Phillip Willkie (Republican)
1964 (with James P. Mitchell) def. Happy Chandler (Independent Democratic), Elliott Roosevelt (Democratic)
1968 - 1969: Frederic Morrow (Republican)
1969 - 0000: Orval Faubus (Courage)
1968 (with Richard B. Kay) def. Frederic Morrow (Republican), Paul Robeson Jr. (Popular Front), Paul O'Dwyer (Democratic) [withdrew]

Causes of Death

Kennedy: Assassinated by anti-Catholic extremists
W. Willkie: Heart attack while meeting with Chinese diplomat Soong Mei-ling
Stassen: Drug overdose in a failed attempt to treat wartime injuries
P. Willkie: Committed suicide following Red Hot Summer riots

---

1924 - 1942: Joseph Stalin (Communist)
1942 - General Secretary Stalin makes peace offer to Hitler's Germany, accepting Brest-Litvosk borders
1942 - 1946: Vyacheslav Molotov / Lavrentiy Beria / Mikhail Kalinin (Communist)
1942 - General Secretary Stalin arrested, formation of troika, restoration of Nazi-Soviet conflict
1946 - 1947: Vyacheslav Molotov / Lavrentiy Beria / Andrei Zhdanov (Communist)
1947 - 1949: Andrei Zhdanov (Communist)
1947 - Defeat of Nazi Germany, pact signed with Anglo-American Alliance
1949 - 0000: Lavrentiy Beria (Communist)
1949 - Death of Zhdanov, arrest of Molotov over Zionist conspiracy, NKVD-led coup, end of Soviet-American warfare

---

1940 - 1942: Winston Churchill (Conservative leading War Coalition)
1940 - Resignation of Chamberlain following Norway Debate, formation of all-party war coalition
1942 - 1944: Stafford Cripps (Independent Labour leading War Coalition)
1942 - Resignation of Churchill following the Fall of Singapore and withdrawal of the Soviet Union
1944 - 1947: Leo Amery (Conservative leading War Coalition)
1944 - Resignation of Cripps following failed Allied invasion of France
1947 - 1950: John Anderson (Independent)
1947 (Anti-Socialist Union with Conservatives, Liberals & SDP) def. Stafford Cripps (Christian Democracy - Labour / Radical / Crippsite Conservative)
1950 - 1951: Ernest Bevin (Labour coalition with SDP & Miscellaneous Left)
1950 - End of Anti-Socialist Pact after the death of Stafford Cripps and bankruptcy of the United Kingdom
1951 - 1951: A.V. Alexander (Labour coalition with SDP & Miscellaneous Left)
1951 - 1954: Duff Cooper (Union)
1951 (Majority) def. Lord Beaverbrook (Albion), A.V. Alexander (Labour), Megan Lloyd George (Radical), Herbert Morrison (SDP)
1954 - 1958: Oliver Stanley (Union)
1956 (Coalition) def. Lord Beaverbrook (Albion), Hugh Gaitskell (Labour), Megan Lloyd George (Radical)
1958 - 1960: Selwyn Lloyd (Union coalition with Labour)
1960 - 1963: Alfred Robens (Albion)
1960 (Majority) def. Selwyn Lloyd (Union), Frank Soskice (Labour), Megan Lloyd George (Radical)
1963 - 1968: Max Aitken (Albion)
1964 (Majority) def. Donald Johnson (Union), Megan Lloyd George (Progressive), Reg Birch (ILP-CPGB)
1968 - 0000: Geoffrey Rippon (Atlantic Conservative)
1968 (Majority) def. Edward Hulton (Progressive), Jack Powell ('Continuity' Albion), Reg Birch (ILP-CPGB)

---

Understanding the Brossolette-Era
Oscar "Red Haussmann" Niemeyer: from the ashes of Paris to a socialist playground​

1940 - 1940: Philippe Pétain vs. Charles de Gaulle (Vichy France / Free France)
1940 - Fall of France, declaration of Free French government
1940 - 1946: Philippe Pétain vs. Philippe Leclerc de Hauteclocque (Vichy France / Free France)
1946 - 1947: Pierre Laval (Independent leading Coalition of Republican Liberty)
1947 - 1948: Émile Muselier (Miscellaneous left)
1947 (Triparty Alliance with PCF, SFIO & MRP) def. Pierre Laval (Republican Liberty), Charles Vallin (Republican Left)
1948 - 1949: Jacques Soustelle (Committee for Public Safety)
1948 - General strikes break out in opposition to the Continuation War
1949 - 1963: Pierre Brossolette (National Front)
1949 Constitutional Referendum - Yes (57%)
1949 def. Francisque Gay (Popular Republican), Henri d'Astier de la Vigerie (Republican Liberty)
1956 def. Henri de Kérillis (Republican Centre), Guy Petit (National Right)

1963 - 1965: Georges Guingouin (National Front)
1963 def. Antonine Pinay (Republican Centre - United Opposition)
1965 Impeachment Trial - Convicted

1965 - 1965: Eugène Tisserant (Popular Republican) [acting]
1965 - 0000: Louis Napoleon (Popular Appeal - United Opposition)
1965 def. Maurice Kriegel-Valrimont (National Front)

///

1928 - 1942: Chiang Kai-shek (Kuomintang)
1928 - Northern Expedition finalized, China united under Nationalist rule
1942 - 1949: H.H. Kung (Kuomintang)
1942 - Assassination of Generalissimo Chiang in Burma
1949 - 1964: Kung Te-cheng (Kuomintang)
1949 - Retirement of President Kung following passage of "Sagacious Constitution"
1964 - 0000: David Kung Ling-kan (Kuomintang)
1964 - Retirement of President Kung from political roles, continues spirtual offices
I have to say, I’m really intrigued by this. I’m hoping for a timeline or at least a write-up to flesh out this fascinating world.
 

Time Enough

"Enthusiastic Cis Male Partner"
Pronouns
He/Him
1909-1912: John A. Johnson (Democratic)
1908 (With Clark Howell) def: William Howard Taft/James Sherman (Republican)
1912-1913: Clark Howell (Democratic)
1913-1921: Albert B. Cummins (Republican)

1912 (With Herbert S. Hadley) def: Clark Howell/James Burke (Democratic), Eugene Debs/Emil Seidel (Socialist Party of America)
1916 (With Leonard Wood) def: James Burke/Woodrow Wilson (Democratic), Theodore Roosevelt/Miles Poindexter (National)

1921-1929: Albert Ritchie (Democratic)
1920 (With Franklin Delano Roosevelt) def: Leonard Wood/Henry C. Wallace (Republican)
1924 (With Franklin Delano Roosevelt) def: William Hale Thompson/Herbert Hoover (Republican), Robert LaFollette/Burton K. Wheeler (Progressive-Farmer-Labor Alliance)

1929-1933: Joseph C. O'Mahoney (Democratic)
1928 (With Joseph T. Robinson) def: Herbert Hoover/Charles Dawes (Republican), Burton K. Wheeler/Charles E. Merriam (Progressive)
1933-1940: Bronson M. Cutting (Republican)
1933 (With Style Bridges) def: Floyd B. Olson/Earl Browder (Progressive), Joseph C. O’Mahoney/Joseph T. Robinson (Democratic)
1936 (With Style Bridges) def: Floyd B. Olson/Earl Browder (Progressive), Jesse H. Jones/Harry F. Byrd (Democratic)

1940-1949: Alf Landon (Republican)
1940 (With Hanford MacNider) def: Paul V. McNutt/George L. Berry (Democratic), William Langer/Clarence D. Martin (Union)
1944 (With Henry A. Wallace) def: George L. Berry/Harry Hopkins (Democratic), Earl Browder/Paul Douglas (Progressive)

1949-: Huey P. Long (Democratic)
1948 (With Brien McMahon) def: Henry A. Wallace/Arthur Vandenberg (Republican), John W. Bricker/‘Pappy’ O’Daniel (National), Paul Douglas/Ben Davis (Progressive)


The 1948 election would be the most contentious election America had experienced in 18 years. The Democrats had been kept out of power and had experienced the embarrassment of spending the 1930s being a third player compared to the Left Wing Progressive Party, as the party bickered about whether to play to Southern Conservative’s or reach out to Northern Liberals and MidWestern Populists which Cutting was doing with his ‘Fair Deal’ and ‘Justice Program’ series of economic reforms, job building and enacting of business and Labour Union reforms.

Cutting had been a popular if controversial president, his belief in Keneysianism and Social Credit informing much of his reasoning for combating the Grand Recession, a reaction to the perceived light touch of folks like Albert Ritchie and Jospeh C. O’Mahoney and his relationship with both big business and Labour Unions were strained as he was tough on both, both breaking up monopolies and endorsing strike breaking actions in Chicago and California.

Alf Landon, was the Moderate candidate of sorts, given his main opposition was Left Wing Populist William Langer in Republican Primaries he quickly became the unifying candidate. Langer formed his own party in response which rapidly took the winds out of the sails of the Progressive party which found itself awkwardly backing down and backing Langer to avoid splitting the Left Vote. With the air drifting from the Left Progressive movement, the Democrats found the ball in there park, and the nomination of Paul V. McNutt who backed the Fair Deal and his Labour Union running mate finally gave hope to the Democrats.

Langer would cause the 1940 election to be a tight affair, as Alf Landon just clinched a few electoral votes to victory, even if McNutt won the Popular Vote. 1944 was held during the midst of America’s war with Japan, and Landon won on a message of ‘Not Rocking The Boat’ helped by him choosing a running mate friendly to Labour Interests and Progressive’s and Democrats splitting the vote again.

So as Landon prepared to bow out, eyes turned to his potential replacement. Henry A. Wallace would win in a surprise upset at the Republican convention, leading to John W. Bricker to denounce the supposed Communist infiltration of the Convention, and he would form his own party with Southern Conservative and Texas Governor ‘Pappy’ O’Daniel. With the Republican’s a mess, eyes turned to the Democrats, as the Progressive’s decided to sign there own death warrant by pairing a Georgist with a Marxist running mate.

The Democrats pondered which direction to go, Clarence D. Martin campaigned as the voice of those Left Behind, Millard Tydings Campaigned as the ‘Steady As She Goes’ candidate and Huey P. Long would campaign as the Populist Man of the People, presenting himself as the Democrats answer to Cutting. In the end, Long would win.

Long would relish his chance, campaigning himself as the ‘Right Person, For the Right Time’ and saying ‘That finally, the Democrats will have a man who gets stuff done whilst in the White House’ which was popular with number of Working Class folks, managed to piss off a number of fans of Johnson, Howell and Ritchie.

Long would win the election on a campaign of change, he would be the man who brought about the America promised by folks like Bryan, Johnson and McNutt throughout the years. With a Liberal Labour Lawyer by his side, Long would win by a slim margin.

In office and proclaiming ‘A New American Century’ Long’s Populism knew no end. The problem would be that undercurrents Left bubbling under the surface of America, the Anti-Semitism brought by Cutting’s Introduction of Social Credit into the mainstream consciousness, Jim Crow left unresolved by a nervous Landon and Long’s own history of graft and controversy would lead to a fraught and chaotic 1950s as events overseas raised there head, as Bukharian and Strasser decided to deal with unresolved issues once and for all.
 
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Time Enough

"Enthusiastic Cis Male Partner"
Pronouns
He/Him
I wholeheartedly admit that I was inspired by @iupius here;

"these are strange times to be a queen: A Historical Analysis of the Crown Season 3"

Prime Ministers of the United Kingdom:
1959-1962: Hugh Gaitskell (Labour)†

1959 (Majority) def: Rab Butler (Conservative), Jo Grimond (Liberal)
1962-1968: Anthony Greenwood (Labour)
1963 (Majority) def: Reginald Maudling (Conservative), Jo Grimond (Liberal)
1968-1972: Peter Thorneycroft (Conservative)
1968 (Majority) def: Anthony Greenwood (Labour), Emlyn Hooson (Liberal)
1972-1973: John Profumo (Conservative)
1972 (Majority) def: Anthony Benn (Labour), Emlyn Hooson (Liberal), Ray Gunter (ILP)
1973-1977: Maurice Macmillan (Conservative)
1977-: Peter Shore (Labour)

1977 (Majority) def: Maurice Macmillan (Conservative), John Pardoe (Liberal), Jim Sillars (ILP)
1978 EEC Referendum: Stay In: 47% ,
Leave: 53%

"Season 3 of The Crown is certainly a contentious one, beginning in 1962 with the death Hugh Gaitskell (Mark Gatiss makes his final appearance as the Prime Minister in Episode 1: The Nation Mourns) and ending in 1978 as the EEC Referendum see's Britain leaving the EEC and the Queen (Olivia Coleman) asking Prince Philip (Tobias Menzies) where Britain future lies. Of course many are questioning the historical validity of the Season 3 and wondering how accurate it is as parts of it descend in to out right historical soap opera at points.

The Queen's relationship with Anthony Greenwood (Bertie Carvel) is presented as having a frosty relationship, particularly in the wake of the 1965 Pound Devaluation and his 1967 attempt to reform the House of Lords leading to an argument over the phone between the two about the rightful place of the House of Lords in British Society. This didn't happen and whilst the Queen had numerous disagreements with Greenwood, the pair had a cordial relationship with Greenwood being invited to tea by the Queen in the aftermath of 1965 funeral of Winston Churchill. In particular there seems to be theory presented that Greenwood was a mentor of sorts to Prince Charles (Josh O'Connor) during Episode 4: Tywysog Cymru which is rather contradictory to what actually happened (Greenwood only met Charles a few times and was noted as not being particularly impressed by him), given how additionally the events of said episode happened during Throneycroft's tenure it's rather baffling to see Greenwood around at all.

Peter Thorneycroft (Tim McInnerny) brief appearance (which mainly consists of him talking to the Queen about painting and having reservations about John Profumo) ignores his massive impact on the British economy as he attempted to convert Britain into a European Social Market state which combined his support for America's involvement in Vietnam would lead to his forced resignation as the Conservatives fell in the polls. The appearance of John Profumo (Alistair Petrie) is probably the closest that the Crown gets to turning into an outright black comedy as his brief period in office sees a miners strike, a sex scandal of his own doing and a botched withdrawal from Vietnam leading to his relationship with both Queen and Country being stretched. Whilst much of Profumo's sequence's cram most of his problems into his brief tenure ship (the withdrawal from Vietnam occurred during the end of Thorneycroft's Premiership) and his sex scandal is overanalysed (with the Crown bizarrely implying that it could have possible been a Soviet plot?) and does a lot to ignore the actual women involved. Additionally the show skips the drama occurring in the Labour Party and Tony Benn (who appears as just archive footage), which is fine because James Graham’s TV adaptation of ‘People’s Flag’ (2017) makes up for it.

Maurice Macmillan (Adrian Rawlins) is a sad chapter in the show, his scene with the Queen as he's recuperating from pneumonia and asking for him to go to the nation for a rather foregone election is a rather emotional scene, though much of the dialogue is fabricated it has been noted by the few people there that Macmillan was seemingly close to tears as he reminisced about the potential of his father only for the Queen to try and awkwardly cheer him up, which is played rather sweetly despite it all. Adrian Rawlins does seem to be on the way to winning a best supporting actor BAFTA so even if it wasn’t entirely correct, he caught the tone of Macmillan’s time right.

Peter Shore has become a fan favourite (Paul Ritter) getting on surprisingly well with the Queen despite his Left Wing Populist appearance. Shore deferential treatment towards British traditions and his belief in Socialist ideals leads to tensions between the Queen and his cabinet, which play out deliciously in Episode 10: Countdown as Shore puts staying in the EEC to a referendum, with the Queen trying to awkwardly convince him to not even try.

Many are looking forward to see the various clashes between Shore and Scargill, the attempt on the Queens life in 1980 and the raise of Prime Minister Heseltine in series 4.”
 
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Time Enough

"Enthusiastic Cis Male Partner"
Pronouns
He/Him
What a great framing device @Time Enough
Thank @iupius for doing the original version which was the inspiration here. The hardest part was finding actors who would work for the characters in question, I think my favourite choices were Tim McInnerny as Thorneycroft and Paul Ritter as Peter Shore.

Also Adrian Rawlins is perfect for playing a depressed slightly pathetic Prime Minister Macmillan.
 

Time Enough

"Enthusiastic Cis Male Partner"
Pronouns
He/Him
I love the bit aside of "this bit with Prince Charles is horseshit, why's it here?"
Having read and noticed that Peter Morgan will just, make shit up, if he thinks it makes a story ‘more exciting’ it seemed like a perfect little thing to add to indicate that even his alternate history counterpart is doing the same.

Additionally I was thinking that the author was mildly annoyed at Tim McInnerny not getting the time to shine as Peter Thorneycroft, much how his role in the TV show Utopia is to spend 2 minutes being really good as Airey Neave and then being killed off screen.
 

Blackentheborg

Mickey Leland would've won
Location
the Blitz House
Pronouns
He/Him
fred.jpeg

The Career of Fred Hampton

1966-1968: Leader, NAACP Youth Council (West Suburban Branch)
1968-1969: Member, Illinois Black Panther Party
1969-1970: Co-Director of the Rainbow Coalition

(with William "Preacherman" Fesperman and José Cha Cha Jiménez) representing the Young Patriots Organization, the Lincoln Park Poor People's Coalition, the Students for a Democratic Society, the Brown Berets, Rising Up Angry, the American Indian Movement, the Red Guard Party, the Mothers, the Young Lords
1969-1970: Chairman of the Illinois Black Panther Party & Deputy Chairman of the Black Panther Party
1970-1971: Black Panther Party Central Committee Chief of Staff
1970: Co-Convener of the National Committees to Combat Fascism

(with Angela Davis) representing the Communist Party USA, the Peace and Freedom Party, the Progressive Labor Party, the Red Guard Party, the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, the Black Panther Party, Students for a Democratic Society (SDS), the Weather Underground Organization, the Third World Liberation Front, the Women's International Terrorist Conspiracy from Hell (W.I.T.C.H), the Young Lords, the Young Patriots Organization, the Young Socialist Alliance, the Brown Berets, the White Panther Party, the American Indian Movement, the Congolian Maulers, the Lincoln Park Poor People's Coalition, El Comité, I Wor Kuen, Rising Up Angry, Venceremos.
1972-1973: Chairman of the Council for Metropolitan Open Communities for the Free Chicago Autonomous Zone
1972: Minister of the Black Panther Party Midwest Front
1973: Member of the Acting Directive Council of the People's Will

(with Tom Hayden, Angela Davis, Rennie Davis, Jeff Jones, Susan Stern, Bill Ayers)
1974-1976: Speaker & First Secretary of the American Central Committee
(acting, elected unopposed)
1976-19??: Private citizen, author
1981: Elder Statesman of the Nation

(honorary title)
 

Mumby

Always mysterious!
Published by SLP
Location
Municipal Commune of Bourne
Pronouns
He/Him

The Career of Fred Hampton

1966-1968: Leader, NAACP Youth Council (West Suburban Branch)
1968-1969: Member, Illinois Black Panther Party
1969-1970: Co-Director of the Rainbow Coalition

(with William "Preacherman" Fesperman and José Cha Cha Jiménez) representing the Young Patriots Organization, the Lincoln Park Poor People's Coalition, the Students for a Democratic Society, the Brown Berets, Rising Up Angry, the American Indian Movement, the Red Guard Party, the Mothers, the Young Lords
1969-1970: Chairman of the Illinois Black Panther Party & Deputy Chairman of the Black Panther Party
1970-1971: Black Panther Party Central Committee Chief of Staff
1970: Co-Convener of the National Committees to Combat Fascism

(with Angela Davis) representing the Communist Party USA, the Peace and Freedom Party, the Progressive Labor Party, the Red Guard Party, the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, the Black Panther Party, Students for a Democratic Society (SDS), the Weather Underground Organization, the Third World Liberation Front, the Women's International Terrorist Conspiracy from Hell (W.I.T.C.H), the Young Lords, the Young Patriots Organization, the Young Socialist Alliance, the Brown Berets, the White Panther Party, the American Indian Movement, the Congolian Maulers, the Lincoln Park Poor People's Coalition, El Comité, I Wor Kuen, Rising Up Angry, Venceremos.
1972-1973: Chairman of the Council for Metropolitan Open Communities for the Free Chicago Autonomous Zone
1972: Minister of the Black Panther Party Midwest Front
1973: Member of the Acting Directive Council of the People's Will

(with Tom Hayden, Angela Davis, Rennie Davis, Jeff Jones, Susan Stern, Bill Ayers)
1974-1976: Speaker & First Secretary of the American Central Committee
(acting, elected unopposed)
1976-19??: Private citizen, author
1981: Elder Statesman of the Nation

(honorary title)
based
 

Luke_Starkiller

Well-known member
The Clone Wars were a series of interplanetary armed conflicts and labor crises marked by the use of cloning technology in the late Galactic Republic.

1st Clone War (210 BBY - 199 BBY): With the advent of economically-feasible mass-cloning technology, corporations begin to use cheaply-produced clone labor, leading to many individual systems declaring the practice illegal. War breaks out across several systems, the Republic intervenes in a limited capacity to maintain peace. Cloning is declared legal by the Galactic Republic, mainly for its industrial benefits.

2nd Clone War (156 BBY-130 BBY): Also known as the Lesser Mandalorian War, Mandalorian raiders replenished their forces using stolen cloning technology and began to attack key trade routes. Several systems began to grow their own cloned militias to supplement their existing singular-lifeform forces in combatting the threat. The Mandalorian population was further reduced, remainders either exist as zealots, clan-like hermit states, or mercenaries. Due to the somewhat-localized nature of these conflicts, these battles occurred across a relatively-long time frame and only began to be referred to as one of the Clone Wars decades later.

3rd and 4th Clone War (112 BBY-33 BBY): Some scholars prefer to describe this as a singular war effort, but common schools of thought break the conflict into two distinct periods: before the Republic intervened, and after the Republic intervened. Military Cloning proliferated following the Second Clone War, leading to many guilds, corporations, and cartels forming private armies. Armed conflict became common between systems, private organizations, and private organizations fighting planetary systems. While the conflict was confined to individual systems or small clusters of systems settling disputes through deadly, seemingly-unending armed conflict, the Jedi Order became relied upon as mediators and, in some situations, warriors.

As the number of conflicts increased and the webs of alliances grew increasingly large and complex over the course of decades, the Republic military was forced to intervene, using its own clone armada. The end of the war led to the Republic reflecting on how the practice of military cloning contributed to the conflict's longevity, and as a result, they retired their own clone forces and placed harsh regulations on the practice of cloning as a whole.

5th Clone War (33 BBY-27 BBY): In response to the increased cloning regulations, a group of rogue systems, corporations, guilds, and crime syndicates form the Shadow Collective and use their private clone armies to wage war against the Republic, which at the time was militarily depleted due to the retiring of its clone battalions and full reliance upon voluntary enlistment. The Republic manages to convince several major clone populations to turn against their masters with an implied promise of suffrage. The clone uprisings and intervention of the Jedi (now acting as both monk-like advisors and warrior-protectors for several systems) and Republic forces eventually defeats the Collective, which is also plagued by infighting. The rogue systems and corporations are brought under the heel of the Republic and administrative duties are given to allies of the incoming Valorum Chancellery. Clone laborers who revolted against the Collective are not given the freedom that had been led to believe they'd acquire as newly Republic-owned companies require labor.

A revolutionary tactic that causes this war to stand out from others is the use of highly-advanced infiltrator clones, who were implanted with long-term memory patterns (as opposed to flash-learned combat and/or functional techniques) in order to impersonate key officials within the Republic's political and security hierarchies. These infiltrators were able to fool the vast majority of biometric security systems. The only people who were able to detect the impostors were Force-wielders such as the Jedi Order, a fact which further cemented the Republic's reliance upon the Order.

6th Clone War (25 BBY-20 BBY): Clone warlord Atha Prime, a revolutionary from the spice mines of Kessel, leads an uprising against his new masters. This inspires several other clone populations to do the same, and soon, these rogue clones form the Clone Brotherhood. Believing that diplomacy will be ineffective, Atha Prime and the Brotherhood have resorted to brutal, terroristic tactics, often using their superior numbers and savagery to overwhelm Outer- and Mid-Rim planetary militias. As the conflict has continued, the Republic has become further mired in bureaucracy as system represntatives clash over which planets to save first- typically corresponding to which suffering industry is connected to which Senator. With the galaxy's main supply of labor now in revolt, the economy has collapsed, highlighting the deep disparities between the elites and the common folk.

Alderaan, a pacifist Core World and the scientific hub of the Galaxy, becomes occupied by clone invaders seeking to use the planet's geneticists to fuel the Brotherhood's war machine. While resistance forces oppose the occupiers on the ground, a small task force convinces the Republic Navy to intervene, eventually decimating the clone hordes on the planet. The galaxy becomes embroiled in a conflict between the now-expanded Republic forces, headed by the Jedi and the new Stormtrooper legions, and the Clone Brotherhood, eventually culminating in the Battle of Utapau and the destruction of the Clone Brotherhood's major bacta reserves, which would soon lead to their surrender. The actions taken by Republic forces during the Battle of Utapau causes the Jedi Order to sever ties with the Republic military and begin aiding dissidents. This would be cited as one of the reasons why the Jedi were labelled traitors following the end of the Clone Wars.

Over the next year, the Republic's forces eliminated the remaining clone holdouts. Now aware of the existential threats that bureaucratic inefficiency, corporate patronage, and rampant decadence posed to the galaxy (by virtue of creating the socioeconomic conditions that sparked the last few conflicts), the Republic reformed itself as the Galactic Empire. With bacta and cloning technology in short supply and the traitorous Jedi order purged, the Empire achieved what had eluded the Republic for centuries: a state monopoly on violent force.
 
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TheHatMan98

Well-known member
Inspired by Steve Richards's latest book: 'The Prime Ministers We Never Had: Success and Failure from Butler to Corbyn'

Prime Ministers of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

1951-1955: Winston Churchill (Conservative)
1951 (Majority) def. Clement Attlee (Labour), Clement Davies (Liberal)

1955-1957: Anthony Eden (Conservative)

1957-1964: R.A. Butler (Conservative)
1959 (Majority) def. Hugh Gaitskell (Labour), Jo Grimond (Liberal)

1964-1968: Harold Wilson (Labour)
1964 (Majority) def. R.A. Butler (Conservative), Jo Grimond (Liberal)
1966 (Majority) def. Edward Heath (Conservative), Jo Grimond (Liberal)


1968-1971: Roy Jenkins (Labour)
1970 (Coalition, with Liberal) def. Edward Heath (Conservative), Jeremy Thorpe (Liberal)

1971-1975: Barbara Castle (Labour)

1975-1983: Margaret Thatcher (Conservative)
1975 (Majority) def. Barbara Castle (Labour), Jeremy Thorpe (Liberal), Roy Jenkins (SDP), William Wolfe (SNP)
1976 EEC Membership Referendum: 69% YES, 31% NO
1979 (Majority) def. Denis Healey (Labour), David Steel (Liberal), Roy Jenkins (SDP), William Wolfe (SNP)


1983-1984: Michael Heseltine (Conservative)

1984-1991: Denis Healey (Labour)
1984 (Majority) def. Michael Heseltine (Conservative), Shirley Williams/Bill Pitt (Liberal-SDP Alliance), Willie McRae (SNP), Dafydd Wigley (Plaid Cymru)
1989 (Majority) def. Norman Tebbit (Conservative), Bill Pitt (Liberal Democrats), Dafydd Wigley (Plaid Cymru), Willie McRae (SNP)


1991-1997: Neil Kinnock (Labour)
1992 (Majority) def. Norman Tebbit (Conservative), Bill Pitt (Liberal Democrats), Alex Salmond (SNP)

1997-2008: Kenneth Clarke (Conservative)
1997 (Majority) def. Neil Kinnock (Labour), Simon Hughes (Liberal Democrats)
2002 (Majority) def. Margaret Beckett (Labour), Simon Hughes (Liberal Democrats)
2006 (Majority) def. John Prescott (Labour), Simon Hughes (Liberal Democrats), Robert Kilroy-Silk (UKIP), Roseanna Cunningham (SNP), Dafydd Elis-Thomas (Plaid Cymru


2008-2009: Michael Portillo (Conservative)
Mar. 2009 (Minority) def. David Milliband (Labour), Mark Oaten (Liberal Democrats), Dafydd Elis-Thomas (Plaid Cymru), Robert Kilroy-Silk (UKIP)

2009-2015: David Milliband (Labour)
Dec. 2009 (Coalition, with Lib Dems) def. Michael Portillo (Conservative), Mark Oaten (Liberal Democrats), Robert Kilroy-Silk (UKIP), Dafydd Elis-Thomas (Plaid Cymru), Roseanna Cunningham (SNP)
2012 Welsh Independence Referendum: 77% NO, 22% YES, 1% Other
2012 Scottish Independence Referendum: 69% NO, 30% YES, 0.5% Other
2012 Electoral Reform Referendum: 49% NO, 26% YES - PR, 23% YES - AV
2014 (Majority) def. Michael Gove (Conservative), Robert Kilroy-Silk (UKIP), Mark Oaten (Liberal Democrats), Elin Jones (Plaid Cymru), Stewart Hosie (SNP)
2015 European Union Membership Referendum: 52% Leave, 47% Reamian, 0.9% Other


2015-2018: Ed Milliband (Labour)
2016 (Minority, with Lib Dems, Plaid Cymru and SNP supply & confidence) def. Peter Hitchens (Conservative), David Campbell Bannerman (UKIP), Lembit Öpik (Liberal Democrats), Elin Jones (Plaid Cymru), Stewart Hosie (SNP)

2018-Present: Jeremy Corbyn (Labour)
2018 (Majority) def. Peter Hitchens (Conservative), Lembit Öpik (Liberal Democrats), David Cameron (Change UK), Elin Jones (Plaid Cymru), Stewart Hosie (SNP), Robert Kilroy-Silk (Brexit Party), Nigel Farage (UKIP)
2019 Exiting the European Union Deal Referendum: 51% DEAL, 31% REMAIN, 18% NO DEAL
 

AnActualFam

Well-known member
Location
Somewhere at Sea
Pronouns
He/Him
A list I was inspired to make thanks to reading a wiki article saying that some expect Ribicoff to be picked went way off the rails, enjoy this insanity.

1963-1965 Lyndon Johnson/VACANT (Democratic)
1965-1969 Lyndon Johnson/Abraham Ribicoff (Democratic)

1964 def. Barry Goldwater/William E. Miller (Republican)

1969-1977 Abraham Ribicoff/George Smathers (Democratic)
1968 def. Richard Nixon/Robert Finch (Republican), George Wallace/John Wayne (AIP)
1972 def. Ronald Reagan/Spiro Agnew (Republican),
George Wallace/John G. Schmitz (AIP)

1977-1985 John Connally/James Buckley (Republican)
1976 def. George Smathers/Edmund Muskie (Democratic)
1980 def.
Frank Church/John Glenn (Democratic)

1985-1993 Edwin Edwards/J. James Exon (Democratic)
1984 def. James Buckley/Howard Baker (Republican)
1988 def. Lee Iacocca/Gary Hart (Independent), Pat Robertson/Pete Domenici (Republican)


1993-1997 Vincent "Buddy" Cianci/John McCain (Republican)
1992 def. Jerry Brown/Paul Tsongas (Reform), J. James Exon/Al Gore (Democratic)

1997-2001 Dick Lamm/Ralph Nader (Reform)
1996 def. Vincent "Buddy" Cianci/John McCain (Republican), Mel Reynolds/Bob Graham (Democratic)

2001-2009 J.C. Watts/Joe Biden (Republican)
2000 def. Jerry Litton/Bill Bradley (Democratic), Dick Lamm/Ralph Nader (Reform)
2004 def. Dean Barkley/Benjamin Nighthorse Campbell (Reform), Joe Lieberman/John Edwards (Democratic)


2009-2017 Dick Gephardt/Tom Strickland (Democratic)
2008 def. Ralph Nader/Charlie Crist (Reform), Joe Biden/Matt Blunt (Republican)
2012 def. Jon Huntsman Jr./Bob McDonnell (Republican), Charlie Crist/Carole Keeton Strayhorn (Reform)


2017-2021 Rick Snyder/David Beasley (Republican)
2016 def. Jesse Ventura/William Weld (Reform), Tom Strickland/Rick Perry (Democratic)

2021-present Norm Coleman/Matt Gonzalez (Reform)
2020 def. Rick Snyder/David Beasley (Republican), Steve Bullock/Tim Ryan (Democratic)
 
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