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Lists of Heads of Government and Heads of State

Sideways

A jpeg stock photo of gas station flowers
Published by SLP
Location
Teignmouth, Devon
Pronouns
She/Her
Actually, I have a complaint. I found out that the Chair of the LGBT Conservatives is called Bunbury, I puposefully included a reference to Bunburyism and nobody even thought to offer me a cucumber sandwich. This would never happen if alternate history micro-fic writers unionised

this-ghastly-state-of-things-is-what-you-call-bunburying-i-suppose.jpg

Not a perfect state of affairs. But I would hate for us to be perfect. It would leave no room for developments, and I intend to develop in many directions.
 

AndrewH

I was hospitalized for approaching perfection
Location
Tampa, FL
1933 - 1937: Al Smith / Cordell Hull (Democratic)
defeated, 1932: Herbert Hoover / Charles Curtis (Republican)
1937 - 1941: Huey Long / William Lemke (Justice)
defeated, 1936: Al Smith / Cordell Hull (Democratic), Hamilton Fish / Frank Knox (Republican)
1941 - 1949: Huey Long / Sheridan Downey (Justice)
defeated, 1940: Robert Moses / Hatton Sumners (Democratic), Frank Knox / Warren Austin (Republican)
defeated, 1944: Charles W. Sawyer / Millard Tydings (Democratic), John Winant / W. Kingsland Macy (Republican)
1949 - 1953: James Forrestal / Kim Sigler (Republican)
defeated, 1948: George H. Earle / Willis Mahoney (Justice), Rose Long / Claude Pepper (‘Louisiana’ Justice)
1953 - 1960: Sheridan Downey / George Long (Justice)
defeated, 1952: James Forrestal / Kim Sigler (Republican)
defeated, 1956: Thomas E. Dewey / John J. Rhodes (Republican), Joe McCarthy / Thomas Werdel (Independent Justice)
1960 - 1961: Sheridan Downey / Martin Dies (Justice)
1961 - 1965: Lyndon Johnson / Frank Lausche (Justice)
defeated, 1960: Thomas E. Dewey / Henry Cabot Lodge (Republican)
1965 - 1973: Lyndon Johnson / Pat Brown (Justice)
defeated, 1964: Thomas E. Dewey / Harold Collier (Republican)
defeated, 1968: Pete McCloskey / Dan Evans (Independent - Reform in some states)
1973 - 1973: Pete McCloskey / Howard J. Samuels (Reform)
defeated, 1972: Speedy Long / Roy Elson (Justice)
1973 - 1974: John Sparkman / vacant (Justice)
1974 - 1977: John Sparkman / Curtis LeMay (Justice)
1977 - 1985: Bob Casey / Edward Hanrahan (Justice)
defeated, 1976: Tom Hayden / Paul Findley (Reform)
defeated, 1980: Tom Hayden / Bob Carr (Reform)
1985 - present: Malcolm "Mackie" Long / Charlotte Whitford (Justice)
defeated, 1984: Tom Hayden / Bob Woodward (Reform)

Mackie Long's ascension to the Presidency in 1984 astounded Washingtonologists, disturbed foreign governments and delighted millions of voters who were nostalgic for the good ol' days with the Kingfish. One of the accepted rules of American politics was that Presidents clung onto power until they were knocking at deaths door; Lyndon Johnson only retired from frontline politics after he had smoked a hole in his chest after twelve years as President (and even then he was instrumental in leading the successful impeachment and imprisonment of Pete McCloskey), John Sparkman was already an old man when he was thrust into leadership, Sheridan Downey only lived another six months after his retirement, and Huey Long himself had to be dragged out of the White House after years of hard drinking and numerous assassination attempts had left him barely functioning. Bob Casey was affable, genial, at the peak of his power, relatively young and, most importantly, healthy - all that made his announcement in 1984 that he would not be seeking re-election that more shocking. While rumors of a palace coup, internal politicking and shocking scandals spread like wildfire, those close to Casey would only say that the Big Man (as he had become popularly known) was tired of intraparty politics and after eight years of getting what he wanted to get done done, was looking forward to spending his fifties and beyond with his family back home in Pennsylvania.​
Malcolm Long (mononymously referred to as "Mackie" by most) was to most Washingtonologists little more than an amusing factoid. The son of Senator Russell Long and grandson of Huey, Mackie was in many senses the second coming of the Kingfish. While he bore little physical similarity to Huey (Mackie was tall where he was short, thin where he was fat), Mackie was boisterous, charismatic and ruthlessly ambitous; his background seemed tailor-made for a career in politics. While Mackie spent few years working out on the oil fields thanks to his good relationship with his uncle Palmer (one of America's first "energy barons"), he was part of the first wave of recruits to join up with the Army after President Johnson formally began the war in Panama, served a single tour as a DCO, before heading back stateside to work as a legislative assistant to Senator Alfred J. Jensen of North Dakota. Mackie, at the age of 26, had an impeccable resume and the most famous family name in all of America; at the age of 27, he became one of the youngest Mayors in American history after his election as the Mayor of Fargo.​
Of course, since Mackie was Mackie, he left North Dakota for the Capital at the first chance he got. Gerald Nye, the titan of North Dakota, had retired from the Senate in 1966 after it became clear that his cancer was not in remission, and his appointed replacement had left a vacancy for North Dakota's at-large seat. Herschel Lashkowitz, the previous Mayor of Fargo and a rival of Mackie's for control of power in the state, won the initial special election while Huey geared up for a run in '68 (fearing that he'd be seen as "too green" in '66). Representative Lashkowitz, believing he had the support of President Johnson, retracted state contracts awarded to APEX (Palmer Long's own oil fiefdom) and began auctioning them off to the highest bidder - Mackie went crying to daddy, who in turn used his own clout and personal friendship with the President to bring down the full wrath of the White House on North Dakota. Herschel Lashkowitz (Lashkowitz, what kind of name is that? Now Long, that's an American name!) was bombarded with smears, slurs and slander for three months straight, while every Justice politician in the entire state was let known that if they went against Mackie they would be finding themselves out of a job next election, or worse. Mackie became a political star overnight, with the growing student movement against the White House seeing in him a possible ally in Congress (admittedly, this was only because he was 30 while the rest of the Congress was mostly geriatrics) while he brought back memories of Huey's time in the Senate to the old fogies. Marvelous Mackie, slickbacked hair, hip clothes, brilliant white teeth, the most handsome man in Congress. Magnanimous Mackie, a charitable, gladhanding and genial politician who would listen to his constituents for hours on end. Mad Mackie, the fiery, raving populist from the Prairie - he was everything to everyone, and most Americans saw him as a possible President some day. But he had to wait for his turn.​
Johnson's refusal to seek another term in '72 was a shock to everybody, including himself (a devastating heart attack on Christmas Day, 1971 convinced him that he wouldn't survive another term - Johnson would die on February 19th, 1975), meant that the Party was left in a lurch. Speedy Long, the self-proclaimed "Redneck Prince" of Louisiana, stepped into the void, and since Speedy had seniority over Mackie (and Russell didn't want the job), Mackie put his ambitions on hold in the name of family unity. He would regret this decision soon enough - Speedy Long would lose a rigged election to a hippy-dippy DA and a "cosmopolitan" intellectual after it became clear that the student movement wasn't just anti-war, but pro-democracy. While the mechanisms and institutions that controlled the levers of power moved into action to correct this grievous error, the Long name was disgraced within the Justice Party. It clearly didn't hold the same power it did in the past, and Mackie found himself on the outs with his colleagues in the House.​
So if he couldn't hack it in the House, he would just join his father in the Senate. The 1974 North Dakota Senate Election was, for a time, the thing that had killed Mackie Long's political career. His first mistake was to challenge Quentin Burdick, a liberal, anti-impeachment Senator who was increasingly on the outs with Party leadership - but had the full-throated backing of the North Dakota's Farmers Union and the angry young men that elected Pete McCloskey. While Daddy Long did his best to help out his son, President Sparkman was sympathetic to Mackie's campaign (more out of dislike for Burdick than anything else) but had bigger problems to deal with (namely, a domestic insurgency across the entire West) and didn't have much of a personal relationship with Russell, and there's only so much a Senator from Louisiana can do for an election in North Dakota. Crowds followed Mackie wherever he went on the campaign trail, but instead of cheering his name, they pelted him with food and called him a fascist. Union farmworkers and sympathizers began attacking Long supporters out in the street, the states powerful Native American community refused to let Mackie speak out on the reservations, and a bomb believed to be connected to notorious terrorist (or freedom fighter, depending on who you asked) Leonard Peltier nearly killed him while he was driving along the 3. While the Justice Party was nominally pro-union, Mackie screamed to high-heaven about supposed Soviet/Indian/Chinese communist subversives in the NDFU working to get Burdick another term, which ended up further incensing the many voters who had a relationship with the NDFU, which was the biggest union in the state and the 'third rail' of North Dakota politics. The primary was landslide victory for Burdick, and Mackie, humiliated, served another term in the House before "retiring" in 1976.​
Although there were rumors that President Casey would offer him a comfy position in his Cabinet, possibly Postmaster General or Presidential Secretary, Mackie didn't return to politics and was mostly seen holding host with tired old film stars like Barbara Stanwyck and Ronald Reagan on the late-night circuits. It was an ignominious end for the once rising star of American politics; his claim to fame outside the States was mostly as the "Long family member who has a shitty talk show." That talk show, ironically, would be the thing that would save his career. Happy Hour with Mackie Long was initially a bust, a cheaply made program on the American Television Network (ATN) with a wheelhouse of unamusing party games and joke-book level humor that failed to bring in younger viewers. Mackie, who had underwent significant plastic surgery as he entered his forties to try and keep his youthful looks, went out and bombed on a nightly basis and came close to breaking his contract with ATN and leaving the program entirely. That is, until Mackie deciding to go in a different direction on the night Bob Casey announced he would not be running for reelection - mocking the "tired old ideas and the tired old men of the so-called Justice Party," he railed against the aging gerontocracy that would most likely pick one of their one to succeed the outgoing President. The media ran wild with it, headline's of "Mackie's Back!" splashed across every newspaper in the country and the morning news desperately trying to book interviews with the suddenly in-demand Long. That gerontocracy he attacked took notice, too - clearly the popular mood was against an old hand taking over and it's not like Mackie was ever a rabble-rouser until now, so why not bring him into the fold? Mackie, ever ambitious, jumped at the offer and joined back in the party he had become famous for attacking.​
So for the first time since 1949, a Long is President. The crowds at his inauguration were delirious, the domestic press was approving, and while international observers were troubled by this upjumped talk show host with a famous last name, they at least hoped that he was a man they could do business with. Mackie has openly encouraged comparisons to the Kingfish, but now that he's President he might be taking after his grandfather a bit too much - he's beefed up White House security and his personal bodyguard to extreme levels, has reportedly been losing sleep, and has begun talking about plots to bring him down, from both outside the Capital and within...​
 

theev

Las Vegas is a society of armed masturbators
Pronouns
he/him
Although there were rumors that President Casey would offer him a comfy position in his Cabinet, possibly Postmaster General or Presidential Secretary, Mackie didn't return to politics and was mostly seen holding host with tired old film stars like Barbara Stanwyck and Ronald Reagan on the late-night circuits. It was an ignominious end for the once rising star of American politics; his claim to fame outside the States was mostly as the "Long family member who has a shitty talk show." That talk show, ironically, would be the thing that would save his career. Happy Hour with Mackie Long was initially a bust, a cheaply made program on the American Television Network (ATN) with a wheelhouse of unamusing party games and joke-book level humor that failed to bring in younger viewers. Mackie, who had underwent significant plastic surgery as he entered his forties to try and keep his youthful looks, went out and bombed on a nightly basis and came close to breaking his contract with ATN and leaving the program entirely. That is, until Mackie deciding to go in a different direction on the night Bob Casey announced he would not be running for reelection - mocking the "tired old ideas and the tired old men of the so-called Justice Party," he railed against the aging gerontocracy that would most likely pick one of their one to succeed the outgoing President. The media ran wild with it, headline's of "Mackie's Back!" splashed across every newspaper in the country and the morning news desperately trying to book interviews with the suddenly in-demand Long. That gerontocracy he attacked took notice, too - clearly the popular mood was against an old hand taking over and it's not like Mackie was ever a rabble-rouser until now, so why not bring him into the fold? Mackie, ever ambitious, jumped at the offer and joined back in the party he had become famous for attacking.​
does the joker go on happy hour with mackie long
 

Time Enough

"Enthusiastic Cis Male Partner"
Pronouns
He/Him
Bevan’s Britain:

1945-1949: Clement Attlee (Labour)†
1945 (Majority) def: Winston Churchill (Conservative), Archibald Sinclair (Liberal), Ernst Brown (National Liberal), Harry Pollitt (CPGB)
1949: Herbert Morrison (Labour Caretaker)
1949-1959: Nye Bevan (Labour)†
1950 (Majority) def: Lord Woolton (Conservative), Clement Davis (Liberal), John Maclay (National Liberal), Harry Pollitt (CPGB)
1955 (Majority) def: Harold MacMillian (Conservative), Jo Grimond (Liberal), Alfred Robens (Workers Party), Harry Pollitt (CPGB)

1959: John Freeman (Labour Caretaker)
1960-1967: Iain MacLeod (Conservative)

1960 (Majority) def: John Freeman (Labour), Jo Grimond (Liberal), Alfred Robens (Workers Party), John Gollan (CPGB), Tony Cliff (International Socialists)
1964 (Majority) def: Harold Wilson (Labour), Jo Grimond (Liberal), Alfred Robens (Workers Party), John Gollan (CPGB), Tony Cliff (Socialist Labour Party)

1967-1969: Ted Heath (Conservative)
1967 (Coalition with Liberals) def: Micheal Foot (Labour), Jeremy Thorpe (Liberal), Alan Brown (Workers Party), Tony Cliff (Socialist Labour)
1969-: Barbara Castle (Labour)
1969 (Majority) def: Ted Heath (Conservative), Jeremy Thorpe (Liberal), Dick Taverne (Workers Party), Tony Cliff (Socialist Labour)

1949 and Attlee falls down some stairs, not being the spritely man he used to Attlee dies and Labour Leadership election is called whilst in office. Morrison announces he’ll be Prime Minister of a caretaker Government and plans to run in the leadership election but a bunch of worried Leftists and a few Right members who despise Morrison put the kerbosh on that. Instead the Right push forward A.V.Alexander (given how Gaitskell is too young and inexperienced and Bevin is too old and there are worries of another Attlee incident) whilst the Left put forward Bevan.

Compared to the dull Alexander, Bevan is inspiring, forthright, riding high from the creation of the NHS and able to form a loose coalition of Labour Centrists,Leftists and Trade Unionists sick of Transport house. All this combine to allow Bevan to just squeak into becoming Leader of the Labour Party and Prime Minister. Not long afterwards, an election is called and many guess that Bevan may lose against the great Churchill.

Few would have guessed an abrupt stroke would put Churchill out of commission and lead to a messy Tory nomination period in which the favourite Anthony Eden having to take a holiday due to the stress leading to Lord Woolton awkwardly becoming leader. This combined with a fiery manifesto preaching Industrial Democracy, More Houses and greater recovery alongside actually trying to implement the message Labour promised in it’s manifesto in 45’.

All this allows Bevan to get into Parliament with 75 seat majority (a slight improvement on 1945). Using his majority he gets too work and quickly he hits some trouble. The Labour Right still exists and ain’t happy with there new boss and try to undermine Bevan. The first two years of Bevan’s premiership are mainly dealing with Morrison and Bevin, but upon Bevin’s death in 1951 the force the pair held within Labour collapses as the bullying Morrison manages to drive away any possible allies he has. Those who don’t toe the line or join Morrison’s ineffectual pressure group go and join Alfred Robens in the ‘Workers Party’ which despite sounding like a Communist Party mainly preaches bland Labour Right talking points splitting in the aftermath of the 1951 Korean War funding fiasco (in which Hugh Gaitskell is kicked out the cabinet for demanding charges on dentistry to increase Britain’s defence fund).

Outside of that Bevan focuses upon housing, increased democratisation (the houses of lords aren’t dismantled but are massively reformed), Industrial Democracy (implemented mainly in Nationalised industries) and increased power for Trade Unions and Co-Ops (to keep those elements of the party happy). There’s also the atomic bomb, which despite angering elements of his cabinet and party, Bevan keeps hold off citing that he wouldn’t want to go to a negotiation table naked (this also improves relations with the Americans under Truman who were originally icy with Bevan on the outset). Relations with the Non-Aligned alliance like India and Yugoslavia are improved and Britain's Empire begins dismantling.

When the 1955 election occurs Bevan is able to allow Labour to get a third term though now with a majority of 30 instead. Still his plans continue, increased Nationalised industries, implementation of social liberal values like the decriminalisation of homosexuality and equal pay amendments and increased funding for the arts. Bevan also gets stuck in the International sphere, helping to mediate a good outcome for Hungry during the Hungarian Crisis of 1956.

By 1959 Britain seems to healthier, happier and more productive than it was in the 30s and 40s much of down too Bevan’s radical Government. It’s then that the ‘Welsh Wizard’ to some of the ‘Tito of Tonypandy’ to others abruptly resigns. It turns out that Bevan had been struck down by stomach cancer and he decided to resign before it impacted his leadership. Bevan watched as one of his protégés John Freeman loses the early 1960 election to Iain MacLeod.

MacLeod’s Premiership is mainly more about keeping elements of status quo going than dismantling everything (seeing how popular this new Britain is). MacLeod implements some ideas bizarrely of Market Socialism as a way to try bring the market properly back into Britain and his Primership is about implementing the ‘Middle Way’ ideas of his predecessor. Things tick along as the Conservatives manage to to secure another majority in 64 against the slightly dull bureaucrat Harold Wilson. But it’s in MacLeod’s second term that the wheels begin to fall off.

In 1965/66 the rumblings of the Monetarists lead by Keith Joseph grow louder. Radicalised by years in opposition and now in power they are horrified to see MacLeod continue more or less the same as before (with some mild privatisations here and there). In 66 they attempt a cabinet coup and start staging numerous rebellious acts against Macleod in the Commons. MacLeod manages to beat the machinations of Joseph but the stress of running a country and dealing with his own party gets to him and he resigns in early 1967.

Ted Heath takes over and his subsequent election goes poorly forcing him into a coalition with the Liberals. Despite supporting ideas on businesses and other against a too expanded state it’s there that the coalition ends. Eventually Heath is brought down by strike action in 1969 after attempts to privatise the steel industry go incredibly wrong. Into the breach steps in the fiery and brilliant Barbara Castle, a former Bevanite cabinet member and person promises to bring Britain into a new shiny age as the 70s dawn.
 
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Time Enough

"Enthusiastic Cis Male Partner"
Pronouns
He/Him
I thought that the Future would be Cooler? A collaborative future list*:

Prime Ministers of Great Britian and Northern Ireland:
2023-2027: Rishi Sunak (Conservative)

2025 (Majority) def: Keir Starmer (Labour), Ed Davey (Lib Dems), Joanna Cherry (Scottish National Party), Adam Price (Plaid Cymru), Arlene Foster (Democratic Unionist Party), Colum Eastwood (Social Democratic Labour Party), Naomi Long (Alliance), Siân Berry (Green Party)
2027-2031: Derek Thomas (Conservative)
2029 (Coalition with DUP) def: Keir Starmer (Labour), Layla Moran (Lib Dems), Joanna Cherry (SNP), Mhairi Black (Free Scottish Party), Adam Price (Plaid Cymru), Arlene Foster (DUP), Colum Eastwood (SDLP), Naomi Long (Alliance), Nigel Farage (Reform), Siân Berry-Magid Magid (Green Party)
2031-2039: Mark Wallace (Conservative)
2032 (Coalition with Unionist) def: Lisa Nandy (Labour), Layla Moran (Lib Dems), Joanna Cherry (SNP), Mhairi Black (FSP), Adam Price (Plaid Cymru), Arlene Foster (Unionist), Colum Eastwood (SDLP), Naomi Long (Alliance), Nigel Farage (Reform), Siân Berry-Magid Magid (Green Party)
2037 (Coalition with Reform & Unionist) def: Angela Rayner (Labour), Katharine Macy (Lib Dems), Joanna Cherry (SNP), Mhairi Black(FSP), Arlene Foster (Unionist), Colum Eastwood (SDLP), Nigel Farage (Reform), Siân Berry-Magid Magid (Green Party)

2039-2040: Chris Leslie, Viscount of Keyleigh (Progressive Alliance)
2039 (Progressive Alliance Coalition) def: Mark Wallace (Conservative), Nadia Whittome (Labour), Katharine Macy (Lib Dems), Joanna Cherry (SNP), Mhairi Black (FSP), Arlene Foster (Unionist), Cara Hunter (SDLP), Magid Magid (Green Party)
2040: Sam Gyimah (Progressive Alliance)
2040-2041:Chuka Umunna (Progress)

2041-2042: Nadia Whittome (Labour)
2041 (Coalition with Lib Dems & Progress) def: Matt Hancock (Conservative), Katharine Macy (Lib Dems), Chuka Umunna (Progress), Mhairi Black (FSP), Arlene Foster (Unionist), Cara Hunter (SDLP),Magid Magid (Green Party)

Prime Ministers of the British Union:
2042-2052: Alex Sobel (Labour)

2042 (Coalition with Lib Dems) def: Matt Hancock (Conservative), Katharine Macy (Lib Dems), Chuka Umunna (Progress), Magid Magid-Talia Woodin (Green Party), Elizabeth Hayden-Shona Jemphrey (New Socialists), Lucy Harris (New Reform)
2046 (Majority) def: Elliot Colburn (Conservative), Elizabeth Barnard (Lib Dems), Chuka Ummunna (Progress), Talia Woodin (Green Party), Elizabeth Hayden-Shona Jemphrey (Socialists for Change), Lucy Harris (New Reform)
2050 (Coalition with Lib Dems) def: Elliot Colburn (Conservative), Elizabeth Barnard (Lib Dems), Chuka Ummunna (Progress), Talia Woodin (Green Party), Elizabeth Hayden-Shona Jemphrey (Socialists for Change), Lucy Harris (New Reform)

2052-: Arthur Webber (Labour)
2052 (Majority) def: Elliot Colburn (Conservative), Elizabeth Barnard (Lib Dems), Chuka Ummunna (Progress), Talia Woodin (Green Party), Lucy Harris (New Reform)

*I have no clue how we reached this situation, I guess Mark Wallace and his Right Wing Coalition go too far, a Progressive Alliance rises up and establishes a new decentralised and PR based Parliament and we get what follows.

Put your own theories down below if you have a better theory.
 

Edmund

政治ギャル、永田町を叱る!
Location
Tynemouth
Pronouns
he/him
2091-2099: Seina Ray (Labour)
2099-2108: Apple Chatten (Democratic)
2108-2112: Russert Halden Sowers (Democratic)
2112-2113: Aloora Munnelly (Labour)
2113-2118: Russert Halden Sowers (Democratic)
2118-2120: Paisley Allen (Labour)

What England will be like a Hundred Years hence?

Nothing Tory makes it out of the near-future. The Democrats can offer the exact same social and economic libertarianism without all the baggage of being a major party that received less than 20% of the 18- to 24-year-old vote. Anglicans make up no more than 4% of the population, but nobody's bothered with disestablishment yet. 70% of all relationships are polyamorous. England is a middle power. Everyone works from home and 'going out' is a rarity. Having a brain augmentation is as common as having a smartphone was in 2020. 95% of the population will experience mental health issues during their lifetime. The total fertility rate is 0.2. Most of Lincolnshire and Norfolk are underwater — nobody cares. The 'British' Antarctic Territory provides 10% of GDP. You're probably still alive, so you've got that going for you.

That's my theory, barring a black swan event.
 

SoldierOfChrist

The War on Gamer
The New Butchers

Presidents of the Provisional Government of Republic of China

1912–1912: Sun Zhongshan (Tongmenghui)
1911 (provisional) def: Huang Xing (Tongmenghui), Li Yuanhong (Nonpartisan)
1912–1912: Yuan Shikai (Nonpartisan)
1912 (provisional): no opposition

Presidents of the Republic of China

1912–1927: Yuan Shikai † (Nonpartisan) [1]
1913 def: scattered opposition
1918 def: Liang Qichao (Progressive Party) [2]
1923 def: vacant (Progressive Party)

1927–1927: Xu Shichang (Nonpartisan)
1927–1930: Duan Qirui † (Nonpartisan) [3]
1927 def: Feng Yuxiang (Patriotic League), Sun Chuanfang (Nonpartisan)
1930–1930: Wang Yitang (Nonpartisan)
1930–0000: Sun Chuanfang (Nonpartisan) [4]
1930 def: Liu Cunhou (National Interest League)

President of the Revolutionary Government of the Republic of China

1913–1913: Cen Chunxuan (Nationalist Party)

[1] As per OTL, Yuan Shikai crushes the Nationalist revolutionaries but it is a much more close-run thing and deflates his imperial ambitions. Instead of ruthlessly eliminating all potential rivals and alienating subordinates, Yuan co-opts many ambivalent provincial leaders with promises of autonomy and personal enrichment. Dr. Sun begins his second exile in Japan and turns towards pan-Asianism, while the shattered Nationalist Party finds its support mostly confined to overseas communities. The next fifteen years prove to be an exercise in constructing the image of stability while never actually strengthening the central state apparatus. Governors seize control of factories and railroads and reign as petty kings, and the Bank of China is divided between a consortium of Shanghainese and Cantonese industrialists. Yuan plays his ambitious lieutenants against one another much as he plays Japan against the West, recognizing the guarantee of foreign investment as the only way to maintain his hold on power.

[2] Initially formed as the anti-Nationalist grouping in the National Assembly, the Progressives quickly become a sham opposition, hanging on to Liang Qichao's obsolete vision of constitutionalism without monarchism and a vague sense of patriotism. The party quietly faded away after the Three Provinces Uprising in 1923, replaced by several equally irrelevant groupings.

[3] The first contested presidential election turns into a factional battle between Beiyang stalwarts and a new class of officers who rely on patronage networks connected to Yuan's elevated underlings rather than the Marshal himself. The long-suffering heir, Duan's three-year reign is marked by regional unrest and widespread drought before he himself becomes the victim of the army's power struggles, assassinated by his own bodyguards.

[4] The chosen president of Wu Peifu's Hubei clique, Sun has proven to be ambitious thus far, planning an expedition to subdue the rebellious southern provinces once and for all. Meanwhile, the new regime in Tokyo makes rumblings and issues impossible economic demands, threatening to end the flow of wealth to the governors if China does not submit. The coming decade promises to be interesting.
 

Ares96

Confirmed Deep State Agent
Published by SLP
Location
Fubbicktown
Pronouns
he/him
2091-2099: Seina Ray (Labour)
2099-2108: Apple Chatten (Democratic)
2108-2112: Russert Halden Sowers (Democratic)
2112-2113: Aloora Munnelly (Labour)
2113-2118: Russert Halden Sowers (Democratic)
2118-2120: Paisley Allen (Labour)

What England will be like a Hundred Years hence?

Nothing Tory makes it out of the near-future. The Democrats can offer the exact same social and economic libertarianism without all the baggage of being a major party that received less than 20% of the 18- to 24-year-old vote. Anglicans make up no more than 4% of the population, but nobody's bothered with disestablishment yet. 70% of all relationships are polyamorous. England is a middle power. Everyone works from home and 'going out' is a rarity. Having a brain augmentation is as common as having a smartphone was in 2020. 95% of the population will experience mental health issues during their lifetime. The total fertility rate is 0.2. Most of Lincolnshire and Norfolk are underwater — nobody cares. The 'British' Antarctic Territory provides 10% of GDP. You're probably still alive, so you've got that going for you.

That's my theory, barring a black swan event.
I mean this in the best possible way - this is very similar to those 60s TV segments where a junior professor with a pipe explained how in THE YEAR 2000, we will all be living in 1000-unit phalanstères with units able to detach and airlift from building to building whose interiors are kept at 27 degrees so you don't have to wear clothing indoors except for aesthetic purposes.
 

Edmund

政治ギャル、永田町を叱る!
Location
Tynemouth
Pronouns
he/him
I mean this in the best possible way - this is very similar to those 60s TV segments where a junior professor with a pipe explained how in THE YEAR 2000, we will all be living in 1000-unit phalanstères with units able to detach and airlift from building to building whose interiors are kept at 27 degrees so you don't have to wear clothing indoors except for aesthetic purposes.
Oh, I know. I took the title (and format) from the Answers magazine as a "the future as seen from now" because ultimately all of this is unpredictable and I'm relying entirely upon current trends.
 

Sideways

A jpeg stock photo of gas station flowers
Published by SLP
Location
Teignmouth, Devon
Pronouns
She/Her
@Time Enough sorry I missed your first of those few TLs, I just wanted to say, I really enjoy your stuff - you often get in some nice phresh picks and good ways to do things.

Ellen Wilkinson, I've often thought, could be quite a good PM. In an odd sort of way. I could see her holding onto the cabinet office, reforming the lines of government, but letting the ministries run themselves. Which would... I mean she'd be a narrow first among equals working out a system for checks and balances, rather than the kind of leader we're used to. But... in the right circumstances. Maybe.

Well done for breaking ground on PM Arthur Webber
 

Time Enough

"Enthusiastic Cis Male Partner"
Pronouns
He/Him
@Time Enough sorry I missed your first of those few TLs, I just wanted to say, I really enjoy your stuff - you often get in some nice phresh picks and good ways to do things.

Ellen Wilkinson, I've often thought, could be quite a good PM. In an odd sort of way. I could see her holding onto the cabinet office, reforming the lines of government, but letting the ministries run themselves. Which would... I mean she'd be a narrow first among equals working out a system for checks and balances, rather than the kind of leader we're used to. But... in the right circumstances. Maybe.

Well done for breaking ground on PM Arthur Webber
Why thank you, it does mean a lot getting positive feedback from a veteran list makers so that’s nice. I would be interested to know what picks you thought were the phreshest because mine is probably Ron Dellums as a President of the U.S.A or Christopher Thomson as Prime Minister (also doing collaborative lists often helps with phresh picks). Also I always like to ponder how to make a list realistic (even the gimmick one of Nottinghamshire MPs had a vague plan of sorts).

Also yeah Ellen Wilkinson (despite her flaws) would probably be a good PM and I would be interested in how to get her into a list as a proper PM (it does help despite being on the Left of the party she was friendly with the Right which helped).

Also yeah, I was surprised that no one had done PM Webber and upon finding out I made it my goal to be the first to pop him in a list. He’ll probably show up a bit more (alongside Nadia Whittome, they make a good double team).
 

Time Enough

"Enthusiastic Cis Male Partner"
Pronouns
He/Him
Back To Basics: A Major Labour

1979-1990: Margaret Thatcher (Conservative)
1979 (Majority) def: James Callaghan (Labour), David Steel (Liberal), William Wolfe (SNP), Gwynfor Evans (Plaid Cymru), Harry West (UUP), Gerry Fitt (SDLP), Ian Paisley (DUP)
1984 (Majority) def: Micheal Foot (Labour), David Steel-Shirley Williams (Liberal-SDP Alliance),Gordon Wilson (SNP), Dafydd Wigley (Plaid Cymru), James Molyneaux (UUP), John Hume (SDLP), Ian Paisley (DUP)
1988
(Majority) def: John Major (Labour), Paddy Ashdown (Social Liberals), Jim Sillars (SNP), Dafydd Wigley (Plaid Cymru), James Molyneaux (UUP), John Hume (SDLP), Ian Paisley (DUP), David Owen ('Continuity' SDP)
1990-2001: John Major (Labour)
1990 (Majority) def: Margaret Thatcher (Conservative), Paddy Ashdown (Social Liberals), Jim Sillars (SNP), Dafydd Elis-Thomas (Plaid Cymru), James Molyneaux (UUP), John Hume (SDLP), Ian Paisley (DUP), David Owen (New SDP)
1994 (Majority) def: Norman Tebbitt (Conservative), Paddy Ashdown (Social Liberals), Margo MacDonald (SNP), Dafydd Elis-Thomas (Plaid Cymru), James Molyneaux (UUP), Paul Arthur (SDLP), Ian Paisley (DUP), Jimmy Goldsmith (Referendum)
1997 (Coalition with Soc Libs) def: John Redwood (Conservative), Paddy Ashdown (Social Liberals), Ken Clarke (‘Euro’ Conservative), Margo MacDonald (SNP), Dafydd Elis-Thomas (Plaid Cymru), David Trimble (UUP), Paul Arthur (SDLP), Ian Paisley (DUP), Jimmy Goldsmith (Referendum)

2001-2005: John Bercow (Conservative)
2001 (Majority) def: John Major (Labour), Simon Hughes (Social Liberals), Ken Clarke (‘Euro’ Conservative), Margo MacDonald (SNP), Elfyn Llwyd (Plaid Cymru), David Trimble (UUP), Paul Arthur (SDLP), Ian Paisley (DUP), Robert-Kilroy Silk (Britain First!)
2005-2010: Harriet Harman (Labour)
2005 (Majority) def: John Bercow (Conservative), Simon Hughes (Social Liberals), Ken Clarke (‘Euro’ Conservative), Roseanna Cunningham (SNP), Elfyn Llwyd (Plaid Cymru), David Trimble (UUP), Paul Arthur (SDLP), Ian Paisley (DUP), Robert-Kilroy Silk (Britain First!)
2010-2014: Ken Clarke (Conservative)
2010 (Majority) def: Harriet Harman (Labour), David Laws (Social Liberals), Roseanna Cunningham (SNP), Elfyn Llwyd (Plaid Cymru), Sylvia Hermon (UUP), Mark Durkan (SDLP), Peter Robinson (DUP), Robert-Kilroy Silk (Britain First!), Caroline Lucas (Green Party)
2014 (Coalition with Soc Libs) def: Ed Balls (Labour), Vince Cable (Social Liberals), Jeane Freeman (SNP), Leanne Wood (Plaid Cymru), Sylvia Hermon (UUP), Karen McKevitt (SDLP), Peter Robinson (DUP), Robert-Kilroy Silk (Britain First!), Natalie Bennett (Green)

2014-2016: Philip Hammond (Conservative)
2016-2024: Ed Miliband (Labour)
2016 (Majority) def: Philip Hammond (Conservative), Vince Cable (Social Liberals), Jeane Freeman (SNP), Leanne Wood (Plaid Cymru), Sylvia Hermon (UUP), Karen McKevitt (SDLP), Nigel Dodds (DUP), Paul Nuttall (Britian First!), Natalie Bennett (Green)
2020 (Majority) def: Jeremy Hunt (Conservative), Munira Wilson (Social Liberals), Alison Thewliss (SNP), Leanne Wood (Plaid Cymru), Sylvia Hermon (UUP), Clarie Hanna (SDLP), Arlene Foster (DUP), Ann Widdecombe (Britain First!), Amelia Womack-Caroline Lucas (Green)
2023 (Majority) def: Liz Truss (Conservative), Munira Wilson (Social Liberals), Alison Thewliss (SNP), Adam Price (Plaid Cymru), Sylvia Hermon (UUP), Clarie Hanna (SDLP), Arlene Foster (DUP), Catherine Blaiklock (Britain First!), Caroline Lucas-Alexandra Phillips (Green)

2024-: Sarah Owen (Labour)

"Major could be credited for bringing the Labour Party into the 21st Century. Influenced by his local MP Marcus Lipton (who's Lambeth and then Vauxhall seat he would be MP for) and a chance encounter with former Prime Minister Clement Attlee he would join the Labour Party...Over the 70s and 80s his politics would be informed by the left wing politics of Micheal Foot and his personal friend Bryan Gould (though they would disagree about the European question) but he would also take inspiration from the campaigns and policies of Harold Wilson and the social liberalism of Roy Jenkins. This infusion of Left and Right would serve him well in the 1984 Leadership Election as in we gain endorsements from all sections of the party...His eventual campaigns mixing slick adverts and his famous soapbox speeches would after two campaigns gain Labour a majority. The 90s would be a time of boom as Labour invested into state whilst embracing the new commercial industries and banking particularly under Chancellor Bryan Gould alongside Social Liberal reforms like repealing Section 28 and increased rights for minorities under Bernie Grant...Major's downfall would come from his love for Europe and the European Union. Gould disagreed vigorously with this and when the European Question came up yet again in 1996 things became heated leading to Gould resigning out of anger. The following election would be thought on the European Question and whilst Labour would squabble with it's self over Europe the Conservatives (apart from Ken Clarke's splinter group) and the Social Liberals would offer definite answers to the question. The eventual Ashdown-Major Coalition would be the infamous final chapter in Major's Government..." Snippets from Major:The Man, The Mystery by Alistair Campbell

(If your wondering which Bercow we're looking at...it's the Right Wing one)
 
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Time Enough

"Enthusiastic Cis Male Partner"
Pronouns
He/Him
I'm guessing Bercow's government was spectacularly unsuccessful if Ken Clarke goes from running a splinter against the majority to leading the party within probably about a year.
Yep, the idea is we get Peak Right Wing John Bercow in office on a slim majority, a Thatcherite Eurosceptic Government which crashes and burns due a variety of reasons ranging from party problems (despite not being fans of his Eurocentric ideals many prefer Ken Clarke over the blustering Bercow), aggressive Labour opposition and a small recession towards the end of his term leads to Bercow being ousted by Harriet Harman (which many agree is an embarrassment).

The Conservatives having been burned decide to accept Clarke back into the fold realising that they need to change from the party of Thatcher to whatever Clarke is pushing for. Those who are hardcore Bercowites/Thatcherites bugger off to Britain First! in response.
 

rpryor03

Member
"At Least We're Not the French": Britain as France

1976-1990: Tony Benn (Labour)
1976 (l.e.): def. Michael Foot, Roy Jenkins, Denis Healey, Anthony Crosland
1979 (Majority): def. William Whitelaw (Unionist), Keith Joseph (Conservative), David Steel (Liberals), Gordon Wilson (SNP), Gwynfor Evans (PC)
1981 (Majority): def. Jim Pryor (Unionist), Leon Brittan (Conservative), David Steel (Liberals), Gordon McLennan (Communist), Roy Jenkins (Left Party), Gordon Wilson (SNP), Gwynfor Evans (PC)
1986 (Minority, C/S with Left Party): def. Leon Brittan (Conservative), Roy Jenkins (Left Party), David Steel (Liberals), Gordon McLennan (Communist), Gordon Wilson (SNP), Dafydd Elis-Thomas (PC), John Tyndall (National Front), James Kilfedder (UPUP)

1990-1991: Ken Livingstone (Labour)
1990 (l.e.): def. Margaret Beckett, John Prescott, Jeremy Corbyn
1991-2006: Leon Brittan (Conservative)
1991 (Minority, C/S with Liberal Union): def. Ken Livingstone (Labour), Alan Beith (Liberal Union), Alex Salmond (SNP), John Tyndall (National Front), Dafydd Wigley (PC), Gordon McLennan (Communist), Tommy Sheridan (Scottish Socialist)
1997 (Minority, Grand Coalition): def. Ken Livingstone (Labour), Alan Beith (Liberal Union), Alex Salmond (SNP), Arthur Scargill (Socialist Labour), John Tyndall (National Front), Dafydd Wigley (PC), Mike Woodin (Green), Tommy Sheridan (Scottish Socialist)

2002 (Minority, Grand Coalition): def. Ken Livingstone (Labour), Vince Cable (Liberal Union), Tommy Sheridan (Scottish Socialist), John Swinney (SNP), Arthur Scargill (Socialist Labour), John Tyndall (National Front), Ieuan Wyn Jones (PC), Mike Woodin (Green)
2006-2012: George Osborne (Conservative)
2006 (l.e.): def. David Davis, Malcolm Rifkind
2007 (Minority, c/s with Liberal Union): def. Dianne Abbott (Labour), Vince Cable (Liberal Union), Alex Salmond (SNP), Nick Griffin(National Front), Ieuan Wyn Jones (PC), Caroline Lucas/Keith Taylor (Green) Arthur Scargill/Tommy Sheridan (Socialist)
2012-2017: Jeremy Corbyn (Labour)
2012 (Minority, c/s with Liberal Union): def. George Osborne (Conservative), Nick Griffin(National Front), Vince Cable (Liberal Union), Alex Salmond (SNP), Leanne Wood (PC), George Galloway (Socialist) Caroline Lucas (Green)
2017-Present: Chuka Umunna (Let's Go, Britain!)
2017 (Minority, c/s with Growth for Britain, Greens, SNP, and "Government Tories"): def. Nick Griffin (National Front), David Cameron (Conservative), George Galloway (Growth for Britain), Nicola Sturgeon (SNP), Leanne Wood (PC), Richard Burgon (Labour/Green Movement), Paul Nuttall (A Better Britain)
2022: vs. Nick Griffin (National Front), Michael Fabricant ('True' Conservative), Sam Gyimah ('Government' Conservative), George Galloway (Growth for Britain), tbd (SNP), Adam Price (PC), Jon Trickett (Labour/Green Movement), Paul Nuttall (A Better Britain), Richard Burgon (New Labour, New Britain), Sir Ed Davey (Democratic Union)
 

Time Enough

"Enthusiastic Cis Male Partner"
Pronouns
He/Him
The Wheels Fall Off...

Prime Ministers of the United Kingdom:
1900-1902: Marquess of Salisbury (Conservative)

1900 (Majority) def: Henry Campbell Bannerman (Liberal), Keir Hardie (Labour), John Redmond (Irish Parliamentary Party)
1902-1906: Arthur Balfour (Conservative)
1906-1910: Henry Campbell Bannerman (Liberal)
1906 (Majority) def: Arthur Balfour (Conservative), Keir Hardie (Labour), Robert Handale (Imperial Liberal), John Redmond (IPP)
1910-1915: H.H.Asquith (Liberal)
1910 (Majority) def: Arthur Balfour (Conservative), Arthur Henderson (Labour), Robert Handale (Imperial Liberal), John Redmond (IPP), William O'Brien (All for Ireland)
1915-1921: Earl Kitchener (Independent leading War Government)
1921-1922: Eric Geddes (Conservative)

1921 (Majority) def: H.H. Asquith (Liberal), William Wedgwood Benn (Radical), Arthur Henderson (Labour), Albert Inkpin (Communist Party of Great Britain), Independent Irish Nationalists
1922-1923: Austen Chamberlain (Conservative)
1923: General Strike, followed by British Civil War

Prime Ministers of the British Democratic Government:
1923-1925: Austen Chamberlain (Conservative)
1925-1927: Eric Geddes (National)
1925 (Majority) def: H.H.Asquith (Independent Liberal), Philip Snowden (Democratic), Rotha Lintorn Orman (Action)
1927-1932: Winston Churchill (National)
1928 (Majority) def: Herbert Samuel (Ind.Liberal), Malcolm MacDonald (Democratic)
1932: Kingsley Wood (National)
1932: Birmingham Peace Accord

Premiers of the Revolutionary Committee:
1923-1926: Neil Maclean (Socialist Labour)
1923 def: Sidney Webb (Fabian), Albert Inkpin (Communist), A.J. Cook (Syndicalist), Major Clement Attlee (Soldier Socialist), William Wedgwood Benn (Radical)
1926: Albert Inkpin (Communist)
1926-1928: A.J.Cook (Syndicalist)
1926 def: James Maxton (Socialist Labour), Sidney Webb (Fabian), Albert Inkpin (Communist), Major Clement Attlee (Soldier Socialist), William Wedgwood Benn (Radical)
1928-1931: Rose Cohen (Communist)
1928 def: James Maxton (Socialist Labour), Herbert Morrison (Fabian), Major Clement Attlee (Soldier Socialist), A.J.Cook (Syndicalist), William Wedgwood Benn (Radical)
1932: Ellen Wilkinson (Socialist Labour)
1932 def: Herbert Morrison (Fabian), Rose Cohen (Communist), Manny Shillwell (Syndicalist)
1932: Birmingham Peace Accord


Premiers of the British Union:
1932-1936: Ellen Wilkinson (Socialist Labour)

1932 (With George Strauss) def: Harry Pollitt (CPGB), Kingsley Wood (National), Emmanuel Shillwell (United Syndicates), Richard Acland (Radical), Herbert Morrison (Fabian), Malcolm MacDonald (Democratic)
1936-1940: George Strauss (Socialist Labour)
1936 (With Stafford Cripps) def: Harry Pollitt (CPGB), John Maynard Keynes (National), Emmanuel Shillwell (United Syndicates), Richard Acland (CommonWealth)
1940-1944: Emmanuel Shillwell (United Syndicates)
1940 (With Ernest Bevin) def: Stafford Cripps (Socialist Labour), John Maynard Keynes (National), R.Palme Dutt (CPGB), G.D.H Cole (CommonWealth)
1944-1948: Oliver Baldwin (Socialist Labour)
1944 (With Jennie Lee) def: Arthur Deakin (United Syndicates), John Maynard Keynes (National), R.Palme Dutt (CPGB), G.D.H Cole (CommonWealth)
1948-1952: G.D.H. Cole (Common Wealth)
1948 (With John Loveseed) def: Aneurin Bevan (Socialist Labour), Arthur Deakin (United Syndicates), Evan Durbin (National), Margot Heinemann (CPGB)
1952: John Peck (Communist Party of Great Britain)
1952 (With Margot Heinemann) def: John Loveseed (Common Wealth), Jennie Lee (Socialist Labour), Arthur Deakin (United Syndicates), Evan Durbin (National)

A @Yokai Man suggestion
-David Lloyd George doesn’t manage to escape being lynched by an angry mob in Birmingham in 18 December 1901 after speaking against the Boer War,leading to social tensions
 
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