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Lists of Heads of Government and Heads of State

Stuyvesant

Just wait until I actually get my shit together
Location
The Place Beyond The Pines
Pronouns
he/him
Rulers of Chicago
2272-2300: Patriarch Brian (Ecumenical)
2300-2316: Patriarch Connor (Ecumenical)
2316-2329: Patriarch Scott (Ecumenical)
2329-2363: Patriarch Gresham (Ecumenical)
2363-2366: Patriarch Stefan (Ecumenical)
2366-2367: Pope David I (Catholic)
2367-2372: Patriarch Stefan (Ecumenical)
2372-2375: Pope David I (Catholic)
2375-Spring 2376: Patriarch Stefan (Ecumenical)
Spring 2376-July 2376: Pope David I (Catholic)
July 2376-August 2, 2376: Patriarch Stefan (Ecumenical)
August 2, 2376-August 9, 2376: Patriarch of the East Hnanisho (Nestorian)
August 9, 2376-December 25, 2376: Patriarch Stefan (Ecumenical)
December 25, 2376-January 19, 2377: Pope David I (Catholic)
2377-2380: Magnate Cyrus Boystown (Rust Cult)

Cyrus led a rebellion of the Local Rust Cultists and captured all three of the Feuding Clergymen, sacrificing all of them to Father Bessemer on his Feast Day

Speakers of the Republic of Calumet:
2380-2420: President Stanislaus Avondale (Americanist)
2420-2446: Aldo Hart (Americanist)
2446-2461: Morgan Avondale (Americanist)
2461-2499: Robert Parsons (Catholic)
2499-2537: President Ferguslav Avondale (Americanist)
2537-2555: Emil Young (Strangite)

Emil was murdered by one of his wives, jealous that her children would not be his heirs
2555-2576: Daley I Richards (Americanist)
2576-2603: Fionnslav Avondale (Americanist)
2603-2611: Daley II Richards (Americanist)
2611-2628: President Anatol Avondale (Americanist)

Anatol Avondale was offered up in Sacrifice to the Slain-God by Albert Soady when the latter conquered Chicago

Rulers of Chicago
2628-2653: King Albert Soady of Superior (Norse)
2653-XXXX: Duke Robert DeSalle (Catholic)

Robert DeSalle, Descendant of two former rulers of Calumet (Robert Parsons and Emil Young), led an army of Chicagoans [Financed by His Holiness] against Soady, driving the Vikings out of what they called 'Vindgarðr'

The City of Chicago has seen many things, It has been destroyed and rebuilt countless times, It was fought over for over a Decade during the Duel of the Faiths, It saw a Second Golden Age under the Republic, and then a Destruction second only The Event in its Destruction and Totality. However it rebuilt itself, one should never count out Chicago, lest you hear their War Cry of "DA BEARS!"
 
Last edited:

Elephant_trail

Active member
Gone Fishing
Nixon 1960! or Kennedy find s out what a difference a running mate makes

1.Richard m. Nixon Republican Henry Cabot Lodge 1961-1963
Def. john fritzgerald Kennedy Democratic George Smathers


2. Henry Cabot Lodge Republican 1963-1964

3. Henry Cabot Lodge Republican Charles Hallack 1964-1969
Def. Lyndon Baines Johnson Democratic Eugene Mcarthy

4.Hubert Horatio Humphrey Democratic Terry sanford 1969-

Def. Henry Cabot Lodge Republican Charles Hallack
 

Uhura's Mazda

Forum Poster 'General Fructuoso Rivera'
Published by SLP
Location
Tamaki Makaurau
List of First Lords of the Treasury
1944-1945:
Anthony Eden (Conservative)
With: Clement Attlee and Herbert Morrison (Labour), Oliver Lyttelton (Conservative), Sir Archibald Sinclair (Liberal)
1945-1946: Clement Attlee (Labour)
With: Anthony Eden and Oliver Lyttelton (Conservative), Herbert Morrison (Labour), Sir John Anderson (National)
1946-1947: Sir John Anderson (National)
With: Anthony Eden and Oliver Stanley (Conservative), Clement Attlee and Herbert Morrison (Labour)
1947-1948: Herbert Morrison (Labour)
With: Anthony Eden and Oliver Stanley (Conservative), Clement Attlee (Labour), Gwilym Lloyd George (National Liberal)
1949-1950: Oliver Stanley (Conservative)
With: Anthony Eden (Conservative), Clement Attlee and Ernest Bevin (Labour), Gwilym Lloyd George (National Liberal)
1950-1951: Gwilym Lloyd George (National Liberal)
With: Oliver Stanley and Harold Macmillan (Conservative), Clement Attlee and Ernest Bevin (Labour)
1951-1952: Ernest Bevin (Labour)
With: Oliver Stanley and Harold Macmillan (Conservative), James Chuter Ede (Labour), Gwilym Lloyd George (National Liberal)
1952-1953: Harold Macmillan (Conservative)
With: Anthony Eden (Conservative), Ernest Bevin and James Chuter Ede (Labour), Gwilym Lloyd George (National Liberal)
1953-1954: James Chuter Ede (Labour)
With: Anthony Eden and Harold Macmillan (Conservative), Ernest Bevin (Labour), John Maclay (National Liberal)
1954-1955: Anthony Eden (Conservative)
With: Harold Macmillan (Conservative), James Chuter Ede and Hugh Gaitskell (Labour), John Maclay (National Liberal)
1955-1956: John Maclay (National Liberal)
With: Anthony Eden and Rab Butler (Conservative), James Chuter Ede and Hugh Gaitskell (Labour)
1956-1957: Hugh Gaitskell (Labour)
With: Anthony Eden and Rab Butler (Conservative), Jim Griffiths (Labour), John Maclay (National Liberal)
1957-1958: Rab Butler (Conservative)
With: Selwyn Lloyd (Conservative), Hugh Gaitskell and Jim Griffiths (Labour), John Maclay (National Liberal)
1958-1959: Jim Griffiths (Labour)
With: Rab Butler and Selwyn Lloyd (Conservative), Hugh Gaitskell (Labour), Richard Casey (National)
1959-1960: Selwyn Lloyd (Conservative)
With: Rab Butler (Conservative), Jim Griffiths and Philip Noel-Baker (Labour), Richard Casey (National)
1960-1961: Richard Casey (National)
With: Selwyn Lloyd and Harold Macmillan (Conservative), Jim Griffiths and Philip Noel-Baker (Labour)
1961-1962: Harold Macmillan (Conservative)
With: Selwyn Lloyd (Conservative), Philip Noel-Baker and James Callaghan (Labour), Richard Casey (National)
1962-1963: Philip Noel-Baker (Labour)
With: Harold Macmillan and Peter Thorneycroft (Conservative), James Callaghan (Labour), Richard Casey (National)
1963-1964: James Callaghan (Labour)
With: Harold Macmillan and Peter Thorneycroft (Conservative), Philip Noel-Baker (Labour), Malcolm MacDonald (National)
1964-1965: Peter Thorneycroft (Conservative)
With: Harold Macmillan (Conservative), James Callaghan and Frank Soskice (Labour), Malcolm MacDonald (National)
1965-1966: Malcolm MacDonald (National)
With: Peter Thorneycroft and Duncan Sandys (Conservative), James Callaghan and Frank Soskice (Labour)
1966-1967: Frank Soskice (Labour)
With: Peter Thorneycroft and Duncan Sandys (Conservative), Patrick Gordon Walker (Labour), Malcolm MacDonald (National)
1967-1968: Duncan Sandys (Conservative)
With: Reginald Maudling (Conservative), Frank Soskice and Patrick Gordon Walker (Labour), Malcolm MacDonald (National)
1968-1969: Patrick Gordon Walker (Labour)
With: Duncan Sandys and Reginald Maudling (Conservative), Frank Soskice (Labour), Ian Gilmour (National)
1969-1970: Reginald Maudling (Conservative)
With: Duncan Sandys (Conservative), Patrick Gordon Walker and Michael Stewart (Labour), Ian Gilmour (National)
1970-1971: Ian Gilmour (National)
With: Reginald Maudling and Edward Heath (Conservative), Patrick Gordon Walker and Michael Stewart (Labour)
1971-1972: Michael Stewart (Labour)
With: Reginald Maudling and Edward Heath (Conservative), Denis Healey (Labour), Ian Gilmour (National)
1972-1973: Edward Heath (Conservative)
With: Robert Carr (Conservative), Michael Stewart and Denis Healey (Labour), Ian Gilmour (National)

List of Prime Ministers

1973: Edward Heath (Conservative minority)
1973-1974: Edward Heath (Conservative-Social Democrat minority coalition)

1973 def: Harold Wilson (Labour), Don Bennett (Liberal), Roy Jenkins (Social Democrat)
1974-1978: Margaret Thatcher (Conservative-Liberal coalition)

Upon the tragic and gruesome death of Sir Winston Churchill, a grieving nation could not imagine a single person taking over during the War, and the office of Prime Minister was put 'in commission', shared by five Lords of the Treasury with a rotating First Lord acting as Chairman and primus inter pares. The system was inspired by that of the Swiss Federal Council, and some of the dimmer commentators predicted that such a set-up would be conducive to a peaceful existence due to the (presumed) limited impact of ego on decision-making. In fact, the long process of peacemaking in Europe and the endless colonial conflicts combined to turn what might have been merely an emergency power structure into a semi-permanent feature of the British Constitution. Inertia is a powerful force.

The post-war Keynesian consensus (or 'Attlersonism') was popularly believed to rest on the equal admixture of Labour and Tory, although revisionist historians point to equally beige and spending-happy Governments across the Western world, who weren't notably reliant on grand coalitions. The inclusion of Labour Treasury Lords certainly seems to have reduced industrial unrest compared to other similar economies, though, as the Government set an example of class collaboration to both workers and employers. The unions became very influential in the halls and smoke-filled rooms of power during these decades - after all, the rule of the day was consensus, and the top ranks of trade unions tend to be full of people who have moved from manufacturing goods to manufacturing consensus.

Labour and the Conservatives were guaranteed two Lords apiece, with the fifth seat at the table reserved for a minor supporting party - at the outset this was the Liberal seat, but said party went into opposition at the end of the formal war in Europe. Subsequently, the 'tie-break' seat was held by National Liberals and their successors. The downside to this was that there was effectively a permanent 3-2 majority for the Conservative side, which obviously displeased the Labour Left. The Bevanites frequently switched between abstaining from the PLP nomination process for the Treasury Lords and bemoaning their exclusion from the levers of power - however, in general the factional impasse was resolved by allocating the Party Leader position to the Left, significantly Bevan, Castle and Wilson.

With the Attlersonian Consensus disintegrating in the early 1970s and the opposition Liberals (resolutely opposed to state intervention, Commonwealth immigration, taxes and the Common Market) making great strides against the tired old parties, Harold Wilson took the brave and very stupid step of pulling the Labour Party out of the Government. The keys to 10 Downing Street were dusted off and handed to Ted Heath, who took the office of PM out of commission and governed alone until a snap election could be held. In the meantime, the Labour Party split badly, with the pro-coalition wing emerging as a new Social Democratic Party, based upon those of Austria and Italy. The SDP accommodated the National Party, which otherwise had little reason now to exist.

The result of the 1973 election, the first in decades to be genuinely significant, returned a four-way split in terms of seats. This is how Britain encountered the grotesque chaos of a governing coalition between the second-place and the fourth-place party, as Heath and Jenkins teamed up in the interests of Europeanism and social liberalism. Neither party was united on these issues, by any means. But backbench rebellions paled into insignificance against the economic crisis. This was utimately what impelled the rump Tory parliamentary party to putsch Heath in favour of Trade and Industry Secretary Margaret Thatcher, who proposed retrenchment, trade union reform, privatisation and an end to the 'proportionate' system of party-network jobbery. She formed a coalition with Bennett's Liberals and went on to change Britain irrevocably.

While many are deeply unhappy with the course of British politics since the 70s, only the Continuity Social Democrats still propound a return to the Swiss System.
 

Walpurgisnacht

Incredibly Busy Trying To Kill Everyone
Location
Banned from the forum
Pronouns
He/Him
Sorry for nitpicking, but there might be a typo: it should be "Professor J. Q. Braganza".
Fixed, thanks for pointing it out.

While many are deeply unhappy with the course of British politics since the 70s, only the Continuity Social Democrats still propound a return to the Swiss System.
Very nice! The artificial prolongment of the National Liberal/National Labour parties is an excellent touch, as the Radical Actionite Liberals absorbing the system's more right-wing discontents.

What exactly is the relationship between Party Leaders and Council members? Does one have power over the other?
 

Uhura's Mazda

Forum Poster 'General Fructuoso Rivera'
Published by SLP
Location
Tamaki Makaurau
Very nice! The artificial prolongment of the National Liberal/National Labour parties is an excellent touch, as the Radical Actionite Liberals absorbing the system's more right-wing discontents.

What exactly is the relationship between Party Leaders and Council members? Does one have power over the other?
It's not really a Radical Action thing - the Liberals pull out when the existential conflict is over, but ITTL there's a lot of scrappy codas like Greece and the UK gets into a bit of an Iraq situation.

I am a massive fan of National Lib/Lab.

Think of the Lords of the Treasury as a sort of inner Cabinet overseeing a ton of Ministers and portfolios, and also engaging in tedious negotiations to form a consensus on every issue. The Party Leader doesn't generally want to be popularly identified with the compromises, so they stay out of the Council and instead help to form policy and make gains in elections. The Lords use these electoral mandates to attempt to pass as much as possible of the Party's policy. This is basically how it works in Switzerland, anyway.
 

Nanwe

Designated VOLTer
Location
(B)XL, EU
Pronouns
he/him
List of First Lords of the Treasury
1944-1945:
Anthony Eden (Conservative)
With: Clement Attlee and Herbert Morrison (Labour), Oliver Lyttelton (Conservative), Sir Archibald Sinclair (Liberal)
1945-1946: Clement Attlee (Labour)
With: Anthony Eden and Oliver Lyttelton (Conservative), Herbert Morrison (Labour), Sir John Anderson (National)
1946-1947: Sir John Anderson (National)
With: Anthony Eden and Oliver Stanley (Conservative), Clement Attlee and Herbert Morrison (Labour)
1947-1948: Herbert Morrison (Labour)
With: Anthony Eden and Oliver Stanley (Conservative), Clement Attlee (Labour), Gwilym Lloyd George (National Liberal)
1949-1950: Oliver Stanley (Conservative)
With: Anthony Eden (Conservative), Clement Attlee and Ernest Bevin (Labour), Gwilym Lloyd George (National Liberal)
1950-1951: Gwilym Lloyd George (National Liberal)
With: Oliver Stanley and Harold Macmillan (Conservative), Clement Attlee and Ernest Bevin (Labour)
1951-1952: Ernest Bevin (Labour)
With: Oliver Stanley and Harold Macmillan (Conservative), James Chuter Ede (Labour), Gwilym Lloyd George (National Liberal)
1952-1953: Harold Macmillan (Conservative)
With: Anthony Eden (Conservative), Ernest Bevin and James Chuter Ede (Labour), Gwilym Lloyd George (National Liberal)
1953-1954: James Chuter Ede (Labour)
With: Anthony Eden and Harold Macmillan (Conservative), Ernest Bevin (Labour), John Maclay (National Liberal)
1954-1955: Anthony Eden (Conservative)
With: Harold Macmillan (Conservative), James Chuter Ede and Hugh Gaitskell (Labour), John Maclay (National Liberal)
1955-1956: John Maclay (National Liberal)
With: Anthony Eden and Rab Butler (Conservative), James Chuter Ede and Hugh Gaitskell (Labour)
1956-1957: Hugh Gaitskell (Labour)
With: Anthony Eden and Rab Butler (Conservative), Jim Griffiths (Labour), John Maclay (National Liberal)
1957-1958: Rab Butler (Conservative)
With: Selwyn Lloyd (Conservative), Hugh Gaitskell and Jim Griffiths (Labour), John Maclay (National Liberal)
1958-1959: Jim Griffiths (Labour)
With: Rab Butler and Selwyn Lloyd (Conservative), Hugh Gaitskell (Labour), Richard Casey (National)
1959-1960: Selwyn Lloyd (Conservative)
With: Rab Butler (Conservative), Jim Griffiths and Philip Noel-Baker (Labour), Richard Casey (National)
1960-1961: Richard Casey (National)
With: Selwyn Lloyd and Harold Macmillan (Conservative), Jim Griffiths and Philip Noel-Baker (Labour)
1961-1962: Harold Macmillan (Conservative)
With: Selwyn Lloyd (Conservative), Philip Noel-Baker and James Callaghan (Labour), Richard Casey (National)
1962-1963: Philip Noel-Baker (Labour)
With: Harold Macmillan and Peter Thorneycroft (Conservative), James Callaghan (Labour), Richard Casey (National)
1963-1964: James Callaghan (Labour)
With: Harold Macmillan and Peter Thorneycroft (Conservative), Philip Noel-Baker (Labour), Malcolm MacDonald (National)
1964-1965: Peter Thorneycroft (Conservative)
With: Harold Macmillan (Conservative), James Callaghan and Frank Soskice (Labour), Malcolm MacDonald (National)
1965-1966: Malcolm MacDonald (National)
With: Peter Thorneycroft and Duncan Sandys (Conservative), James Callaghan and Frank Soskice (Labour)
1966-1967: Frank Soskice (Labour)
With: Peter Thorneycroft and Duncan Sandys (Conservative), Patrick Gordon Walker (Labour), Malcolm MacDonald (National)
1967-1968: Duncan Sandys (Conservative)
With: Reginald Maudling (Conservative), Frank Soskice and Patrick Gordon Walker (Labour), Malcolm MacDonald (National)
1968-1969: Patrick Gordon Walker (Labour)
With: Duncan Sandys and Reginald Maudling (Conservative), Frank Soskice (Labour), Ian Gilmour (National)
1969-1970: Reginald Maudling (Conservative)
With: Duncan Sandys (Conservative), Patrick Gordon Walker and Michael Stewart (Labour), Ian Gilmour (National)
1970-1971: Ian Gilmour (National)
With: Reginald Maudling and Edward Heath (Conservative), Patrick Gordon Walker and Michael Stewart (Labour)
1971-1972: Michael Stewart (Labour)
With: Reginald Maudling and Edward Heath (Conservative), Denis Healey (Labour), Ian Gilmour (National)
1972-1973: Edward Heath (Conservative)
With: Robert Carr (Conservative), Michael Stewart and Denis Healey (Labour), Ian Gilmour (National)

List of Prime Ministers
1973: Edward Heath (Conservative minority)
1973-1974: Edward Heath (Conservative-Social Democrat minority coalition)

1973 def: Harold Wilson (Labour), Don Bennett (Liberal), Roy Jenkins (Social Democrat)
1974-1978: Margaret Thatcher (Conservative-Liberal coalition)

Upon the tragic and gruesome death of Sir Winston Churchill, a grieving nation could not imagine a single person taking over during the War, and the office of Prime Minister was put 'in commission', shared by five Lords of the Treasury with a rotating First Lord acting as Chairman and primus inter pares. The system was inspired by that of the Swiss Federal Council, and some of the dimmer commentators predicted that such a set-up would be conducive to a peaceful existence due to the (presumed) limited impact of ego on decision-making. In fact, the long process of peacemaking in Europe and the endless colonial conflicts combined to turn what might have been merely an emergency power structure into a semi-permanent feature of the British Constitution. Inertia is a powerful force.

The post-war Keynesian consensus (or 'Attlersonism') was popularly believed to rest on the equal admixture of Labour and Tory, although revisionist historians point to equally beige and spending-happy Governments across the Western world, who weren't notably reliant on grand coalitions. The inclusion of Labour Treasury Lords certainly seems to have reduced industrial unrest compared to other similar economies, though, as the Government set an example of class collaboration to both workers and employers. The unions became very influential in the halls and smoke-filled rooms of power during these decades - after all, the rule of the day was consensus, and the top ranks of trade unions tend to be full of people who have moved from manufacturing goods to manufacturing consensus.

Labour and the Conservatives were guaranteed two Lords apiece, with the fifth seat at the table reserved for a minor supporting party - at the outset this was the Liberal seat, but said party went into opposition at the end of the formal war in Europe. Subsequently, the 'tie-break' seat was held by National Liberals and their successors. The downside to this was that there was effectively a permanent 3-2 majority for the Conservative side, which obviously displeased the Labour Left. The Bevanites frequently switched between abstaining from the PLP nomination process for the Treasury Lords and bemoaning their exclusion from the levers of power - however, in general the factional impasse was resolved by allocating the Party Leader position to the Left, significantly Bevan, Castle and Wilson.

With the Attlersonian Consensus disintegrating in the early 1970s and the opposition Liberals (resolutely opposed to state intervention, Commonwealth immigration, taxes and the Common Market) making great strides against the tired old parties, Harold Wilson took the brave and very stupid step of pulling the Labour Party out of the Government. The keys to 10 Downing Street were dusted off and handed to Ted Heath, who took the office of PM out of commission and governed alone until a snap election could be held. In the meantime, the Labour Party split badly, with the pro-coalition wing emerging as a new Social Democratic Party, based upon those of Austria and Italy. The SDP accommodated the National Party, which otherwise had little reason now to exist.

The result of the 1973 election, the first in decades to be genuinely significant, returned a four-way split in terms of seats. This is how Britain encountered the grotesque chaos of a governing coalition between the second-place and the fourth-place party, as Heath and Jenkins teamed up in the interests of Europeanism and social liberalism. Neither party was united on these issues, by any means. But backbench rebellions paled into insignificance against the economic crisis. This was utimately what impelled the rump Tory parliamentary party to putsch Heath in favour of Trade and Industry Secretary Margaret Thatcher, who proposed retrenchment, trade union reform, privatisation and an end to the 'proportionate' system of party-network jobbery. She formed a coalition with Bennett's Liberals and went on to change Britain irrevocably.

While many are deeply unhappy with the course of British politics since the 70s, only the Continuity Social Democrats still propound a return to the Swiss System.
Love the concept and the execution.
 

zaffre

At the same time, a Space Bug
Location
Massachusetts
Not Feeling So Good

1809-1812: James Madison (DR-VA) / George Clinton (DR-NY)
1808: Charles C. Pinckney (F-SC) / Rufus King (F-NY), George Clinton (AR-NY) / James Monroe (AR-VA)
1812-1813: James Madison (DR-VA) / Vacancy
1813-1814: James Madison (DR-VA) / Elbridge Gerry (DR-MA)

1812: DeWitt Clinton (AR-NY) / Jared Ingersoll (F-PA)
1814-1817: James Madison (DR-VA) / Vacancy
1817-1825: James Monroe (AR-VA) / Joseph Hiester (AR-PA) [2]

1816: William H. Crawford (DR-GA) / Daniel D. Tompkins (DR-NY) [1]
1820: William H. Crawford (DR-GA) / Daniel D. Tompkins (DR-NY), Henry Clay (NR-KY) / Daniel D. Tompkins (NR-NY), William Lowndes (I-SC) / William Eustis (I-MA) [3]

1825-1827: Rufus King (AR-NY) / Andrew Jackson (AR-TN) [4]
1824: Henry Clay (D-KY) / Albert Gallatin (D-PA), William H. Crawford (D-GA) / John Tod (D-PA)
1827-1829: Andrew Jackson (A-TN) / Vacancy [5]
1829-1833:
Nicholas Biddle (A-PA) / Andrew Jackson (A-TN) [7]

1828: Henry Clay (D-KY) / Martin Van Buren (D-NY) [6]
1833-1834: Nicholas Biddle (A-PA) / William Wirt (A-VA) [8]
1832: John Tyler (I-VA) / Roger Taney (I-MD) [10]
1834-1835: Nicholas Biddle (A-PA) / Vacancy
1835-1835: John C. Calhoun (A-SC) / Vacancy [9]
1835-: John C. Calhoun (A-SC) / John Q. Adams (A-MA)

1835: no opposition due to irregular circumstances [11]

[1] William H. Crawford's behavior in the lead-up to the 1816 nominating caucus may have been too cute by half (saying he didn't want it, asking Monroe for a better Cabinet position, anonymously calling an early caucus that had like two people there) but he never officially bowed of the race and in the final push was ultimately able to pip Monroe for the nomination by a vote of 62 to 57. Unfortunately for Crawford, this immediately backfired because:

[2] Monroe ran anyway. Why wouldn't he? He had said he was going to, the caucus system was about as popular as dirt, and, oh right, he had literally done the same thing eight years ago. But Crawford was not an eminence on the scale of James Madison, Monroe meant to win this time around, and the Federalists, crucially, were aware they had no hope of winning on their own. They pulled the same trick as four years ago and non-endorsed Monroe, who was far more simpatico to them on the issues than Crawford (or than the unprincipled shit DeWitt Clinton had actually been, for that matter). Monroe and the Anti-Caucus Republicans won the very hard-fought contest 124 to 93, with staunchly Federalist Massachusetts, Connecticut, and Delaware providing the margin of victory - and his political life was in their hands.

[3] The 1820s are generally considered the most vitriolic decade in American history. President Monroe was reviled after four years of cooperation with Federalists as a treasonous arch-fiend, Crawford was demonized as King Caucus and the third option was scarcely better. Henry Clay had quietly ignored his own party to back Monroe in 1816 only to be stunned when the Secretaryship of State was denied to him. Under the circumstances, he quickly drifted back to the Democratic-Republicans and made hell for the administration in the House - his fight to admit Missouri as a slave state caused a four year impasse and hardening feelings on both sides of the political divide. Together, Clay and Crawford could have ejected the administration as Federalist pawns. But they were divided by a host of issues and the result was a bitterly contested second victory for Monroe, just scraping to an electoral majority by one vote. William "can't we all get along" Lowndes was also there.

[4] The Virginia Dynasty finally came to an end in 1824 with the election of a Northern titan, Monroe's own Secretary of State and reluctant heir apparent, Rufus King. King had been chosen for the Cabinet in 1816 in a bit of under-the-table dealing that Speaker Clay labeled a "Corrupt Bargain", unfairly - his diplomatic skills were so respected that even Jefferson had kept him on as Ambassador. King helped shepherd Monroe's diplomatic agenda to fruition, and his firmly pro-Northern credentials on the Missouri Question positioned him as, really, the inevitable choice in 1824.

King was old with dubious credentials, but an adroit Vice Presidential pick in popular General Jackson helped clear him of the 'treason' charge and (again) Clay and Crawford's inability to get their shit together meant that the 'official' Democratic-Republicans were hopelessly divided. King was adept enough to take advantage of this - Missouri's gradual emancipation proviso (and East Maine and West Maine) all owe him a debt of gratitude, and his short term is very fondly remembered before its end in a constitutional crisis.

[5] Another politician might have ascended to the Presidency with a groundswell of support, but in Jackson's case it was quite the opposite - part of it was his hedging on the Missouri Question (although, ever the soldier, he had reluctantly toed King's line) but the fact of the matter was that a military chieftain taking over on the President's death simply rubbed people the wrong way. Jackson, aware that the threat of Clay was too serious to play games (and, apocryphally, persuaded by long-time political ally John Quincy Adams), made clear that his status was simply that of Acting President and moreover pledged not to seek reelection. For his pains, he was rewarded with the Vice Presidency again, under a Northern wunderkind that was about to need his skills more than ever.

[6] Clay and Van Buren had more than their fair share of political talent between them but also a reputation that had become a bit, well, unsavory, what with the gambling and ruffled shirts and widespread belief that Clay had literally poisoned Crawford with foxglove in 1823 in an attempt to murder him. Monroe and his Anti-Caucus Republicans had been catchily mocked as 'Anglicans' for their general treachery for nigh on a decade now, but historians generally attribute Jackson's final switch to using it himself as an assertion that, well, at least he went to church, unlike that shit Clay. It was also presumably to fend off the bigamy charges.

[7] Biddle had been an enterprising young Federalist and a close friend of Monroe and, naturally, was one of the rising stars of the unholy new alliance when it was concluded in 1816 - subsequent service in Congress and as King (and Jackson)'s Secretary of the Treasury had only burnished his star. But for all his talent, he was no conciliator, and very narrow victory over Clay and Van Buren further emboldened him and made the Democratic-Republicans more fearful that they had been shut out of power indefinitely. The final tipping point came in the oddest of places - Ustanali Bank (more properly known as New Echota). Georgia's negotiations with the Cherokee had been at a long-running impasse, not least because, as Crawford's home state, Georgia tended to have very few friends in the national government at all, and in 1829 it resorted to nullifying all past treaties and beginning (fraudulent) negotiations with individual Cherokee factions to drive them out. The 'Treaty' of New Echota incensed Biddle, and for the Anglicans who had long wished to cleanse the taint of disloyalty left by the Hartford Convention, it offered the opportunity to strike back. But the coalescing of a Federal army at Charleston, followed by (much more provocatively) Biddle's threat to admit the Cherokee as a state proved a step too far. Biddle would never have had the votes in the Senate for such a demand (indeed, he wouldn't have had Vice President Jackson's vote) but the one-two punch was enough to push long-suffering Georgia to finally rebel and declare that Clay was rightfully-elected President and Van Buren Vice President if you discounted the (improperly enumerated (?)) East Maine and West Maine electoral votes the year before. Clay himself was rather reluctant to take the plunge (not least because up to this point he had agreed with the Cherokee) but he himself had raised the point that the election might be illegitimate, and the furor in the West and South was such that, for better or worse, he had a tiger by the tail. The West, Most Of The South, and Van Buren's own New York all flocked to his side.

[8] The conflict that raged from 1829 on is variously known as the Nullification War, the Ustanali Bank War, the Civil War (duh), the Eleven Years War, or more simply, The War, since it eclipsed all else. The boyish President aged nearly by the day, while his VP had his own concerns - Jackson is to date the only sitting Vice President to lead an army in the field. To list the reversals and counter-reversals of that war is beyond the scope of this humble list - Jackson's March, the Harrying of New York, the First and Second Sieges of Norfolk, the Toledo Campaign, have all been scorched deep into the American memory, and that was but the first third of the war. But French intervention (with the unusually bold strategy, for Orleanists, of bearding the lion in its den with the invasion of Boston) is generally considered the have ignited the Second Phase of the war with its provocation of British intervention and (as a result) Richard Lawrence's assasination of President Biddle in a roundabout attempt to seize the British throne.

[9] Former Vice President Jackson is alleged to have wept and said that Lawrence would never have succeeded had he been there, but Jackson was not there, and more to the point, he was not Vice President anymore, his services proving too vital to the war effort. Instead, Jackson dueled (not literally) rebel general Harrison along Lake Erie while Biddle's successor was...Pres. Pro Tempore Calhoun, The Indispensible Man. Calhoun had been an arch-nationalist going back to Madison's day, and his hated enemy Crawford assuming leadership of the Democratic-Republicans for a whole decade had only solidified these beliefs. Calhoun's own South Carolina had proved the staunchest bastion of federalism in the deep South, resisting their rival Georgia almost to the last, and while Calhoun had tended to be an uneasy fit for the administration's slavery policy, that was rapidly becoming a moot point - Clay had only brought in France (and Mexico) with gradual emancipation on his end.

[10] Tyler and Taney ran on a ticket of "We Aren't Traitors, I Mean Clay Probably Is The Rightful President But Who Can Say, Really" and were not exactly popular.

[11] Calhoun was not about to repeat Jackson's mistake of becoming a lame duck immediately, and what with the exigencies of the war effort he was smoothly reelected, with the (constitutionally questionable) interpretation that the "special election" in case of a double vacancy was only open to the acting President for whom it was necessary to confer legitimacy. Calhoun presided over the New England Campaign, all three Battles of Albany, and the retaking of South Carolina, and although Clay's government still made bold bosts about their western redoubt, the writing was on the wall. Clay is remembered today as the southern champion of sectionalism that nearly tore the nation in two (did, essentially, depending what you think of California and the white rebel exodus that has become known as the Trail Of Tears) while Calhoun was the wise-minded leader of an entire country and (at the point-blank demand of Perceval the Younger as the cost of British support) in the near-term, The Great Emancipator.

To say that John C. Calhoun did not ultimately enjoy most of his Presidency is, perhaps, an understatement.
 

zaffre

At the same time, a Space Bug
Location
Massachusetts
Oh come on. :p

This is pretty fun though, I have to say, although I think your Jackson is maybe a bit too pacific a personality, even with the whole flipping reputations going on here.
Mostly happenstance that I took Jackson's aggro down a notch, although interestingly enough he was writing letters to Monroe about how he should include Federalists in the cabinet IOTL - you have a pretty weird realignment when him / Adams / Calhoun are all firmly on the same side.

Wasn't really space to get into it, but I imagine the nominating caucus was replaced with *something* that meant the northern, er, dog of the Anglicans wagged the dog and Jackson was aware that he wasn't their first choice.
 

Catalunya

Well-known member
Favorite Son

2001-2009: Al Gore / Joe Lieberman (Democrat)
2000: George W. Bush / Dick Cheney (Republican)
2004: John McCain / Rudy Giulliani (Republican), Ralph Nader / Dennis Kucinich (Green)
2009-2011: Fred Thompson / Mitt Romney (Republican)
2008: John Edwards / Jack Reed (Democrat)
2012 - 2012: Mitt Romney / vacant (Republican)
2012 - 2017: Mitt Romney / David Petraeus (Republican)
2012: Hillary Clinton / Judith Rodin (Democrat), Russ Feingold / Bernie Sanders (Independent)
2017 - 2021: Donald Trump / Bill Frist (Republican)
2016: Michael Bloomberg / Gary Locke (Democrat)
2021 - 2029: Andrew Cuomo / Gavin Newsom (Democrat)
2020: Donald Trump / Bill Frist (Republican)
2024: Brian Fritzpatrick / Marco Rubio (Republican)
2029 - 2033: Andrew Cuomo / Ro Khanna (Democrat)
2028: Starbucks Guy / John Thune (Republican)
2033 - 2033: Andrew Cuomo / Amy McGrath (Democrat)
2032: John James / Elise Stefanik (Republican)

"I could never say it to you personally big brother, but you have always been mom's favorite son".
- California Senator Chris Cuomo, April 4th 2033.

I'm sure you get the premise.
 

Japhy

Well-known member
Published by SLP
Location
Albany, NY
Pronouns
He/Him
ATLF: Chasing Shadows as it is In Progress (With Apologies to @Mumby)

Obviously Spoilers to whats already happened but you should have gone with that from the acronym.

I will admit there was a tiny, tiny bit of tweaking on my part here from the original work, which is great and should be read. I just felt that the top of the Non-Partisan Ticket could be someone who wouldn't be one of the most boring people in New York History and a Louisiana-Arkansas ticket wouldn't have worked well for Long.

Following the events of the Election Butler cracks down hard on the Growing American Fascist movement with mixed results. The Black Legion goes to ground, JP Morgan and the Du Ponts flee the country but dissent nationwide is high and while the President seeks to nationalize the railroads, develop national infrastructure and reorganize in hundreds of ways the relationship between the US government and its people, there is a weariness that never quite fades away. The Boot-Black Shirts thanks to their often disorganized nature continue to be a problem, as are the KKK and Father Coughlin's Christian Front. Butler wages a back-alley civil war with these forces but as time goes on they look more and more towards the forces of International Fascism to gain aid. In 1936 both sides saw major enlistments for the Spanish Civil War, causing the rugged valleys of Spain to become an early instance of the Second American Civil War as well as the Great Patriotic War. Following the 1937 Anglo-German Non-Aggression Pact these forces only continue to grow. Before his premature death in Office President Butler had begun to recognize the dangers of the Isolationism that had America stand by as De La Roque took power in France and the Beaverbrook Government's new tack in foreign policy.

Unfortunately Butler's death closed any reevaluation and President Norris sought only to secure the first smooth transition of power in a Decade from one Administration to the next in 1940. The Libertarian Party embraced the Domestic focus of Daniel Hoan over the more internationalist views of those who were returning from Spain. The Soviet-German conquests of Eastern Europe almost broke the Libertarian Coalition asunder but eventually President Hoan was able to contain the strife, if at what would soon be revealed to be a high cost. The Stand Down of the Victory Legion as part of the political settlement for Neutrality in 1941, as well as slim military and naval budgets going back long before the March on Washington meant that in 1942 the United States government was woefully unprepared for the American Pronunciamiento of July 4th 1942. The Fascist Underground, having spent years in the shadows burst out again on the scene, now with the support of the reactionary heart of the United States Army. Within Days Fast convoys of German, Italian and French Volunteer Divisions were landing in Charleston and Boston was under attack from French Carrier Planes. Eugene Talmadge the rabidly violent would-be American Fuhrer oversaw forces of several of the American Far Right organizations, as well as further groups that flocked to his banner when the revolt started. The Fascist Underground's intelligence service, under the dynamic leadership of "Wild Bill" Donovan had planned well and thousands of Victory Legion Volunteers were caught at home and murdered in the first day of the war. By 1943 the situation seemed desperate as President Hoan held out in Washington even as National Front forces stood as close as Baltimore in the North and Erwin Rommel and his Panzer Korps Dixie at Manassas in the South.

1944 would see great battles and sieges from Chicago and St. Louis to Boston-Charlestown and in Philadelphia, as Dwight Eisenhower dueled George Patton for the first capital of the US. Secretary of State James P. Cannon died in a mysterious plane crash trying to reach London, forever assumed thereafter to have been the actions of Soviet Intelligence due to Stalin's Paranoia of the Libertarian Party's Anti-COMINTERN line. By November, even as the tide seemed to turn in many places as Victory Legion and US Volunteer Regiments fought tooth and nail on a dozen fronts and Constitutional Partisan Brigades operated in Fascist occupied territory, President Hoan was forced to evacuate to Sacramento. Hopes for International Fascism of Japanese involvement were washed away when the now Western Government and Democratic-Republican Secretary of State Robert A. Taft traded Guam and agreed to transfer ownership of one of the two American Naval Bases on Luzon in the Independent Philippines to Tokyo. Taft would partake in the legalities of the election that year but with no intention of giving up on his work of international appeals for the administration. A special act by congress this year would suspend the Electoral College and mandate that all EC votes go to the winner of the popular vote, an important move in the face of millions of Americans driven into refugee status in the Mountain and Pacific Wests.

But 1945 would see things turn. In Britain the Beaverbrook Government collapsed on itself and the radical government of Ernest Bevin came to power and the swing of the British Government to American support began to build. In June Adolph Hitler suffered a seizure that saw him fall into a Coma and all hell broke loose as various Nazi leaders sought to secure singular power behind the debilitated throne. Two months later the last major Fascist forces West of the Mississippi river were forced to surrender after the United States Navy's Submarine service successfully blockaded the Italo-American 5th Army in Houston. And then as a year end surprise The Chief, Eugene Talmadge died of acute Liver Failure. His Chief of Staff, Alvin Owsley had hoped for a smooth transition of power but his decision to retain the firey Father Coughlin as his Secretary of Information and Education triggered a faultline eruption in the National Front. While the Front could easily come together in the name of the Special Commands who traveled the country and did their nightmarish work of pogroms, lynchings and massacres of Black, Jewish, Hispanic, and Asian populations, there was just too much of a divide between Catholic Fascists and those Fascists who were keen to start piling Catholics into mass graves as well. In the two weeks of bloodletting that followed as the Anti-Papist Salvation Committee sought to wrest control away from Owsley the National Front's frontlines began to mutiny and buckle. The Constitutional Forces were swift to take advantage of their luck and by the end of it had finally broken through the siege lines and provided overland relief to the broken horror of the Chicago Defenses.

Eighteen more months of bloodshed followed the relief of Chicago. In 1946 the French regime collapsed, and the British Empire entered the war, with Canadian, Australian, New Zealand and Indian Expeditionary Forces arriving in the United States, helping build momentum going forward. In 1947 Stalin, finally chose to bring the curtain down and launched a surprise attack on the German forces in the East, utterly demolishing them and seeing another coup in Berlin as Goering, fresh off his abolition of the SS was forced to flee for his life. The German Junta of Wehrmacht Generals that followed him would seek peace in the West. It wouldn't come but some of the last campaigns of the National Front's forces would be engaging with German forces pulling out and choosing to fight them over their desertions. By October Major combat operations were over in the US as Owsley boarded a submarine bound for Neutral South Africa where he would live out his life in exile. In Europe the New Authoritarian Regimes in France and Italy would enter the Reich partly as saviors and partly as conquerors, securing an arc Austria and Bavaria and everything West of the Rhine. The Soviets would get the rest.

America would be transformed by the Holocaust that a sizeable portion of the country had supported and the war they had triggered to do it, aware that it couldn't retreat back into isolationism but also unsure of itself and its mission. Anti-Colonialism though would find itself a bi-partisan and secure front for looking out at the world, and a sense of never-again preparedness. It would take decades to rebuild and to begin the process of healing, all the same. Owsley would escape but thousands of other willing participants would face fair trials and justice. Japan, her puppet regime in China and the Neo-Fascists regimes in Paris, Madrid, Rome, Budapest, Bucharest, Athens, and Belgrade would find common cause in the Anti-Anglo-Anti-Comintern Pact of 1948 and in trying to hold down their empires by brute force. Britain on the other hand sought to create the Commonwealth Community of "equal" partners and maintain its dreams of controlling the world through the balance of power for another two generations, before one would end peacefully (The Community) and one would end in tears (in Bangkok). The Soviet attention would shift now, towards the instability of China and the threat of Japan, but maintaining a leery eye towards the Rhine and the Alps, as well as towards the German Socialist Republic it had installed in Berlin and is other regimes in Prague, Warsaw, and Helsinki and hopes of more peaceful COMINTERN triumphs. But, least for the time being the world was done with Great Wars. And as science moved forward, preventing one would soon become a major goal of all such governments.

1933-1935: Huey P. Long / vacant (Democratic)
1932: Alfred E. Smith (Democratic), Herbert C. Hoover / Charles Curtis (Republican)
1935-1937: Huey P. Long / vacant (Democratic, later Unionist), Smedley D. Butler (Independent) [As Secretary of General Affairs]
1937-1940: Smedley D. Butler / George W. Norris (Independent Anti-Capitalist, Later Libertarian)

1936: Upton B. Sinclair, Jr. (Independent Anti-Capitalist), Robert E. Wood / Eugene Talmadge (Non-Partisan), Huey P. Long / William Langer (Unionist)
1937: Federal Reorganization Act of 1937 Abolishes office of Secretary of General Affairs, Establishes Independent Attorney General, National Comptroller
1940-1941: George W. Norris / vacant (Libertarian)
1941-1949: Daniel W. Hoan / Rexford Tugwell (Libertarian)

1940: Robert A. Taft / William B. Bankhead (Democratic-Republican), Charles A. Lindbergh / Hamilton Fish III (Homeland League)
1944: Robert A. Taft / Alben W. Barkley (Democratic-Republican)

1942-1945: Eugene Talmadge (National Front)
1945-1947: Alvin M. Owsley (National Front)
1945: George Van Horn Mosley-Gerald B. Winrod (Anti-Coughlinite National Front) [As Salvation Committee Co-Chairs]

1949-1953: Edward K. Barsky / Claude D. Pepper (Libertarian)
1948: Walter Krueger / Earl Warren (Democratic-Republican)
1953-1957: Henry A. Wallace / Nelson A. Rockefeller (Democratic-Republican)
1952: Edward K. Barsky / Claude D. Pepper (Libertarian)
1957-1961: Adlai E. Stevenson II / Walter P. Reuther (Libertarian)
1956: Henry A. Wallace / Nelson A. Rockefeller (Democratic-Republican)
1961-1963: Adlai E. Stevenson II / Willa B. Brown (Libertarian)
1960: Robert F. Kennedy / Albert A. Gore (Democratic-Republican)
1963-1965: Willa B. Brown / vacant (Libertarian)
1965-1973: Willa B. Brown / Robert C. D. Mitchum (Libertarian)

1964: William W. Scranton / Stuart W. Symington, Jr. (Democratic-Republican)
1968: Robert F. Kennedy / John B. Connolly, Jr. (Democratic-Republican)
1973-1981: Lauren Bacall / Edward I. Koch (Democratic-Republican)
1972: Eugene J. McCarthy / Benjamin M. Spock (Libertarian)
1976: Cesar E. Chavez / Adlai E. Stevenson III (Libertarian)
 

theev

Insane Clown Posse... must be about Congress
Pronouns
he/him
1587557212701.png

2017-2021: Donald Trump (Republican)
2016 (with Mike Pence): Hillary Clinton (Democratic)
2021-2029: Mark Zuckerberg (Democratic)
2020 (with Deval Patrick): Donald Trump (Republican)
2024 (with Deval Patrick): Donald Trump (Republican)

2029-2033: Donald Trump Jr. (Republican)
2028 (with Josh Hawley): Pete Buttigieg (Democratic), Lee Carter (DSA)
2033-2037: Mark Cuban (Democratic)
2032 (with Andrew Yang): Donald Trump Jr. (Republican), Alexandria Ocasio-Cortes (DSA)
2037-0000: Brian Kemp (Republican)
2036 (with Ben Shapiro): Mark Cuban (Democratic), Chesa Boudin (DSA)
2040 (with Ben Shapiro): Andrew Yang (Democratic)


i wake up,i eat cornflakes with pepsi,i watch tv,i yell mcdonalds,i watch tv,i go to work,i take the teslabus,i watch the robots build the sea wall,i clock out,i take the teslabus,i get home,i watch ultraviolence,i yell mcdonalds,i watch ultraviolence,i eat fast food with pepsi,i get reminder,i take sleeping pills,i mine crypto,i rent dreamspace,i wake up
 

Japhy

Well-known member
Published by SLP
Location
Albany, NY
Pronouns
He/Him
Just a dumb thing that came into my head from the book I'm reading.

There is of course a light rain coming down in Arlington a Bobby Kennedy is being laid to rest. His Brother, the President of the United States has not been more tempted to drink at any point in the last 27 years then he is today. But Teddy knows that Bobby would be disappointed if he broke his pledge now. Instead he stands there feeling hollow. They did a lot of good the two of them since their talk in 1968 when Bobby had decided against challenging President Johnson. There had been hard years but achievements none the less. With President Nixon, the National Health Administration, and against him, a swift impeachment for his crimes in the Watergate scandal. With Stevenson, National full employment, the ERA and when that crank Fred Church died, Bobby had gone from UN Ambassador to seat-warming VP. They'd raised their massive broods, and Jack's kids as well. God he thinks to himself, Jackie hasn't even been gone three years. He thinks they all did a decent enough job, only Bobby Junior turned out to be a real asshole what wish his stupid-ass crusade to have Homeopathy included in the NHA. Jack-Jack had come close but there'd been enough rough, late night conversations at least to get him to focus on the Bar. And then after '92 well, he had to tell himself they'd done pretty damned well. Bobby as his Chief of Staff for the First term had been... stressful but wonderful. Working things with Gorbachev. Trying to patch things up with the Brits. Getting the Education Reform and Universal Dental Care and that cockamamie War on Hunger (Thank God Bobby had talked him into it though!) through the congress had been no easy matters. But that was all past now. He looks over and sees the torch at the other grave before looking back to the freshly dug grave where Bobby was buried, and then to the rest of his family. They could have done more. But, he tell himself, Bobby and him did more then enough. And maybe they'd made the world a bit of a better place. He thinks about raising a toast but knows he won't. Yeah, they hadn't done too bad a job. And they'd built a real legacy, not just for the country, not just a myth of Camelot. He smiles sadly, and then turns. The rain hides the tears, not that he cares to hide them. His second term isn't over yet and there's still more to do.

1969-1973: Richard M. Nixon / John G. Tower (Republican)
1968: Lyndon B. Johnson / Edmund S. Muskie (Democratic), George C. Wallace, Jr. / Curtis T. LeMay (American Independent)
1972: Hubert H. Humphrey / J. Terry Sanford (Democratic)
1973-1977: John G. Tower / Anne L. Armstrong (Republican)
1977-1983: Adlai E. Stevenson III / Frank F. Church III (Democratic)

1976: Ronald W. Reagan / Gerald R. Ford, Jr. (Republican)
1980: Spiro T. Agnew / Jack F. Kemp (Republican), George H. W. Bush / Barbara Jordan (Independent)
1983-1985: Adlai E. Stevenson III / Robert F. Kennedy (Democratic)
1985-1993: Howard H. Baker, Jr. / James A. Baker III (Republican)

1984: John H. Glenn / Gary W. Hart (Democratic)
1988: Jesse L. Jackson / Joseph R. Biden, Jr. (Democratic)
1993-2001: Edward M. Kennedy / D. Ann W. Richards (Democratic)
1992: James A. Baker III / Freddie D. Thompson (Republican), Paul E. Tsongas / H. Ross Perot (Independent)
1996: William J. Clinton / Lowell P. Weicker, Jr. (Reform), Patrick J. Buchanan, J. Danforth Quayle / J. Danforth Quayle, Christine T. Todd Whitman (Republican)
 
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