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Least favorite alt-history story?

Marching Through Georgia is the most book for teen boys book I ever read, and as a teen boy at the time I enjoyed it a treat, but it didn't leave me with much of an urge to read what my friend assured me were the more gritty serious followup stories.
In hindsight, I do wonder if Stirling was making a point about the Cold War.

On one hand, we have the Nazis – no other explanation required – and on the other we have a force that appears to be slightly more affable than Hitler, but is equally as dangerous in the long run if not more so. The historical USSR was often just as dangerous as the Nazis and perhaps more so in many ways – the novel depicting the US allying with the Draka might easily be a stand-in for the alliance with Stalin, in which the US missed a great many opportunities to curtail Soviet power until it was too late.

Actually, that might have been the point all along.

Stirling wrote Marching only a few years (not many, IIRC) before the Fall of the Berlin Wall, but that caught many people by surprise. The USSR looked invulnerable until it suddenly was not.

Of course, from a real-world point of view, the existence of a powerful and aggressive state to the south would deter Hitler from any adventures east …

… Or am I just overthinking it <grin>.

Chris
 
Sorairo, author The Footprint of Mussolini and The Death of Russia, appears to be going for a trifecta with his new project, Bush vs. The Axis of Evil. As far as one can tell, it's a neocon wish fulfillment fantasy in which the US takes on Iraq, Iran and North Korea all in one go.

It would be a war larger than expected, even to the extent some still call it World War Three. It would be fought from the shores of the Mediterranean to the back alleys of Pyongyang. It would be the bloodiest war America had fought since Vietnam, the biggest by geography since the Big One itself, and even as it recedes into bitter memory with the fresh atrocities of the world, many wonder if it hasn’t simply made the international situation worse. It would be fought between the forces of the West, led by a President who had never imagined the task he would be faced, against the so-called ‘Axis of Evil’.
 
Sorairo, author The Footprint of Mussolini and The Death of Russia, appears to be going for a trifecta with his new project, Bush vs. The Axis of Evil. As far as one can tell, it's a neocon wish fulfillment fantasy in which the US takes on Iraq, Iran and North Korea all in one go.
As Kirk said of Khan: “I'll give him this: he's consistent!”
 
The PoD, for those blessedly unaware, appears to be that Hezbollah decides after the Israeli withdrawal they're going to kill all the Jews in the world, so does 9/11 in order to get as many American Jews into Israel so they can kill all of them. Poor taste imo.
 
The PoD, for those blessedly unaware, appears to be that Hezbollah decides after the Israeli withdrawal they're going to kill all the Jews in the world, so does 9/11 in order to get as many American Jews into Israel so they can kill all of them. Poor taste imo.
Oh boy, Tom's really taking inspiration from current events huh?
 
Sorairo, author The Footprint of Mussolini and The Death of Russia, appears to be going for a trifecta with his new project, Bush vs. The Axis of Evil. As far as one can tell, it's a neocon wish fulfillment fantasy in which the US takes on Iraq, Iran and North Korea all in one go.

Like I've said before, this kind of thing is too easy a target. It's a deserving target, and a rightful target, but it's also far too easy a target.
 
In hindsight, I do wonder if Stirling was making a point about the Cold War.

On one hand, we have the Nazis – no other explanation required – and on the other we have a force that appears to be slightly more affable than Hitler, but is equally as dangerous in the long run if not more so. The historical USSR was often just as dangerous as the Nazis and perhaps more so in many ways – the novel depicting the US allying with the Draka might easily be a stand-in for the alliance with Stalin, in which the US missed a great many opportunities to curtail Soviet power until it was too late.

Actually, that might have been the point all along.

Stirling wrote Marching only a few years (not many, IIRC) before the Fall of the Berlin Wall, but that caught many people by surprise. The USSR looked invulnerable until it suddenly was not.

Of course, from a real-world point of view, the existence of a powerful and aggressive state to the south would deter Hitler from any adventures east …

… Or am I just overthinking it <grin>.

Chris
MOD POST:
Whilst there are perhaps ways in which it could be argued the Soviet Union was more dangerous than Nazi Germany, "many ways" suggests a rather diminished attitude to how dangerous the Nazis were to so many people.
Given your history of actions and of line dancing on subjects related to this in particular, the mod team have decided you will be kicked for a week, and can consider yourself in the Last Chance Saloon.
As usual, could everyone please refrain from liking this post.
 
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