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Alternate Wikibox Thread

Edward Heath
Harold Wilson
James Callaghan
Margaret Thatcher
John Major
Tony Blair
Gordon Brown



AH Cameron.png

David Cameron is a British intelligence officer who has been serving as the Director General of MI5 since 2018.

Cameron was born in London and educated at Eton College and Oxford, and has served as an intelligence officer since graduating from Oxford in 1988.

His service as an intelligence officer has spanned three decades, including service focused on Northern Ireland and coordinating intelligence sharing with the European Defence Forces following their establishment in 2004.

In 2013, Cameron took charge of the MI5 response to the attempted assassination of then-Prime Minister Shahid Malik.

He succeeded Dame Sue Gray as Director General of MI5 in April 2018.

Cameron has taken a higher-profile role than his processors, making regular media appearances and statements beyond the Director-General’s annual threat update and regularly posting on Minitel updates. This has in turn generated rare criticism of the Director General, over systemic intelligence failures in the aftermath of the Wembley Stadium bombing and alleged poor relations with European counterparts. He generated mass derision among Minitel users worldwide for posting a photograph of him having a phone conversation with his American counterpart in the middle of the British Airways Flight 111 hijacking.

Despite this, his term as Director General was extended by the Smith Government.
 
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Edward Heath
Harold Wilson
James Callaghan
Margaret Thatcher
John Major
Tony Blair
Gordon Brown




David Cameron is a British intelligence officer who has been serving as the Director General of MI5 since 2018.

Cameron was born in London and educated at Eton College and Oxford, and has served as an intelligence officer since graduating from Oxford in 1988.

His service as an intelligence officer has spanned three decades, including service focused on Northern Ireland and coordinating intelligence sharing with the European Defence Forces following their establishment in 2004.

In 2017, Cameron took charge of the MI5 response to the attempted assassination of then-Prime Minister Shahid Malik.

He succeeded Dame Sue Gray as Director General of MI5 in April 2018.

Cameron has taken a higher-profile role than his processors, making regular media appearances and statements beyond the Director-General’s annual threat update and regularly posting on Minitel updates. This has in turn generated rare criticism of the Director General, over systemic intelligence failures in the aftermath of the Wembley Stadium bombing and alleged poor relations with European counterparts. He generated mass derision among Minitel users worldwide for posting a photograph of him having a phone conversation with his American counterpart in the middle of the British Airways Flight 111 hijacking.

Despite this, his term as Director General was extended by the Smith Government.
Out of every one you did, Cameron seems to be the only one who is still important in political spheres.
 
Edward Heath
Harold Wilson
James Callaghan
Margaret Thatcher
John Major
Tony Blair
Gordon Brown
David Cameron


AH May.png

Theresa May OBE is a businesswoman and civil servant.

The daughter of a vicar who studied geography at Oxford, May initially worked as a consultant for the Bank of England. She became a senior advisor to the organization on international affairs, helping to co-ordinate the restructuring of the organisation following the UK's entry into the DucatZone in 1998. She served as Deputy Governor of the Bank of England between 2006 and 2008.

Following this she pursued a career in business, taking on several chairmanships and leadership roles in the private sector. She became known as a corporate troubleshooter, brought in to rescue and restructure failing or crisis-ridden companies. Most notably she served as Chairman of British Telecom in the aftermath of the 2010 Telcom Blackout, a post she held until the corporation was renationalised in 2013.

A long-time cricket fan, May has since 2019 served as the first female Chairman of the England Cricket Board. Taking charge of the organization after several discrimination scandals, she has presided over an alleged "purge" of the middle ranks of the organization, a new code of conduct and issued a formal apology for decades of discrimination and bullying scandals. In 2022, she oversaw the establishment of the Wales Cricket Board and an independent Welsh national team, with the England and Wales Cricket Board being renamed to reflect this. In 2023 she was nominated for an Order of the British Empire for her services to sport.

May is a Conservative, and unsuccessfully stood for the Conservative Party in the then-safe Labour seat of Vauxhall in the 1991 general election. Her husband, Sir Philip May, is a Conservative politician who served as Member of Parliament for Sevenoaks between 1991 and 2019, Minister for Overseas Development under Lynda Chalker and Defence Secretary in the first Newton Dunn Ministry. Philip May also unsuccessfully stood for leader in the 2001 and 2003 Conservative Party leadership elections.
 
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Yes, this is exactly what it looks like — the 21st century's take on the civil rights movement needs its own March on Washington.

Most people just call it the March for Decency.

note: notice how it isn't called the Decency Movement - that is because the Decency Movement is a BLM-esque organization; the wider "civil rights movement" equivalent is itself called the Rethinking Era.

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also, surprise improved 2032 election
 
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Edward Heath
Harold Wilson
James Callaghan
Margaret Thatcher
John Major
Tony Blair
Gordon Brown




David Cameron is a British intelligence officer who has been serving as the Director General of MI5 since 2018.

Cameron was born in London and educated at Eton College and Oxford, and has served as an intelligence officer since graduating from Oxford in 1988.

His service as an intelligence officer has spanned three decades, including service focused on Northern Ireland and coordinating intelligence sharing with the European Defence Forces following their establishment in 2004.

In 2017, Cameron took charge of the MI5 response to the attempted assassination of then-Prime Minister Shahid Malik.

He succeeded Dame Sue Gray as Director General of MI5 in April 2018.

Cameron has taken a higher-profile role than his processors, making regular media appearances and statements beyond the Director-General’s annual threat update and regularly posting on Minitel updates. This has in turn generated rare criticism of the Director General, over systemic intelligence failures in the aftermath of the Wembley Stadium bombing and alleged poor relations with European counterparts. He generated mass derision among Minitel users worldwide for posting a photograph of him having a phone conversation with his American counterpart in the middle of the British Airways Flight 111 hijacking.

Despite this, his term as Director General was extended by the Smith Government.
Sue Gray as his predecessor.

Genius. Did she have a posting in Ireland?
 
Edward Heath
Harold Wilson
James Callaghan
Margaret Thatcher
John Major
Tony Blair
Gordon Brown
David Cameron



Theresa May OBE is a businesswoman and civil servant.

The daughter of a vicar who studied geography at Oxford, May initially worked as a consultant for the Bank of England. She became a senior advisor to the organization on international affairs, helping to co-ordinate the restructuring of the organisation following the UK's entry into the DucatZone in 1998. She served as Deputy Governor of the Bank of England between 2006 and 2008.

Following this she pursued a career in business, taking on several chairmanships and leadership roles in the private sector. She became known as a corporate troubleshooter, brought in to rescue and restructure failing or crisis-ridden companies. Most notably she served as Chairman of British Telecom in the aftermath of the 2010 Telcom Blackout, a post she held until the corporation was renationalised in 2013.

A long-time cricket fan, May has since 2019 served as the first female Chairman of the England Cricket Board. Taking charge of the organization after several discrimination scandals, she has presided over an alleged "purge" of the middle ranks of the organization, a new code of conduct and issued a formal apology for decades of discrimination and bullying scandals. In 2022, she oversaw the establishment of the Wales Cricket Board and an independent Welsh national team, with the England and Wales Cricket Board being renamed to reflect this. In 2023 she was nominated for an Order of the British Empire for her services to sport.

May is a Conservative, and unsuccessfully stood for the Conservative Party in the then-safe Labour seat of Vauxhall in the 1991 general election. Her husband, Sir Philip May, is a Conservative politician who served as Member of Parliament for Sevenoaks between 1991 and 2019, Minister for Overseas Development under Lynda Chalker and Defence Secretary in the first Newton Dunn Ministry. Philip May also unsuccessfully stood for leader in the 2001 and 2003 Conservative Party leadership elections.
And Philip having the political career here.

Genius
 
Edward Heath
Harold Wilson
James Callaghan
Margaret Thatcher
John Major
Tony Blair
Gordon Brown
David Cameron
Theresa May



AH Johnson.png

Boris Johnson was an English journalist best known for his work as a war reporter on the Libyan Civil War and the Kashmir War.

Born in New York, Johnson was educated at Eton College and then Oxford University, where he was elected President of the Oxford Union and edited several student magazines.

After a brief period at The Times, Johnson secured employment on the lead-writing desk of The Daily Telegraph, having met its then-editor, Max Hastings, while at university. He was known for his distinctive literary style, replete with old-fashioned phrasing and hyperbolic language. He worked on the Brussels Desk of the Telegraph between 1989 and 1994, reporting critically on the integrationist Barre Commission and singling out EEC Vice President John Smith especially for criticism.

In 1994, after much pressure from Johnson, Hastings assigned Johnson to be a war reporter. Over the next ten years, Johnson became one of the most prominent war correspondents in the British media, reporting on the Macedonian War, the Libyan Civil War and the Russian invasion of the Crimean Republic. His distinctive literary style kept him prominent, and he was nominated for several journalism awards.

Johnson was killed in Kargil, India in April 2004, while reporting on the Kashmir War. His lodgings were hit by a rocket launched by the Pakistani army; he and six others were killed, including two journalists working for the New York Times.

There was an immediate outpouring of grief from the British media and political establishment; Prime Minister Paddy Ashdown described Johnson as a "hero", and he was posthumously awarded Foreign Reporter of the Year at the 2004 Press Awards. The Johnson Award was subsequently established to recognize young journalists working as foreign correspondents.

More recently however, Johnson's legacy has been more mixed. He has been criticized for bigotry and xenophobia in his reporting: he repeatedly used the word "picanannines" to describe black Africans, suggested that deceased anti-apartheid whistleblower John Major had "dual loyalties with terrorism" and repeatedly argued that "Muslim grievance" was behind every conflict he reported on.

More prominently, his legacy and reporting have been dogged by allegations that much of his reporting was systemically fabricated, most prominently reported on in a Private Eye investigation published in 2013. Much of his reporting about the European Union was found to be greatly embellished or invented, and subsequently many of the articles in his war reporting - including several allegations of war crimes which had significant political and diplomatic ramifications - were found to be riddled with false quotes, embellished descriptions and statements and factual errors.

The last Johnson Award was awarded in 2013. Charles Moore was forced to resign his longtime role as editor of The Daily Telegraph the same year due to his part in the scandal, having signed off on the majority of Johnson's articles as editor.
 
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Next up in the state soccer leagues, Delaware. This one was actually a bit trickier to do because there's just not that much in Delaware.

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“I, good gracious, old chap, well I’d like a career like one Churchill had!”

*monkey’s paw curls*

Johnson was killed in Kargil, India in April 2004, while reporting on the Kashmir War. His lodgings were hit by a rocket launched by the Pakistani army; he and six others were killed, including two journalists working for the New York Times.
 
Wow, @Callan 's been cranking them out, I'd only got as far as trying to think what I'd come up with for Cameron: I was envisaging him as an advertising executive who accidentally becomes his own mascot while demonstrating a campaign (similar to how Richard Osman ended up on Pointless) and ends up as a Lord Wonga type figure for a payday loan company.

May reminds me of ones about Thatcher where Denis becomes the politician (though on reflection I don't think I've ever seen that played straight) or Iain doing it with Tony and Cherie Blair.

Boris is inspired, paralleling Churchill in perhaps not a way he would like to.
 
Love the series @Callan. I was reminded reading these that Denis Healey had several job offers after the War, one of which included staying in the army to write the official history of the Italian campaign, another was a fellowship at Balliol (at one stage he wanted to be an art historian).
A few more butterflies and Denis Healey is Prince William's favourite tutor at university, then there's a scandal years later when the tabloids find out he was once a member of the Communist Party.
 
A few more butterflies and Denis Healey is Prince William's favourite tutor at university, then there's a scandal years later when the tabloids find out he was once a member of the Communist Party.
It’s canon.

The Johnson thing was based on a couple of asides I’ve seen about how Max Hastings refused to make Johnson a war reporter - I think you and @AH Layard are right in that he was probably trying to ape Churchill - and then remembering what a lousy journo he actually was OTL, how the kind of stuff he got away with would’ve correctly sunk the careers of most reporters.

On the Balliol thing, one thing I noticed while researching for this is how so many of the figures of Heath and Wilson’s generation were offered or briefly had serious academic careers, and had the scarily powerful intellectual minds to match. Once you get to Cameron’s generation the gimmick becomes a bit harder because so many of those guys just don’t really have hinterlands to speak of.
 
On the Balliol thing, one thing I noticed while researching for this is how so many of the figures of Heath and Wilson’s generation were offered or briefly had serious academic careers, and had the scarily powerful intellectual minds to match. Once you get to Cameron’s generation the gimmick becomes a bit harder because so many of those guys just don’t really have hinterlands to speak of.

That’s very true (although should say that it was an easier career choice to become an academic then if you had a very good undergraduate result, you could immediately get elected an Oxbridge fellow without even a Master’s let alone a PHD and tying up 5-7 years of your life and earnings). Rab Butler and Enoch Powell being examples of this.
 
It’s canon.

The Johnson thing was based on a couple of asides I’ve seen about how Max Hastings refused to make Johnson a war reporter - I think you and @AH Layard are right in that he was probably trying to ape Churchill - and then remembering what a lousy journo he actually was OTL, how the kind of stuff he got away with would’ve correctly sunk the careers of most reporters.

On the Balliol thing, one thing I noticed while researching for this is how so many of the figures of Heath and Wilson’s generation were offered or briefly had serious academic careers, and had the scarily powerful intellectual minds to match. Once you get to Cameron’s generation the gimmick becomes a bit harder because so many of those guys just don’t really have hinterlands to speak of.
Thats quite sad really
 
Edward Heath
Harold Wilson
James Callaghan
Margaret Thatcher
John Major
Tony Blair
Gordon Brown
David Cameron
Theresa May
Boris Johnson



AH Truss.png

Elizabeth Truss is a British-Canadian academic and cultural commentator. A “post-liberal” feminist, she is the author of the 2019 book Disgrace, which she describes as a manifesto for post-liberal feminism.

Born in Oxford, England, Truss moved with her family at the age of twelve to British Columbia, Canada when her father took up a teaching position at Simon Fraser University, where he continues to teach pure mathematics to this day. Truss praised the Canadian curriculum and the attitude that it was "really good to be top of the class", which she contrasted with her “egalitarian” education in Britain. Truss’s parents had originally hoped for her to study at the University of Cambridge but she instead elected to go to the University of Toronto, where she graduated with a BA - and ultimately a PhD - in political science.

During her time at the University of Toronto Truss was noted for her frequent contributions to the university newspaper The Varsity as well being active with the Liberal Party of Canada, even as they suffered electorally post-John Crosbie. She let her Liberal membership lapse in 2016.

After graduating from UofT, Truss was hired as a professor of politics and culture at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario lecturing on political economy and women in politics. She came to prominence in a series of debates in the late 2000s hosted at UofT’s Munk School, representing the “No” side in a series of debate proposed on the question “Is Feminism Finished?”.

Since the 2010, her political views have become more individualistic. She came to prominence for a series of articles in 2014 arguing how the Minitel-based “On-Call” economy was a feminist issue, in the context of several ride-hailing Phone Clients being banned in Ontario for flouting labour laws. Her articles generated much debate and backlash in Canada and abroad, most notably from her university’s own student union.
She is the co-author and signature to the 2016 “Post-Liberal Manifesto”, alongside writers and commentators such as Michael Gove, Frederic Mitterand and Hilary Rodham, and wrote Disgrace as an explanation of that manifesto.

Since then, she has generated further controversy for her views, regarding transgender rights, worker’s rights and foreign policy. She is critical of many aspects of modern feminism and progressivism, especially regarding what she has described as the “box-ticking, zero-sum” approach to women’s rights, as well as the influence of postmodern Philip here such as Foucault. She has endorsed the UN intervention in the Ethiopian Civil War, defended Hollywood producer Donald Trump after he was charged with sexual assault, and advocated for the partial legalization of child labour.

In a 2021 article for the Globe and Mail newspaper, Truss endorsed a tactical vote against the incumbent Stiles Government in the 2021 Canadian federal election. In 2022 she published a further book on post-liberal political economy and women’s issues, entitled The Mini-Budget.

Truss remains a regular media contributor and speaker on politics and women’s issues, and has spoken twice at America’s Heritage Foundation and Britain’s Conservative Monday Club.
 
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Edward Heath
Harold Wilson
James Callaghan
Margaret Thatcher
John Major
Tony Blair
Gordon Brown
David Cameron
Theresa May
Boris Johnson




Mary Truss is a British-Canadian academic and cultural commentator. A “post-liberal” feminist, she is the author of the 2019 book Disgrace, which she describes as a manifesto for post-liberal feminism.

Born in Oxford, England, Truss moved with her family at the age of twelve to British Columbia, Canada when her father took up a teaching position at Simon Fraser University, where he continues to teach pure mathematics to this day. Truss praised the Canadian curriculum and the attitude that it was "really good to be top of the class", which she contrasted with her “egalitarian” education in Britain. Truss’s parents had originally hoped for her to study at the University of Cambridge but she instead elected to go to the University of Toronto, where she graduated with a BA - and ultimately a PhD - in political science.
During her time at the University of Toronto Truss was noted for her frequent contributions to the university newspaper The Varsity as well being active with the Liberal Party of Canada, even as they suffered electorally post-John Crosbie. She let her Liberal membership lapse in 2016.

After graduating from UofT, Truss was hired as a professor of politics and culture at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario lecturing on political economy and women in politics. She came to prominence in a series of debates in the late 2000s hosted at UofT’s Munk School, representing the “No” side in a series of debate proposed on the question “Is Feminism Finished?”.
Since the 2010, her political views have become more individualistic. She came to prominence for a series of articles in 2014 arguing how the Minitel-based “On-Call” economy was a feminist issue, in the context of several ride-hailing Phone Clients being banned in Ontario for flouting labour laws. Her articles generated much debate and backlash in Canada and abroad, most notably from her university’s own student union.
She is the co-author and signature to the 2016 “Post-Liberal Manifesto”, alongside writers and commentators such as Michael Gove, Frederic Mitterand and Hilary Rodham, and wrote Disgrace as an explanation of that manifesto.

Since then, she has generated further controversy for her views, regarding transgender rights, worker’s rights and foreign policy. She is critical of many aspects of modern feminism and progressivism, especially regarding what she has described as the “box-ticking, zero-sum” approach to women’s rights, as well as the influence of postmodern She has endorsed the UN intervention in the Ethiopian Civil War, defended Hollywood producer Donald Trump after he was charged with sexual assault, and advocated for the partial legalization of child labour.

In a 2021 article for the Globe and Mail newspaper, Truss endorsed a tactical vote against the incumbent Stiles Government in the 2021 Canadian federal election. In 2022 she published a further book on post-liberal political economy and women’s issues, entitled The Mini-Budget.

Truss remains a regular media contributor and speaker on politics and women’s issues, and has spoken twice at America’s Heritage Foundation and Britain’s Conservative Monday Club.
I do like the bit of background worldbuilding about Minitel that reminds us that these are all in the same universe.

Also obligatory comments about that one lecturer of @zaffre 's, because the different first name plus the Canadian connection immediately made me make the mental comparison to "British Prime Minister, Elizabeth May".
 
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