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Lists of Heads of Government and Heads of State

TheNixonator

Politically Illiterate
1861-1862: Jefferson Davis (Nonpartisan) [Provisional]
1862-1868: Jefferson Davis (Nonpartisan)
1861 (with Alexander Stephens) def. scattered opposition
1868-1874: Alexander Stephens (Southern Rights)
1867 (with Thomas Bragg) def. Robert Toombs (Whig)
1874-1880: Thomas Bragg (Southern Rights)
1873 (with Isham G. Harris) def. Joseph E. Brown (Whig)
1880-1886: Lucius Lamar (Southern Rights)
1879 (with John H. Reagan) def. Robert M. Patton (Whig)
1886-1892: James Longstreet (Whig)
1885 (with Zebulon Vance) def. Judah P. Benjamin (Southern Rights)
1892-1898: Wade Hampton III (Southern Rights)
1891 (with Pendleton Murrah) def. Thomas H. Watts (Whig)
1898-1904: John Y. Brown (Southern Rights)
1897 (with Joseph Wheeler) def. John Brown Gordon (Whig)
1904-1910: Henry W. Grady (Whig)
1903 (with Jim Hogg) def. Stephen Mallory II (Southern Rights)
1910-1916: Thomas S. Martin (Conservative)
1909 (with John Sewell) def. Jeff Davis (Agrarian Labor)
1916-1922: Jefferson B. Snyder (Conservative)
1915 (with Lee Cruce) def. Benjamin Tillman (Agrarian Labor)
1921-1921: Charles Culberson* (Conservative) [As President-Elect]
1921 (with Locke Craig) def. James K. Vardaman (Agrarian Labor)

1921-1923: Confederate Civil War
Redneck militias def. National Government


CSACivilWar.png

1923-1924: James K. Vardaman** (Agrarian Labor)
Replaced Culberson - 1923 Constitutional Convention held

* Overthrown by Rednecks.
** Presidency abolished.
 
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TheNixonator

Politically Illiterate
1861-1862: Jefferson Davis (Nonpartisan) [Provisional]
1862-1868: Jefferson Davis (Nonpartisan)
1861 (with Alexander Stephens) def. scattered opposition
1868-1874: Alexander Stephens (Southern Rights)
1867 (with Thomas Bragg) def. Robert Toombs (Whig)
1874-1880: Thomas Bragg (Southern Rights)
1873 (with Isham Harris) def. Joseph E. Brown (Whig)
1880-1886: Lucius Lamar (Southern Rights)
1879 (with John H. Reagan) def. Robert M. Patton (Whig)
1886-1892: James Longstreet (Whig)
1885 (with Zebulon Vance) def. Judah P. Benjamin (Southern Rights)
1892-1898: Wade Hampton III (Southern Rights)
1891 (with Pendleton Murrah) def. Thomas H. Watts (Whig)
1898-1904: James Brown Gordon (Southern Rights)
1897 (with Stephen Mallory II) def. Henry DeBardeleben (Whig)
1904-1910: Henry W. Grady (Whig)
1903 (with Jim Hogg) def. Stephen Mallory II (Southern Rights)
1910-1916: Thomas S. Martin (Conservative)
1909 (with John Sewell) def. Jeff Davis (Agrarian Labor)
1916-1922: Jefferson B. Snyder (Conservative)
1915 (with Lee Cruce) def. Benjamin Tillman (Agrarian Labor)
1922-1923: Charles Culbertson* (Conservative)
1921 (with Locke Craig) def. James K. Vardaman (Agrarian Labor)
1923-1930: James K. Vardaman** (Agrarian Labor)
1923 Constitutional Convention held
1930-1931: William Joseph Simmons (Agrarian Labor)
Replaced Vardaman
1931-////: William H. “Alfalfa Bill” Murray (Agrarian Labor)
1931 def. Huey Long (Agrarian Labor), William Joseph Simmons (Agrarian Labor), Ellison D. Smith (Agrarian Labor) and Nicolás Rodríguez Carrasco (Agrarian Labor)

* Overthrown by Rednecks.
** Died of natural causes.
First Party System (1867-1909):
Southern Rights Party: Right-wing, federalism, elitism, expansionism, pro-British sentiment, free trade (faction)
Despite being formed by the supporters of Jefferson Davis (as well as members of the Knights of the Golden Circle), it quickly expanded into a party of the planter elite and military men who wished to stick to the old ways of the South and fight against industrialization.
Whig Party: Center-left to center-right, decentralization, industrialization, modernization, pro-French sentiment, populism (faction)
Founded by those who criticized the Davis administration (such as their surprising lack of support for state's rights), the Whig Party eventually changed their goal into that of bringing about a "New South" through modernization.

Second Party System (1909-1921):
Conservative Party: Center-right to right-wing, conservatism, industrialization, elitism, paternalism, free trade (faction)
Soon after the planter class embraced industrialization, the two main parties of the Confederacy joined together to preserve slavery, trade with their allies, and keeping the poor in their place.
Agrarian Labor: Big-tent (economically left-wing, socially far-right), anti-elitism, populism, agrarianism, white supremacy, white socialism (faction)
Established due to the backlash from the modernization of Dixieland (and the bosses' choice to use slave labor over good ol' white workers), the Agrarian Labor Party was an electoral coalition united against the elite and their slaves comprised of poor farmers, populists, white supremacists, and labor unionists.

Third Party System (1923-):
Agrarian Labor: Big-tent (economically left-wing, socially far-right), authoritarianism, populism, agrarianism, white supremacy, white socialism (faction)
Following the Agrarian Labor Party and their "Redneck" cronies' victory in the Civil War, the new regime took on an increasingly dictatorial (yet still populistic) tone.
 
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Time Enough

"Enthusiastic Cis Male Partner"
Pronouns
He/Him
1978-1981: Margaret Thatcher (Conservative)†
1978 (Majority) def: James Callaghan (Labour), David Steel (Liberal)
1981-1984: Michael Heseltine (Conservative)
1983 (Majority) def: Denis Healey (Labour), David Steel-Roy Jenkins (Liberal-SDP Alliance)
1984-1989: Denis Healey (Labour)
1984 (Coalition with Alliance) def: Michael Heseltine (Conservative), David Steel-Roy Jenkins (Liberal-SDP Alliance)
1989-: Airey Neave (Conservative)
1989 (Majority) def: Denis Healey (Labour), David Penhaligon-Shirley Williams (Alliance), Seamus Lynch (Workers), David Owen (SDP)
1993 (Reform Confidence & Supply) def: Jack Straw (Labour), Paddy Ashdown-Lindsay Granshaw (Alliance), Seamus Lynch-Tilda Swinton (Democratic Left Alliance), David Alton (Reform)


So based upon @Wolfram President Kucinich list I picked through his test thread and found Neave being PM and other bobbins, so here’s a possible list about it.

So Callaghan calls an election in 1978 and loses but not as much as OTL 79. Thatcher is more cautious with the Unions and Monetarism but still similar events to OTL 79-81 occur, Strikes, Unemployment and Race Riots become the mood music of the era. Additionally Neave peruses an aggressive action against the PIRA and IRSP particularly in the wake of Lord Mountbatten death in 79’. Then Thatcher is killed on a Glasgow visit by Adam Busby in a surreal suicide attack, Busby who believed that Thatcher and Neave conspired to crackdown on Scottish Nationalist movements in the wake of the failure of the Devolution referendum and the Group 79’s connection the the PIRA decided to not go with Letter Bombing Campaign and instead with makes a bomb vest.

In the ensuing chaos, Heseltine becomes leader though no one particularly likes him. Heseltine tries to be a Wet Monetarist but still peruses austerity policies and his ‘Inner City Relief’ fund dries up rather quickly. Whilst the Argentines would be scared off from pursuing the Falklands (instead a war between them and Chile would erupt in time) the whole event makes Heseltine seem paranoid not helped by his prancing around the isles wearing a flak jacket. The police cracking heads of peaceful protestors at Greenham Common and continued IRA Bombings made Britian feel miserable in the coming years. Heseltine managed squeak out a slim majority in 1983 thanks to Labour and Alliance battling each other more than Heseltine.

Then the Miners Strike happened. Ian MacGregors plan was still approved and Scragill still peruses striking and flying pickets. But with a weaker government and leader the Tories repeat 74’ again with Heseltine demanding who run Britain. In the end Labour and the Alliance decide that an awkward coalition government is the way to go and so five awkward years of a halfway house between Monetarist Social Democracy and a Keneysian Mixed Market occurs.

Meanwhile continuing with Neave’s policy of Containment, MI5 spends the 80s supporting the Workers Party as a possible ‘non-sectarian fighter’ in the troubles. Flushed with extra cash and arms, the Workers Party and the OIRA pursue aggressive campaigns against there enemies and popular political campaigns (helped by Mr Adams being car bombed) means that the Workers Party becomes one of the major parties of Ireland (especially after Dick Spring loses his seat in 87’ leaving the Irish Labour Party moribund). With De Rossa behind the steering wheel it’s decide that the Workers Party should capitalise on minor breakthroughs in Northern Ireland.

With discontent on the Left over Healey, the Workers party sense an opportunity, fielding candidates in Irish communities across Britain and particularly Scotland where a number of former Scottish Socialist activists join up. As the Alliance breaks up over it’s future with David Owen storming out to do his own Social Democratic Party with Blackjack and Libertarian Workerism and Healey has to deal with another attempted leadership challenge by the Left it’s no surprise that the Tories sweep in.

Airey Neave is the grand old man of British Toryism, despite being in his 70s upon taking power he is as vigorous as ever, his tenure helped by a split Left and most his potential Tory enemies being victims of scandal or dead. Neave though is unable to capitalise on this to the full extent he would like, even as the Kucinich begins to end and the PIRA begin to subside. The economy enters a recession in the aftermath of a Stock Market crash and calls for further European Integration by his cabinet, troubles Neave.

Neave manages to slip into No10 again in 1993, as the Left is split again and David Alton decides the devil he knows is better than a possible ‘Socialist’ cabinet. The Democratic Left chugs on, as the Workers Party becomes the main opposition force in Ireland and MI5 and the Soviets regret protecting there strange little bunch of Irish Marxists who could know hold the keys to power for any future Left Wing Government. Now as 1993 begins to end, Neave is pondering retirement and preparing his potential successor and son in law to the martyr Thatcher, Jonathan Aitken for leadership of the Conservative Party.

What’s the worst that could happen...
 

Time Enough

"Enthusiastic Cis Male Partner"
Pronouns
He/Him
The Workers Party being successful on both sides of the border, despite sounding fucking bonkers seemed doable for a hot second in the Mid 80s as Sinn Fein's Post Hunger Strike popularity flamed out by 83' and the Adam's Squad of Modernisers hadn't got going yet. The main problem for the Northern Irish section of the party was lack of support from Down South and there weird belief in trying to gain support from Protestant Working Class just ended up costing them there Catholic voters.

Also MI5 did have contacts with the party at several points though didn't do anything other than using them to identify prominent Republicans.
 

Thande

Conſiderable Perſon
Published by SLP
Pondering some more up-to-date analogues for your basic UK-as-US-scenario:

2017-2021: Richard Desmond/Philip Davies (Conservative)
2016 def: Cherie Blair/Andy Burnham (Labour)
2021-????: John Prescott/Priti Patel (Labour)
2020 def: Richard Desmond/Philip Davies (Conservative)

I want to take this further back but I'm stymied by the lack of a convincing Labour Obama analogue, nobody BAME I can think of seems to be of the right age, socio-economic background or have comparable charisma. One could, of course, do the same thing I've done with Patel and imply that some BAME people who are in the Conservatives in OTL might be in Labour in a US-analogous situation (or vice versa depending on context). Thoughts?
 

Time Enough

"Enthusiastic Cis Male Partner"
Pronouns
He/Him
nobody BAME I can think of seems to be of the right age, socio-economic background or have comparable charisma
Claude Moraes? I have no fucking clue. Like Paul Boateng is probably the closest in terms of charisma I guess.

Maybe find barristers who are BAME or something.
 

Thande

Conſiderable Perſon
Published by SLP
Claude Moraes? I have no fucking clue. Like Paul Boateng is probably the closest in terms of charisma I guess.

Maybe find barristers who are BAME or something.
Paul Boateng is the one usually brought up and feels like the best fit, but I feel like the age difference is too much for Obama's backstory. Though on looking it up, it's less than I thought it was, so maybe.
 

Mumby

Always mysterious!
Published by SLP
Location
Municipal Commune of Bourne
Pronouns
He/Him
1912-1920
Theodore Roosevelt
Progressive
1920- 1928
Eugene Debb
Socialist
1928-1936
Calvin Coolidge
Progressive
Charles Lindbergh
1936-1940
Democratic
H.p. Lovecraft
1940-1952
Progressive
Dwight Eisenhower
Democratic
1952-1964
Barry Goldwater
Progressive
1964-1968
Joe Kennedy jr
Democratic
1968-1972
Richard M.Nixon
Democratic
1972_1984
Gil Peterson
Progressive
1984_1992
I mean no offence, but this is so difficult to read, your formatting is very inconsistent.

Honestly, I tried to make a point by putting into my usual formatting and I think you've got one too many Presidents or something it makes no sense.
 

AlfieJ

left labour poster on here
The American Tendency

"The very idea that domestic British politics might in some way be influenced from outside is anathema: Italy, under the Christian Democrats, well of course; and, yes, probably Japan under the Liberal Democrats. But Britain, the home of the mother of parliaments? Never." - Tom Easton, 'Who Were They Travelling With?', Lobster 31 (June 1996)



1979-1982: Margaret Thatcher (Conservative)
1979: James Callaghan (Labour), David Steel (Liberal)
1982-1984: Willie Whitelaw (Conservative)
1984-1985: Roy Jenkins (Social Democratic)
1984: Michael Foot (Labour), Willie Whitelaw (Conservative), David Penhaligon [replacing David Steel] (Liberal)
1985-1989: Shirley Williams (Social Democratic)
1989-1999: Robert Maclennan (Social Democratic)
1989: Tony Benn (Labour), John Nott (Conservative), Archy Kirkwood (Liberal), Shirley Williams (Independent Fabian)
1993: Terry Fields (Socialist), Graham Bright (Conservative), Archy Kirkwood (Liberal), Austin Mitchell (Labour Representation Committee)
1997: David Davis (Conservative), Tony Banks (Socialist)*, Frank Field (LRC), David Alton (Liberal)

1999-2001: Stephen Haseler (Social Democratic)
2001-2003: Sue Slipman (Social Democratic)
2001: David Davis (Conservative), Robin Ramsay (Socialist), Bob Marshall-Andrews (LRC), Norman Baker (Liberal), David Campbell-Bannerman (Tory)
2003-: David Davis, Robin Ramsay, Bob Marshall-Andrews, Norman Baker [collective leadership] (Democracy)
2003: Sue Slipman (Social Democratic), Bill Jordan (Freedom Group), David Campbell-Bannerman (Tory), Various (Independent Socialist)

*Tony Banks died during the election campaign, reportedly of a heart attack.
 
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Mumby

Always mysterious!
Published by SLP
Location
Municipal Commune of Bourne
Pronouns
He/Him
The American Tendency

"The very idea that domestic British politics might in some way be influenced from outside is anathema: Italy, under the Christian Democrats, well of course; and, yes, probably Japan under the Liberal Democrats. But Britain, the home of the mother of parliaments? Never." - Tom Easton, 'Who Were They Travelling With?', Lobster 31 (June 1996)



1979-1982: Margaret Thatcher (Conservative)
1979: James Callaghan (Labour), David Steel (Liberal)
1982-1984: Willie Whitelaw (Conservative)
1984-1985: Roy Jenkins (Social Democratic)
1984: Michael Foot (Labour), Willie Whitelaw (Conservative), David Penhaligon [replacing David Steel] (Liberal)
1985-1989: Shirley Williams (Social Democratic)
1989-1999: Robert Maclennan (Social Democratic)
1989: Tony Benn (Labour), John Nott (Conservative), Archy Kirkwood (Liberal), Shirley Williams (Independent Fabian)
1993: Terry Fields (Socialist), Graham Bright (Conservative), Archy Kirkwood (Liberal), Austin Mitchell (Labour Representation Committee)
1997: David Davis (Conservative), Tony Banks (Socialist)*, Frank Field (LRC), David Alton (Liberal)

1999-2001: Stephen Haseler (Social Democratic)
2001-2003: Sue Slipman (Social Democratic)
2001: David Davis (Conservative), Robin Ramsay (Socialist), Bob Marshall-Andrews (LRC), Norman Baker (Liberal), David Campbell-Bannerman (Tory)
2003-: David Davis, Robin Ramsay, Bob Marshall-Andrews, Norman Baker [collective leadership] (Democracy)
2003: Sue Slipman (Social Democratic), Bill Jordan (Freedom Group), David Campbell-Bannerman (Tory), Various (Independent Socialist)

*Tony Banks died during the election campaign, reportedly of a heart attack.
horrifying

who is that bill jordan tho
 

Sideways

Гуси 🦢
Published by SLP
Location
Teignmouth, Devon
Pronouns
She/Her
Here Be Dragons

70-65 million BC: Trinisaura Nixapod - Snow-footed Trinisaur

For reasons that are still debated, bird species went extinct in Antarctica at around this time, and their absence allowed dinosaurs to fill some of the niches that even then were becoming associated with birds. The reasons why are unknown, but in this one part of the world, dinosaurs survived the mass extinction.

65-63 million BC: Trinisaura Minor

A small dinosaur species, fit for a depleted world. The Trinisaur Minor was semi aquatic and survived on a diet of seaweed and land plants, along with insects.

64-59 million BC: Draco Antecessor

Basal dragon - while the ancestors of the Leviathon species evolved to be fully aquatic and developed a predatory diet, the early dragons were land dwelling and subsisted on the dwindling supply of vegetation, a diet they were not suited to. Much like Galapagos Iguanas they could not evolve to digest their diet, but they could essentially cook their food slowly in their guts. In the summer this was possible through basking, but the draco antecessor also broke down its food through internal fermentation, especially in winter. This had the added advantage of generating heat.

62-55 million BC: Draco Leporidae - Hare Dragon

Wolf sized predators started to predate on dragons, and size became an advantage, both to fend off hunters and to survive the long winters. Ironically then, the ancestor of all Dragons was one of the smallest herbivore species. Their unique piston muscles allowed them to make use of their stomach muscles to leap great distances, allowing them to escape hunters

55-47 million BC: Draco Pseudopteromyini - Squirrel Dragon

In the heat of the Paleocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum the forests of Antarctica expanded and times were good for herbivores. The Draco Lepis took to the trees, exchanging leaping for gliding, using their loose back skin as the gliding surface. This allowed them to keep their arms free and take advantage of their strong chest muscles. Some evidence exists that Squirrel Dragons could produce toxic gasses from their mouths as a defensive strategy.

47-41 million BC: Draco Vulpes - Fox Dragon

A larger variety of Squirrel Dragon, this species took up an omnivorous lifestyle of scavanging and some hunting. It is believed it latched onto prey and incapacitated them with its chemical breath, using its wings to steady itself for the kill. This is the earliest specie to be firmly classified as a Great Dragon. It is still debated if the Fox Dragon had fire breathing capabilities,

41-30 million BC: Draco Tarasqua Minor - Lesser Tarascque

The first Great Dragon species to take up an obligate carnivore lifestyle, and, at six foot, one of the biggest predators in the Antarctic at the time. The big innovation of the Tarasque was, however, the power of flight. The strong, gas driven gut muscles of the lesser dragons had migrated to the back, and the ability to fly allowed it to prowl larger areas, which was important for a species that needed to stay active in the ong Antarctic nights.

30-15 million BC: Draco Tarasqua Major - The Greater Tarascque

Very similar to the earlier Tarascque, the big difference was that Tarasqua Major was bigger, some as big as 15 feet long. For the Dragons, larger size meant larger digestive tracts, which were key to its flight. The Great Dragons are the only form of life whose flying ability gets greater the bigger it is. As Antarctica froze, the rest of the southern hemisphere became its hunting grounds. However the declining fauna of the Antarctic had an advantage for a species that nested on the ground. It would forever remain the Dragon's primary spawning ground.

15 million BC - Present Day: Draco Rex - True Dragon

Dragons reached their greatest size as the temperature cooled, and the Draco Rex was adapted for the new ice age. At 30 feet long, the True Dragon is the largest animal in the world and has hunting ranges across the southern hemisphere.

The "True Dragon" earned its name because the animal has been such a major feature of all cultures on Earth - to the extent that it features on the flags of as disparate states as Wales, Bhutan, Mexico, New Zealand, and of course Antarctica. When it was first encountered by Europeans in the 14th century, it was like something out of myth. It seemed unbelievable that such a thing could really exist.

However, it is not the only specie of its type - Leviathans are still a common enough sight at sea, even if climate change and over hunting have seriously impacted their numbers. Smaller Sea Dragons are found across the southern hemisphere, where they fill a similar ecological niche to seals and selkies. Australian Fire Dragons may be smaller, but they are so prolific as to cause major crop damage, in fact in the 1930s the military had to be called in to cull their numbers in an event that is now called The Dragon Wars. New Zealand's own native dragon species survived until the Maoris hunted them to extinction.

In the dry and frozen regions of Antarctica, the True Dragon is the major ecosystem engineer. Their excretions are a major source of nutrients and their burrowing has prevented total freezing of the coast lands. Their dung is also a major source of seeds on a continent where little in the way of native flora survives.

The True Dragon also built the continent in another way - the first explorers, in the early 18th century, arrived in search of their spawning ground and found extreme wealth. The continent was rich in minerals, a good port for whalers, but most importantly, it allowed for the hunting of dragons. Dragon pelts, eggs, meat, and fuel was worth a great deal across the world. So much, in fact, that the continent was seen as too important for any one country to dominate. In 1885, due to its untapped natural wealth, the Berlin Conference granted Antarctica the unique designation of International Dominion. In part, the establishment of the League of Nations and later, the United Nations, was in part because of Dragons.

By the 1940s, that natural wealth had been almost exhausted. True Dragons had become rare, and frightened of humans. Ten years later, the hunting of True Dragons was banned. Modern environmentalism grew out of this effort, which is why the dragon can now be found in the logos of groups like Greeneace and the WWF. The study of dragons drove the development of rocketry, genetics, and Darwin's visit to Antarctica inspired the theory of evolution. Without dragons, modern civilisation would be completely unrecognisable.

Here in Antarctica, dragons are inspiring new generations of scientists, poets, environmentalists, adventurers and many more people who are driven, every year, to explore this place where, due to a heroic international conservation effort, the map still reads Here be Dragons

Information board, Victoria & Wilhelm International Zoo, Antarctica
 
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