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Election maps and assorted others

Makemakean

Mr Makemean
Pronouns
Logical, unlike those in German
I never want to hear of Baffin Island ever again.

Canada 1980
View attachment 25542
Wait, wait, wait...! Akimiski Island is part of Nunavut?!

How did this come about?

Looking at Wikipedia, it would appear that nobody actually lives on Akimiski Island all around the year, but that it has traditionally been considered to be part of the territory of the Attawapiskat First Nation, and according to Wikipedia, members of that tribe go there for "traditional purposes", which I can only assume must be something to do with their religion, or something. And they are pretty much the only people who ever go there, apart from apparently bird watchers who are interested in the bird sanctuary they have up there.

Okay, so now, if the Attawapiskat First Nation were a group from further up north in Nunavut who travel down through Hudson Bay to Akimiski Island every once in a while to observe whatever rites it is that they observe there, it would of course make absolute perfect sense for Akimiski to be part of Nunavut, and that's what I figured must be the case.

Then I looked into the Attawapiskat First Nation.

The rest of their traditional territory is all in Kenora District in Ontario!

So why on Earth is Akimiski part of the jurisdiction on Nunavut when it's so far away from Nunavut and the only people who ever visit the place are from Ontario?!
 

Indicus

<insert title here>
Location
Trawno
Pronouns
he/him
So why on Earth is Akimiski part of the jurisdiction on Nunavut when it's so far away from Nunavut and the only people who ever visit the place are from Ontario?!
Looking it up here, it's a remnant of how Canada expanded. When it purchased Rupert's Land (originally defined as the entirety of the Hudson Bay watershed) from the Hudson's Bay Company in 1870, it turned that giant territory that expanded from Ungava to Yukon into the Northwest Territory, including the islands of James Bay (including Akimiski). Later, Ontario and Quebec were expanded dramatically so now they had the coastline of Hudson Bay and James Bay, but only the mainland of the Northwest Territory was transferred into Ontario's and Quebec's jurisdiction, and so the Northwest Territories continued to include the islands of James Bay. In 1999, in the Nunavut Act which divided the territory from the Northwest Territories, "the islands in Hudson Bay, James Bay and Ungava Bay that [were] not within Manitoba, Ontario or Quebec " were included within it, which thus gave Nunavut the island of Akimiski purely due to geographic convenience.
 

Ares96

‘doing incalculable harm’
Published by SLP
Location
Växjön, Växjöff
Pronouns
he/him
wien-tram.png

This should be everything west of the river and north of the U4 - probably the trickiest bit of the network. The south is big, but the trams are relatively sparse, so the big challenge should be lining things up properly rather than physically fitting everything in without leaving too big gaps.
 

Ares96

‘doing incalculable harm’
Published by SLP
Location
Växjön, Växjöff
Pronouns
he/him
Any idea what was up with the 7 uncontested seats in '73, @Ares96 ?
The DLP winning Gordon is because the incumbent Liberal MLA (no shit) forgot to hand in his nomination papers on time. The party decided to make the best of a bad situation and officially endorsed the DLP candidate, giving them their only-ever seat in NSW.

The five Liberal seats without Labor candidates were, IIRC, all contested by the Australia Party (the forerunner of the Australian Democrats), so there might be an electoral alliance at play, though I don’t know.

Balmain and Heffron were both contested by the DLP, which frankly was always going to do better there than the Liberals, but they were also contested by the Australia Party, which seems to contradict the idea of a general electoral alliance at least.
 
NSW 1981 (Sydney)

Ares96

‘doing incalculable harm’
Published by SLP
Location
Växjön, Växjöff
Pronouns
he/him
If the first Wranslide was won in Sydney, the second one was the result of Neville Wran's popularity extending through the rest of the state. In 1981, the Liberals pretty much stood their ground in Sydney, losing North Shore to an independent and a significantly redrawn Bligh to Labor but winning back Willoughby, while regaining some of their old majorities in those seats that had held in 1978. However, only one (1) Liberal in regional NSW would hold his seat (Joe Schipp in Wagga Wagga). The Liberals and NCP each ended up with fourteen seats each, totalling less than a third of the chamber.

val-au-nsw-1981.png
 
Austria 1923/1927/1930

Ares96

‘doing incalculable harm’
Published by SLP
Location
Växjön, Växjöff
Pronouns
he/him
There don't seem to be any results available anywhere for the 1920 elections, so with that in mind, here are the three other Austrian interwar elections.

In 1923, a fairly dull election campaign saw the incumbent Bürgerblock government under Ignaz Seipel retain power - the German-National bloc lost a lot of votes, but because the CS fell one seat short of an absolute majority, the coalition was the only stable option.

val-at-1923.png

The remaining four years were, um, about as quiet as it's possible for interwar Central Europe to get, and in 1927, the governing parties decided to stand for re-election as a unified list (Einheitsliste) - this was probably a tactical error, as the unified list barely improved on the CS result in 1923. The Landbund made big strides as a result, but did not succeed in depriving the unified list of a majority in the chamber. The SDAP made slight improvements on their 1923 result, and it looked for all the world like polarisation was setting in.

val-at-1927.png

The Bürgerblock government fell in autumn 1930, when the CS nominated a Chancellor who was unpalatable to the German National side, and the succeeding CS minority government called fresh elections. By this point, the stable equilibrium was being undermined by the growth of paramilitary radicalism. The Heimwehr, a loose organisation of ex-military men who originally formed to combat Slovene interests in southeastern Carinthia during the referendum there in 1920, had been on the rise ever since, and the first big clashes between them and the SDAP-supported Republikanischer Schutzbund ensued in 1927 after a group of Heimwehr men were acquitted of murdering a child during a demonstration. In May 1930, Heimwehr groups from around the country had gathered in Korneuburg, north of Vienna, and sworn what became known as the Korneuburg Oath, proclaiming support for "renewing Austria from the ground up" and opposition to both Marxism and German nationalism. From this point on, the formerly loose-knit Heimwehr became one of Austria's strongest political movements. When the government fell and the National Council was dissolved, they very hastily threw together an electoral organisation dubbed the Heimatblock ("Homeland Bloc"), and put up the eccentric nobleman and former Nazi Ernst Rüdiger Starhemberg as their candidate for Chancellor.

val-at-1930.png

The Heimatblock would only get around six percent of the vote, becoming the smallest party in the new chamber, but their entrance emboldened sympathetic elements within the CS and discredited the more pro-democratic elements in the government. In 1931, the Creditanstalt, Austria's oldest and largest bank, declared bankruptcy, and the bailout proposed by Chancellor Ender brought down the government once more. A brief CS minority was followed by the installation of Engelbert Dollfuß, former Agriculture Minister and known corporatist, at the head of a CS-GDVP-HB coalition. In March 1933, a heated debate in the National Council resulted in all three speakers resigning - Dollfuß, never a man to look a gift horse in the mouth, declared the chamber "self-eliminated", and sent in the police to occupy the parliament building and prevent them from assembling again. Soon after, the governing parties were merged into the Vaterländische Front (Patriotic Front - usually rendered as "Fatherland Front" in English) and all others - most prominently the SDAP - were banned. The forcible disarmament of the Schutzbund resulted in four days of armed struggle during February 1934, which is generally known in German as the Februarkämpfe (February Struggles) and in English as the Austrian Civil War, and ended with the total defeat of the Schutzbund.

Now in complete control of the country, Dollfuß proclaimed a new constitution abolishing liberal democracy, and ruled as the fascist dictator of Austria for two months before getting shot. His assassins were not left-wingers, but rather Austrian Nazis (we hate Austrian Nazis) who thought this would be a great time to insert themselves into all of this. The assassination was followed by a general coup attempt, which was foiled by Dollfuß' successor as Chancellor, Kurt Schuschnigg, who would go on to rule the "Austrofascist" state for four years before the Nazis totally overpowered him and forced Austria's annexation into Germany in March 1938.
 
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