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BD's Graphics & Misc Bandwagon Thread

bd_roberts

Misgendered! At The Disco
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Sheffield, SRSY
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Hi all, bit of a newbie to SLP forums but decided to make one of these threads to imitate my pals @cikka and @Turquoise Blue (albeit i imagine my thread will be far worse). So, here's my thread of alternate history graphics, short timelines accompanying them, and general oddities; that kind of thing.

First off, a silly little timeline for devolution in Yorkshire.

----------------------

Devolution in Yorkshire and the Humber

List of First Ministers

2006-2010: John Prescott (Labour)
(Coalition with Liberal Democrats) def: William Hague (Conservative), Phil Willis (Liberal Democrat), Robert Geoffrey Heseltine (Abolish the Assembly), George Galloway (Respect), David Exley (BNP), Peter Davies (English Democrat), Celia Foote (Greens/AGS)
2010-2013: William Hague (Conservative)
(Coalition with Liberal Democrats and UKIP) def: John Prescott (Labour), Phil Willis (Liberal Democrat), Jane Collins (UKIP), Jillian Creasy (Greens/AGS), Andrew Williams (Abolish the Assembly), Andrew Brons (BNP), Peter Davies (English Democrat), Arshad Ali (Respect)
2013-2014: William Hague (Conservative)
(Coalition with UKIP, confidence and supply from Abolish the Assembly and English Democrats)
2014-2016: Harry Harpham (Labour)
(Coalition with Liberal Democrats) def: Robert Goodwill (Conservative), Keith Aspden (Liberal Democrat), Jane Collins (UKIP), Jillian Creasy (Greens), Richard Carter (Yorkshire), Ralph Dyson (TUSC)
2016 (Acting): Keith Aspden (Liberal Democrats)
(Coalition with Labour)
2016-2018: Alex Sobel (Labour)
(Coalition with Liberal Democrats)
2018-present: Alex Sobel (Labour)
(Minority, confidence and supply from Greens and Yorkshire Party) def: Craig Whittaker (Conservative), Johan Zegstroo (Liberal Democrat), Steven Winstone (UKIP), Magid Magid (Greens), Mick Bower (Yorkshire), James Heartfield (Abolish the Assembly)

Assembly Compositions

2006 Assembly.png2010 Assembly.png2014 Assembly.png2018 Assembly.png

Election Maps

Devolved Yorkshire Constituencies 2006.svg.pngDevolved Yorkshire Constituencies 2010.svg.pngDevolved Yorkshire Constituencies 2014.svg.pngDevolved Yorkshire Constituencies 2018.svg.png
 
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bd_roberts

Misgendered! At The Disco
Location
Sheffield, SRSY
Pronouns
they/them
that tiny bit of south yorkshire spilling out is giving me anxiety smh

good work tho
i tried so hard to stick to county borders, but people decide to live in the wrong places 😞

also there's two lol; hemsworth & west don and then there's the horrible north don & co one
 

bd_roberts

Misgendered! At The Disco
Location
Sheffield, SRSY
Pronouns
they/them
New Manchester Liberalism or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Liberals

2020 election.png
[n 1] Figure includes all members taking the Liberal whip, including those from the 'sister parties' of Cymru Fydd, the Scottish Liberals and the Liberal Unionists, and those who stand under the joint Liberal and Labour designation.

Excerpt from the BBC Election Night Write-up


After a night of nail-biting close calls in some marginals, Alex Johnson has emerged victorious from an eventful campaign, having managed to lead his big-tent, centre-left Liberal Party to majority government. This follows a long four years of hung parliament. His campaign on 'no-nonsense liberalism' has clearly resonated with voters, and his attempt to position himself as personable has paid off. Neville Starmer, the leader of the opposition centre-right Conservative Party, was unable to convince British voters to change course, despite his party having marginally won the popular vote only four years ago. He and his party remain consigned to opposition.

It was not much of a better night for third parties. The Scottish Nationals under Monica Ward and Guto Bebb's Welsh nationalist party, Cymru Goch, both fell back in their nations, losing seats to resurgent Liberal sister parties (the Scottish Liberals and Cymru Fydd, respectively). Despite achieving a small swing toward them in total voteshare, the Socialist Party under David Brown ultimately proved unable to capitalise on left-wing disenchantment with the Johnson administration, and lost a number of seats to the major parties; most notably, the seats of Cambridge, Glasgow Hillshead and Manchester Gorton, all of which were won in by-elections less than two years ago. The Greens proved unable to advance beyond their 2 incumbent seats, with party leader Justine Greening maintaining her seat in Bristol West.

Starmer, ridiculed as Sir Neil by detractors from the right of his party due to his working class upbringing and his lack of a "proper" aristocratic background, had hoped to be the first working class Prime Minister from the Conservative party, but his attempt to mend the fracturing Conservative coalition by advocating protectionist economics and conservative social views has clearly failed. Starmer is sure to be visited by the notoriously ruthless '1921 Committee' in the morning, and party grandees are already calling for his resignation.

Johnson, meanwhile, was seen in LPHQ late in the night, jubilantly singing liberal anthem 'The Land' with his staffers. Despite four years of infighting, Johnson was the right man to unite the broad party to a stunning victory. His cabinet was also seen to be celebrating the victory; Lisa Nandy, the incumbent Chancellor and one of the most prominent members of the Liberal and Labour grouping, was seen celebrating in her safe seat of Cheadle, while Home Secretary Jo Swinson of the Scottish Liberals was seen with her staffers in Edinburgh.

With the election all but wrapped up, the Liberal Party - as it often does - has shown once more that it is one of Britain's two favoured parties.
 
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bd_roberts

Misgendered! At The Disco
Location
Sheffield, SRSY
Pronouns
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I'm so sorry, but after a PhD interview this morning my brain is mush and I have to get this dumb idea out of my head...

Pārtus Populusque Rōmānus
"The Party and the People of Rome"

List of Princeps Populares of the Roman Plebians' Party (RPP)


1920-1922: Antonius Farsuleius Gramicus (Impossibilist)
1922-1928: Antonius Gargonius Quellius (Mainstream)
1928-1931: Antonius Farsuleius Gramicus (Impossibilist)
1933-1936: Jovius Barrius Titius (Mainstream)
1936-1977: Palpellius Maecilius Tullius (Tullist)
1977-1979: Septimus Julius Carillus (Tullist)
1979-1986: Marius Attius Mitteranus (Reformist)
1986-1989: Gnaeus Lollius Martius (Reformist)
1989-1999: Marius Albucius Sorius (Reformist)
1999-2007: Lionus Veturius Jospius (Mainstream)
2007-2018: Silvius Sammius Berlusconius ("Roman Dream")
2018-present: Gaius Geminius Contus (Populist)
 

bd_roberts

Misgendered! At The Disco
Location
Sheffield, SRSY
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There is something just not quite right about not grouping the Guianas there...
Yeah, I was really tempted to do it; but I've tried where possible to put the territories of different nations in different boxes.

The ideal solution would be á la Macaronesia, but I couldn't quite get the dotted line to fit properly :*(
 

bd_roberts

Misgendered! At The Disco
Location
Sheffield, SRSY
Pronouns
they/them
European Federation infobox.pngThe European Federation, more commonly known as Europe, Europa or more simply the Federation, is a country primarily located in Western Europe, with several overseas territories, regions and dependencies across the globe. The heartland of the Federation spans from the North Sea to the Mediterranean, and from the Atlantic Ocean to the Alps and the East German border, with a total land area of 2,032,458 km2 (784,736 sq mi), making it the thirteenth-largest country in the world. The Federation comprises one exclave, West Berlin, and is present on other continents through overseas territories such as the Guianas in South America, Sint Maarten in the Carribean, Mayotte in Africa and French Polynesia in Oceania. Europa borders Denmark to the north, East Germany, Czechoslovakia, Austria, Switzerland and Titoist Yugoslavia to the east and the United Kingdom, Morrocco and Monaco to the south. It completely surrounds Andorra, San Marino and the Vatican. In the Americas, it borders Brazil and Guyana.

The Federation has a total population of 284.4 million, making it the second-most populous country in Europe, and the fifth-most populous in the world. The country is a federal semi-presidential republic, comprised of eight federal member states, the largest by area being France, and by population being West Germany. The Federation has four capital cities; Brussels is the exectuive capital, Strasbourg houses the legislature, Frankfurt handles financial matters and Luxembourg City is home to the judiciary. The largest city in the Federation is Paris, but the conurbation of Rhine-Rhur is the largest metropolitan area.

The area now comprising the heartland of the Federation has a tumultuous history. In the Iron Age, the region was primarily inhabited by Celts, Germanic tribes and Italic peoples, but as the region entered antiquity the majority of it came under the control or influence of the Roman Empire, with Romanisation leading to the emergence of the modern Romance languages. After the Fall of Rome, the region became the centre of a number of large polities, firstly the Empire of the Franks, then the Carolingian Empire, and then the Holy Roman Empire. Alongside and following these empires, feudal kingdoms also emerged during the Middle Ages, most notably the Kingdoms of France, Castile, Aragon and Portugal, the latter three of which led the Reconquista. The transition from the Middle Ages began with the Renaissance in the 15th and 16th centuries, beginning largely in the city states of Italy. This coincided with the Age of Discovery, in which explorers from Western Europe revealed the existence of the Americas to the continent, ushering in an age of colonial empires. The Reformation led to the emergence of Protestantism and the rise of religious wars across the continent, most notably the Thirty Years' War.

Eventually, religious wars gave way to the Enlightenment, which saw the rise of ideals such as liberty, toleration and fraternity, which in 1789 helped give rise to the French Revolution and the overthrow of the Ancien Régime. The revolution threw the continent into turmoil, eventually leading to the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars, which saw the First French Empire under Napoleon Bonaparte briefly dominate Europe. Despite the eventual banishment of Napoleon and the defeat of the revolution on the battlefield, the ideas it represented would come to permeate European society, giving rise to the Revolutions of 1848 and a move toward liberalism on the continent. This was combined with the Industrial Revolution to give rise to massive economic, social and cultural change in the region. Rising tensions in the early 20th century led to both the First and Second World Wars. The aftermath of the Second saw Europe as a whole divided by an Iron Curtain. The Western European countries began to come together after the war, first forming the Coal and Steel Community in 1952, which eventually gave rise to the Treaty of Rome six years later. This was followed by the Treaties of Luxembourg and Grenoble in the early 1970s, which saw the first step toward federalisation taken under the leadership of Willy Brandt and François Mitterrand. In 1990, the European Constitution was adopted, officially founding the European Federation as a union of France, West Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Belgium and Luxembourg. The first and only expansion to the Federation was in 1996, when Spain and Portugal were admitted as member states.

Europe is considered a superpower, with the second-largest economy in the world by nominal GDP and the third-largest by PPP. The European economy is world-leading in the industrial and technological sectors, and is the world's largest exporter of goods. The Federation is a developed country with a high standard of living, ranking very highly on HDI. It maintains one of the world's most expansive welfare states, with universal healthcare, widespread social security, and a world-class education system with tuition-free higher education. As the inheriter of the majority of Western Europe's cultural lineage, the Federation is considered a centre for both culture and science, with a reputation for producing world-class art, science, and philosophy. It has by far the world's largest number of UNESCO World Heritage Sites, and is a major tourist desination. The Federation is an official nuclear-weapon state, and is one of the five permanent members of the UNSC. It is a member of the United Nations, the OECD, the WTO, NATO, the G7 and the G20.
 
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bd_roberts

Misgendered! At The Disco
Location
Sheffield, SRSY
Pronouns
they/them
Prime Ministers of the United Kingdom, 1964-present

1964-1970: Harold Wilson (Labour)

1964 (Majority), def: Alec Douglas-Home (Conservative), Jo Grimond (Liberal)
1966 (Majority), def: Edward Heath (Conservative), Jo Grimond (Liberal), Gerry Fitt (Republican Labour)

1970-1974: Edward Heath (Conservative)
1970 (Majority), def: Harold Wilson (Labour), Jeremy Thorpe (Liberal), William Wolfe (SNP), Ian Paisley (Protestant Unionist), Gerry Fitt (Republican Labour)
1974-1980: Peter Shore (Labour)
1974 (Majority), def: Edward Heath (Conservative), Jeremy Thorpe (Liberal), William Wolfe (SNP), Harry West (UUP), Gwynfor Evans (Plaid Cymru), Gerry Fitt (SDLP), Ian Paisley (DUP)
1978 (Majority), def: Enoch Powell (Conservative), David Steel (Liberal), William Wolfe (SNP), Ian Paisley (DUP), Gwynfor Evans (Plaid Cymru), Gerry Fitt (SDLP)
1979 (Minority, support from Liberals)

1980-1984: Enoch Powell (Conservative)
1980 (Majority), def: Peter Shore (Labour), David Steel (Liberal), William Wolfe (SNP), Gerry Fitt (SDLP), Gwynfor Evans (Plaid Cymru)
1984-1986: Peter Shore (Labour)
1984 (Majority), def: Enoch Powell (Conservative), David Steel (Liberal), Gordon Wilson (SNP), Dafydd Wigley (Plaid Cymru), John Hume (SDLP)
1986-1988: Enoch Powell (Conservative)
1986 (Majority), def: Peter Shore (Labour), David Steel (Liberal), Gordon Wilson (SNP), Jean Lambert (Green), Dafydd Elis-Thomas (Plaid Cymru), John Hume (SDLP)
1988 (Interim): Margaret Thatcher (Conservative)
1988-1994: Keith Joseph (Conservative)

1990 (Majority), def: Roy Hattersley (Labour), David Steel/Jean Lambert (Alliance 90), John Swinney (SNP), Dafydd Elis-Thomas (Plaid Cymru), John Hume (SDLP)
1994-2004: Bryan Gould (Labour)
1994 (Majority), def: Keith Joseph (Conservative), David Steel/Jean Lambert (Alliance 90), John Swinney (SNP), Dafydd Wigley (Plaid Cymru), John Hume (SDLP)
1998 (Majority), def: Michael Portillo (Conservative), Alan Beith/Jean Lambert (Alliance 90), Alex Salmond (SNP), Dafydd Wigley (Plaid Cymru), John Hume (SDLP)
2002 (Minority, support from Alliance 90), def: Liam Fox (Conservative), Paddy Ashdown/Caroline Lucas (Alliance 90), Alex Salmond (SNP), Ieuan Wyn Jones (Plaid Cymru), John Hume (SDLP)

2004-2006: Margaret Beckett (Labour)
2004 (Minority, support from Alliance 90)
2006-2014: William Hague (Conservative)
2006 (Minority, support from National Alternative), def: Margaret Beckett (Labour), Paddy Ashdown (Alliance 90), Caroline Lucas (Green Left), Alan Sked (National Alternative), Alex Salmond (SNP), Ieuan Wyn Jones (Plaid Cymru), Mark Durkan (SDLP)
2010 (Coalition with Alliance 90), def: Tony Lloyd (Labour), Chris Huhne (Alliance 90), Caroline Lucas (Green Left), John Redwood (National Alternative), Alex Salmond (SNP), Ieuan Wyn Jones (Plaid Cymru), Margaret Ritchie (SDLP)

2014-present: Gordon Brown (Labour)
2014 (Majority), def: William Hague (Conservative), Caroline Lucas (Alliance 90), Alex Salmond (SNP), Leanne Wood (Plaid Cymru), Alasdair McDonnell (SDLP)
2018 (Majority), def: Theresa Brasier (Conservative), Vince Cable (Alliance 90), John Swinney (SNP), Leanne Wood (Plaid Cymru), Colum Eastwood (SDLP)
 
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bd_roberts

Misgendered! At The Disco
Location
Sheffield, SRSY
Pronouns
they/them
Alternate 2019 Election infobox.pngThe 2019 United Kingdom general election was held on Thursday, 13 June 2019. The election took place two years after the previous 2017 election, and saw the election of a second, consecutive hung parliament. Labour overtook the Conservatives to emerge as the largest party, and made a net gain of 8 seats, but both major parties saw large swings against them to the Liberal Democrats and Brexit Party respectively.

The election was held following two years of negotiations and debates surrounding Britain's withdrawal from the European Union. Theresa May's minority government, with support from the Democratic Unionist Party, was unable to secure the support of the House of Commons for any Brexit-related bill. The gridlock in Parliament saw dissatisfaction with the two major parties grow, until the 2019 elections to the European Parliament saw the Brexit Party and Liberal Democrats emerge as the top two parties. Following this dismal result, the Conservatives attempted to depose Theresa May and replace her with Boris Johnson, but May instead called for a general election, in a move some described as "the nuclear option".

The campaign saw the polls widen slightly, as Labour announced its commitment to a second referendum, which was seen to dent the appeal of the Liberal Democrats. Nevertheless, Vince Cable's "bollocks to Brexit"-focused campaign continued to prove a thorn in both parties' side. The meteoric rise of the Brexit Party, led by Nigel Farage, also proved a major challenge to the main parties, with individual constituency polling suggesting that the party could both make in-roads into Labour's heartlands and deprive the Conservatives of a number of marginal seats.

Electoral pacts featured prominently in the campaign, but had a negligible impact on the result. The Liberal Democrats, the Green Party and Plaid Cymru organised into Unite to Remain. Labour was invited to participate, but did not join the alliance. Sinn Féin, the SDLP and Alliance all collaborated in Northern Ireland. Theresa May attempted to negotiate an electoral pact with the Brexit Party, but was rebuked by Farage.

The election produced a fractious hung parliament, and became known as the "Boomerang election" as it represented a shift away from the brief return to two-party politics. Labour made a net gain of 8 seats, but lost a number of heartland seats in Northern England to the Brexit Party, including former leader Ed Miliband's Doncaster North. The Conservatives made a net loss of 111 seats, with both the Prime Minister and her opponent Boris Johnson losing their constituencies. The story of the election was the performance of the Liberal Democrats and Brexit Party, who between them secured an unprecedented 41% of the vote. The Liberal Democrats overturned large Conservative majorities in Remain-voting southern England, while the Brexit Party did the same to Labour majorities in the North. This was heralded as the beginning of four party politics. The SNP also returned to prominence in Scotland, gaining 11 seats, while pro-Remain parties won the majority of seats in Northern Ireland.

Theresa May was ineligible to continue as Prime Minister in the aftermath of the election, and Jeremy Corbyn briefly took over the role as leader of the largest party. This coincided with coalition talks between Labour and the Liberal Democrats. The Liberal Democrats refused to support a Corbyn-led government in an official manner, but agreed to a short confidence and supply deal to extend Article 50 and organise a Second Referendum. Senior Labour figures, however, began lobbying for Corbyn's replacement. He was eventually replaced in an internal coup by John McDonnell, who aimed to secure a coalition with the Liberal Democrats. Proportional representation was a key Liberal Democrat demand, and so 2019 was the final United Kingdom general election held under first-past-the-post.
 
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Bolt451

BOOK IT, TONY!
Location
Sandford, Gloucestershire
Pronouns
She/Her
View attachment 42279The 2019 United Kingdom general election was held on Thursday, 13 June 2019. The election took place two years after the previous 2017 election, and saw the election of a second, consecutive hung parliament. Labour overtook the Conservatives to emerge as the largest party, and made a net gain of 8 seats, but both major parties saw large swings against them to the Liberal Democrats and Brexit Party respectively.

The election was held following two years of negotiations and debates surrounding Britain's withdrawal from the European Union. Theresa May's minority government, with support from the Democratic Unionist Party, was unable to secure the support of the House of Commons for any Brexit-related bill. The gridlock in Parliament saw dissatisfaction with the two major parties grow, until the 2019 elections to the European Parliament saw the Brexit Party and Liberal Democrats emerge as the top two parties. Following this dismal result, the Conservatives attempted to depose Theresa May and replace her with Boris Johnson, but May instead called for a general election, in a move some described as "the nuclear option".

The campaign saw the polls widen slightly, as Labour announced its committment to a second referendum, which was seen to dent the appeal of the Liberal Democrats. Nevertheless, Vince Cable's "bollocks to Brexit"-focused campaign continued to prove a thorn in both party's side. The meteoric rise of the Brexit Party, led by Nigel Farage, proved a major challenge to both parties, with individual constituency polling suggesting that the party could make in-roads into both Labour's heartlands and deprive the Conservatives of a number of marginal seats.

Electoral pacts featured prominently in the campaign, but had a negligible impact on the result. The Liberal Democrats, the Green Party and Plaid Cymru organised into Unite to Remain. Labour was invited to participate, but did not join the alliance. Sinn Féin, the SDLP and Alliance all collaborated in Northern Ireland. Theresa May attempted to negotiate an electoral pact with the Brexit Party, but was rebuked by Farage.

The election produced a fractious hung parliament, and became known as the "Boomerang election" as it represented a shift away from the brief return to two-party politics. Labour made a net gain of 8 seats, but lost a number of heartland seats in Northern England to the Brexit Party, including former leader Ed Miliband's Doncaster North. The Conservatives made a net loss of 111 seats, with both the Prime Minister and her opponent Boris Johnson losing their constituencies. The story of the election was the unprecedented performance of the Liberal Democrats and Brexit Party, who between them secured an unprecedented 41% of the vote. The Liberal Democrats overturned large Conservative majorities in Remain-voting southern England, while the Brexit Party did the same to Labour majorities in the North. This was heralded as the beginning of four party politics by some. The SNP also returned to prominence in Scotland, gaining 11 seats, while pro-Remain parties won the majority of seats in Northern Ireland.

Theresa May was ineligible to continue as Prime Minister in the aftermath of the election, and Jeremy Corbyn briefly took over the role as leader of the largest party. This coincided with coalition talks between Labour and the Liberal Democrats. The Liberal Democrats refused to support a Corbyn-led government in an official manner, but agreed to a short confidence and supply deal to extend Article 50 and organise a Second Referendum. Senior Labour figures, however, began lobbying for Corbyn's replacement. He was eventually replaced in an internal coup by John McDonnell, who aimed to secure a coalition with the Liberal Democrats. Proportional representation was a key Liberal Democrat demand, and so 2019 was the final United Kingdom general election held under first-past-the-post.
And here's the full election map in case people were interested!

View attachment 42280
I did a similar thing about a summer of 2019 election (where Naomi Long is picked as a compromise leader between Labour and Lib Dems) but this is much better executed and goes into better detail about the seats.

Labour Stroud and Lib Dem Cotswolds AND Cheltenham. I'm okay with this.

Is that Claire Wright in Devon too?
 

bd_roberts

Misgendered! At The Disco
Location
Sheffield, SRSY
Pronouns
they/them
I did a similar thing about a summer of 2019 election (where Naomi Long is picked as a compromise leader between Labour and Lib Dems) but this is much better executed and goes into better detail about the seats.

Labour Stroud and Lib Dem Cotswolds AND Cheltenham. I'm okay with this.

Is that Claire Wright in Devon too?
Ooh Long is a good shout. I settled on McDonnell mostly because I think it's good ✨ drama ✨. If I have to guess, it's not long before he himself gets replaced by someone like Yvette Cooper.

Yep; that's Claire! Worth noting that sooo many of the seats are two-, three- or even four-way marginals here. In particular the two Brexit Party London seats are, I'm fairly certain, a case of the Brexit Party sneaking by as the LDs, Labour and Tories all ate into the Remain vote.
 

Bolt451

BOOK IT, TONY!
Location
Sandford, Gloucestershire
Pronouns
She/Her
Ooh Long is a good shout. I settled on McDonnell mostly because I think it's good ✨ drama ✨. If I have to guess, it's not long before he himself gets replaced by someone like Yvette Cooper.

Yep; that's Claire! Worth noting that sooo many of the seats are two-, three- or even four-way marginals here. In particular the two Brexit Party London seats are, I'm fairly certain, a case of the Brexit Party sneaking by as the LDs, Labour and Tories all ate into the Remain vote.
Also looking further on I'm assuming this govt stays together for the sake of Covid?
 
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