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Nanwe's Maps and Graphics Thread

Nanwe

The Troika always wins
Location
Lund, DK


So this is still a WIP, but it's coming along nicely. This is the ethnic majority map. The % of the majority ethnicity are shown for each political district (okres). Bohemia and Moravia-Silesia were further subdivided into judicial districts but I decided not to show that for the sake of showing everything at the same level. The data is from the 1931 census, which is really thorough.

For reference, Czechoslovaks are in red, Germans in yellow, Hungarians in green, Rusyns (Ukrainians and Russians too) in purple, Poles in dark blue and 'Jewish' (as ethnicity, not religion) in teal. The 1931 census derived ethnicity from self-identification. As a results, some numbers may be suspect especially where Poles lived or in urban Slovakia. Many Jews in Bohemia and Moravia identified either as German or Czechoslovak.

A religious map will follow soon after I finish tracing all the districts. The more interesting numbers will be those of the Czechoslovak Church, a modernist Catholic splinter that became a sort of hyper-influential national church in Bohemia (especially) and Moravia. It claimed to be neo-Hussite and combined elements from modernist Catholicism, Protestantism (Hussite and otherwise) and elements of Orthodoxy. Masaryk was a member.
 

Nanwe

The Troika always wins
Location
Lund, DK
For the record, Bohemia was a one single city type of place.

In 1930, Prague had about 850,000 inhabitants, the next Bohemian city, Plzen had 115,000. And the third largest Bohemian city, Usti nad Labem, had 43,000.

Also, for map-makers, would you recommend I show the % of people in the largest towns? I have data on ethnicity and religion for every municipality (obce) with a population of over 10,000, adding to 108 towns. I was thinking of maybe showing the 23 towns with over 25,000 people. But not sure where it should be a separate map or on the same one. Probably with semi-transparent circles that also indicate the municipality's size.
 

Alex Richards

Tends to eat truffles once found
Patreon supporter
Published by SLP
Location
Derbyshire
For the record, Bohemia was a one single city type of place.

In 1930, Prague had about 850,000 inhabitants, the next Bohemian city, Plzen had 115,000. And the third largest Bohemian city, Usti nad Labem, had 43,000.

Also, for map-makers, would you recommend I show the % of people in the largest towns? I have data on ethnicity and religion for every municipality (obce) with a population of over 10,000, adding to 108 towns. I was thinking of maybe showing the 23 towns with over 25,000 people. But not sure where it should be a separate map or on the same one. Probably with semi-transparent circles that also indicate the municipality's size.
Perhaps do it on a grid pattern next to the map with numbered indications?
 

Nanwe

The Troika always wins
Location
Lund, DK
If I can design a nice logo based off a carnation, expect soon-ish a description of the ČSDSD (the social-democrats).

logo_CRS_CS.png
The Czechoslovak Republican Party (Czecho-Slovak: Československá republikánská strana; Hungarian: Republikánus párt; Rusyn: Чехословацька pепубліканська партія, romanized: Čehoslovacʹka republikans'ka partija; Yiddish: רעפובליקאנער פארטיי, romanized: Refublikner fartej; ČRS) is a conservative-liberal, agrarian political party in Czechoslovakia. The party was established in 1922 shortly after Czechoslovakia's independence from the merger of the Czech Agrarian Party and the Slovak National Republican and Peasant Party. Founded as an agrarian party advocating land reform and protectionism, the party has moved ideologically towards economically-liberal positions, like a defence of free-market economics, and become the main party of the Czechoslovak centre-right. The party maintains close ties with its German-speaking sister party, the Agrarian League (Bund der Landwirte).

Although coming second behind the Czechoslovak Social Democratic Workers' Party in the elections of 1920, the split between the party's left, who went on to found the Communist Party in 1922, and the rest of the party allowed the Republican Party to become the largest single political force in the 1920s and 1930s, forming part of every government between 1920 and 1943 and successively presiding the Council of Ministers between 1922-1926 and again from 1926 until 1943. The party would sit outside of government for most of the period 1943-1961, returning to the cabinet in the Laušman II cabinet, the so-called Constitutional Reform Government. Today, the party has displaced National Unification and the Czechoslovak Liberal Party as the main centre-right force in the country, providing several major Prime Ministers such as Antonín Švehla, Milan Hodža, Jozef Lettrich or Petr Farský.

In the 2017 general election, the party obtained 38 seats out of 300, becoming the second-largest party in the Chamber of Deputies. The party also holds 12 seats (of 80) in the Senate and is the sole party, together with the social democrats, to be represented in all four state diets. The party's political influence is strongest in the Subcarpathian Rus, eastern Slovakia and rural Bohemia.

The Republican Party is the mother organisation of the Union of the Republican Youth (JRD), the Union of Republican Academics (USRA), the Chamber of Landlords and Smallholders (DDM), the Union of Agricultural and Forestry Employees (OJZLZ), the Central Association of Public Servants and Teachers (USUaU) and the USVZ cooperative. It is a founding member of the International Agrarian Bureau, together with various other agrarian parties.

Here are the logos used in the Subcarpathian Rus:

CRS_Rus'_logos.png
 
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Nanwe

The Troika always wins
Location
Lund, DK
I'm getting a very Nordic vibe from that. Nice.
Thanks! Interestingly, the four-leafed clover was also the symbol of the interwar agrarian parties in Eastern Europe (and of the Green International), it's just the only countries with agrarian parties that weren't crushed by the Communists were the Nordics.

So these are some ideas for the social democrats' logo:

 

Ares96

Ísbjörn í húsdýragarðinn!
Published by SLP
Thanks! Interestingly, the four-leafed clover was also the symbol of the interwar agrarian parties in Eastern Europe (and of the Green International), it's just the only countries with agrarian parties that weren't crushed by the Communists were the Nordics.
The first Nordic party that used it were the Finns, and they got it from the PSL. I have a vague sense that the Swedish ones may have used a sheaf of wheat at some point, but I can’t remember.
 

Nanwe

The Troika always wins
Location
Lund, DK
The first Nordic party that used it were the Finns, and they got it from the PSL. I have a vague sense that the Swedish ones may have used a sheaf of wheat at some point, but I can’t remember.
That's likely, yeah. Several agrarian parties at the time used wheat and/or a plough as symbols back then too. Probably was dropped due to similarities with the Soviet symbology.
 

Nanwe

The Troika always wins
Location
Lund, DK
This monstruosity is 1 MB in size, but it's hyper-detailed, so it was worth it.

Note, here Jewish means people who identified as Jewish in ethnic terms, not religious ones. Foe that reason many Jews in Bohemia and Moravia identified as either Czechoslovak or German. In any case, a map of the breakdown of each major ethnic group will follow suit as well as one with the main religious groups.

Also, the map in Bohemia and Moravia uses the administrative districts for the purpose of homogeneity, however, I also have data and maps to draw the judicial districts (smaller units, typically any admin. district had from 1 to 4).


Czechoslovakia_census_1930_map.png
 

Nanwe

The Troika always wins
Location
Lund, DK
So was the border between Czech and Slovak identity just the old administrative border, or were there more nuances to it?
There were areas of Moravia where the Czech dialect spoken is very close to Slovak, it's a Moravian-Slovak transitions area. But in terms of identity, keep in mind that the border between the Czech lands and Slovakia (Upper Hungary) had remained consistent for over a thousand years. So the Czech national identity awoke in the 16th century and then again (big time) after 1848. The Slovak one appears also in the 19th century and while influenced by the Czech, it was separate - different literary standards, historical myths, etc.

So the border is, linguistics aside, a very good approximation.
 

Nanwe

The Troika always wins
Location
Lund, DK
Religions' map of Czechoslovakia, according to the 1930 census.

Religious adherence to the Catholic Church in Bohemia was very weak, even among self-professed Catholics. Even for devout Catholics and even in Moravia, Czech national culture was deeply tied to the Hussite heresy, and Jan Hus was revered as a father of the nation, regardless of his religious inclinations. As such, over the 1920s and 1930s, more and more Czechs would move away from the Church towards the newly-created Czechoslovak Church, various Neo-Hussite groups are identify as 'non-religious'.

Needless to say, relations between the Church and the Czechoslovak state were not easy in the beginning, given the anti-clerical or secular predilections of the main Czech parties (with the exception of the Czechoslovak People's Party) and their idolization of the Hussite movement. As a result, relations were very tense, although the state was not laïque or officially secular due to opposition from the CSL and the Slovak People's Party during the constitutional drafting period. In 1928, Benes and the papal Nunzio signed a 'modus vivendi', short of a concordat but a decent enough agreement to normalize relations.

The Czechoslovak Church is an interesting thing. It was founded in 1919 as a splinter of the Catholic Church. Originally a sort of modernist Catholic Church, advocating lay participation in rituals, the use of Czech in the liturgy and the Bible, the Church would also soon come to adopt elements drawn from Hussite tradition, other Protestant traditions and even Orthodoxy. The Czechoslovak Church was sort of the 'national' church in a way, as it was very closely linked to people like Masaryk or Benes, among other major politicians of the First Czechoslovak Republic. The Czechoslovak Church was, despite its name, a Czech and especially Bohemian phenomenon.

The Augsburg Confession churches (for there were 2, the Silesian one, mostly Polish, and the Slovakia and Subcarpathian Ruthenia) were Lutheran churches. The Reformed Church of Czechoslovakia was a Calvinist church, mostly ethnically Hungarian, and a splinter of the Hungarian Reformed Church.

About Jews, whereas Jews in Bohemia and Moravia as well as a good chunk of Slovakia belonged to the more secular, reformist strands, the Jews of eastern Slovakia and especially in the Subcarpathian Rus where Hassidic jews, and many times actively hostile to the work/presence of Zionists and secularized Jews. Many of them had crossed the Carpathian Mountains in the 17th and 18th centuries from Poland or Russia.

Rusyns were predominantly Greek Orthodox with a significant minority of 'Russian' Orthodox. Many Greek Catholic priests had enjoyed good relations with the pre-1920 Hungarian state, and as such as the Greek Catholic hierarchy was very suspected of being Magyarones (pro-Hungarian fifth column). For that reason, the Czechoslovak state encouraged people to become Orthodox. That went as far as having the Czechoslovak state organize the Eparchy of Mukacevo and Presov, attached to the Serbian Orthodox Church, due to historical ties and the fact that Russia and Ukraine were communist states. This was also supposed to help the Ukrainophile and Russophile elements of the Rusyn nationalist elites and help them reach the people of the region, at the time very backwards.


 
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Nanwe

The Troika always wins
Location
Lund, DK
Trying out the new style for the maps. The circles indicate every city with a population over 20,000 that wasn't a statutory city (that is, a city-district). Statutory cities as of 1930 were Prague (under its own, special law), Brno, Olomouc, Bratislava, Kosice, Uzhorod and Mukacevo.

And this is the map of the share of the population that were members of the Czechoslovak Church. More maps to follow.

 

Nanwe

The Troika always wins
Location
Lund, DK
Have to say, both Jews and Germans make up a much smaller part of Prague than I would've guessed.
The thing to remember is that Prague at this time was way bigger than the pre-1920 merge one. The old city with the Habsburg-era boundaries, crossing both sides of the Morava River (known as Praha I-VII).

Germans were 5.4% of Prague's population, but 8.5% of the Habsburg-era city. As for Jewish people, 4.17% vs. 8.07% in the old city boundaries.

The Germans of Prague were considerably more right-wing than elsewhere. In 1920, the DSAP got 50% of the ethnic German vote across the country, but in Prague, all the non-DSAP German parties endorsed the list of the German Democratic Freedom Party (Deutsch-demokratische Freiheitspartei), and obtained 14,028 votes vs. 3,335 for the DSAP.

The city that was majority German before 1920 was Brno (Brünn), but simply because the city centre was majority German and the municipal boundaries hadn't been adjusted to the city's expansion, where the new neighborhoods were overwhelmingly Czech-speaking. When Brno-mesto was created, that ended.

To be frank, there weren't that many Jewish people in either Bohemia (1.07%) or Moravia (1.16%).
 
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Nanwe

The Troika always wins
Location
Lund, DK
A map of Hungarians now. Hungarians were basically non-existent anywhere outside of southern Slovakia and south-western Ruthenia. The districts in white in Moravia and Bohemia is where there were 0 Hungarians, in absolute numbers.

Compared to the last pre-WWI Hungarian census, the number of urban Hungarians had diminished, this can be attributed to three factors, (1) the migration of close to 100,000 Hungarians to Hungary after 1920, (2) the identity switch of ethnically-mixed individuals from Hungarian to (Czecho-)Slovak and (3) the identity switch of Hungarian Jews.

Hungarians represented 17.79% of the population in Slovakia and 15.97% in the Subcarpathian Rus. The vast majority were Roman Catholics (63.22%), with a significant minority of members of the Reformed Church (i.e. Calvinists), who were 27.44% of all Hungarians. Calvinist Hungarians, reflecting demographic patterns in Hungary, mostly lived in eastern Slovakia and in Ruthenia. Indeed, 60% of all Hungarians in Ruthenia were Calvinists.

Around 3.8% of Hungarians were Greek Catholics (12.4% in Ruthenia, 2.1% in Slovakia), 2.9% were members of the Augsburg Confession Church in Slovakia and the Subcarpathian Church (i.e. Lutherans) and 2.3% were Jewish (5.1% in Ruthenia, 1.6% in Slovakia).