• Hi Guest!

    The costs of running this forum are covered by Sea Lion Press. If you'd like to help support the company and the forum, visit patreon.com/sealionpress

Lists of Heads of Government and Heads of State

Mumby

'I love the pun he will go far'
Published by SLP
H E L L W O R L D

Prime Ministers of the United Kingdom, 1931 - 1934:
1931 - 1934: Ramsay MacDonald (National Labour, leading National Government)

defeated, 1931: Stanley Baldwin (Conservative), Arthur Henderson (Labour), John Simon (National Liberal), Herbert Samuel (Liberal)

Premiers of the People's Republic of Great Britain, 1934 - 1974:
1934 - 1956: Harry Pollitt (CPGB)
1933: Popular Front, unopposed
1943:
Popular Front, unopposed
defeated, 1953:
Bob Edwards (SDF), Ernest Millington (Common Wealth)


1956 - 1966: Reg Birch (CPGB)
1956: Opposition to the CPGB banned
1966 - 1966: John Maxton (New Britain)
1966 - 1967: Sid French (Counterrevolutionary Committee)
1967 - 1974: Sid French (CPGB)


Prime Ministers of the Kingdom of Great Britain, 1974 - present:
1974 - 1978: Ian Paisley (Anglo-Irish Joint Occupational Force)
1978 - 1985: Ian Paisley (National Interest)

defeated, 1978: David Burnside (Democratic Unionist), James Chichester-Clark (National), Ian Gilmour (‘Continuity’ Conservative), Hugh Smyth (Democrats)
defeated, 1983: James Chichester-Clark (National Conservatives), Bill Craig (Democratic Unionist), Hugh Smyth (Democrats)
1985: Catholic and Labour parties legalized

1985 - 1991: Geoffrey Howe (National Interest)
defeated, 1986: Robin Jackson (Democratic Unionist), Eric Heffer (Labour), Shirley Williams (SDP), Leon Brittan (National Conservatives), Hugh Smyth (Democrats)
1991 - present: Robin Jackson (Democratic Unionist)
defeated, 1991: Geoffrey Howe (National Interest), David Owen (SDP) Norman Lamont (National Conservatives), Eric Heffer (Labour), Hugh Smyth (Democrats)
1992: Catholic and Labour parties banned
explain your behaviour
 

Oppo

Nationalize Five Guys
FULLY AUTOMATED EVANGELICAL SOCIAL DEMOCRACY

Following Johnson's election victory, Graham's role as the main White House pastor was solidified. At one point, Johnson even considered making Graham a member of his cabinet and grooming him to be his successor, though Graham insisted he had no political ambitions and wished to remain a preacher
what...okay

1963-1965: Lyndon B. Johnson/Vacant (Democratic)
1965-1968: Lyndon B. Johnson/Billy Graham (Democratic)
1964 def. Richard Nixon/John J. Williams (Republican), George Wallace/Billy Graham (Unpledged Electors)
1968-1969: Billy Graham/Vacant (Democratic)
1969-1977: Billy Graham/Walter Reuther (Democratic)
1968 def. George Romney/Claude Kirk (Republican)
1972 def. Ronald Reagan/Howard Baker (Republican)

1977-0000: Millicent Fenwick/John Tower (Republican)
1976 def. Robert F. Kennedy/Dale Bumpers (Democratic)

Following the brokered 1964 Republican Convention that brought Richard Nixon's name back on the front stage of politics, Lyndon B. Johnson became worried that his legacy would be destroyed in the upcoming presidential election. In a surprise announcement, Johnson announced Reverand Billy Graham as his running mate. Graham, who was one of the most admired men in America, was a great assistance in the landslide victory against Nixon and Wallace. Graham would mostly use his political position for ceremonial roles and not get bogged down into policy. Coming into the 1968 Democratic Convention, Graham stayed out of the heated campaign between President Johnson and Robert F. Kennedy. This changed once Johnson was assassinated upon entering Chicago, as the convention turned to him as a compromise candidate. With the fiery UAW President Walter Reuther at his side, Graham won a landslide victory against the disastrous campaign of Governor Romney. Graham tenure in office would be the start of a load of new policies, including Universal Basic Income, a National Health Service, and the appointments of Chief Justice Brennan, Justices Thornberry, Byrd, and Jenner. Foreign policy wise, Graham established peace in Vietnam (largely due to North Vietnam's fear of the Chinese Commune) and improved relations with Kim Il-sung of North Korea. However, Graham was still a staunch anti-Soviet, supporting Israel in the Yom Kippur War and Portugal against colonial revolts. Overall, Billy Graham has been remembered not only for his evangelization work but for one of the greatest post-war presidencies.

1964-1975: Leonid Brezhnev (Communist)
1975-0000: Nikolai Podgorny (Communist)

Brezhnev dies earlier on and is replaced by Podgorny, who keeps up Cold War tensions and continues hardline policies at home.

1949-1967: Mao Zedong (Communist - First Generation)
1967-1968: Jiang Qing (Communist - First Generation)
1968-0000: Wang Hongwen (Communist - Red Guards)

Mao Zedong purges his successor-in-waiting Lin Biao four years earlier than IOTL. Soon after, Mao falls into serious illness and hands over much of his powers to Jiang Qing. Despite support from Mao, the party establishment despises her and the Red Guards refused to obey Bejing's orders. Jiang attempts to invite the Red Guards into government, but they soon turn on her and seize control of the party. The new regime remains a pariah state, with neither the Soviets or Americans willing to engage in diplomacy. The government of Chiang Kai-shek and his son Chiang Wei-Kuo continues to be recognized by the Western world and US allies in Asia.

1964-1972: Harold Wilson (Labour)
1964 (Majority) def. Alec Douglas-Home (Conservative), Jo Grimond (Liberal)
1966 (Majority) def. Edward Heath (Conservative), Jo Grimond (Liberal)
1970 (Majority) def. Edward Heath (Conservative), Jeremy Thorpe (Liberal)

1972-1974: Roy Jenkins (Labour majority)
1974-1977: Iain Macleod (Conservative)
1974 (Majority) def. Roy Jenkins (Labour), Jeremy Thorpe (Liberal)
1977-1977: Robert Carr (Conservative minority)
1977-0000: Tony Benn (Labour)
1977 (Majority) def. Robert Carr (Conservative), Roy Jenkins (Liberal)

Wilson wins reelection over Heath and steps down for Jenkins two years later. Jenkins' tenure sparks division on European issues and nationalization from leftists in the party. Continued instability allows for Macleod to take power, but his frail condition and unpopular austerity budgets hurt the Conservatives in the eyes of the voters. In 1977, the Tories are met with Macleod dying in office, Carr's figurehead leadership, a loss in confidence, and the Bennite Labour victory.

1958-1971: Charles de Gaulle (UNR)
1958 def. George Marrane (PCF), Albert Châtelet (UFD)
1965 def. François Mitterand (FGDS), Jean Lecanuet (MRP), Jean-Louis Tixier-Vigancour (DVED)

1971-0000: Jacques Chaban-Delmas (UNR)
1971 def. François Mitterand (PS), Jean Lecanuet (MR), Jacques Duclos (PCF)
1977 def. Pierre Mauroy (PS), Pierre Abelin (MR)


The 1969 referendum passes and de Gaulle secures even more of his legacy from his amendments and two more years in office. With Pompidou in bad health and discredited by his opposition to de Gaulle, Prime Minister Chaban-Delmas takes over following The Constable's passing and is reelected to two more terms.
 

Mumby

'I love the pun he will go far'
Published by SLP
i present one of my silliest lists, which was accomplished with a little advice from @Thande and @Comisario

Churchill Dynasty

1940-1950: Winston Churchill Sr. (Conservative)
1940 Formation of War Government with Labour, Liberal Nationals, Liberals and National Labour
1945 (National Government with Liberals and Liberal Nationals) def. Clement Attlee (Labour), Archibald Sinclair (Liberal), C.A. Smith (Common Wealth)

1950-1959: Nye Bevan (Labour)
1950 (Majority) def. Winston Churchill (Conservative), Archibald Sinclair (Liberal)
1955 (Majority) def. Anthony Eden (Conservative-Liberal Alliance), Honor Balfour (Radical)

1959-1964: Esmond Romilly (Labour)
1960 (Coalition with Radicals) def. Quintin Hogg (New Democratic), Honor Balfour (Radical)
1964-1970: Randolph Churchill (New Democratic)
1964 (Majority) def. Esmond Romilly (Labour)
1967 (Majority) def. Michael Foot (Labour)

1970-1972: Duncan Sandys (New Democratic majority)
1972-1977: Denis Healey (Labour)
1972 (Majority) def. Duncan Sandys (New Democratic)
1977-1987: Piers Dixon (New Democratic)
1977 (Majority) def. Denis Healey (Labour)
1982 (Majority) def. Roy Jenkins (Labour)
1984 (Majority) def. David Owen (Labour)

1987-1994: Winston Churchill Jr. (New Democratic)
1989 (Majority) def. David Owen (Labour), Jonathan Tyler (Ecology)
1994-2007: Julia Romilly (Labour)
1994 (Coalition with Ecology) def. Winston Churchill Jr. (New Democratic), Sara Parkin (Ecology)
1999 (Alliance 2000 with Ecology) def. Winston Churchill Jr. (New Democratic)
2000 Electoral Reform Referendum YES 53%, NO 47%
2003 (Alliance 2000 with Ecology) def. Michael Portillo (New Democratic)

2007-2008: Paul Foot (Alliance 2000: Labour & Ecology)
2008-2015: Nicholas Soames (New Democratic)
2008 (Coalition with Country) def. Paul Foot (Alliance 2000: Labour & Ecology), Zac Goldsmith (Country)
2010 EU Referendum STAY 51%, LEAVE 49%
2013 (Minority) def. Dave Miliband (Labour), Peter Bone (People's Choice), Caroline Lucas (Ecology-Country Alliance)

2015-2020: Arabella Churchill (United Greens)
2015 (Alliance Nova with Labour) def. Geoff Norcott (People's Choice), Donald Cameron (New Democratic)
 

Thande

Caractacus P. Doom
Published by SLP
i present one of my silliest lists, which was accomplished with a little advice from @Thande and @Comisario

Churchill Dynasty

1940-1950: Winston Churchill Sr. (Conservative)
1940 Formation of War Government with Labour, Liberal Nationals, Liberals and National Labour
1945 (National Government with Liberals and Liberal Nationals) def. Clement Attlee (Labour), Archibald Sinclair (Liberal), C.A. Smith (Common Wealth)

1950-1959: Nye Bevan (Labour)
1950 (Majority) def. Winston Churchill (Conservative), Archibald Sinclair (Liberal)
1955 (Majority) def. Anthony Eden (Conservative-Liberal Alliance), Honor Balfour (Radical)

1959-1964: Esmond Romilly (Labour)
1960 (Coalition with Radicals) def. Quintin Hogg (New Democratic), Honor Balfour (Radical)
1964-1970: Randolph Churchill (New Democratic)
1964 (Majority) def. Esmond Romilly (Labour)
1967 (Majority) def. Michael Foot (Labour)

1970-1972: Duncan Sandys (New Democratic majority)
1972-1977: Denis Healey (Labour)
1972 (Majority) def. Duncan Sandys (New Democratic)
1977-1987: Piers Dixon (New Democratic)
1977 (Majority) def. Denis Healey (Labour)
1982 (Majority) def. Roy Jenkins (Labour)
1984 (Majority) def. David Owen (Labour)

1987-1994: Winston Churchill Jr. (New Democratic)
1989 (Majority) def. David Owen (Labour), Jonathan Tyler (Ecology)
1994-2007: Julia Romilly (Labour)
1994 (Coalition with Ecology) def. Winston Churchill Jr. (New Democratic), Sara Parkin (Ecology)
1999 (Alliance 2000 with Ecology) def. Winston Churchill Jr. (New Democratic)
2000 Electoral Reform Referendum YES 53%, NO 47%
2003 (Alliance 2000 with Ecology) def. Michael Portillo (New Democratic)

2007-2008: Paul Foot (Alliance 2000: Labour & Ecology)
2008-2015: Nicholas Soames (New Democratic)
2008 (Coalition with Country) def. Paul Foot (Alliance 2000: Labour & Ecology), Zac Goldsmith (Country)
2010 EU Referendum STAY 51%, LEAVE 49%
2013 (Minority) def. Dave Miliband (Labour), Peter Bone (People's Choice), Caroline Lucas (Ecology-Country Alliance)

2015-2020: Arabella Churchill (United Greens)
2015 (Alliance Nova with Labour) def. Geoff Norcott (People's Choice), Donald Cameron (New Democratic)
I didn't know you were going to use Alliance 2000 :D
 

Turquoise Blue

Ambiguously Tibby
Patreon supporter
Location
Kemr, FK
Inspired by Glen's Dominion of Southern America TL, I decided to do a list of PMs of an alternate DSA like that one.

Prime Ministers of the Dominion of Southern America
Alexander H. Stephens (Liberal) 1867-1876
1867: def. Wade Hampton III (Conservative) and Andrew Johnson (Workingmen's)
1871: def. P. G.T. Beauregard (Conservative)
John Tyler Morgan (Conservative) 1876-1889

1876: def. Alexander H. Stephens (Liberal)
1881: def. Joseph E. Brown (Liberal)
1885: def. John H. Reagan (Liberal)
John Brown Gordon (Conservative) 1889-1891
1889: def. John H. Reagan (Liberal)
Robert Love Taylor (Liberal) 1891-1903
1891: def. John Brown Gordon (Conservative) and Jim Hogg (Labour Committee)
1895: def. Benjamin Tillman (Conservative) and Jim Hogg (Labour Committee)
1899: def. John Newton Pharr (Conservative), Frank Burkitt (Labour) and Benjamin Tillman (Constitutional)
Joseph Weldon Bailey (Conservative) 1903-1907
1903: def. Robert Love Taylor (Liberal) and Marion Butler (Labour)
John Sharp Williams (Liberal, then Liberal-led National Government) 1907-1919
1907: def. Joseph Weldon Bailey (Conservative), Thomas E. Watson (Labour) and Octaviano Larrazolo (Hispanic Parliamentary)
1911: def. Joseph Weldon Bailey (Conservative), James K. Vardaman (Labour) and Octaviano Larrazolo (Hispanic Parliamentary)
Morris Sheppard (Liberal-led National Government, then Liberal) 1919-1921
1919: def. Thomas Campbell (Conservative), James K. Vardaman (Labour) and Sidney J. Catts (Constitutional)
Thomas Campbell (Conservative) 1921-1928
1921: def. Morris Sheppard (Liberal) and William H. Murray (Labour)
1923: def. William H. Murray (Labour), Morris Sheppard (Liberal) and M. Hoke Smith (Independent Liberal)
William H. Murray (Labour-Liberal coalition) 1928-1931
1928: def. Thomas Campbell (Conservative) and Robert L. Owen (Liberal)
George Berry (Labour-Liberal coalition) 1931-1933
James F. Byrnes (Conservative-National Liberal coalition, then Conservative-led Wartime Coalition) 1933-1945
1933: def. George Berry (Labour), Robert L. Owen (Liberal), Kenneth McKellar (National Liberal) and Huey Long (Common Wealth)
1938: def. William Bankhead (Labour), Kenneth McKellar (National Liberal), Pat Harrison (Liberal) and Huey Long (Common Wealth)
Burnet Maybank (Conservative-led Wartime Coalition) 1945-1946
Sam Rayburn (Labour) 1946-1953
1946: def. Burnet Maybank (Conservative) and Allen J. Ellender (Liberal)
1951: def. Spessard Holland (Conservative) and Allen J. Ellender (Liberal)
Jim Folsom (Labour) 1953-1955
Spessard Holland (Conservative) 1955-1963
1955: def. Jim Folsom (Labour) and Allen J. Ellender (Liberal)
1959: def. Jim Folsom (Labour) and Carl Albert (Liberal)
Lyndon B. Johnson (Labour, then Labour-Democratic Congress coalition) 1963-1975
1963: def. Spessard Holland (Conservative) and Carl Albert (Liberal)
1967: def. John Sparkman (Conservative), Orval Faubus (Southron Labour) and Carl Albert (Liberal)
1971: def. Michael King (Democratic Congress), John Connally (Conservative), Orval Faubus (Southron Labour) and Carl Albert (Liberal)
Lane Kirkland (Labour-Democratic Congress coalition) 1975-1977
John Connally (Conservative minority with support from Southron, then Conservative) 1977-1985
1977: def. Lane Kirkland (Labour), Michael King (Democratic Congress), Lloyd Bentsen (Liberal) and Lester Maddox (Southron)
1981: def. Fred Harris (Labour), Ralph Abernathy (Democratic Congress), Lloyd Bentsen (Liberal) and Larry McDonald (Southron)
1984: def. George Wallace (Labour), Ralph Abernathy (Democratic Congress), Lloyd Bentsen (Liberal) and Larry McDonald (Southron)
Lamar Alexander (Conservative) 1985-1991
1987: def. Jeane Jordan (Labour), Ralph Abernathy (Democratic Congress), Lloyd Bentsen (Liberal) and Larry McDonald (Southron)
Edwin Edwards (Labour-Liberal coalition, then Labour) 1991-2002
1991: def. Lamar Alexander (Conservative), John Lewis (Democratic Congress), Al Gore (Liberal) and Larry McDonald (Southron)
1995: def. Lamar Alexander (Conservative), John Lewis (Democratic Congress), David Duke (Southron) and Al Gore (Liberal)
1999: def. John Lewis (Democratic Congress), Richard Shelby (Conservative), Bruce Babbitt (Liberal) and Evan Mecham (Southron)
Fidel Castro (Labour) 2002-2003
Phil Bredesen (Conservative minority with support from Southron, then Conservative) 2003-2010
2003: def. John Lewis (Democratic Congress), Fidel Castro (Labour), Bruce Babbitt (Liberal) and Jeff Sessions (Southron)
2007: def. Mickey Leland (Labour), John Lewis (Democratic Congress), Bruce Babbitt (Liberal) and Jeff Sessions (Southron)
Abel Maldonado (Conservative, then Conservative minority) 2010-2015
2011: def. Chris Bell (Labour), John Lewis (Democratic Congress), and Alex Sink (Liberal)
2015: def. Ben Ray Luján (Labour), Jim Clyburn (Democratic Congress), Cindy Hyde-Smith (Southron Values) and Alex Sink (Liberal)
Bill Frist (Conservative-Southron Values coalition) 2015-2019
Kamala Harris (Labour-Democratic Congress-Liberal coalition) 2019-present
2019: def. Bill Frist (Conservative), Jim Clyburn (Democratic Congress), Alex Sink (Liberal) and Cindy Hyde-Smith (Southron Values)
 
Last edited:

Ciclavex

The Earl Ciclavex of New Sweden
Moderator
Patreon supporter
Location
Penn’s Woods
In the spirit of some of the “Real Name Meaning Translation” Lists before, I present you a slight variation on that theme —

President of the People’s Commission of the United Council Socialist States
1922-1924: Donald E. Yukon (American Communist Party (Majoritarian))
1924-1930: Edmund J. Cryer (American Communist Party (Majoritarian)/Unionwide Communist Party)
1930-1941: Euclid M. Hammerson (Unionwide Communist Party)
1941-1946: Joseph G. Steele (Unionwide Communist Party)


President of the Cabinet of the United Council Socialist States
1946-1953: Joseph G. Steele (Unionwide Communist Party/Communist Party of the Council Union)
1953-1955: George M. Smalls (Communist Party of the Council Union)
1955-1958: Nicholas A. Wexford (Communist Party of the Council Union)

1958-1964: Victor D. Beetle (Communist Party of the Council Union)
1964-1980: Edmund N. Braid (Communist Party of the Council Union)

1980-1985: Nicholas A. Felix (Communist Party of the Council Union)
1985-1991: Nicholas J. Rowan (Communist Party of the Council Union)

Chairman of the Communist National Committee of the United Council Socialist States
1922-1952: Joseph G. Steele
1953-1964: Victor D. Beetle

1964-1982: Leonard E. Hill
1982-1984: Geordie D. Brentwood

1984-1985: Amnon Z. Dressler
1985-1991: Michael D. Crumb

President of the American Federation
1991-1999: Conan N. Evergreen (Independent)
1999-2008: Donald D. Waye (National Union, then Independent)
2008-2012: Adam S.
Baer (Independent, then Americans United)
2012-0000: Donald D. Waye (All-American Popular Front)
 

Uhura's Mazda

{{{The Independents}}}
Published by SLP
Location
Tamaki Makaurau
Heaven knows how the LRC has lasted so long with so many entrenched factions dependent on the political patronage they are bestowed on the rare occasions when Labour comes to power. At this point, the factions are so institutionalised that there is barely a cigarette paper to slide between them on the ideological front - the Coops are supposed to be slightly to the left of the other major wing, the Fabians, but in practice the only conflict between the two is tribal. Every sub-party signs up hundreds or thousands of members per constituency in various slightly dodgy ways, just to be sure of having their candidate selected in a seat which has already been allocated to them in a smoke-filled room in Transport House.

As will be readily apparent, the Labour Leader's task of assembling a Front Bench is an unenviable one, with not only talent to consider, but also the optimum factional balance. This is doubly important when coming into Government, hence some of the unpromising choices made by Mr Balls for fear of sowing dissent - see, for instance, the hiving off of the kooky Georgists to a meaningless Department as distant as humanly possible from the Treasury. Cabinet selections, however, shed an invaluable light for onlookers into the often opaque internal wrangles of the LRC: last time Labour were in Government, the ILP looked much healthier, Common Wealth only merited a smattering of Junior Ministers, and the balance within the NDP now bends much more towards the new gang of working-class-adjacent modernisers than the old array of Old Right has-beens.

Prime MinisterEd Balls (Co-operative Party)
Chancellor of the ExchequerDavid Miliband (Fabian Society)
Home Secretary Ed Miliband (Co-operative Party)
Foreign SecretaryDouglas Alexander (Fabian Society)
Secretary of State for Economic Affairs Jon Cruddas (National Democratic Party)
Chief Secretary to the TreasuryChuka Umunna (Co-operative Party)
Secretary of State for Social Development Jon Trickett (Independent Labour Party)
Secretary of State for DefenceDan Jarvis (Fabian Society)
Secretary of State for Primary Industries and Rural AffairsMary Creagh (Co-operative Party)
Secretary of State for Families Hazel Blears (National Democratic Party)
Secretary of State for HealthLiz Kendall (National Democratic Party)
Secretary of State for TransportChristian Wolmar (Co-operative Party)
Secretary of State for Housing James Purnell (Fabian Society)
Secretary of State for Energy and the EnvironmentNatalie Bennett (Common Wealth)
Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice Lord Falconer of Thoroton (Fabian Society)
Secretary of State for Constitutional Affairs Chris Huhne (Justice!)
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of CommonsDave Nellist (Social Democratic Federation)
Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of LordsThe Lord Adonis (Fabian Society)
Chancellor of the Duchy of LancasterOwen Jones (Common Wealth)
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland Emily Thornberry (Co-operative Party)
Secretary of State for ScotlandGeorge Galloway (Independent Labour Party)
Secretary of State for WalesVaughan Gething (Fabian Society)
Chief Whip Tom Watson (Co-operative Party)
Attorney General The Lord Bach (Fabian Society)
 

Uhura's Mazda

{{{The Independents}}}
Published by SLP
Location
Tamaki Makaurau
Great list, Mazda!
I assume Justice! is the Georgist group?
Oh, and what's the deal with the National Democratic Party?
Indeed, by analogy with the Justice Party of Denmark and general Georgist rhetoric.

The NDP is a relic of the old National Democratic and Labour Party (which usually dropped the 'and Labour') which was a Liberal-funded minor party which made a big thing of being in favour of the First World War. ITTL, they return to the Labour Representation Committee and become the home of Old Right thought, which slowly dies away after Not!Thatcher. After years of irrelevance, it is reinvigorated by the people behind OTL's Blue Labour.
 

Uhura's Mazda

{{{The Independents}}}
Published by SLP
Location
Tamaki Makaurau
The Truce

The rise of Communism, spread across Eastern and Central Europe by the Red Army, frightens the British Establishment into retaining the War Government - and the wartime electoral truce - until the fall of the Berlin Wall. The Tories grow militarily atavistic and politically authoritarian (although Keith Joseph is an exception, liberalising the economy to the extent of abolishing rationing) while their 'Block Parties' atrophy into corrupt vehicles for careerists. The only challenges facing these parties are the occasional by-elections resulting from the death or retirement of an existing MP, in which pro-democratic campaigners often smash the War Government. But it's never quite enough to deny them a majority.

At the end of the Cold War, the Government can no longer find any excuses for failing to hold a general election (with PR). Britain rejoices, sending their governing parties to oblivion - but before long, they come to regret it.

1940-1955: Winston Churchill (War Government: Conservative, Labour, National Liberal, Liberal, National Labour)
1955-1961: Anthony Eden (War Government: Conservative, Labour, National Liberal, Liberal, National Labour)

1961-1972: Duncan Sandys (War Government: Conservative, Labour, National Liberal, Liberal, National Labour)
1972-1982: William Whitelaw (War Government: Conservative, Labour, National Liberal, Liberal, National Labour)
1982-1985: Keith Joseph (War Government: Conservative, Labour, National Liberal, Liberal, National Labour)

1985-1990: Christopher Soames (War Government: Conservative, Labour, National Liberal, Liberal, National Labour)
1990-1993: Vince Cable (Democratic Coalition: Radical Action, Common Wealth, Independent Labour)

1990 def: Martin Webster (British Social Movement), Tony Benn (Common Wealth), Christopher Soames (Conservative), Dennis Canavan (Independent Labour), David Nicholson (Communist), Jack Cunningham (Labour), Michael Heseltine (National Liberal), Geraint Howells (Liberal), Adam Nicolson (National Labour)
1993-1994: Tony Benn (Democratic Coalition: Social Democrat, Radical Action)
1994-1997: Nick Griffin (Third Way Coalition: British Social Movement, Conservative, United Labour)

1994 def: Tony Benn (Social Democrat), Vince Cable (Radical Action), David Nicholson (Communist), Nigel Lawson (Conservative), Michael Heseltine (Liberal and National Liberal), Jack Cunningham (United Labour)
1997-2013: Nick Griffin (British Social Movement)
2013-0000: Mark Collett (British Social Movement)
 
Last edited:

Mumby

'I love the pun he will go far'
Published by SLP
The Truce

The rise of Communism, spread across Eastern and Central Europe by the Red Army, frightens the British Establishment into retaining the War Government - and the wartime electoral truce - until the fall of the Berlin Wall. The Tories grow militarily atavistic and politically authoritarian (although Keith Joseph is an exception, liberalising the economy to the extent of abolishing rationing) while their 'Block Parties' atrophy into corrupt vehicles for careerists. The only challenges facing these parties are the occasional by-elections resulting from the death or retirement of an existing MP, in which pro-democratic campaigners often smash the War Government. But it's never quite enough to deny them a majority.

At the end of the Cold War, the Government can no longer find any excuses for failing to hold a general election (with PR). Britain rejoices, sending their governing parties to oblivion - but before long, they come to regret it.
[MY COMPUTER IS SCREAMING AS I TRY TO SNORT THIS LIST]

liberal and national liberal

sweet jesus what a grim timeline