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Lists of Heads of Government and Heads of State

Thande

Chemical Christian Chaos Chelator
Published by SLP
List of First Secretaries of Scotland
1980-1997 Donald Dewar (Labour majority)
1980: def. Alick Buchanan-Smith (Conservative), Russell Johnstone (Liberal), Gordon Wilson (SNP)
1984: def. Alick Buchanan-Smith (Conservative), Russell Johnstone (SDP-Liberal Alliance), Gordon Wilson (SNP)
1988: def. Peter Fraser (Conservative), Russell Johnstone (SDP-Liberal Alliance), Gordon Wilson (SNP)
1992: def. Michael Forsyth (Conservative), Malcolm Bruce (Liberal Democrat), Alex Salmond (SNP)

1996: def. Jim Wallace (Liberal Democrat), Alex Salmond (SNP), David McLetchie (Conservative)
1997-2008 Henry McLeish (Labour majority)
2000: def. Alex Salmond (SNP), im Wallace (Liberal), Alex Salmond (SNP), David McLetchie (Conservative)
2004: def. Jim Wallace (Liberal), Alex Salmond (SNP), David McLetchie (Conservative)
2008-2012 John Swinney (SNP-Liberal Democrat minority coalition with confidence-supply from Conservatives)
def. Henry McLeish (Labour), Nicol Stephen (Liberal), Annabel Goldie (Conservative)
2012-? Johann Lamont (Labour majority)
2012: def. Annabel Goldie (Conservative) , John Swinney (SNP), Tavish Scott (Liberal)
2016: def. Murdo Fraser (Conservative), Willie Rennie (Liberal), Angus Robertson (SNP)
Do you see Dewar having Livingstone-like clashes with Thatcher in the 80s and an attempt to abolish the Scottish Assembly?
 

OwenM

Your guess is as good as mine.
Do you see Dewar having Livingstone-like clashes with Thatcher in the 80s and an attempt to abolish the Scottish Assembly?
I think lower-key, and disquiet about the idea what with there having been a referendum, but it's possible there is a referendum on abolishing it which fails.
One thing that I intended not to happen was the poll tax trial, although on checking the text of the Scotland Act I'm no longer 100% sure that's as certain as I had thought.

Also I now want to construct a TL where Gordon Wilson is running Scotland at the same time as Gordon Wilson is running British Columbia and there are miscaptions as a result.
 

Cevolian

Well-known member
The Last Christmas
A festive Yuletide Tale​

Lord of Elfland (Álfheimr to 1215)

0000-1100: Wodan (The Divine King)
1100-1215: Old Father Yule (Pagan)
1215-2018: Saint Nicholas of Myra (Christian)
2018-2018: collective (Sons of Odin Provisional Revolutionary Government)

Although the stories of the Elfin people are mainly lost to time, human folklorists and historians have been able to establish a rough chronology of the rise and fall of the one known to humans as "Santa Claus" from 1215-2018. According to Elfin lore, "Elfland" (a sub-dimensional realm accessible at the North Pole via the Aurora) was created by the chief god "Wodan" at the beginning of time and was, for a time, ruled over by Wodan himself until 1100 AD when, with the power of the "Old Gods" waning with the expansion of the Kingdom of the White Christ, Wodan returned to Asgard. In his place he left Old Father Yule, a benevolent spirit of the forest (and our "Father Christmas") as the guardian of the elves. He would begin the tradition of gift-giving in Álfheimr and beyond, which would continue for 114 years, starting with the "Jolly Ride" of 1100 and the giving of gifts to Norse children. Though a wise and kind ruler, however, Old Father Yule became weakened as faith in the old gods waned, and by 1200 as Christianity had spread all across Scandinavia, Northern Germany, and the British Isles, he was often too weak to effectively manage his domain.

By 1207, Álfheimr had caught the attention of one Saint Nicholas of Myra. An ancient Christian figure who, with his fellow saints, had been returned to Earth to act as silent guides to their fellow men, and with angels in tow, St Nicholas was displeased that the word of god had yet to be spread to the Elfin peoples of the Far North. Summing an army from across Christendom and backed by a divine host, Nicholas would launch the "Silent Crusade" against Old Father Yule in 1208, and fire and iron would rain down upon the peaceful Elfin people. By 1215, St Nicholas and his men had managed to gain control of the entirety of Álfheimr and, hoping to supervise a conversion of the long-lived Elves to Christianity, Nicholas took personal stewardship of the "Elflands", renamed to remove the last vestige of Paganism. Worship of Wodan was outlawed, Old Father Yule had been exiled, and roamed the British Isles (where, by all accounts, he remains to this day, sighted by, among others, a bookish Oxford Don with a penchant for brave little people) and the population of Álfheimr were left under the tyrannous rule of old St Nick and his men. Curiously, the tradition of the "Jolly Ride" was maintained, seen as an act of magnificent Christian charity, and recostitued as a celebration of Christmastide.

Through the years Nicholas' crusaders died off but, with the magic of the Lord of Elfland at his grasp, he was able to live on and, with the help of his angelic warriors, he maintained power over Elfland. Over eight centuries of Christmas rides were carried out, and even as the "Age of Gods" came finally to an end with the retreat from the world of the White Christ's power and his "silent dominion", Nicholas of Myra continued to spread joy around the world with his gift giving, even as his subjects languished under his oppressive regime. By the 19th century St Nicholas had rather lost his way, and Elfland had become a vast, industrial, machine dedicated to bringing toys to the children of men, and doling out punishment where Nicholas saw fit. None no quite when they emerged, but the Sons of Odin eventually rose from the mass of oppressed elves, a group of political terrorists who, under the yolk of Nicholas, had grown tired of their ways being suppressed and their labour enslaved. Years of violence and insurgency finally gave way, in 2018, to the "Year Without a Christmas".

On Christmas Eve 2018, the Sons of Odin, aided by rebel aligned workers in St Nicholas' central Toy Manufactory were able to seize control of his citadel and, with the loss of hundreds of their kind, break Old Father Yule's staff and free both themselves, and Elfland's enslaved reindeer, from his grasp. With their own control over their lands restored, the wise and kind Einar the Meek used the "Yule Staff" to banish the Angellic host. A Kangaroo Court soon found Saint Nicholas guilty of usurpation, enslavement, religious suppression, and all manner of other crimes and, to the shock and horror of a world which had woken up without presents or Festive joy, he was executed in a broadcast to the world's governments on Christmas morning. The Provisional Government would be prompt, swift, and merciless in carrying out "justice", and, for all its claims to have restored an era of freedom for Elfkind, many elves were executed or imprisoned for "collaboration", and much of Elfland's Christian population were forced into exile in Europe and North America, brining elves and humans into contact for the first time. As it held elections to elect a "Speaker" for its people on the 31st December 2018, the Provisional Government, in its final act, awarded the "Elfin Star" to General James Mathis who had intervened to prevent President Trump from "Showing those Elves what Merry Christmas really means" (Donald J. Trump, Twitter, December 25th, 2018).

Speaker of the Elfin People

2019-2021: Einar Freedom Bringer (Sons of Odin)
2018 (Majority) def. Sigurd the Coward (Christmas League), Halldór the Kind (Reindeer Rights)
2021-2023: Blær Brave Heart (Sons of Odin)
2020 (Majority) def. Halldór the Kind (Reindeer Rights), Nikola Claus (Christmas League)
2023-2025: Einar Freedom Bringer (Sons of Odin)
2022 (Majority) def. Björn the Festive (Yuletide)
2025-0000: Björn the Festive (Yuletide)
2024 (Majority) def. Eric the Swift (Sons of Odin), Asleif (Álfheimr Front), Rudolf the Black (Dökkálfar Rights Alliance)

It was only natural that the Sons of Odin, the liberators of Elfland, were elected in a landslide on the 31st December 2018, and the hero Einar Freedom Bringer took office for a two year term as Speaker on the 1st January, defeating Sigurd the Coward (a Christian pro-Nicholas elf who, despite the name conveyed by his enemies had distinguished himself in the War on Christmas) and Halldór the King, the popular champion of the rights of the country's reindeer population who had been used as beasts of burden by Saint Nicholas and elves alike. Establishing friendly relations with the European Union and Canada, the "Republic of Elfland", the first formally Pagan nation admitted to the UN was unable to develop a strong relationship with the US or Russia, and the lingering animosity about Trump's threats to go to war to reinstall Nicholas (even after he had died) only made things worse.

As December 2019 rolled around it became clear that, with the Elves still busy rebuilding and with no love lost between elves and men, there would be no Christmas. 2020 was much the same. Einar was followed by Blær Braveheart, the last surviving Captain of the Sons who, with her fearless dedication to the cause, had led the assault on Nicholas' Citadel. Like Einar, who had stepped down to establish a limit of one consecutive term, Blær was committed to Elfin democracy, the gradual transformation of Nicholas' factories into a genuine industrial economy (despite the grumbling of the more "traditionalist" Elfin nationalists in the Sons) and, thanks to Halldór's success in the 2021 election, the passage of the Reindeer Rights Act. The "collaborator" Christmas League, meanwhile, sunk to an embarrassing fourth place as Nikola Claus, Nicholas' daughter, was put up as a token candidate who, having fled to the US, was leading the fun-raising efforts for "Noraid 2" to fund Christian resistance to the Sons.

By 2023, however, the former Christmas League had somewhat improved its standing, and Björn the Festive would win a respectable second place on a platform which, whilst accepting the crimes of Nicholas and his acolytes, questioned why "The Yuletide" couldn't be a chance to bring merriment to all. Compared to the earnest Einar and his plans to build a strong market economy, Björn seemed rather jovial and electable to many Elves. His victory, however, would come with the shattering of the Sons of Odin in 2024, and the walkout of the party by the "Álfheimr Front", a radical traditionalist offshoot who supported a return to "Orthodox Wodanism", the abandonment of the Nordic names conferred by Nicholas, and the recalamation of the Elfin people's mythic past. This was, of course, partly a constructed past (with a heavy influence from the works of J.R.R. Tolkien who, having met Old Father Yule, had "borrowed" some of his descriptions of the pre-Nicholas Álfheimr. Nevertheless, with the emergence of a movement for the right of the "Dark Elves" who had been discovered at the South Pole and forced out by Argentina, and had entered the Republic as refugees, their slogan of "Álfheimr for the Ljósálfar" began to resonate.

Einar, who had grown tired of governing and wanted another real adventure with Blær and their old friends announced he would not run for a third term later that year, and instead declared that he would be leading a mission to spread the word of Odin and the Elfin way to the rest of the world in the hopes of normalising relations. In his place Eric the Swift, another veteran of the war, was selected by the Sons but, with none of the charisma of Björn the Festive, and with Asleif's radicalism dividing the nationalist vote, he narrowly lost the 2024 election, and a divided electorate saw the Yuletide Party win a slim majority. Now as December 2025 fast approaches, and the toy factories fire up again - for a small fee from human parents around the world, of course - the entice spirit seems to be gearing up again for the first time in seven years. Somewhere, as his elves praise Wodan and gear up to spread a thoroughly non-Christian winter joy, Old Father Yule is smiling merrily.


Merry Yuletide everyone!
 

Mumby

'I love the pun he will go far'
Published by SLP
Merry Christmas, everyone!

Over By Christmas

Prime Ministers of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland

1908-1915: H.H. Asquith (Liberal)
1910 Jan (Minority, with IPP confidence and supply) def. Arthur Balfour (Conservative & Liberal Unionist), John Redmond (Irish Parliamentary), Arthur Henderson (Labour), William O'Brien (All-For-Ireland)
1910 Dec (Minority, with IPP confidence and supply) def. Arthur Balfour (Conservative & Liberal Unionist), John Redmond (Irish Parliamentary), George Barnes (Labour), William O'Brien (All-For-Ireland)

1915-1915: Winston Churchill (Liberal leading National Government with Unionists)
1915-1915: Keir Hardie / James Connolly / George M. Ll. Davies (British Labour / Irish Labour / Christian Pacifist led National Committee of the Provisional Government)
1915-1916: James Connolly / George M. Ll. Davies / Ramsay MacDonald (Irish Labour / Christian Pacifist / British Labour led National Committee of the Provisional Government)

Chairmen of the People's Commonwealth of the British Isles

1916-1920: Ramsay MacDonald (British Labour)
1916 (Majority) def. George M. Ll. Davies (Christian Democracy), James Connolly (Irish Labour), James Myles Hogge (Silver Badge), Christabel Pankhurst (Women's), Henry Page Croft (National)
1920-1924: Ramsay MacDonald (National Labour)
1920 (Grand Coalition with Christian Democracy) def. George M. Ll. Davies (Christian Democracy), James Connolly (Communist Labour), Oswald Mosley (Silver Badge), Richard Cooper (National), Nancy Astor (Women's)
1924-1927: Robert Blatchford (National)
1925 (New Coalition with Silver Badge and Women's) def. Ramsay MacDonald (National Labour), Jim Larkin (Communist Labour), George M. Ll. Davies (Christian Democracy)
1927-1927: Oswald Mosley (Silver Badge leading Emergency Government)
1927-1928: Robert Blatchford (New Unionist minority, with National Labour, Communist Labour, and Christian Democracy confidence and supply)
1928-1932: Fenner Brockway (United Labour)
1928 (Majority) def. Robert Blatchford (New Unionist), Henry Williamson (Soldiers of Tomorrow)

The Christmas Truce of 1914 turns into something more enduring as the soldiers of the Western Front down tools and refuse to fight. These mutinies spread across Europe, being joined by domestic general strikes. Asquith proves too weak in the face of the burgeoning revolution and is replaced by Churchill who in unattainted by Gallipoli.

Churchill's attempt to bloodily suppress the strikes proves to be the final straw and before 1915 is out a revolutionary government has been formed.

Keir Hardie occupies a near mythic role in post-revolutionary Britain, being one of the founders of Labour and an architect of the general strikes that ended the war.

The People's Commonwealth is rather decentralised and it's party system is initially both fragmented and dominated by each island's respective Labour Party. As the years march on however, the two parties shift - British Labour becoming the more reformist National Labour and Irish Labour becoming the more radical Communist Labour.

MacDonald's Grand Coalition sees the collapse of Christian Democracy as the main party of the right and the continued arguments between the two Labour parties over doctrine allows the 'New Coalition' to take power.

Blatchford's government takes a departure from the internationalist pacifism of the MacDonald governments as he prepares rearmament in the face of the Russian Empire's ambition. Controversially he also extends a hand out to the Empire-in-exile.

A general strike over unrelated matters sees Blatchford's government halted in its tracks and every party schisms over the course to take. Oswald Mosley seizes power in a coup and attempts to use revolutionary era legislation to halt the strikes and reform the government to his wishes. This fails as Blatchford gathers up his supporters and seeks common cause with the Labour Parties and the rump of Christian Democracy for the remaining year before the 1928 general election.

The final realignment takes places as a United Labour attains victory in a landslidewhile 'the Worker's Right' aligns behind Blatchford. Henry Morrison leads a continuity Mosleyite party that preaches back-to-the-land policies.
 
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moth

Or as the natives called him - mäize
Location
Portsmoth
Love? Actually,

1990-1995: John Major (Conservative)
def. 1992 (Majority): Neil Kinnock (Labour), Paddy Ashdown (Liberal Democrats)

1995-1996: Michael Portillo (Conservative)

1996-2003: Tony Blair (Labour)
def. 1996 (Majority): Michael Portillo (Conservative), Paddy Ashdown (Liberal Democrats), James Goldsmith (Referendum)
def. 2000 (Majority): Menzies Campbell (Liberal Democrats), Ken Clarke (Conservative), Jeffrey Titford (New Britain)

2003-2012: David MacLean (Liberal Democrats)
def. 2003 (Majority): Tony Blair (Labour), William Hague (Conservative), Jeffrey Titford (New Britain)
def. 2007 (Majority): Jack Straw (Labour), Mike Nattrass (New Britain & Anti-Europe Conservative), Frances Curran (Left List), William Hague (Conservative, Pro-European)

2012-2017: Hilary Benn (Labour)
def. 2012 (Minority): David MacLean (Liberal Democrats), Robin Birley (People's), Tim Collins (Modern Conservative)

2017-20??: David MacLean (Liberal Democrats)
def. 2017 (Modern Conservative Coalition): Hilary Benn (Labour), Tim Collins (Modern Conservative), Robin Birley (People's)
 

Mumby

'I love the pun he will go far'
Published by SLP
Love? Actually,

1990-1995: John Major (Conservative)
def. 1992 (Majority): Neil Kinnock (Labour), Paddy Ashdown (Liberal Democrats)

1995-1996: Michael Portillo (Conservative)

1996-2003: Tony Blair (Labour)
def. 1996 (Majority): Michael Portillo (Conservative), Paddy Ashdown (Liberal Democrats), James Goldsmith (Referendum)
def. 2000 (Majority): Menzies Campbell (Liberal Democrats), Ken Clarke (Conservative), Jeffrey Titford (New Britain)

2003-2012: David MacLean (Liberal Democrats)
def. 2003 (Majority): Tony Blair (Labour), William Hague (Conservative), Jeffrey Titford (New Britain)
def. 2007 (Majority): Jack Straw (Labour), Mike Nattrass (New Britain & Anti-Europe Conservative), Frances Curran (Left List), William Hague (Conservative, Pro-European)

2012-2017: Hilary Benn (Labour)
def. 2012 (Minority): David MacLean (Liberal Democrats), Robin Birley (People's), Tim Collins (Modern Conservative)

2017-20??: David MacLean (Liberal Democrats)
def. 2017 (Modern Conservative Coalition): Hilary Benn (Labour), Tim Collins (Modern Conservative), Robin Birley (People's)
oooo i was considering doing something with this myself

my POD was the fuel crisis in 2001 kicking off earlier, hague and kennedy substantially slicing blair's majority in the election that year so that the government could actually fall over iraq

1997-2003: Tony Blair (Labour)
1997 (Majority) def. John Major (Conservative), Paddy Ashdown (Liberal Democrat), David Trimble (Ulster Unionist), Alex Salmond (Scottish National)
2001 (Majority) def. William Hague (Conservative), Charles Kennedy (Liberal Democrat), David Trimble (Ulster Unionist), Ian Paisley (Democratic Unionist), John Swinney (Scottish National)

2003-2003: Gordon Brown ('War' Labour minority, with de facto 'War' Conservative confidence and supply)
2003-2003: Robin Cook ('Peace' Labour leading Caretaker Government)
2003-2008: Matthew Taylor (Liberal Democrat)
2003 (Peace Coupon majority, with Labour Democrats) def. Jack Straw (Labour), William Hague (Conservative), Alex Salmond (Scottish National), Ian Paisley (Democratic Unionist), Ieuan Wyn Jones (Plaid Cymru), Gerry Adams (Sinn Fein)
2008-2014: John McDonnell (Labour)
2008 (Coalition with Liberal Democrats) def. Edward Leigh (Conservative), Matthew Taylor (Liberal Democrat), Alex Salmond (Scottish National), David Miliband (NewLabour), Peter Robinson (Democratic Unionist), Gerry Adams (Sinn Fein)
2009 AV referendum, NO 52%, YES 48%
2009 (Majority) def. Edward Leigh (Conservative), Julia Goldsworthy (Liberal Democrat), Alex Salmond (Scottish National), Peter Robinson (Democratic Unionist), Gerry Adams (Sinn Fein)

2014-2016: John Baron (Conservative)
2014 (Minority coalition with Liberal Democrats, with SNP confidence and supply) def. John McDonnell (Labour), Vince Cable (Liberal Democrat), Tasmina Ahmed-Sheikh (Scottish National), Peter Robinson (Democratic Unionist), Gerry Adams (Sinn Fein)
2015 Scottish independence referendum NO 58%, YES 42%

2016-2017: John Baron (Conservative minority, with Scottish National confidence and supply)
2017 EU membership referendum REMAIN 51%, LEAVE 49%
2017-2017: Nicky Morgan (Conservative minority, with Scottish National confidence and supply)
2017-2022: Matthew Taylor (Liberal Democrat)
2017 (Coalition with Conservatives) def. Graham Stringer (Labour), Nicky Morgan (Conservative), Arlene Foster (Democratic Unionist), Gerry Adams (Sinn Fein)
 

moth

Or as the natives called him - mäize
Location
Portsmoth
oooo i was considering doing something with this myself

my POD was the fuel crisis in 2001 kicking off earlier, hague and kennedy substantially slicing blair's majority in the election that year so that the government could actually fall over iraq

1997-2003: Tony Blair (Labour)
1997 (Majority) def. John Major (Conservative), Paddy Ashdown (Liberal Democrat), David Trimble (Ulster Unionist), Alex Salmond (Scottish National)
2001 (Majority) def. William Hague (Conservative), Charles Kennedy (Liberal Democrat), David Trimble (Ulster Unionist), Ian Paisley (Democratic Unionist), John Swinney (Scottish National)

2003-2003: Gordon Brown ('War' Labour minority, with de facto 'War' Conservative confidence and supply)
2003-2003: Robin Cook ('Peace' Labour leading Caretaker Government)
2003-2008: Matthew Taylor (Liberal Democrat)
2003 (Peace Coupon majority, with Labour Democrats) def. Jack Straw (Labour), William Hague (Conservative), Alex Salmond (Scottish National), Ian Paisley (Democratic Unionist), Ieuan Wyn Jones (Plaid Cymru), Gerry Adams (Sinn Fein)
2008-2014: John McDonnell (Labour)
2008 (Coalition with Liberal Democrats) def. Edward Leigh (Conservative), Matthew Taylor (Liberal Democrat), Alex Salmond (Scottish National), David Miliband (NewLabour), Peter Robinson (Democratic Unionist), Gerry Adams (Sinn Fein)
2009 AV referendum, NO 52%, YES 48%
2009 (Majority) def. Edward Leigh (Conservative), Julia Goldsworthy (Liberal Democrat), Alex Salmond (Scottish National), Peter Robinson (Democratic Unionist), Gerry Adams (Sinn Fein)

2014-2016: John Baron (Conservative)
2014 (Minority coalition with Liberal Democrats, with SNP confidence and supply) def. John McDonnell (Labour), Vince Cable (Liberal Democrat), Tasmina Ahmed-Sheikh (Scottish National), Peter Robinson (Democratic Unionist), Gerry Adams (Sinn Fein)
2015 Scottish independence referendum NO 58%, YES 42%

2016-2017: John Baron (Conservative minority, with Scottish National confidence and supply)
2017 EU membership referendum REMAIN 51%, LEAVE 49%
2017-2017: Nicky Morgan (Conservative minority, with Scottish National confidence and supply)
2017-2022: Matthew Taylor (Liberal Democrat)
2017 (Coalition with Conservatives) def. Graham Stringer (Labour), Nicky Morgan (Conservative), Arlene Foster (Democratic Unionist), Gerry Adams (Sinn Fein)
Ah- see for me, the 2001 Fuel Crisis is a bit too chaotic a PoD for Richard Curtis-land, and while David (Maclean, because Hugh Grant's mothers maiden name) is obviously not Labour and succeeds Blair (or at least is heavily hinted to be), I've always taken away that the PM was meant to be Blair without Blairism; he's not managing peace, but he's also not at war, rather it's a bland majority government of the mushy centre in which Britain doesn't really face much issue, or at least it's placid enough that David can go about fucking his house cleaner and making speeches about how jolly good love is.
 
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Bolt451

That's PRINCESS Thermodynamics
Ah- see for me, the 2001 Fuel Crisis is a bit too chaotic a PoD for Richard Curtis-land, and while David (Maclean, because Hugh Grant's mothers maiden name) is obviously not Labour and succeeds Blair (or at least is heavily hinted to be), I've always taken away that the PM was meant to be Blair without Blairism; he's not managing peace, but he's also not at way, rather it's a bland majority government of the mushy centre in which Britain doesn't really face much issue, or at least it's placid enough that David can go about fucking his house cleaner and making speeches about how jolly good love is.
I really hate that film.
 
Neoliberalism Forever!
Presidents of the United States
2001-2005 George W. Bush/ Dick Cheney (Republican) (1)
2000: Al Gore/ Joe Lieberman(Democratic) ,Ralph Nader/ Winona LaDuke (Green)
2005-2006: Al Gore/ Gary Locke (Democratic) (2)
2004: George W. Bush/ Dick Cheney (Republican)
2006-2013 Gary Locke/ Mark Pryor (Democratic) (3)
2008: Mike Huckabee/ Lindsey Graham(Republican) (4)
2013-? Hillary Clinton/ Tom Vilsack (Democratic) (5)
2012: Tim Pawlenty/ Bobby Jindal (Republican) (6)
1. From the beginning, the second President Bush had a troubled administration. Having entered office under the cloud of Florida's butterfly ballots, he would manage to lose the Senate less than a year after taking power. The problems and the scandals would never stop coming. The bursting of the DotCom bubble. Halliburton. Enron. The Bush administration was successful in passing a round of tax cuts and education reforms but 2002, which saw the Democrats regain the House and expand their majority in the Senate, would leave Bush as a lame duck. Bush's trumpeting of the successful foiling of a major terrorist attack in New York fell flat. Like Clinton before him, it was believed that he was inventing a foreign threat to take attention away from his domestic failures. In the end, the result of the 2004 election was a foregone conclusion.

2. The story of Al Gore has been told on stage and screen countless times. His childhood in Washington D.C., working his way up through the House and Senate, his thankless years as Vice-President, seeing victory cruelly snatched from his jaws , the vindication of 2004 and finally his shocking death. The euphoria felt by liberals upon Gore's return led in turn to an outpouring of grief when he was struck down by a far-right assassin a year later, leaving a nation shocked and traumatised. Still, some cynics have noted that Gore's death was ultimately beneficial for Democrats, resulting in what had looked likely to be a bruising midterm instead resulting in several Democrat gains. Conspiracy theories continue to circulate.

3. The first Asian president would prove to be defiantly reluctant to change history in any other way, quickly seeking to broaden his appeal with an amiable southerner. Locke's first term was primarily concerned with foreign affairs. Locke sought to topple Saddam Hussein, who had been a persistent thorn in the side of the Clinton, Bush and Gore administrations. While the appetite for war was low, Locke tightened the sanctions still further and launched numerous air strikes. Saddam would eventually fall, thanks to a combination of failing health and rebellion but this would not happen until 2009.
After his easy victory over the Republican id unleashed, Locke would find himself faced with an economic downturn in 2009. While relatively mild, the downturn proved to be an opportunity for Locke to implement the same policies he had used as Governor of Washington. Taxes were cut, thousands of federal employees were laid off and funding for Medicare and education was slashed. Locke's relations with Senators such as Russ Feingold and Bernie Sanders were infamously hostile. Their hostility, however paled in comparison to that of the Republicans, smarting over their defeats. The 4th of July Movements would allow the Republicans to make gains in the 2010 Midterms, although their majority in the House was narrow and the Senate remained in Democratic hands, despite the shocking defeat of Majority Leader Daschle.

4. The comprehensive failure of the Republican establishment enabled the insurgent wing to choose the nominee, with a moderate-ish Senator to stop the donors panicking. The ticket was a miserable failure, although greater partisanship prevented it from self-destructing as spectacularly as the Goldwater campaign.

5. The economy had largely recovered by 2011, enabling the former First Lady to run, sustained by memories of the 90's and the desire of a generally peaceful and prosperous electorate not to rock the boat. Nevertheless, the 2012 election was extremely close and dark mutterings about the late returns in Ohio continue to circulate on Fox News. The Democrats received a second thumping in 2014, handing the Republicans a substantial majority in the House and a bare one in the Senate. Congress continues to dog President Clinton with numerous investigations of various supposed scandals. As the 2016 election approaches the eyes of the White House are on two things- the crowded horrorshow that is the 2016 Republican primary and the rumours of financial troubles coming out of Lehman Brothers.

6. The establishment regained control in 2012, although not without facing a long and different primary campaign against Rick Santorum. In an effort to simultaneously reassure the conservative base and reach out to minorities, Bobby Jindal was chosen for VP. He succeeded in the former task but not so much the latter.

Prime Ministers of the United Kingdom
1997-2010 Tony Blair (Labour) (7)
1997: John Major (Conservative), Paddy Ashdown (Liberal Democrat)
2001: William Hague (Conservative), Charles Kennedy (Liberal Democrat)
2005: Iain Duncan Smith (Conservative)(8) , Charles Kennedy (Liberal Democrat) (9)
2009: Tim Collins (Conservative),(10) Danny Alexander (Liberal Democrat), (11) Robert Kilroy-Silk (UKIP)(12)
2010-2013 John Reid (Labour) (13)
2013-2013 John Reid (Labour minority) (14)
2013: Tim Collins (Conservative) (15), David Laws (Liberal Democrat),(16) Nigel Farage (UKIP)(17)​
2013-? James Purnell (Labour-Liberal Democrat Coalition) (18)
7. What can be said about Blair ,other than that he was the most influential prime minister of a generation and the longest serving of all time? Despite his desire to be more radical, Blair's second term was not particularly eventful, save for the implementation of northeast devolution and the controversial NHS reforms of Alan Milburn, derided by many on the left as creeping privatisation. It was after winning a third consecutive landslide that Blair decided that his legacy would be to bring Britain into the Euro. Although the idea was extremely unpopular to begin with, Join would narrowly manage to win, at the cost of winning a great deal of antipathy towards the government and jettisoning Brown.
The 2009 election saw a huge swing against the government which greatly reduced Labour's majority. However even a reduced majority was still massive and Blair would survive, only to be forced from office less than a year later, after a serious heart attack.

8. The Quiet Man would not prove to be quite as much of a disaster as his worst critics had feared, losing only a couple of seats and managing to gain several others. Still, it was enough to resign over.

9. The Lib Dems made a net gain of seats in 2005 but a combination of disappointment over the scale of the gains and Kennedy's alcoholism would force him to resign.

10. Tim Collins sought to create a kinder, gentler Conservative Party, one that wasn't quite so scary to many voters. Widely derided as the "Tory Blair”, he did well enough against the actual Blair that he was allowed to stay on as leader.

11. After the brief and unhappy tenure of Chris Huhne, Danny Alexander emerged as dark horse in the subsequent leadership election. A darling of the right, he was successful in gaining seats in Scotland but would go backwards elsewhere.

12. Building upon opposition to the Euro, UKIP under it's eccentric leader would gain many votes from supporters of both the two main parties, although they failed to win any seats.

13. Brown made an attempt to finally get what he was owed but the Blairites managed to unify under their Glaswegian attack dog. Reid was tough on crime, not so much on the causes of crime. Prison sentences were raised, immigration was slashed and the criminal justice system was rapidly reformed. Economic policy slid to the right, with Reid permitting Chancellor Alan Milburn more freedom to pursue his own policies. Despite a brief bounce in popularity towards the beginning of his premiership, fuelled by his obvious differences from Blair the uncharismatic prime minister soon began to lose public sympathy. Reid also had many differences with Labour backbenchers, especially over immigration.

14. The 2013 election was a mess. 16 Years of government had left Labour exhausted and out of ideas and many began to wonder whether a stay in opposition might be good for the party. In the event, thanks to weakness among the opposition and a well-timed UKIP surge, Labour emerged as (barely) the largest party in a hung parliament, with the lowest share of the vote of any winning party in recent history. Reid stubbornly sought to cling on as a minority government, his mutual antipathy with the Liberal Democrats preventing any deal with them. Reid would only last for a couple of months before he was inevitably forced to jump.

15. Collins sought to finally return to power but while voters were unhappy with Reid's Labour, many were still unsure about the Conservatives. While much blame for his failure has been placed upon UKIP splitting their vote and an ill-advised comment by Shadow Home Secretary Chris Grayling on gay couples, the truth is that the Conservatives in general ran a bland and uninspiring campaign. Collins would hang on until it became clear that a second election was not going to happen.

16. The problem with Alexander, it was decided was his personality, not his politics. David Laws therefore stood forward to represent the Liberal right to the public. The Lib Dems had a somewhat uneven campaign, with gains from Labour being balanced out by losses to the Conservatives. Nevertheless, getting into government for the first time in many decades was enough to save Laws.

17. UKIP was the only party that could be said to have had a consistently good election gaining a handful of seats and many more votes. UKIP continues to grow as a reaction against the bland centrism of the three major parties.

18. Upon Reid's resignation, the young Home Secretary took control. Purnell has thus far proven to be a less polarizing figure than Reid and has excellent relations with his coalition partners. However both governing parties have seen their popularity continue to fall and the latest round of local elections have been troubling in the extreme. Labour waits it out, hoping that events will save them.
 

Turquoise Blue

Ambiguously Tibby
Patreon supporter
Location
Kemr, FK
Prime Ministers of the Republic of Examplia
01: John Villar Mooreshead (One majority) 1951-1957
1951: def. Tom Brookes (Two)
1954: def. Tom Brookes (Two)
02: Tom Brookes (Two majority, then
Two - The Liberals minority) 1957-1959
1957: def. John Villar Mooreshead (One)
03: John Villar Mooreshead (One majority) 1959-1968
1959: def. Tom Brookes (Two - The Liberals) and Hamilton Reyes (Two (Original))
1962: def. George Dern (Two - The Liberals), Manuel Alvarez (Social Labour) and Hamilton Reyes (Two (Original)
1965: def. Richard Ardern ("Reunified" Two) and Manuel Alvarez (Social Labour)
04: Richard Ardern ("Reunified" Two majority, then Two minority) 1968-1973
1968: def. John Villar Mooreshead (One) and Manuel Alvarez (Social Labour)
1971: def. Franklin Smalls (One) and Manuel Alvarez (Social Labour)
05: Duncan Tune (One-National Two coalition) 1973-1982
1973: def. Richard Ardern (Two), William Lamm (Social Labour) and Jabez Silva (National Two)
1976: def. Richard Ardern (Two), William Lamm (Social Labour) and Jabez Silva (National Two)
1979: def. Samuel Catts (TWO.The Liberals), Joseph Proud-Bellamy (Social Labour) and Jabez Silva (National Two)
06: Samuel Catts (TWO.The Liberals-Social Labour coalition, then majority) 1982-1995
1982: def. Duncan Tune (One), Joseph Proud-Bellamy (Social Labour) and Jabez Silva (National Two)
1985: def. Stanley Howlin (One) and Joseph Proud-Bellamy (Social Labour)
1988: def. Stanley Howlin (One), Joseph Proud-Bellamy (Social Labour) and Annabeth Random (Three - The Real Alternative)
1992: def. Jay Mixson (One), Joseph Proud-Bellamy (Social Labour) and Annabeth Random (Three - The Real Alternative)
07: Madison O'Malley (One-Two Unionist-Three - The Real Alternative "Progressive Coupon") 1995-1997
1995: def. Samuel Catts (TWO.The Liberals), William Pitt (Two Unionist), Annabeth Random (Three - The Real Alternative) and Liz Fry (Social Labour)
08: Joseph Proud-Bellamy, 3rd Earl of Proudhon (Social Labour-led "Wartime Government") 1997-2005

09: Madison O'Malley (One-Two Unionist coalition, then majority) 2005-2011
2005: def. Liz Fry (Social Labour), William Pitt (Two Unionist), Quentin Lyle (TWO.The Liberals) and Zephyr Raincoat (Three - The Real Alternative)
2009: def. Skylar White (Two), Liz Fry (Social Labour), William Pitt (Two Unionist) and Zephyr Raincoat (Three - The Real Alternative)
10: Frankie Edison (One majority) 2011-2014
11: William Pitt (Two-Two Unionist coalition, then Two majority) 2014-2015*
2014: def. Skylar White (Two), Frankie Edison (One), Zephyr Raincoat (3ARTH) and Bobbie Black (Social Labour)
12: Skylar White (Two majority) 2015-2022
2017: def. Simon Bright Eyes (One), Miranda Nixon (3ARTH), Frankie Edison (One (Secular)) and Bobbie Black (Social Labour)
13: Frankie Edison (One (Secular)-Social Labour-3ARTH coalition, then One (Secular)-Social Labour coalition) 2022-2027
2022: def. Skylar White (Two), Bobbie Black (Social Labour), Simon Bright Eyes (One) and Miranda Nixon (3ARTH)
2026: def. Danny Bloom (Two), Alex Thorsson (One), Bobbie Black (Social Labour), Jack Proud-Bellamy (Socialist Four) and Miranda Nixon (3ARTH)
14: Cameron Davies (One (Secular)-Social Labour coalition, then One (Secular)-led "Remain United" coalition) 2027-2032
2031: def. Tammy Tyler (Two), Alex Thorsson (One), Jack Proud-Bellamy (Socialist Four) and Bobbie Black (Social Labour)
15: Fergus MacDonald (Two majority) 2032-2039
2032: def. Alex Thorsson (One), Cameron Davies (One (Secular)), Jack Proud-Bellamy (Socialist Four) and Harry Bleak (Threecology)
2037: def. Maud MacDonald (Reunited One). Jack Proud-Bellamy (Socialist Four) and Harry Bleak (Threecology)
16: Ted Gust (Two majority, then Two-Socialist Four coalition) 2039-2042
2040: def. Maud MacDonald (One), Jack Proud-Bellamy (Socialist Four), Harry Bleak (Threecology) and Louise Rainey (Five Star)
17: Jack Proud-Bellamy (Two-Socialist Four coalition) 2042-2043
18: William Reach (One-Threecology coalition, then One-led "Ministry of All the Talents") 2043-2050
2043: def. Ted Gust (Two [Alliance]), Amelia Linden (Threecology), Louise Rainey (Five Star) and Jack Proud-Bellamy (Socialist Four [Alliance])
2049: def. Frank Allen (Two [MAT]), Louise Rainey (Five Star), Amelia Linden (Threecology [MAT]) and Matt Mack (Socialist Four [MAT])
19: David Tennant (Military) 2050-2053
20: Louise Rainey (Five Star-led "Constitutional Convention", then Five Star majority) 2053-
2056: def. Frank Allen (One-Two "Buckled Shoe" Alliance) and Matt Mack (Three-Four "Shut Door" Alliance)

With Examplia's democracy spiralling out of control due to the economy imploding, the military chose to step in. The rising far-right Five Star Movement, already under a cordon sanitaire, led a popular uprising that ended up toppling the military regime and establishing the Five Stars as the dominant party. Rewriting the Examplian constitution to suit their ends, they ended up winning a landslide election in 2056

Can the Buckled Shoes and Shut Doors come to an agreement, a possible "Zero Party", or is the Five Stars sure to win every election from here on out, driving Examplia further and further to the right? All is up in the air, but one thing is certain - Examplia has changed and for the worse
 

Beata Beatrix

de mirabeau did nothing wrong
This is inspired by Matthew Engels' comment that Horatio Bottomley would've easily been elected Mayor of London if such a post had existed in his day. As far as I know, Asquith didn't have any plans to make elected mayors a, like, thing, but it's a fun idea and um yeah.

Domine Dirige Nos

Mayors of London

1916 - 1921: Horatio Bottomley (John Bull)
1916: Neil Primrose (Liberal); Ronald Collet Norman (National Unionist); George Lansbury (Labour)
1920: Thomas James Macnamara (Liberal and Labour); Arthur Conan Doyle (National Unionist); George Lansbury (Independent Labour)

1921 - 0000: John Burns (Liberal)

As a part of H.H. Asquith's ambitious proposal for 'Home Rule All Round,' the Prime Minister would, along with creating Irish and Scottish Parliaments - the long and colourful premiership of Robert Bontine Cunninghame Graham, 'Ar Bob,' as a generation of Scots knew him, is a story in itself, while Redmond's Ireland would quickly be dubbed 'the Ruby Isle' for the bloodshed there, perpetrated by Tom Clarke's Irish Republican Brotherhood - devolve the powers of the London County Council onto a directly elected Mayor, with the first Mayor to be elected in 1916. While there was certainly some resistance to the bill, it would ultimately pass, and soon, would-be mayors began campaigning.

With the dissolution of the LCC's Progressive and Municipal Reform Parties, which represented the national Liberal and National Unionist parties, respectively, a jolted London knew that the election had begun in earnest. The Liberals and the National Unionists began looking for candidates to represent them in the election. The Liberals would ultimately reject the aging former radical John Burns, turned Whiggish over the years, in favour of the handsome, young Under-Secretary of State of Foreign Affairs and Asquith's preferred candidate, Neil Primrose, the son of former Prime Minister Lord Rosebery. The National Unionists, meanwhile, nominated a dynast of their own, Ronald Collet Norman of the Norman banking family. Labour, meanwhile, selected the firebrand radical Councillor George Lansbury, a strong advocate of women's suffrage, primarily as a tactic to gain the endorsement of Sylvia Pankhurst, who had been milling an run for the Mayoralty as a protest candidate to campaign for women's suffrage.

And then there was Horatio Bottomley. The populist editor of John Bull and former MP, despite his dubious parentage, his prosecution for fraud, and his subsequent bankruptcy, was still one of the most popular men in London. Thus, when he announced that he would be standing for Mayor, on a 'John Bull' ticket of his own creation, many feared that Bottomley might actually win. Bottomley, campaigning on a platform of 'Bottomley, Brains and Business,' saw his rousing speeches, in which he reveled in painting himself as a representative of the "man on the street," packing with supporters, cheering his denunciation of Primrose as a "deserter," chiding him for his having left London for a parliamentary seat in Cambridgeshire, all while saving the worst of his vitriol for "the banker" Norman. As the election came closer and closer, intellectuals like George Bernard Shaw decried Bottomley as a demagogue. No one thought he would win.

And then he did. Horatio Bottomley was Mayor. Now triumphantly in office, Bottomley did little actual governing, except for cutting spending as part of his "anti-waste" platform, which brought business into government - most of his effort was focused on making his John Bull movement into "a great third party" at Westminster, led by his ally Charles Frederick Palmer and supported by newspaper magnate Lord Rothermere.

By 1920, Bottomley was as popular as ever, but now a National Unionist, Austen Chamberlain, was in 10 Downing Street, having defeated both Asquith and his bedraggled successor, Winston Churchill, a man who was little more than "everyone's second choice." For all their mutual animosity, though, there was one thing both Chamberlain and Churchill could agree on: they wanted Bottomley out of office. Both men were proud, however, and neither would countenance endorsing the other party's candidate, even if it meant defeating Bottomley. The Liberal candidate, the Quebec-born radical Thomas James Macnamara, would ultimately receive the endorsement of the Labour Party by a narrow vote. Out of this conference stormed George Lansbury, who stood once more as an 'Independent Labour Party' candidate. The National Unionists, meanwhile, after briefly considering putting up former PM Arthur Balfour for the Mayoralty, or even the dying Foreign Secretary, Andrew Bonar Law, a figure of pity since his narrow defeat in 1915, ultimately chose the famed author Arthur Conan Doyle, of Sherlock Holmes fame, who had stood for the Liberal Unionists on two separate occasions. Conan Doyle was by now tired - his young son Adrian had died of the German Flu in 1919 - and while would do an admirable job of campaigning, his heart was truly not in the game. Macnamara was viewed with suspicion by Liberals and Labour voters, who both saw him as neither one nor the other, but, instead, "somewhere in between." Lansbury's base of support was limited, and despite it all, Bottomley was just as popular as ever. He won reelection as Mayor, although by a smaller margin than in 1916.

Things soon came crashing down, however. Bottomley's criminal activity and underhanded tactics were well-known the public - although most voters simply didn't care - but when he was accused of having used his hireling Maundy Gregory to mastermind financial schemes defrauding the entire city of London, and to even potentially have committed murder - Bottomley would later be acquitted of this charge - the city was in an uproar. Bottomley maintained that any financial impropriety was entirely accidental, but Chamberlain would have none of it, and neither would the people of London. Bottomley would ultimately resign, replaced by old John Burns by a unanimous vote of the City Council, and would soon find himself imprisoned, sewing wool bags.

London looked forward now, to a future without Horatio Bottomley. It was hard to envision for many, but the City had seen more and worse. For now, John Burns looked to London.
 
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Thoughts?

Choice 80's democrat candidates

Gov. Paul Simon of Illinois
Fmr. Gov. Reubin Askew of Florida
Sen. Birch Bayh of Indiana
Sen. Gary Hart of Colorado
Sen. Ted Kennedy of Massachussetts
Fmr. Gov. Jerry Brown of California
Sen. and Fmr. Gov. Cliff Finch of Mississippi
Gov. David Pryor of Arkansas
Sen. Dick Clarke of Iowa
Fmr. Gov. Edwin Edwards of Louisiana
Rep. and former V.P. candidate Mo Udall of Arizona
 

Oppo

Mike Pence’s hair
I recall Comisario saying in the Labour Left thread that Gordon Brown feared Ken Livingstone would end up being the successor to Blair. Given how much we love Red Ken here, I figured it would be a fun concept.

The United Kingdom

1997-2005: Tony Blair (Labour)
1997 (Majority) def. John Major (Conservative), Paddy Ashdown (Liberal Democrats)
2001 (Majority) def. Michael Heseltine (Conservative), Charles Kennedy (Liberal Democrats)

2005-2012: Ken Livingstone (Labour)
2005 (Majority) def. Michael Portillo (Conservative), Charles Kennedy (Liberal Democrats)
2010 (Minority) def. Tim Collins (Conservative), Menzies Campbell (Liberal Democrats), Alex Salmond (SNP)

2012-2012: Yvette Cooper (Labour minority)
2012-2017: Tim Collins (Conservative)
2012 (Majority) def. Yvette Cooper (Labour), Danny Alexander (Liberal Democrats), Alex Salmond (SNP)
2016 (Majority) def. Jon Trickett (Labour), Danny Alexander (Liberal Democrats), Nicola Sturgeon (SNP)

2017-2020: Boris Johnson (Conservative majority)
2020-0000: Jon Trickett (Labour)
2020 (Majority) def. Boris Johnson (Conservative), Nicola Sturgeon (SNP), Danny Alexander (Liberal Democrats)

While not being Blair’s 1950, the 2001 election was not positive news for Tony Blair and the New Labour project. Despite the DUP growing into the Tories’ vote (with Eurosceptics still bitter over Hezza replacing Clarke at the last minute), the Conservatives would fall just over 200 seats.

This would prove difficult during the Iraq War vote, where Blair and Portillo were able to gain approval by a too close for comfort margin. 2003 and 2004 would provide a great deal of stress on the Prime Minister, culminating in a heart attack. Fearing that the New Labour project would be destroyed by Gordon Brown, Blair would call up the Mayor of London to secure his legacy. Standing side by side, Blair would announce his retirement and announce Livingstone as his preferred successor. While Brown would still run, Blair’s sway among MPs kept others out of the race and whipped votes for Red Ken; and sure enough, he would succeed. Gordon Brown would be furious and move to the backbenches before retiring in 2010.

Soon after taking office, Livingstone would call an election to secure himself support for his Iraqi peace plan and get a seat in Parliament. In the first general election debates held in Britain, an unprepared Portillo embarrassed himself as Livingstone’s media skill turned him from a loon to a statesman. While opinion polls at the start of the campaign indicated a hung Parliament, Labour would end up gaining three seats. Both Kennedy and Portillo would be out by the end of the year, replaced by Ming Campbell and the Iraq War hero Tim Collins.

After the election, Livingstone would announce that British troops would leave Iraq by Christmas 2005, causing a surge in popularity among many who abandoned Blair. Without Bush in office, Livingstone’s close relationship with President Green would also be applauded. Of course, relations with Merkel and Chirac would be very tense as Britain became more distant from the rest of the EU. Middle Eastern policy would also be impacted as Israel and Saudi Arabia were met with a British government very much opposed to their governments.

The Prime Minister’s response to the London bombings were also praised for his sharp condemnation of both the attack and prior governments’ foreign policy agenda. Livingstone organized an anti-racism campaign to stop Islamophobic attacks on Muslims.

Of course, while much of Livingstone’s policies were popular, his radical stances continued to upset many. Chancellor Trickett’s new budget would have a dramatic raise in taxes, especially on businesses. Collins and those on the opposition benches would soon latch on the issue as a leverage for public protest. While Labour would narrowly hold on to power in 2007’s Scottish elections, their decreased victory was a bad sign. Tony Blair would renter the spotlight when he would become President of the European Council, helping Anglo-European relations.

Israeli-Palestinian issues would come up again and given Livingstone a major issue. During the 2007 invasion of Lebanon, Livingstone seeming to compare the Israeli government to Nazi Germany got him condemnation among his own party.

However, in response to the financial crisis, Livingstone’s anti-banking messages greatly resonated with many, gaining Labour’s support in the polls. At the EU elections, Labour would finish a stronger than expected second place, resisting the growth of the DUP, Greens, and BNP.

In the 2010 election, all signs headed to a hung Parliament. Despite a weak LibDem showing, seat counts between the Tories and Labour were expected to be neck and neck with two charismatic yet outspoken leaders. Collins’ strategy was to focus on “law and order” and cutting government tax and regulation. Livingstone attacked Collins for running a “dog whistle” campaign and believed that socialist economic policy would be needed to get Britain out of the recession.

At the end of the election, Labour would form a government with the LibDems and Celtic nationalists supporting another Queen’s Speech. Collins would maintain his role as the Conservative Party’s leader. The opposite would take place for Livingstone, with David Miliband launching a challenge following his sacking from the cabinet. While Miliband had a strong base in the party, few were ready for him as Prime Minister.

Livingstone’s last two years would have him be seen as the “sickman PM”, with him facing the difficult prospect of a minority government and a largely uncooperative LibDems. His plan was to call a snap election right after the London Olympics seemed to be sensible, with the games being his work as mayor and Prime Minister. Unfortunately, Livingstone’s planned speeches grew more and more rambling, and once the games concluded, his fellow MPs demanded he resigned. Knowing the writing was on the wall, he would step down (with Yvette Cooper defeating the discredited David Miliband). Thus would end the tenure of Britian’s most controversial and divisive Prime Minister. Ken Livingstone would certainly leave his mark on Britian, just as he did in London.

The United States

2001-2005: George W. Bush/Dick Cheney (Republican)
2000 def. Al Gore/Joe Lieberman (Democratic), Ralph Nader/Winona LaDuke (Green)
2005-2009: Mark J. Green/Dick Gephardt (Democratic)
2004 def. George W. Bush/Bill Frist (Republican)
2009-2015: Fred Thompson/George Allen (Republican)
2008 def. Mark J. Green/Dick Gephardt (Democratic)
2012 def. Tom Daschle/Barack Obama (Democratic)
2015-2015: George Allen/Vacant (Republican)
2015-2017: George Allen/Mitch Daniels (Republican)
2017-0000: Gary Locke/Russ Feingold (Democratic)
2016 def. George Allen/Mitch Daniels (Republican)

2000 would be a memorable election, but for more than just the presidential race. New York’s Senate race would be an intense battle between First Lady Hillary Clinton and Mayor Rudy Giuliani. In what was the most expensive Senate race at that point, Giuliani would narrowly prevail. This in itself would not make much of an impact. Due to a last-minute call for Brian Schweitzer, the Senate would remain 50-50 until Jim Jeffords’ defection. However, it would be the first step in Mark Green’s ascension to the presidency. Green, as New York City’s public advocate, would take over for Giuliani following the mayor taking the Senate seat. Green had already announced a candidacy for 2001, but as the incumbent he had a stronger base.

Green would end up as mayor on New York City’s most tragic day - 9/11. That day, his leadership would make him known as “America’s Mayor.” His reelection in November would be a landslide over billionaire Michael Bloomberg, and his name would be mentioned as a presidential prospect straight away. Green would force out other contenders such as John Kerry and John Edwards with commanding leads in the polls. Green’s main rivals would end up being Wesley Clark, Dick Gephardt, and Joe Lieberman. Gephardt’s loss in Iowa would discredit his candidacy as Green continued to have strong showings across the board. While Joe Lieberman would have Joementum in New Hampshire and Clark would do well on Super Tuesday, Green would have the clear edge in the primaries. While Bush attempted to paint himself as the candidate of stability and strong leadership, Green had proved on 9/11 that he was just as tough. In a strong victory, Green would defeat President Bush and issue a New Democratic era. Things went downhill from that dream.
 
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