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Lists of Heads of Government and Heads of State

Those Marvellous Presidents (Part 1)

1957-1965: Steve Rogers /Estes Kefauver (Democratic)

The Democrats decided the only way to defeat Eisenhower was to find their own equivalent and when New York teacher & local Democrat activist Steve Rogers' true wartime record was declassified, they knew they had one. Rogers, Kefauver, and their chosen Congress creatures like LBJ would embark on an ambitious set of policies that Rogers would label "the Square Deal": enhanced welfare programs and labour laws, slum renovation and new housing bills, investment in education, and the creation of Medicare. The Soviet Union and Red China were to be opposed - Rogers' 'commie smasher' activity in the early 1950s, combined with his war work, made it hard for opponents to label the Square Deal as socialistic - and the moon, he proclaimed, would be in reach.

Lacking any previous experience with office or any leadership outside of his captain rank in WW2, Rogers often struggled with the bureaucratic parts of his job and was one of the weaker presidents - Kefauver and others were given a great deal of leeway. The President relied on his famous charisma to get politicians on his side or, failing that, to appeal to the public. This is largely responsible for him serving two terms. The 1959 Civil Rights Act was a bitterly fought piece of legislation and barely passed, and saw him face a vicious fight for the nomination in 1960 - a fight he was barely able to afford with the threat of the more serious-seeming Nixon as the Republican candidate. But 1960 also saw the debut of televised debates and Rogers' charisma saw him narrowly scrape past both opponents.

The early 1960s saw growing tension over desegregation and welfare for African-Americans (both that they were receiving it and the struggles to ensure the civil servants at the ground were giving it), and over Rogers' foreign policy: his pressure on Batista in Cuba had led to a seemingly weak left-wing government, troops were 'advising' in South Vietnam but the long-term plan was unclear, and it was becoming clear he was at odds with his own CIA over their activity. Plans for a multinational intelligence sharing outfit, acronym SHIELD, were presented by opponents (and CIA leakers to the press) as an overly ambitious, overly expensive way to distract America from its own interests. It was clear Kefauver would struggle to win office with this legacy.


1965 - 1969: Harrington Byrd / William Miller (Republican)

A hawkish and patrician figure, Byrd had come to prominence with his senate hearings into Stark Industries - he was seen as an uncompromisingly tough figure who, while pro-business and planning to ease the labour laws, could reassure swing voters that he wouldn't let the industrial complex push them around. Once in office, his two primary defence & foreign policy plans were to strengthen the West's involvement in Vietnam without forcing the US to lose too many lives - in the end, US forces would secure part of the country & train Vietnamese forces, who would then (with foreign and Marine Recon support) actually do the rural fighting - and to reform SHIELD so it would 'work'. In a sop to the CIA, he appointed senior officer Colonel Nick Fury as the first head of SHIELD.

The growing counterculture was a source of confusion and annoyance for Byrd, but was dismissed as irrelevant and kids being stupid (which didn't please many of the more socially conservative figures in his party). His main domestic policy concern was rising crime levels, which struck him and Miller both as a failure of their rule, and the ongoing racial tensions. It proved near-impossible to reverse Rogers' legislation there and Byrd found that giving the states more leeway on this was causing protests, riots, and mystery deaths in parts of the south. The failure to put a lid on this was an international embarrassment, and harmed attempts at diplomatic relations with the new Wakandan monarchy; worse still was the Sons of the Serpent terror group forming, initially due to Chinese black money in retaliation over Vietnam but swiftly becoming an unkillable domestic presence.

A bright spot was America landing on the moon in 1966. Byrd was able to get Congress to approve taxes for a mission to Mars, planned for the mid-70s.


1969-1977: Dr Henry Pym / Gerald Ford (Republican)
1975-1977: Gerald Ford / Bill Foster (Republican)


Pym, a decorated scientist, was already a scientific advisor for the government and was famous for involvement in crime-fighting with the Avengers group - when he challenged Byrd for the candidacy, his tough-on-crime credentials seemed impeccable.

While committed to reducing taxes and reducing some parts of the welfare budget, he also increased funding for STEM education at all levels of the school system and for universities. For Pym, this was necessary to keep the US as the world's superpower and equally necessary for ending the US's sense of ennui. Initiatives were set up to increase African-American and Hispanic involvement in STEM, overseen by his advisor Dr Bill Foster; this went some way to calming racial tensions even as Pym pushed for harsher policing and federal action. His signature law-enforcement and counter terror policy was the "Fifty State Initiative" to put Avengers everywhere, and this did go some way to shattering the Sons of Serpent for a few years. The crime rate did briefly plateau.

Under him, the Vietnam War ground to a slow, dull semi-peace with a few "accidents" and terrorist outrages every month. Relations with the communist powers remained frosty, causing mutual arms buildups and continuing the fiction that the Republic of China was the 'real' Chinese state. The Latverian dictatorship also continued to be a thorn in Pym's side, and indeed everyone's once it had the bomb.

What doomed Pym in the end was his mental health. Bipolar disorder and depression had dogged him for most of his adult life, which was hushed up during the presidency - up until 1975, when it leaked out. Pym was deeply ashamed of what he considered "weakness" and when the news came out, he resigned the presidency despite the lack of any call to do so. Ford attempted to continue Pym's policy and stunned the country with the first black Cabinet member when he made Foster a VP (mainly to have someone close for the STEM work than anything else), but that would be his only sole legacy.


1977-1981: Prez Rickard / Walter Mondale (Democratic)

Rickard was a true outsider, coming out of nowhere in a burst of youthful energy (Mondale was necessary to calm the swing voters with the sight of an 'adult'). He was famous worldwide for having been the eighteen-year-old mayor of Partridge, Minnesota, and for doing a good enough job to become a plausible candidate in 1976. The Ford government was tired and the boomer generation was disgruntled that they'd seen Rogers leave for 12 years of stodgier figures.

We also know now that corrupt figures like Smiley and Wilson Fisk were backing Rickard's campaign in the hope of taking advantage of him and any chaos caused by inexperience. While they greatly underestimated Rickard, there was indeed chaos caused by his passion and inexperience, and Fisk was able to expand his reach outside of New York.

Rickard's youth and passion would lead to big, transformative gestures: a rollback of labour laws to the Rogers standard, more ethnic minorities and women appointed than before (including a Native American head of the FBI), and relations were opened with China. (An attempted thaw with Latveria did not work) The delayed Mars landing took place. While Pym had enacted green policies, recognising their scientific validity, Prez greatly ramped up environmental protections and pollution curbs. The downsides were, of course, the aforementioned chaos that caused various initiatives and programs to run inefficiently, and he would be blamed for a rise in street crime.

Realistically, he was going to lose in 1980. The problem was who he ended up losing to, and over what issue, as Senator Kelly made a bid for candidacy....
 

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Princes and Princesses of Wales
Gwilym Lloyd George (Liberal-Conservative-National Democratic coalition, then Wartime Solidarity coalition) 1938-1947
"His Elected Majesty"
As part of Neville Chamberlain's "Home Rule All Round", Wales was given its own Parliament, which was named the Senedd. David Lloyd George's name still held much sway over great swathes of Wales even as the place increasingly went to socialist forces and so when his son Gwilym was announced as the new leader of the Welsh Liberal Federation, the split Social Democrats and ILP couldn't prevent the Liberals from coming a comfortable first in the new election. Forming a coalition with the Tories and Nat Dems, a mirror of the Westminster government only excepting the SDP, he then took part in one of Wales' most bizarre rituals and all thanks to his father's perhaps generous influence over the constitutional committee

He went to Machynlleth, the claimed coronation place of Owain Glyndwr, and was officially inaugurated there by the President. Churchill reportedly despised doing such, claiming "it was made for DLG and DLG can have it for all I care!" but he did so, being the elected President. As the coronet went on to Gwilym's head confirming him as the first democratically-elected Prince of Wales, a new era for the Principality of Wales began

Gwilym would a year later summon the SDP and Agriculturalists and officially request them to join his cabinet to present a strong face of unity for Wales in the Second World War. They both agreed and the Wartime Solidarity coalition began

With foreign policy and the Armed Forces being that of Westminster's policy, it was mainly Gwilym's charge to keep Wales' powers for itself and to not let Westminster, even in wartime, violate Home Rule All Round. He had to walk the tightrope between appearing patriotic and not compromising his office

In 1941, there was a motion in the Senedd to expel Cynghrair Cymru for opposing the wartime effort and "supporting Hitler's regime". Some Independent Labour Senators opposed this motion but it passed and the by-elections showed considerable Government gains, damaging Welsh nationalism at a political level. All of this was silently approved by the Government in London

But Gwilym would put his foot down, prodded along by Social Democrats, National Democrats and more urban Liberals, when it came to interning Welsh people of immigrant extraction. "Nothing without a fair trial. We treated them like people, and like people we shall treat them". The Westminster Government found the Liberals broadly in agreement, yet overrode the Welsh government and went ahead with plans anyway

"Bards under the bed" was coined as a saying by Westminster politicians to refer to the "defiant" Welsh government and the perceived danger of Welsh nationalism alike. Gwilym grew to regret his stance, saying in his memoirs "people influenced me to make a ill-considered decision that portrayed me as going against my Country". But he would hold on until the end of the war, when there would be a fresh election, called in 1947

S. O. Davies (Independent Labour-Social Democratic coalition) 1947-1950
"The Red Prince"
S. O. Davies always insisted on being called "President" of Wales, deploring the "royalist" connotations the Lloyd Georges brought to the office. He declined the coronet, preferring a staff of office. Working with Prime Minister Philip Noel-Baker and the Secretary of State for Wales, he helped bring the Social Revolution Noel-Baker brought to Britain, to Wales, including the National Health Service

When Noel-Baker and American President Wallace authorised an intervention to protect China from Soviet-supported troops of the People's State of Manchuria, S. O. Davies vocally opposed this move, declaring that China was under a fascist government and expressed his firm support of the Soviet Union, declaring "Britain stands on the wrong side. It should stand with the workers against the fascists". This led to a crisis that led to the SDP withdrawing and a fresh election called. With war fever still in the air even if subsiding and an increasing perception of the ILP as unpatriotic, it was brutal

Megan Lloyd George (Liberal-Social Democratic coalition) 1950-1957
"Breaking Glass"
In 1950, Wales elected the first female head of government in the UGB, that of Megan Lloyd George. With Gwilym seen as "tainted goods" and an expectation of losing another election, the Welsh Liberal Federation elected Megan as their new leader. And in 1950, she successfully won an election against a reeling ILP and a SDP too dazed to seize the opportunity it had. She got on very well with Prime Minister Noel-Baker and it was overall a time of relaxed tension between the Senedd and Westminster. But when Noel-Baker lost the election of 1955 to former PM Oliver Stanley, it got frosty. In her first ministry, she continued the implementation of the National Health Service, including provision for Welsh language services and prescription for free eyeglasses. Calling a new election in 1954, she successfully won a new mandate

In her second ministry, things got more rocky, especially as the SDP gained at the expense of the shakily-united National Party and increasingly-unpopular Agriculturalists at a federal level. When a by-election in Cardiff went the SDP's way, they pulled out and forced a vote of no confidence

Tudor Watkins (Social Democratic-Independent Labour coalition) 1957-1962
"Preserve and Survive"
Watkins came from the left of the Social Democrats and if he wasn't from rural Powys, would likely have been an ILPper. But nevertheless, he was a Social Democrat and now Prince of Wales. Like S. O. Davies before him, he took the staff of office instead of the coronet. Even though he won the '57 election, he was seen as untrustworthy and "slippery" for withdrawing the SDP from the coalition and for supporting the first withdrawal in '50. Nevertheless, he was now Prince. As Prince, his main focus was dealing with the environment. If the Fellowship Party was in the Senedd, they would have been in Government as Watkins shepherded several bills that established national parks in Wales. When Prime Minister Gaitskell was in power, Watkins would approve of building more houses. What brought him down was his coalition partner, the ILP

By 1962, the ILP was increasingly getting into foreign policy, and that damaged them with their traditional working-class base, dooming the government to defeat as Megan Lloyd George returned to power for the second time

Megan Lloyd George (Liberal-Cynghrair Cymru coalition) 1962-1965
"The People's Princess"
With the Welsh nationalists in tow, MLG returned to power. By this point, concern about the Welsh language declining was strong with Welsh nationalists and MLG was happy to oblidge them by passing several bills, including the one that made the Welsh language co-official with English in Wales itself. This got opposition but a firm whip led to it passing. In exchange for this, Cynghrair Cymru voted on bills that supported working women. This got MLG firm support with Welsh working-class mothers albeit it did not extend to her party

In 1965, President MacDonald was shot and died on the operating table. The government turned to see who would take office and to their horror it said the Prince of Wales. A clear work of art by David Lloyd George that got his daughter into the office he himself was denied

Roderic Bowen (Liberal-Cynghrair Cymru coalition, then Liberal-National coalition, then minority coalition) 1965-1968
"Splitting Headache"
Roderic Bowen was chosen as MLG's successor by a hasty meeting of the Welsh Liberal Federation's Senators. Bowen was on the right of the party as contrast with MLG being firmly on the Left. Bowen elected to change coalition partners, kicking out Cynghrair Cymru and bringing into the Nationals. Wales would have its first dose of the right in decades. The budget of 1966 would see spending cut and government focused on being more efficient. This led to tensions, which was reflected at a federal level with MLG being denied nomination by Emlyn Hooson, Bowen's ally

In the end, a chunk of the Welsh Liberal Federation Senators walked out, following the MPs, into Megan Lloyd George's People's Party. Bowen stumbled on a further year with a minority government before being forced to call an election which was predictable

Cledwyn Hughes (Social Democratic-People's-Cynghrair Cymru coalition, then Social Democratic-Cynghrair Cymru coalition) 1968-1977
"The Quiet Titan"
Cledwyn Hughes was a no-nonsense political titan that brought stability to Wales in a chaotic era for Britain. Reckoned as a moderate, he united the forces of the Welsh "centre" around himself and enabled the incorporation of the People's Party in Wales into the Welsh SDP. Holding the steering wheel, he oversaw a recession in the late 60s and rode it out to recovery before winning a new mandate in 1973

As Westminster churned in the wake of Thorpe's sudden rise and fall from power and the somewhat nepotistic appointment of Harold Macmillan by his own son, Welsh people grew to value Hughes' "boring" government. But as the economy stagnated and dipped once more in 1976...

Walter Padley (Independent Labour-Social Democratic minority coalition) 1977-1979
"Throwback"
A conscentious objector in WWII and somewhat long-term leader of the rump Welsh ILP, Padley did not expect to win the 1977 election, but revolution was in the air in Britain as the increasingly-left SDP leader Tony Benn brought the ILP back into government for the first time in decades and brought into the Fellowship Party for the first time ever. In Wales, this mood led to the surge of the Independent Labour Party at the expense of the more "establishment" Social Democrats and the entrance of Fellowship to the Senedd

Padley would form a minority coalition of the ILP and SDP with unofficial Fellowship support, but the Liberals refused to support him and in two years, it all fell apart and Wales went back to the polls, this time in a very much different atmosphere

Beata Brookes (National-Liberal-Agriculturalist coalition) 1979-1987
"Blue Dragon"
The Nationals were growing, and the Unionists were as well. Yet Brookes declined to work with the far-right Unionists, preferring to bring the Liberals and Agriculturalists in, the second one for the first time ever as they gained from more conservative Cynghrair Cymru voters who mainly voted on cultural issues. Britain was in a mood for sober conservatism, and they increasingly voted for right-wing parties that promised that

The Brookes ministry would be dominated by conflict with the unions, including toughing out the Long Summer of 1984, but also of social tension. Previous ministries liberalised LGBT rights, but there was now a push from young LGBT people to go further and from moral conservatives to roll it back. With the Liberals threatening to withdraw if Brookes pushed for any bill or suchlike and Brookes herself being a firm social conservative, the policy of the Welsh government on this was nothing. Meanwhile, the most lasting legacy of Brookes' ministry was firm disabled rights legislation, surprisingly enough. In the end, there was a blowback to the National brand Britain-wide and this damaged Brookes' chances in 1987

Alex Carlile (Liberal-Social Democratic-Globalist coalition with support from Cynghrair Cymru) 1987-1994
"A Social Viewpoint"
By 1987, Carlile and his brand of Liberals were now in control and they now could lead Wales. With Britain continuing to polarise on social issues as the Unionists rise, exploiting social conservatism and a perception that the Nationals and Agriculturalists were weak, the Liberals also gained. In Wales, Alex Carlile led the party to return to power for the first time since the split of 1967

Bringing in the Globalists and Social Democrats while working out a deal with Cynghrair Cymru, Carlile had to walk a thin line. Himself firmly socially-liberal, he knew many in the Social Democrats and Cynghrair Cymru wouldn't be. So that is why he focused on the most pressing issue, namely transition of jobs from mining to technology. The Long Summer of 1984 and the Pym ministry's response to that dealt a blow to Britain's mining industry and so it was time for a Welsh answer to a British problem

Bringing into American advisors, especially from their Rust Belt states, the plan was written up and implemented in 1990 after a snap election narrowly gave them a new mandate even as the Unionists and ILP gained. The centre couldn't hold for ever. But the plans was implemented in 1991 by a narrow vote where ILP people condemned the "betrayal of our working men"

Carlile mainly conflicted with Prime Minister Rhodes Boyson, an Unionist who aimed at rolling back social progress decades. When Boyson implemented a bill in 1992 that banned LGBT people from teaching in schools and teaching of the existence of LGBT people, Carlile spoke out against it and was one of the vocal opponents of such a bill. In early 1993, the economy crashed

By 1994, the Unionists were wiped out Britain-wide, seen as too preoccupied with social issues to care about the economy. Meanwhile the Liberals were increasingly blamed for Wales' economic woes and the voters turned to the ILP. But... the voters also shifted priorities

Ron Davies (Independent Labour-Cynghrair Cymru coalition) 1994-1999
"Sea Change"
The ascendance of Ron Davies and the "Red-Green" coalition of the ILP and CC reflected a shift in Welsh politics. With CC in third place in a Welsh election for the second time ever and continuing growing, politics were increasingly more about "Westminster vs. Wales" as Davies described such in 1997. Davies was notably someone who preferred more power be in Wales than in Westminster, but he was not a full-blown nationalist yet

With the ILP under modernising John Maxton and just getting over a split in its Scottish branch as the left-wing nationalists left to form Scottish Left, the fact its Welsh branch was led by someone who often sounded like his coalition partner more than he did the Prime Minister irked the central committee but they were reluctant to do anything while the Welsh ILP was still in power

Instead of Carlile's technological solution, Davies preferred a more traditional one that kept miners working in jobs familiar to them. Namely, subsiding the mines. The Globalists decried this while Social Democrats lambasted it as impractical and Liberals declared it harmful idiocy

On social issues, the policy of the day was a free vote. Which led to Carlile pushing through several social programs now free of having to balance coalition partners. Most controversially was a bill to recognise trans people as who they were. In the end, that passed narrowly despite vocal UGB-level outrage. None of them would bring down Davies. What would is the increasing impatience of the central ILP leading to a leak that accused Davies of being in gay relationships while married. In the end, the ILP split between "Daviesites" and "Maxtonites" heading into the 1999 election

Kim Howells (Social Democratic-Liberal-Globalist coalition) 1999-2006
"Welcome to the Wales of TOMORROW!"
Kim Howells, often known as "Howling Howells" for his outspoken nature, was a proud member of the "Third Way" faction in the SDP, and his government would in some ways prove a blueprint for the later Mandelson-Miliband era of British politics

First making headlines for his declaration "We are all capitalists now" as he oversaw the Welsh SDP striking out any mention of socialism in its platform, he ran a confrontional campaign against not the fractured ILP, but the rising Cynghrair Cymru. Portraying it as a battle between "Wales' past and its future", he ended up triumphing and bringing in the Liberals and Globalists, even as CC rose to a comfortable second place thanks to the ILP fracturing between those loyal to Maxton (the future rump ILP) and those to Davies (later renamed Cymru Ymlaen and turned more explicitly nationalist). Wales' politics were shifting more and more every year

The "Megaphone", as some of his Senators jokingly referred to him as, brought back Carlile's technological employment transition plan while combining it with more of a focus on preserving Wales' environment with the help of the Globalists. Mining subsidies were cut in 2000 and finally abolished in 2005 as job training programs went full blast to retrain "Wales' workers for the world of tomorrow" as he loftily declared

Meanwhile, with the SDP more socially-liberal than ever, it was time to push Wales' social values "forward, not back" and many bills expanding LGBT rights beyond the UGB baseline, expanding upon Brookes' standards for disabled care and unofficially sending a Welsh "ambassador" to the CoN

In early 2006, Howells retired as Prince, the only one to ever retire at his discretion and not that of events outside his control

Jackie Lawrence (Social Democratic-Liberal-Globalist coalition) 2006-2007
"Ydych chi'n siarad Cymraeg?"
The Minister of Education in the Howells ministry, Jackie Lawrence was prominent in pushing for more access to Welsh language education and she was key to making support for the Welsh language cross the growing division between "Westminster vs. Wales", or increasingly more accurate, between unionists and nationalists. Lawrence's ministry would be primarily one of the economy, though, as a recession happened in 2006 that engulfed the world's attention. As the Social Democrats swept into control of Westminster in 2006 under Peter Mandelson, Lawrence hoped that similar good feelings would help give her a new mandate. But when she called an election in 2007, the polls were gloomy

Jonathan Edwards (Cynghrair Cymru-Liberal coalition then Cynghrair Cymru-Cymru Fydd-Globalist coalition) 2007-2012
"The Strange Split of Liberal Wales"
The leader of the Wales Liberal Federation at this time was Eleanor Burnham. Burnham was someone who inched close to nationalism at times yet led a traditionally unionist party. So when she announced that she would coalition with Cynghrair Cymru and help put a coronet on Jonathan Edwards' head, the Westminster Liberals expressed concern. Edwards was crowned all the same and the "Lemon and Lime Government" began

The Welsh economy recovered somewhat under Edwards, yet it was a sluggish one all the same. The Carlile Plan was continued yet people grew sceptic of the idea, arguing that instead the focus should be on education more than job training. The Carlile Plan had years, and it didn't have the impact it originally was envisioned to have, so they argued it should be scrapped. The Welsh Liberals maintained this was mainly because of insufficient funding, and that the current Government would invest enough in it

In 2011, the Welsh Liberal Federation split over a bill in the Senedd that would allow Wales to work with other countries, such as Ireland, in a quasi-diplomatic manner, something generally frowned on by a firm-handed Westminster. Also helping this split was the increasing perception that many in England and Scotland didn't understand Wales' linguistic concerns and so wanted to push for "English education for all"

And perhaps it was inevitable given Wales' politics was now more than ever one of unionists vs. nationalists. It's hard to say, but after all was said and done, there was two Welsh liberal parties - the Welsh Liberal Federation, and Cymru Fydd

Bringing into the Globalists, Edwards maintained his majority for another year, then called a new election, hoping that the recovery would boost him

Joyce Watson (Social Democratic-Independent Labour-Globalist coalition) 2012-2017
"Cracked Pavement"
The 2012 election was the most multi-party yet, with 10 parties in the Senedd. Joyce Watson was known as someone who steered the SDP away from the unrepentant Third Way of Howells and Lawrence, and back towards a soggy centre-left, including rekindling the relationship with the trade unions. Hence why she announced that she formed a "Popular Front" of the SDP, ILP and Globalists, the three "unionist" left-wing parties

With the Britain SDP still led by Peter Mandelson and David Miliband, there was a clear division between the Welsh SDP that was "been there done that" with the Third Way and the Britain SDP that was still firmly so. This was dubbed "clear red water" by Vaughan Gething, rising SDP star. The Watson ministry saw a focus on education and on fighting income inequality, seen as the main "culprit" for why Wales' economy was lagging

The economy did pick up, but the Welsh NHS's inefficiency leading to people not receiving healthcare promptly led to a backlash in Welsh politics and in the end it damaged the SDP as they were seen as the primary cause of it [but CC wasn't spared either] and in 2017...

Bethan Sayed (Cynghrair Cymru-Cymru Fydd-Globalist minority coalition supported by Independent Labour and Cymru Ymlaen) 2017-
"Cymru Ifanc"
The youngest to wear the coronet yet, Bethan Sayed entered power after weeks of coalition arithmetic with a 13-party Senedd and both the SDP and CC losing seats. In the end, with nobody willing to return to the country in a new election, a "Umbrella Government" was hammered out where it would be one of CC together with Cymru Fydd and (of course) the Globalists, propped up by the ILP and their splitter party Cymru Ymlaen

This was expected to last a year but it has prolonged longer than everyone thought. Nevertheless, the Princess thinks 2019 is high time for an election and one she expects will lead to a more stable coalition for her. Polls are ambiguous on this, but she is right that CC is enjoying yet another honeymoon going off their popular reforms and she wants to seize that opportunity sooner rather than later

Of course, there are talk that President Mike Woodin might not be in the best of health, and she might have to step in as Acting President in the case of his death or resignation. That would put the cat among the pigeons, both in Westminster and in Wales...
 
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Princes and Princesses of Wales
Gwilym Lloyd George (Liberal-Conservative-National Democratic coalition, then Wartime Solidarity coalition) 1938-1947
"His Elected Majesty"
As part of Neville Chamberlain's "Home Rule All Round", Wales was given its own Parliament, which was named the Senedd. David Lloyd George's name still held much sway over great swathes of Wales even as the place increasingly went to socialist forces and so when his son Gwilym was announced as the new leader of the Welsh Liberal Federation, the split Social Democrats and ILP couldn't prevent the Liberals from coming a comfortable first in the new election. Forming a coalition with the Tories and Nat Dems, a mirror of the Westminster government only excepting the SDP, he then took part in one of Wales' most bizarre rituals and all thanks to his father's perhaps generous influence over the constitutional committee

He went to Machynlleth, the claimed coronation place of Owain Glyndwr, and was officially inaugurated there by the President. Churchill reportedly despised doing such, claiming "it was made for DLG and DLG can have it for all I care!" but he did so, being the elected President. As the coronet went on to Gwilym's head confirming him as the first democratically-elected Prince of Wales, a new era for the Principality of Wales began

Gwilym would a year later summon the SDP and Agriculturalists and officially request them to join his cabinet to present a strong face of unity for Wales in the Second World War. They both agreed and the Wartime Solidarity coalition began

With foreign policy and the Armed Forces being that of Westminster's policy, it was mainly Gwilym's charge to keep Wales' powers for itself and to not let Westminster, even in wartime, violate Home Rule All Round. He had to walk the tightrope between appearing patriotic and not compromising his office

In 1941, there was a motion in the Senedd to expel Cynghrair Cymru for opposing the wartime effort and "supporting Hitler's regime". Some Independent Labour Senators opposed this motion but it passed and the by-elections showed considerable Government gains, damaging Welsh nationalism at a political level. All of this was silently approved by the Government in London

But Gwilym would put his foot down, prodded along by Social Democrats, National Democrats and more urban Liberals, when it came to interning Welsh people of immigrant extraction. "Nothing without a fair trial. We treated them like people, and like people we shall treat them". The Westminster Government found the Liberals broadly in agreement, yet overrode the Welsh government and went ahead with plans anyway

"Bards under the bed" was coined as a saying by Westminster politicians to refer to the "defiant" Welsh government and the perceived danger of Welsh nationalism alike. Gwilym grew to regret his stance, saying in his memoirs "people influenced me to make a ill-considered decision that portrayed me as going against my Country". But he would hold on until the end of the war, when there would be a fresh election, called in 1947

S. O. Davies (Independent Labour-Social Democratic coalition) 1947-1950
"The Red Prince"
S. O. Davies always insisted on being called "President" of Wales, deploring the "royalist" connotations the Lloyd Georges brought to the office. He declined the coronet, preferring a staff of office. Working with Prime Minister Philip Noel-Baker and the Secretary of State for Wales, he helped bring the Social Revolution Noel-Baker brought to Britain, to Wales, including the National Health Service

When Noel-Baker and American President Wallace authorised an intervention to protect China from Soviet-supported troops of the People's State of Manchuria, S. O. Davies vocally opposed this move, declaring that China was under a fascist government and expressed his firm support of the Soviet Union, declaring "Britain stands on the wrong side. It should stand with the workers against the fascists". This led to a crisis that led to the SDP withdrawing and a fresh election called. With war fever still in the air even if subsiding and an increasing perception of the ILP as unpatriotic, it was brutal

Megan Lloyd George (Liberal-Social Democratic coalition) 1950-1957
"Breaking Glass"
In 1950, Wales elected the first female head of government in the UGB, that of Megan Lloyd George. With Gwilym seen as "tainted goods" and an expectation of losing another election, the Welsh Liberal Federation elected Megan as their new leader. And in 1950, she successfully won an election against a reeling ILP and a SDP too dazed to seize the opportunity it had. She got on very well with Prime Minister Noel-Baker and it was overall a time of relaxed tension between the Senedd and Westminster. But when Noel-Baker lost the election of 1955 to former PM Oliver Stanley, it got frosty. In her first ministry, she continued the implementation of the National Health Service, including provision for Welsh language services and prescription for free eyeglasses. Calling a new election in 1954, she successfully won a new mandate

In her second ministry, things got more rocky, especially as the SDP gained at the expense of the shakily-united National Party and increasingly-unpopular Agriculturalists at a federal level. When a by-election in Cardiff went the SDP's way, they pulled out and forced a vote of no confidence

Tudor Watkins (Social Democratic-Independent Labour coalition) 1957-1962
"Preserve and Survive"
Watkins came from the left of the Social Democrats and if he wasn't from rural Powys, would likely have been an ILPper. But nevertheless, he was a Social Democrat and now Prince of Wales. Like S. O. Davies before him, he took the staff of office instead of the coronet. Even though he won the '57 election, he was seen as untrustworthy and "slippery" for withdrawing the SDP from the coalition and for supporting the first withdrawal in '50. Nevertheless, he was now Prince. As Prince, his main focus was dealing with the environment. If the Fellowship Party was in the Senedd, they would have been in Government as Watkins shepherded several bills that established national parks in Wales. When Prime Minister Gaitskell was in power, Watkins would approve of building more houses. What brought him down was his coalition partner, the ILP

By 1962, the ILP was increasingly getting into foreign policy, and that damaged them with their traditional working-class base, dooming the government to defeat as Megan Lloyd George returned to power for the second time

Megan Lloyd George (Liberal-Cynghrair Cymru coalition) 1962-1965
"The People's Princess"
With the Welsh nationalists in tow, MLG returned to power. By this point, concern about the Welsh language declining was strong with Welsh nationalists and MLG was happy to oblidge them by passing several bills, including the one that made the Welsh language co-official with English in Wales itself. This got opposition but a firm whip led to it passing. In exchange for this, Cynghrair Cymru voted on bills that supported working women. This got MLG firm support with Welsh working-class mothers albeit it did not extend to her party

In 1965, President MacDonald was shot and died on the operating table. The government turned to see who would take office and to their horror it said the Prince of Wales. A clear work of art by David Lloyd George that got his daughter into the office he himself was denied

Roderic Bowen (Liberal-Cynghrair Cymru coalition, then Liberal-National coalition, then minority coalition) 1965-1968
"Splitting Headache"
Roderic Bowen was chosen as MLG's successor by a hasty meeting of the Welsh Liberal Federation's Senators. Bowen was on the right of the party as contrast with MLG being firmly on the Left. Bowen elected to change coalition partners, kicking out Cynghrair Cymru and bringing into the Nationals. Wales would have its first dose of the right in decades. The budget of 1966 would see spending cut and government focused on being more efficient. This led to tensions, which was reflected at a federal level with MLG being denied nomination by Emlyn Hooson, Bowen's ally

In the end, a chunk of the Welsh Liberal Federation Senators walked out, following the MPs, into Megan Lloyd George's People's Party. Bowen stumbled on a further year with a minority government before being forced to call an election which was predictable

Cledwyn Hughes (Social Democratic-People's-Cynghrair Cymru coalition, then Social Democratic-Cynghrair Cymru coalition) 1968-1977
"The Quiet Titan"
Cledwyn Hughes was a no-nonsense political titan that brought stability to Wales in a chaotic era for Britain. Reckoned as a moderate, he united the forces of the Welsh "centre" around himself and enabled the incorporation of the People's Party in Wales into the Welsh SDP. Holding the steering wheel, he oversaw a recession in the late 60s and rode it out to recovery before winning a new mandate in 1973

As Westminster churned in the wake of Thorpe's sudden rise and fall from power and the somewhat nepotistic appointment of Harold Macmillan by his own son, Welsh people grew to value Hughes' "boring" government. But as the economy stagnated and dipped once more in 1976...

Walter Padley (Independent Labour-Social Democratic minority coalition) 1977-1979
"Throwback"
A conscentious objector in WWII and somewhat long-term leader of the rump Welsh ILP, Padley did not expect to win the 1977 election, but revolution was in the air in Britain as the increasingly-left SDP leader Tony Benn brought the ILP back into government for the first time in decades and brought into the Fellowship Party for the first time ever. In Wales, this mood led to the surge of the Independent Labour Party at the expense of the more "establishment" Social Democrats and the entrance of Fellowship to the Senedd

Padley would form a minority coalition of the ILP and SDP with unofficial Fellowship support, but the Liberals refused to support him and in two years, it all fell apart and Wales went back to the polls, this time in a very much different atmosphere

Beata Brookes (National-Liberal-Agriculturalist coalition) 1979-1987
"Blue Dragon"
The Nationals were growing, and the Unionists were as well. Yet Brookes declined to work with the far-right Unionists, preferring to bring the Liberals and Agriculturalists in, the second one for the first time ever as they gained from more conservative Cynghrair Cymru voters who mainly voted on cultural issues. Britain was in a mood for sober conservatism, and they increasingly voted for right-wing parties that promised that

The Brookes ministry would be dominated by conflict with the unions, including toughing out the Long Summer of 1984, but also of social tension. Previous ministries liberalised LGBT rights, but there was now a push from young LGBT people to go further and from moral conservatives to roll it back. With the Liberals threatening to withdraw if Brookes pushed for any bill or suchlike and Brookes herself being a firm social conservative, the policy of the Welsh government on this was nothing. Meanwhile, the most lasting legacy of Brookes' ministry was firm disabled rights legislation, surprisingly enough. In the end, there was a blowback to the National brand Britain-wide and this damaged Brookes' chances in 1987

Alex Carlile (Liberal-Social Democratic-Globalist coalition with support from Cynghrair Cymru) 1987-1994
"A Social Viewpoint"
By 1987, Carlile and his brand of Liberals were now in control and they now could lead Wales. With Britain continuing to polarise on social issues as the Unionists rise, exploiting social conservatism and a perception that the Nationals and Agriculturalists were weak, the Liberals also gained. In Wales, Alex Carlile led the party to return to power for the first time since the split of 1967

Bringing in the Globalists and Social Democrats while working out a deal with Cynghrair Cymru, Carlile had to walk a thin line. Himself firmly socially-liberal, he knew many in the Social Democrats and Cynghrair Cymru wouldn't be. So that is why he focused on the most pressing issue, namely transition of jobs from mining to technology. The Long Summer of 1984 and the Pym ministry's response to that dealt a blow to Britain's mining industry and so it was time for a Welsh answer to a British problem

Bringing into American advisors, especially from their Rust Belt states, the plan was written up and implemented in 1990 after a snap election narrowly gave them a new mandate even as the Unionists and ILP gained. The centre couldn't hold for ever. But the plans was implemented in 1991 by a narrow vote where ILP people condemned the "betrayal of our working men"

Carlile mainly conflicted with Prime Minister Rhodes Boyson, an Unionist who aimed at rolling back social progress decades. When Boyson implemented a bill in 1992 that banned LGBT people from teaching in schools and teaching of the existence of LGBT people, Carlile spoke out against it and was one of the vocal opponents of such a bill. In early 1993, the economy crashed

By 1994, the Unionists were wiped out Britain-wide, seen as too preoccupied with social issues to care about the economy. Meanwhile the Liberals were increasingly blamed for Wales' economic woes and the voters turned to the ILP. But... the voters also shifted priorities

Ron Davies (Independent Labour-Cynghrair Cymru coalition) 1994-1999
"Sea Change"
The ascendance of Ron Davies and the "Red-Green" coalition of the ILP and CC reflected a shift in Welsh politics. With CC in third place in a Welsh election for the second time ever and continuing growing, politics were increasingly more about "Westminster vs. Wales" as Davies described such in 1997. Davies was notably someone who preferred more power be in Wales than in Westminster, but he was not a full-blown nationalist yet

With the ILP under modernising John Maxton and just getting over a split in its Scottish branch as the left-wing nationalists left to form Scottish Left, the fact its Welsh branch was led by someone who often sounded like his coalition partner more than he did the Prime Minister irked the central committee but they were reluctant to do anything while the Welsh ILP was still in power

Instead of Carlile's technological solution, Davies preferred a more traditional one that kept miners working in jobs familiar to them. Namely, subsiding the mines. The Globalists decried this while Social Democrats lambasted it as impractical and Liberals declared it harmful idiocy

On social issues, the policy of the day was a free vote. Which led to Carlile pushing through several social programs now free of having to balance coalition partners. Most controversially was a bill to recognise trans people as who they were. In the end, that passed narrowly despite vocal UGB-level outrage. None of them would bring down Davies. What would is the increasing impatience of the central ILP leading to a leak that accused Davies of being in gay relationships while married. In the end, the ILP split between "Daviesites" and "Maxtonites" heading into the 1999 election

Kim Howells (Social Democratic-Liberal-Globalist coalition) 1999-2006
"Welcome to the Wales of TOMORROW!"
Kim Howells, often known as "Howling Howells" for his outspoken nature, was a proud member of the "Third Way" faction in the SDP, and his government would in some ways prove a blueprint for the later Mandelson-Miliband era of British politics

First making headlines for his declaration "We are all capitalists now" as he oversaw the Welsh SDP striking out any mention of socialism in its platform, he ran a confrontional campaign against not the fractured ILP, but the rising Cynghrair Cymru. Portraying it as a battle between "Wales' past and its future", he ended up triumphing and bringing in the Liberals and Globalists, even as CC rose to a comfortable second place thanks to the ILP fracturing between those loyal to Maxton (the future rump ILP) and those to Davies (later renamed Cymru Ymlaen and turned more explicitly nationalist). Wales' politics were shifting more and more every year

The "Megaphone", as some of his Senators jokingly referred to him as, brought back Carlile's technological employment transition plan while combining it with more of a focus on preserving Wales' environment with the help of the Globalists. Mining subsidies were cut in 2000 and finally abolished in 2005 as job training programs went full blast to retrain "Wales' workers for the world of tomorrow" as he loftily declared

Meanwhile, with the SDP more socially-liberal than ever, it was time to push Wales' social values "forward, not back" and many bills expanding LGBT rights beyond the UGB baseline, expanding upon Brookes' standards for disabled care and unofficially sending a Welsh "ambassador" to the CoN

In early 2006, Howells retired as Prince, the only one to ever retire at his discretion and not that of events outside his control

Jackie Lawrence (Social Democratic-Liberal-Globalist coalition) 2006-2007
"Ydych chi'n siarad Cymraeg?"
The Minister of Education in the Howells ministry, Jackie Lawrence was prominent in pushing for more access to Welsh language education and she was key to making support for the Welsh language cross the growing division between "Westminster vs. Wales", or increasingly more accurate, between unionists and nationalists. Lawrence's ministry would be primarily one of the economy, though, as a recession happened in 2006 that engulfed the world's attention. As the Social Democrats swept into control of Westminster in 2006 under Peter Mandelson, Lawrence hoped that similar good feelings would help give her a new mandate. But when she called an election in 2007, the polls were gloomy

Jonathan Edwards (Cynghrair Cymru-Liberal coalition then Cynghrair Cymru-Cymru Fydd-Globalist coalition) 2007-2012
"The Strange Split of Liberal Wales"
The leader of the Wales Liberal Federation at this time was Eleanor Burnham. Burnham was someone who inched close to nationalism at times yet led a traditionally unionist party. So when she announced that she would coalition with Cynghrair Cymru and help put a coronet on Jonathan Edwards' head, the Westminster Liberals expressed concern. Edwards was crowned all the same and the "Lemon and Lime Government" began

The Welsh economy recovered somewhat under Edwards, yet it was a sluggish one all the same. The Carlile Plan was continued yet people grew sceptic of the idea, arguing that instead the focus should be on education more than job training. The Carlile Plan had years, and it didn't have the impact it originally was envisioned to have, so they argued it should be scrapped. The Welsh Liberals maintained this was mainly because of insufficient funding, and that the current Government would invest enough in it

In 2011, the Welsh Liberal Federation split over a bill in the Senedd that would allow Wales to work with other countries, such as Ireland, in a quasi-diplomatic manner, something generally frowned on by a firm-handed Westminster. Also helping this split was the increasing perception that many in England and Scotland didn't understand Wales' linguistic concerns and so wanted to push for "English education for all"

And perhaps it was inevitable given Wales' politics was now more than ever one of unionists vs. nationalists. It's hard to say, but after all was said and done, there was two Welsh liberal parties - the Welsh Liberal Federation, and Cymru Fydd

Bringing into the Globalists, Edwards maintained his majority for another year, then called a new election, hoping that the recovery would boost him

Joyce Watson (Social Democratic-Independent Labour-Globalist coalition) 2012-2017
"Cracked Pavement"
The 2012 election was the most multi-party yet, with 10 parties in the Senedd. Joyce Watson was known as someone who steered the SDP away from the unrepentant Third Way of Howells and Lawrence, and back towards a soggy centre-left, including rekindling the relationship with the trade unions. Hence why she announced that she formed a "Popular Front" of the SDP, ILP and Globalists, the three "unionist" left-wing parties

With the Britain SDP still led by Peter Mandelson and David Miliband, there was a clear division between the Welsh SDP that was "been there done that" with the Third Way and the Britain SDP that was still firmly so. This was dubbed "clear red water" by Vaughan Gething, rising SDP star. The Watson ministry saw a focus on education and on fighting income inequality, seen as the main "culprit" for why Wales' economy was lagging

The economy did pick up, but the Welsh NHS's inefficiency leading to people not receiving healthcare promptly led to a backlash in Welsh politics and in the end it damaged the SDP as they were seen as the primary cause of it [but CC wasn't spared either] and in 2017...

Bethan Sayed (Cynghrair Cymru-Cymru Fydd-Globalist minority coalition supported by Independent Labour and Cymru Ymlaen) 2017-
"Cymru Ifanc"
The youngest to wear the coronet yet, Bethan Sayed entered power after weeks of coalition arithmetic with a 13-party Senedd and both the SDP and CC losing seats. In the end, with nobody willing to return to the country in a new election, a "Umbrella Government" was hammered out where it would be one of CC together with Cymru Fydd and (of course) the Globalists, propped up by the ILP and their splitter party Cymru Ymlaen

This was expected to last a year but it has prolonged longer than everyone thought. Nevertheless, the Princess thinks 2019 is high time for an election and one she expects will lead to a more stable coalition for her. Polls are ambiguous on this, but she is right that CC is enjoying yet another honeymoon going off their popular reforms and she wants to seize that opportunity sooner rather than later

Of course, there are talk that President Mike Woodin might not be in the best of health, and she might have to step in as Acting President in the case of his death or resignation. That would put the cat among the pigeons, both in Westminster and in Wales...
That was inspired!
 

Mumby

'I love the pun he will go far'
Published by SLP
Electrobeat*

1933-1941: Franklin D. Roosevelt (Democratic)
1932 (with John N. Garner) def. Herbert Hoover (Republican)
1936 (with John N. Garner) def. Alf Landon (Republican)

1941-1944: Wendell Willkie (Republican)
1940 (with Styles Bridges) def. John N. Garner (Democratic)
1944-1945: Styles Bridges (Republican)
1945-1953: Harry F. Byrd (Democratic)
1944 (with Henry A. Wallace) def. Styles Bridges (Republican)
1948 (with Millard Tydings) def. Douglas MacArthur (Republican), Henry A. Wallace (Progressive)

1953-1955: Douglas MacArthur (Republican)
1952 (with Robert Taft Sr.) def. W. Averell Harriman (Democratic)
1955-1957: Ezra Taft Benson (Republican)
1957-1961: W. Averell Harriman (Democratic)
1956 (with John S. Battle) def. Ezra Taft Benson (Republican), Wayne Morse (Progressive)
1961-1969: Charles A. Halleck (Republican)
1960 (with Robert B. Anderson) def. W. Averell Harriman (Democratic), Wayne Morse (Progressive)
1964 (with Robert B. Anderson) def. Hubert Humphrey (Democratic)

1969-1973: William F. Buckley Jr. (Republican)
1968 (with Robert Taft Jr.) def. Sam Yorty (Democratic)
1973-1981: John Connally (Democratic)
1972 (with Henry M. Jackson) def. William F. Buckley Jr. (Republican), Gore Vidal (Progressive)
1976 (with Jimmy Carter) def. Paul Laxalt (Republican), George McGovern (Progressive)

1981-0000: Ronald Reagan (Progressive)
1980 (with Jeane Kirkpatrick) def. Jimmy Carter (Democratic), John B. Anderson (Republican)

The year is 1981, and it is morning in America.

This is a world that saw the New Deal throttled in the 1950s and finally suffocated to death in the 1960s. The brief experiment with Keynesianism was rejected and the Democrats' dalliances with civil rights and liberalism, and the Republicans flirtation with statism and, uh, liberalism came to an end. The left was eventually re-energised by the Progressive campaign which has finally culminated in Ronald Reagan's election.

The 60s were the height of a free market boom, as the last constraints maintained by the Byrd and Harriman administrations were unleashed. Unfettered capitalism saw successes in the space race, in the international struggle against communism and in replacing 19th century colonialism with 20th century business management. The boom stuttered and faltered in the 1970s and finally came to a grinding halt under Connally who had essentially accepted much of the economic consensus whilst seeking to widen the frontiers of the state in relation to internal security. As real wages fell, unemployment rose, and a generation found themselves looking forward to lesser standard of living than their parents, the Progressive Party turned from a vehicle for frustrated presidential ambitions into a proper movement. Nevertheless, Connally retained power through a programme of dirty tricks - ably helped along by FBI Director Richard Nixon.

*ATL word for cyberpunk because i am bad
 
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Mumby

'I love the pun he will go far'
Published by SLP
At first I was like ayyyy

But then I was like aaaaaaaa
welcome to a world which entered the 80s in the 60s, and by the 80s its all on fire.

I literally decided to do the final joke at the end just as I was finishing, the premise from the beginning was 'Lefty Reagan implements the same scale of paradigm shift in an America that went monetarist decades before OTL'. It was only right at the end I realised 'haha i can do a bit with jimmy carter and john anderson'
 

Uhura's Mazda

Martinet of the Marshes
Published by SLP
Location
Tamaki Makaurau
Our history was destroyed in the Unpleasantness. We are a people without roots; tumbleweed in the wreckage of this land. We grieved, and then our grief became the piece of grit around which our new culture has begun - gradually - to accrete.

In Moon 256, we found a disc. It was scratched, caked in mud and pecked to buggery by swallows, but it shone and glistened - even when there was hardly any light to reflect. First we thought it was magic, then we thought it was a sort of jewellery, and then we thought it was a metaphorical construct representing the idea that our new society, however tarnished, could still reflect the inherent glories of the Universe. But we knew that it had been made before the Unpleasantness, by people who knew more than we would forget in a lifetime.

Eventually, our technicians, working day and night for dozens upon dozens of Moons, managed to crack the code of the tiny, microscopic markings inscribed upon the grooves of the disc. Discovering that there was a coded message at all was enough of a breakthrough to inspire no fewer than four different religions, each claiming that the message was from some deity and that they knew what the message was. In three of those cases, the purported message involved killing a specific category of person - the fourth religion soon joined suit when they realised that they were the specific category, and the Lovelian Church was therefore Reformed to be mainly about genocide.

As it transpired, the message was from no deity - not one of the four hypothesised deities, at any rate. The two surviving religions merged together upon the Revelation of the Translation in order to worship the one called 'Uhura's Mazda', but they died of their wounds fairly quickly. The message was no religious commandment; it was much more precious than that. All that could be deciphered between the cracks and the scratches was - well, it was a fragment of the history we had lost so many Moons before.

You may read our history now. I, the Guardian of the History, read it every day and weep for what we have lost, for I am the oldest man we know of. Born before the Unpleasantness, my mind was warped by it and I lost all the history I had in my head. To read the message of the Disc is to meet an old friend upon the road and almost - but not quite - recognise him. You do not know my friend, but I shall introduce you to him, and I hope that you will feel, as I do, the precious, tenuous, lithe link with our forgotten past.

List of Prime Ministers of the Punited Kingdom
1945-1951: @Lee Danes (Labour)
1951-1955: Snowball Directline (Conservative)
1955-1957: Tony Paradise (Conservative)
1957-1963: Godwin Randomhouse (Conservative)
1963-1964: Guinness Donald-Roem (Conservative)
1964-1970: William Volleyball (Labour)
1970-1974: Paddington Moorland (Conservative)
1974-1976: William Volleyball (Labour)
1976-1979: The Other Jim Callaghan (Labour)
1979-1990: Marge Straw (Conservative)
1990-1997: Big Jack (Conservative)
1997-2007: Lionel Broadway (Labour)

There were footnotes, but they were so damaged that all we can make out is that Prime Minister Randomhouse enacted Godwin's Law, a piece of legislation that allowed the Government of the day to pass any Bill without a vote. The Law was triggered whenever a member of the Opposition made a spurious comparison to Nazi Germany. Our analysts have spent many Moons arguing over what any of this might actually mean. But to no avail.

This is all we have of our story. And although I am very conscious that I have dedicated my life to protecting such a tiny relic... fundamentally, I can think of no more worthy or useful way to spend a life.
 
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Warthog

a product of cultural adsorption
Location
Mzansi
Inspired by this thread:

No easy walk to round three by Nelson Mandela. Published in 1965 following his defeat of Muhammad Ali in the 1964 world heavyweight championship
Lancaster House : how the Methodist Churches in Africa were unified by Rev Canaan Banana, Rev Ndabaningi Sithole and Rev Abel Muzorewa. With forward by Father R.G. Mugabe SJ
Rivers of Love

Archbishop Desmond Tutu's biography's title naturally recalls his famous 1968 sermon. The sermon (actually entitled No Future Without Forgiveness, and a response to a bigoted speech by a local conservative politician in Tutu's then Wolverhampton parish) foreshadowed much of the future Archbishop of Canterbury's contribution to the theology of reconciliation. The South Africa-born clergyman's legacy remains controversial, as a result of his strident opposition from both the pulpit and the House of Lords to the austerity measures of Britain's first black prime minister, Stephen Lawrence....



The publication of Archbishop Tutu's biography ironically coincides with the sentencing of Britain's other famous South Africa-born son, former long-time Liberal leader Peter Hain, for securities fraud in connection with the African businesses of Kazakh first lady...
 

Warthog

a product of cultural adsorption
Location
Mzansi
Warthog finally posts some actually AH instead of just banter, southern hemisphere island elections and the @Marius and @Warthog Landshow...

Prime Ministers of the Union of South Africa

1943- 1950 Jan Smuts (United)
1943 Def DF Malan (HNP) + FHP Creswell (Labour)​
1946 POD: The United Party pushes through a constituency boundary review, resulting in more urban constituencies, and the balance tipping away from the HNP. In OTL the United Party won the popular vote in 1948 but lost in terms of number of MPs elected.
1948 Def DF Malan (HNP)​

1950-1961 De Villiers Graaf (United)
Smuts dies in office, 1950​
1953 def DF Malan (HNP) + Alex Hepple (Labour)​
1957 Coloured women get the same franchise as men - this remain property-based or racial-based in the different provinces​
1958 Def JG Strijdom (NP)+ Alex Hepple (Labour)​
1961-1974 Harry Schwartz (United)
1961 Def JG Strijdom (NP) + Alex Hepple (Labour)​
1964 Nelson Mandela defeats Muhammad Ali in the 1964 world heavyweight championship
1965 No Easy Walk to Round Three published
1966 Def BJ Vorster (NP) Harry Lawrence (Progressive) Brian Bunting (Labour)​
1968 Expansion of franchise to lower property qualifications in the Cape and Natal
1968 Rev. Desmond Tutu preaches a sermon entitled No Future Without Forgiveness, partly as a response to a bigoted speech by a local conservative politician in his Wolverhampton parish
1970 United wc+s Progressive (Harry Lawrence) and Federal (Colin Eglin) def BJ Vorster (NP) and Brian Bunting (Labour)​
1974-1977 Harry Lawrence (Progressive)
1974 Progressive wc+s Federal (Colin Eglin) + Labour (Brian Bunting) def PW Botha (NP) and Radclyffe Cayman (United)​
1975 Federal party merged into Progressive
1975-1977 Progressive Federal majority government​
1977 Expansion of franchise (qualified franchise for all races)

1977-1978 Helen Suzman (Progressive Federal)
1977 Def Albert Hertzog (NP), Andries Treunicht (Conservative), Dennis Worall (United) and Alan Hendrikse (Labour)​
1978 Universal franchise
1978 South African National Congress registers for elections, as does the Commintern-affiliated Workers and Peasants Party
1978 Heritage Party formed from merger of NP with Conservative Party and black monarchist groups
Prime Ministers of the Federal Republic of South Africa

1978-1983 Helen Suzman (Progressive Federal)
1978-1983 National government: Progressive Federal + SANC (Walter Sisulu) and Labour (Alan Hendrikse) def FW de Klerk (Heritage), Thabo Mofutsanyana (Workers and Peasants) and Dennis Worall (United)​
1978 Magnus Malan launches right-wing rebellion through Vryheids Vereeniging
1979 Malan arrested, sentenced 8 yrs
1981 Socialist party formed from Workers + Peasants, Labour and defectors from SANC

1983- 1990 Walter Sisulu (SANC)
1983 Def Chris Heunis (Heritage) and Thabo Mofutsanyana (Socialist)​
1987 Def Ahmed Kathrada (Socialist) and Chris Heunis (Heritage)​
1990-1994 Thabo Mbeki (SANC)
1991 Def Ahmed Kathrada (Socialist), Prince Mangosuthu Buthelezi (Heritage) and Magnus Malan (Vryheid)

Presidents of the Republic of South Africa
1994-1998 Thabo Mbeki (SANC)
1994 Mbeki declares one party state
1996 Alliance for Change (AFC) formed by dissident SANC members led by Terror Lekota and former Socialist Party members for non-violent opposition to one-party rule
1998 Mbeki dies in office
1998-2000 Peter Mokaba (SANC)
1998 Kgalema Montlante leads split from AFC and armed rebellion commences under Popular Front
2000 Bantu Holomisa (transitional government)
2000 Bantu Holomisa overthrows Mokaba in military coup, establishes transitional government
2001 Political parties legalised. Lekota registers AFC as a party and Montlante registers the Popular Front as the Radical Party. Ngaoko Ramatlodi takes over SANC and registers it for elections.

Prime Ministers of the Federal Republic of South Africa
2001-2014 Kgalema Montlante (Radical)
2001 Def Terror Lekota (AFC) Ngaoko Ramatlodi (SANC)​
2005 def Ronnie Kasrils (AFC) Mampiti Biko (SANC)​
2009 def Baleka Mbete (SANC) Jabu Moleketi (AFC)​
2012 SANC and AFC merge into Federal Party
2013 Split in Radical Party over land tenure results in Montlante's retirement and the formation of Ultra Party

2014-2018 Baleka Mbete (Federal)
2014 Def Gwede Mantashe (Radical) and Patricia de Lille (Ultra)​

2018-???? Solly Mapaila (Radical)
2018 Radical Party resurgance helped by Federal Party leader's sex scandal and Patricia de Lille's defection back from the Ultra Party
2018 Def Melusi Gigaba (Federal) and Zak Achmat (Ultra)​
 
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Warthog finally posts some actually AH instead of just banter, southern hemisphere island elections and the @Marius and @Warthog Landshow...

Prime Ministers of the Union of South Africa

1943- 1950 Jan Smuts (United)
1943 Def DF Malan (HNP) + FHP Creswell (Labour)​
1946 POD: The United Party pushes through a constituency boundary review, resulting in more urban constituencies, and the balance tipping away from the HNP. In OTL the United Party won the popular vote in 1948 but lost in terms of number of MPs elected.
1948 Def DF Malan (HNP)​

1950-1961 De Villiers Graaf (United)
Smuts dies in office, 1950​
1953 def DF Malan (HNP) + Alex Hepple (Labour)​
1957 Women get franchise as men - this remain property-based or racial-based in the different provinces​
1958 Def JG Strijdom (NP)+ Alex Hepple (Labour)​
1961-1974 Harry Schwartz (United)
1961 Def JG Strijdom (NP) + Alex Hepple (Labour)​
1964 Nelson Mandela defeats Muhammad Ali in the 1964 world heavyweight championship
1965 No Easy Walk to Round Three published
1966 Def BJ Vorster (NP) Harry Lawrence (Progressive) Brian Bunting (Labour)​
1968 Expansion of franchise to lower property qualifications in the Cape and Natal
1968 Rev. Desmond Tutu preaches a sermon entitled No Future Without Forgiveness, partly as a response to a bigoted speech by a local conservative politician in his Wolverhampton parish
1970 United wc+s Progressive (Harry Lawrence) and Federal (Colin Eglin) def BJ Vorster (NP) and Brian Bunting (Labour)​
1974-1977 Harry Lawrence (Progressive)
1974 Progressive wc+s Federal (Colin Eglin) + Labour (Brian Bunting) def PW Botha (NP) and Radclyffe Cayman (United)​
1975 Federal party merged into Progressive
1975-1977 Progressive Federal majority government​
1977 Expansion of franchise (qualified franchise for all races)

1977-1978 Helen Suzman (Progressive Federal)
1977 Def Albert Hertzog (NP), Andries Treunicht (Conservative), Dennis Worall (United) and Alan Hendrikse (Labour)​
1978 Universal franchise​
1978 Heritage Party formed from merger of NP with Conservative Party and black monarchist groups​
Prime Ministers of the Federal Republic of South Africa

1978-1983 Helen Suzman (Progressive Federal)
1978-1983 National government: Progressive Federal + SANC (Walter Sisulu) and Labour (Alan Hendrikse) def FW de Klerk (Heritage), Thabo Mofutsanyana (Workers and Peasants) and Dennis Worall (United)​
1978 Magnus Malan launches right-wing rebellion through Vryheids Vereeniging
1979 Malan arrested, sentenced 8 yrs
1981 Socialist party formed from Workers + Peasants, Labour and defectors from SANC

1983- 1990 Walter Sisulu (SANC)
1983 Def Chris Heunis (Heritage) and Thabo Mofutsanyana (Socialist)​
1987 Def Ahmed Kathrada (Socialist) and Chris Heunis (Heritage)​
1990-1994 Thabo Mbeki (SANC)
1991 Def Ahmed Kathrada (Socialist), Prince Mangosuthu Buthelezi (Heritage) and Magnus Malan (Vryheid)

Presidents of the Republic of South Africa
1994-1998 Thabo Mbeki (SANC)
1994 Mbeki declares one party state
1996 Alliance for Change (AFC) formed by dissident SANC members led by Terror Lekota and former Socialist Party members for non-violent opposition to one-party rule
1998 Mbeki dies in office
1998-2000 Peter Mokaba (SANC)
1998 Kgalema Montlante leads split from AFC and armed rebellion commences under Popular Front
2000 Bantu Holomisa (transitional government)
2000 Bantu Holomisa overthrows Mokaba in military coup, establishes transitional government
2001 Political parties legalised. Lekota registers AFC as a party and Montlante registers the Popular Front as the Radical Party. Ngaoko Ramatlodi takes over SANC and registers it for elections.

Prime Ministers of the Federal Republic of South Africa
2001-2014 Kgalema Montlante (Radical)
2001 Def Terror Lekota (AFC) Ngaoko Ramatlodi (SANC)​
2005 def Ronnie Kasrils (AFC) Mampiti Biko (SANC)​
2009 def Baleka Mbete (SANC) Jabu Moleketi (AFC) and Patricia de Lille (Ultra)​
2012 SANC and AFC merge into Federal Party
2013 Split in Radical Party over land tenure results in Montlante's retirement and the formation of Ultra Party

2014-2018 Baleka Mbete (Federal)
2014 Def Gwede Mantashe (Radical) and Patricia de Lille (Ultra)​

2018-???? Solly Mapaila (Radical)
2018 Radical Party resurgance helped by Federal Party leader's sex scandal and Patricia de Lille's defection back from the Ultra Party
2018 Def Melusi Gigaba (Federal) and Zak Achmat (Ultra)​
Nice TL.

But what do you mean by this: '
1957 Women get franchise as men - this remain property-based or racial-based in the different provinces'​
In OTL, all whites over 21 were enfranchised in 1931, with no property restrictions. Is it different in this TL?​
 

Warthog

a product of cultural adsorption
Location
Mzansi
Nice TL.

But what do you mean by this: '
1957 Women get franchise as men - this remain property-based or racial-based in the different provinces'​
In OTL, all whites over 21 were enfranchised in 1931, with no property restrictions. Is it different in this TL?​
Thanks Marius. I was under the impression that the property-based franchise in the cape didn't cover coloured women?
 

Mumby

'I love the pun he will go far'
Published by SLP
Here's a list from the other place, worth transferring here today.

She Was The First

Prime Ministers of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland

1908-1914: H.H. Asquith (Liberal)
1910 Jan (Minority with IPP confidence and supply) def. Arthur Balfour (Unionist - Conservatives, Liberal Unionists), John Redmond (Irish Parliamentary), Arthur Henderson (Labour), William O'Brien (All-For-Ireland)
1910 Dec (Minority with IPP confidence and supply) def. Arthur Balfour (Unionist - Conservatives, Liberal Unionists), John Redmond (Irish Parliamentary), George Barnes (Labour), William O'Brien (All-For-Ireland)

1914-1915: H.H Asquith / John Redmond (Liberal with Labour confidence and supply / Irish Parliamentary majority)

1915: 1ST STAGE OF THE BRITISH CIVIL WAR BEGINS (BLUES VS GREENS)

Blues

1915-1917: Andrew Bonar Law / Edward Carson (Conservative and Unionist leading Military Government)

Greens

1915-1916: H.H Asquith / John Redmond (Liberal / Irish Parliamentary leading Emergency Government)
1916-1917: David Lloyd George / John Redmond (Liberal / Irish Parliamentary leading Emergency Government)

1917: BLUE VICTORY, 1ST STAGE OF THE BRITISH CIVIL WAR ENDS AND 2ND STAGE OF THE BRITISH CIVIL BEGINS (BLUES VS REDS)

Blues

1917-1921: Andrew Bonar Law / Edward Carson (Conservative and Unionist leading Military Government)
1921-1922: Austen Chamberlain / John Redmond (Conservative and Unionist / Irish Parliamentary leading Armistice Government)

Reds

1917-1917: George Lansbury / James Connolly (United Labour leading Revolutionary Government)
1917-1918: George Lansbury / vacant (United Labour leading Revolutionary Government)
1918-1919: George Lansbury/ Jim Larkin (United Labour leading Revolutionary Government)
1919-1919: George Lansbury / vacant (United Labour leading Revolutionary Government)
1919-1919: George Lansbury / Constance Markievicz (United Labour leading Revolutionary Government)
1919-1919: vacant / Constance Markievicz (United Labour leading Revolutionary Government)
1919-1922: Constance Markievicz (United Labour leading Revolutionary Government)

1922: RED VICTORY, END OF THE BRITISH CIVIL WAR

Presidents of the Workers' Federation of the British Isles

1922-1926: Constance Markievicz (United Labour)
1922 def. independent regional campaigns

'Bullets and Butter: The Ballad of the British Revolution' by Andrea Storey (Federal Union of Writers and Publishers, 2003)

'The path to revolution is never sure, but in hindsight the signs of the impending struggle seem to glow fiercely on the horizon and it is a wonder that anyone at the time did not see its coming. So it was with Britain and Ireland, as the comfortable two party system slowly crumbled and the established order of a unitary, monarchist, capitalist state became increasingly unstable. The widening of the franchise to assuage working class sentiment and preserve the existing system did nothing of the sort. It simply allowed the workers and tenants to vote against the interests of the bosses and the landlords for the first time in history. For a time, working class energy was routed into reformist parties like the Parnellites and the early Labour Party but as they failed to achieve their objectives a greater awakening became inevitable.

'In 1910, the Irish Parliamentary Party once more held the balance the power. But the proposal for Home Rule that passed the House of Commons in 1912 and was then forced through the House of Lords in 1914 was a proposal of the more radical 'Sinn Fein' party. This transformed the United Kingdom into a Dual Monarchy modelled after the example of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. The House of Commons was split in two, with Irish MPs sitting in Dublin and making domestic decisions for Ireland and British MPs continuing to sit in Westminster. On foreign affairs issues, the Irish MPs returned to Westminster to vote and this was considered by some to be the first stage of the establishment of an 'Imperial Federation' formalising a closer relationship with the existing legislatures of the mostly self-governing Dominions.

'Irish self-government was established for the entire island of Ireland and from the moment that Irish MPs sat in Dublin, the Unionist contingent was determined to sabotage the project. Unionist MPs refused to take their seats, and paramilitaries groups emerged to defend the unity of Ulster with the mainland. Asquith had effectively bound his hands, and relied on the weak Redmond to put down the militant rising. He faced electoral defeat in 1915, reliant as he was on the Labour Party to remain in government. The fact that the frontbench of the newborn Conservative and Unionist Party had marched in lockstep to Ulster's tune and vowed to defend the militants presented an opportunity. Asquith issued orders for their arrest on grounds of treason.

'This came to nothing, as the Army - riddled with reactionary Unionist officers of the landowning feudal class which was threatened by the political awakening of the islands' working class - mutinied in support of the Unionists in Ulster and the Tories who had escaped the police's clutches. Civil War had well and truly broken out.

'Despite having command of much of the Army it took two years for the 'Blues' to defeat the 'Greens', and in that time the civilian leaders of the Blues were effectively co-opted by an emergent military dictatorship who used the federalist principles of the Asquith government to more effectively enforce their rule. The failure of the bourgeois forces of the Liberals and the IPP to defend democracy led to industrial action, strikes and the militarisation of the trade unions. George Lansbury, an avowed pacifist, and James Connolly, a committed militant, joined forces against the brutal tyranny. They operated an underground resistance movement, uniting the workers' movements of both islands against a common oppressor. Lansbury and Connolly have entered the canon of the national myth, killed as they were by the hungry bloodhounds of the military government 'Black and Tan' secret police, and they were not alone. Following Connolly's death, Jim Larkin picked up the Irish baton and was killed in turn. His remains are interred with Lansbury and Connolly in the Mausoleum of Workers' Heroes.

'In 1919, after the death of Lansbury at the hands of the Black and Tans, the revolution was seemingly at its lowest ebb. Constance Markievicz took the scattered remnants of the Revolutionary Government and reforged them anew. Over the next three years, she and the Red Guards took back Britain and Ireland's industrial heartlands, allied with the radical movements of the ruined countryside and marched on the fortresses of capitalist reaction. In 1921, Bonar Law died of pneumonia and Austen Chamberlain seized control allying the CUP with the very Irish nationalists they had sought to crush to seek an armistice. The war was at an end, as Markievicz allowed those who wanted to flee to do so and established the Workers' Federation that stands to this day...'
 
Realistically, he was going to lose in 1980. The problem was who he ended up losing to, and over what issue, as Senator Kelly made a bid for candidacy....
Those Marvellous Presidents (Part 2)

1981-1985: Robert Kelly /William Stryker (Republican)

The Republican establishment had assumed that one of their own, likely SHIELD alumni George Bush, would win the primary and run against Rickard. They'd reckoned without the anti-mutant sentiment that had been growing since the early 1960s, one fanned in the United States by the growing evangelist movement and in particular the firebrand Reverend Stryker, who proclaimed Satan was at work for it could not be evolution. Global terrorism by the Brotherhood of Evil Mutants (the name a deliberate provocation) and the fact any teenager could become a mutant made their existence seem an existential threat, and one democracies were failing to get to grips with - a claim that, of course, ignored scandals like the Weapon X military experimentation program. Senator Kelly, seen as middle-road pro-business Republican, was able to make himself the 'acceptable' middle class face of this fear and ride it to candidacy. It was only after he picked Stryker as his running mate that many of those middle classes started to worry, and that was still not enough to stop many voting for him.

On the economy and most domestic issues, President Kelly's views were little different to Pym. On certain social issues, he was willing to lean right to keep Stryker and his evangelicals on side - a puritan streak made its way into the school system and media, a sharp contrast to the Rickard days. Cold War politics swung back to the hawks, with increased military funding and SHIELD support.

None of this is what he's most famous for, of course. Kelly's deep concern about mutants as a potential threat led to the creation of the federal Mutant Response Department, a new agency that would handle "mutant crimes" in place of the police and FBI; the army's own versions of Canada's Weapon X were ordered shut down, not for ethical grounds but in a desire to remove mutants from security positions; and mutants were banned from emigrating to the United States. Likely he could have survived that, even as the "Mardies" became infamous for thuggish tactics. Only so many 'normal people' were effected and sporadic mutant terrorism, responding to Kelly's politics, made him look necessary.

However, the MRD began raiding black neighbourhoods, gay enclaves, and in a few cases nice WASP suburbs in pursuit of mutants and Kelly did not, as would have been politically correct, tell them to stop. Now 'normals' were indeed effected. Foreign policy was also affected as Kelly reversed US policy towards the 'white Africa' nations - apartheid South Africa, Rudyarda, and Genosha - that, ever since President Rogers, had been treated with disdain for their racial policies. Since the three nations were also aggressively segregating their mutants, to the point of near-slavery in Genosha's case, Kelly saw them as vital allies. African-American support for both Kelly and the Republicans (up since Foster was made Vice President) cratered. Relations with Germany and Israel, more liberal regimes for mutants, soured, and a scandal broke out in the UK over the State Department becoming close to the notorious mutophobic MP, Nelson Kreelman. In its nadir, US arms and 'training' for Baathist Iraq was ramped up as long as Saddam Hussein continued to wage war on Iran, which had declared mutants were creations of Allah (and thus useable for fighting that very same Iraqi invasion).

With this rising discontent, Kelly should not have tried to push the Mutant Registration Act through in its original form and when the Supreme Court rejected it as unconstitutional, he should have revamped it instead of waging a two-year war with the Court. His political capital was used up as he tried to replace justices, slandered the court in public, and was found having Republican-held state governments push state-only versions of the Act through, all of them subsequently ending up at the Supreme Court anyway. While an estimated 72% of Americans were 'concerned' about mutants in 1984, they were also concerned that the President only seemed concerned about mutants.



1985-1989: John Jonah Jameson /Robert Ralston (Democratic)

Republicans would lament for years that Jameson, infamously socially conservative and law-and-order, should have been one of them. The press mogul indeed had no love for the Rickard administration. However, Jameson had also been viciously opposed to bigotry and had gone after the Stryker campaign even before it linked up with Kelly. The Daily Bugle and its sister publications went after Kelly on a daily basis and Jameson divested himself of his publishing business in 1982 for the very purpose of making a presidential run, egotistically believing only he could pull it off. His knowledge of the dark media arts saw him run a ferocious campaign and debate performance, presenting Kelly as a mewling buffoon who was ruining America and putting YOU, John Q Public, AT RISK from CRIME!! (The Bugle had managed to finally expose Wilson Fisk in 1983, adding to Jameson's anti-crime credentials) Senator Ralston was deliberately picked for his slight wartime ties to President Rogers, giving the campaign some reflected glory.

Jameson scrapped the MRD and ended the detente with 'White Africa' in his first month in office. Rolling back the social conservatism in schools (he agreed with some of the principles but hated who was doing it) took longer, with local politicians opposing him every step of the way, but Jameson was stubborn enough to keep pushing. The media was treated with laissez-faire and, in a controversial move for a Democrat, several business taxes were cut. The nascent Special Counter-Terrorism Unit Delta saw a big increase in funding and resources, to the extent many people incorrectly believe Jameson created it (it was a Rickard-era idea that became operational under Kelly).

Relations with the communist states remained frosty, though relations with Wakanda started to improve - until the aging King T'Chaka actually met Jameson and vice versa. For when it came to foreign relations, Jameson's blunt nature and hair-trigger temper could turn any meeting into a minefield. Foreign media were full of horror stories of raised voices echoing out of Versailles. These conflicts with foreign leaders prevented any reform of SHIELD, something Jameson was keen on (and was necessary when the Kelly-era SHIELD appointees were people on Kelly's wavelength). He instead turned his reformist zeal on the police, spy services, and Fifty State Initiative - while big on law-and-order, he wanted corruption and 'waste' wiped out of the bodies that enforced that law. This earned him few friends at the FBI, CIA, and major police services, with sackings and new directives and very 'impolitic' statements, and Ralston often had to smooth feathers afterwards. Minority communities liked this quite a bit.

The gay community liked it even more when Jameson ordered an investigation into the HIV plague - had indeed campaigned on it as an example of Kelly ignoring a crisis that could effect YOU, the PUBLIC, if not stopped. A disease seen as a "gay" problem was reframed as a potential threat to the suburbs (and would indeed spread there).

Jameson would be the third President to serve a single term (fourth if you count Ford) as his bad health caught up with him in the form of a mild heart attack. Rather than die in office, he said he would resign after the election. This was a reverse of 1980: it was impossible for the Democrats to lose as the Republicans were collapsing after Kelly's reign, losing people to the Libertarians and to the harder-right Cobra Party (stealing the iconography of the 'don't tread on me' snake), formed and led by disgruntled salesman Garrett Freelowe. The big question was which Democrat would win, and so it wasn't even November before everyone knew their next president would be James Rhodes...
 

Turquoise Blue

Ambiguously Tibby
Patreon supporter
Location
Kemr, FK
List for this thing

The Centre Cannot Hold

Presidents of the United States of America (1789-2025) - As Agreed By Everyone
Barack Obama (Democratic) 2009-2017
2008: def. John McCain (Republican)
2012: def. Mitt Romney (Republican)
Donald Trump (Republican) 2017-2021

2016: def. Hillary Clinton (Democratic)
Beto O'Rourke (Democratic) 2021-2025

2020: def. Donald Trump (Republican) and John Kasich (Independent)

Presidents of the United States of America (2025-2033) - As Seen By Democrats
Beto O'Rourke (Democratic) 2025-2029* [wartime suspension of election in 2028 by constitutional convention]
2024: def. Brett Kavanaugh (Republican)
Maria Cantwell (Democratic, then Independent) 2029-2033

Presidents of the Democratic States of America (2033-)
Tulsi Gabbard (Independent, supported by Democratic Socialists) 2033-
2032: def. Cory Booker (New Democratic)

Presidents of the United States of America (2025-2033) - As Seen By Republicans
Brett Kavanaugh (Republican) 2025-2027*
2024: def. Beto O'Rourke (Democratic)
James Lankford (Republican, then Christian Values) 2027-2033 [wartime suspension of election in 2028 by constitutional convention]

Presidents of the Great American Republic (2033-)
James Lankford (Christian Values) 2033-
2032: def. Donald Trump Jr. (Trumpist) and Elinor Swanson (Libertarian)
 

Oppo

Mike Pence’s hair
1954-1962: Democratic, Member of the Crowley City Council
1964-1965: Democratic, State Senator for the 35th District
1965-1972: Democratic, U.S. Representative
1972-1976: Democratic, Governor of Louisiana
1971-1972 def. Dave Treen (Republican), J. Bennett Johnson (Democratic), Gilles Long (Democratic), Jimmie Davis (Democratic), John G. Schwegmann (Democratic), Clarence C. Aycock (Democratic), Samuel Bell (Democratic), Speedy Long (Democratic)
1975 def. Bob Jones (Republican), Wade O. Martin Jr. (Democratic)

1976: Democratic, candidate for presidential nomination
1976 def. Jerry Brown, George Wallace, Mo Udall, Frank Church, Henry Jackson
1977-1981: Democratic, President of the United States
1976 def. Gerald Ford (Republican)
1980: Democratic, candidate for presidential nomination
1980 Ted Kennedy def. Edwin Edwards, Jerry Brown
1980: Independent, candidate for President of the United States
1980 Ronald Reagan def. Ted Kennedy (Democratic), Edwin Edwards (Independent)
1984-1988: Democratic, Governor of Louisiana
1984 def. Dave Treen (Republican)
1987: Democratic, candidate for Governor of Louisiana
1987 Buddy Roemer def. Edwin Edwards (Democratic), Bob Livingston (Republican), Billy Tauzin (Democratic), Jim Brown (Democratic), Speedy Long (Democratic)
1992-1998: Democratic, Governor of Louisiana (impeached)
1991 def. David Duke (Republican), Buddy Roemer (Republican), Clyde C. Holloway (Republican)
1995 def. Mike Foster (Republican), Buddy Roemer (Republican)

2012-2016: Democratic, Governor of Louisiana
2011 def. Bobby Jindal (Republican)
2016: Democratic, candidate for presidential nomination
2016 def. Hillary Clinton, Martin O'Malley
2017-2021: Democratic, President of the United States
2016 def. Donald Trump (Republican), Gary Johnson (Libertarian)

Edwin Edwards certainly is one of the more colorful characters to hold the office of the presidency. Edwards would be descended from the first French colonists who arrived in Louisiana, and started his career in politics as a Long-style populist. In his run for governor in 1971-1972, Edwards’ skill in alliances and attacks on his opponents gave him a landslide victory. As governor, he would preside over the oil boom and changed Louisiana’s electoral system (ironically benefiting the Republicans). While re-elected in 1975, Edwards’ ambitions were not yet met. He would decide to run for the Democratic presidential nomination, rising his way up through victories in the early state of Iowa, New Hampshire, and the south. With Adlai Stevenson as his running mate, he would take a comfortable victory over President Ford.

While things looked bright for the new president, conditions at home and abroad took a turn for the worst. Stagnation and stagnation, Iran, the Soviet-Afghan War, and inflation would all put the Edwards administration in crisis. At the same time, his administration was marred by infighting and disputes with Congress. When Ted Kennedy announced his primary challenge, it was no surprise that Edwards was crushed in the primary. Ronald Reagan would defeat both Kennedy and Edwards (who bitterly ran as an independent) in an electoral landslide.

The next few decades of Edwin Edwards’ career would be met with the same issues. In 1983, he would return to being governor, but he would be defeated by the reformist Buddy Roemer in 1987. It took a race against white nationalist David Duke to return to the office, which he would be impeached over a private prison scheme with a Texas businessman. Edwards would be the only president to serve prison time until controversially reviving a pardon from President Obama in 2011 by his supporters.

With his newfound freedom, Edwards would be able to run for governor against Bobby Jindal, thought to be a major presidential contender in 2012 or 2016. Despite starting out trailing Jindal in the polls, using the same methods he did in his prime, Edwards would take home an upset in a state that had turned heavily Republican.

While most politicans would stop there, Edwards would go on to announce a campaign to return to the presidency in 2015. Edwards would be the main opposition to Hillary Clinton with Vice President Biden out of the race. With a campaign run by young and progressive activists, Clinton would end up falling behind the former president. Given that he was to face off against Donald Trump, Edwards was confident in his victory - giving the Democrats a third term in office.

Of course, it’s been hard to keep the ship together. Edwards has shown the same fighting with his congressional leaders as he did in the 1970s and is having trouble passing a conservative Democratic agenda (angering the left-wing activists that elected him). With the recent departure of Harlan Z. Hill as Chief of Staff and the ongoing Mueller investigation into corruption surrounding the president, it remains to be seen what the next two years will have in store for America.
 
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Mumby

'I love the pun he will go far'
Published by SLP
Institutional Failure

2017-2025: Donald Trump (Republican)
2016 (with Mike Pence) def. Hillary Clinton (Democratic)
2020 (with Mike Pence) def. Beto O'Rourke (Democratic)

2025-2027: Jim Justice (Republican)
2024 (with Marsha Blackburn) def. Mark Cuban (National Unity), Rashida Tlaib (Green-Socialist Alliance)
2027-2031: Marsha Blackburn (Republican)
2028 (with Tomi Lahren) def. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (Green-Socialist Alliance), Elon Musk (New Democratic)
2031-2033: Tomi Lahren (Republican - Emergency Government)
2032 (suspended)
2033-2033: Ilhan Omar (Alliance of the Displaced)
2033 (with Amjal Alami) def. Andrew Yang (New Democratic), Tomi Lahren (Republican)
2033-2034: Ilhan Omar (Reconstruction Alliance)
2034-2041: Amjal Alami (Reconstruction Alliance)
2036 (with Richard Ojeda) def. various (Heartland)

Basically, the Democrats continue to screw the pooch. The Republicans continue down their hard right rabbit hole but are able to keep a hold on the Presidency and Senate, while the House endures a three way split between the Republicans, the corpocratic New Democrats and the leftist GSA. This period of American history - referred to as the Era of Ill Feeling by historians at a later date - comes to an end with the Deluge of 2031. Rising sea levels coupled by a series of enormous hurricanes devastate the East Coast, leading to a refugee crisis and the death of President Blackburn. Lahren's Emergency Government tries to prevent the movement of East Coast refugees into Red States, and indeed suspends the 2032 election when it becomes clear that the Deluge has reshaped the geography of American politics.

This cannot last, and Lahren is ultimately impeached and thrown out and a president election held on a run off system leads to a clear victory for the Alliance of the Displaced in the first round - the Alliance has essentially grown out of the GSA and ballooned thanks to Lahren's anti-refugee policies. The New Democrats collapse and are effectively folded into the broader Reconstruction Alliance. The hard right Republican rump continues a Red State insurgency against 'Libtard Invaders', and President Omar is slain by one such extremist. The Reconstruction Alliance under Alami and Ojeda becomes the dominant party - the only real challengers are numerous 'Heartland' candidates, the political wing of the Red State insurgency.