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Lists of Heads of Government and Heads of State

On the Borders of the Sinai

David Ben Gurion (Mapai) 1948-1949

Moshe Sharett (Mapai) 1949-1956

Elizer Kaplan (Mapai) 1956

Yitzhak Gruenbaum (Independent) 1956

Pinhas Lavon (Mapai) 1956-1959

Moshe Dayan (Mapai) 1959

Shimon Peres (Mapai) 1959-1960

Levi Eshkol (Mapai) 1960-

The assassination of David Ben-Gurion at a Mapal rally in 1949, to many in the new nation of Israel and the outside world seemed like something of a deathblow. Alongside Theodor Herzl, he was the father of the nation, a man who had created a nation state for the long oppressed in their prophesised homeland. How would such a young and unstable nation be able to handle such a blow?

Surprisingly easily it turned out. Moshe Sharett took the reins of power, and charted a moderate course of reforms, mainly trying to avoid the further antagonism of Israel's numerous hostile neighbours. Reparations between West Germany and Israel for victims of the Holocaust were agreed by the Adenauer and Sharett governments at the Munich Conference of 1952, which later paved the way for the establishment of diplomatic relations between the two.

Further reforms were enacted by Defence Minister Pinhas Lavon, as the draft was extended to Arab citizens, though the move while enthusiastically supported by Sharett was less popular amongst the wider Mapal cabinet. Sharett, would be forced to resign over cabinet pressure in regards to hs foreign policy, which was seen by many (notably Golda Meir and other "Ben-Gurionites") as too dovish in its approach to relations with the country's Arab neighbours.

Following a tense few months with two interim governments collapsing, Defence Minister Pinas Lavon formed a government. Lavon's policies toawrds the country's Arab citizens, saw a gradual reduction in the martial law which had governed the lives of the country's Arab minority. Lavon's govenrment would establish diplomatic ties with both West Germany and the Soviet Union (kickstarting the process of Soviet Jewish emigration to Israel which began in the early 60s), and signed commercial treaties with the European Coal and Steal Community in 1957.

While Israel had not been directly involved in the Anglo-French operation in the Suez it had secured recognition at the UN that the Straits of Tiran would remain open to Isaeli shipping, following a long lasting Egyptian blockade from 1950 to 1957. Tensions between Israel and Egypt would continue to fester, and the country maintained a strong military presence on it's borders with both Syria and Egypt, fearing the dreaded encirclement.

Lavon would be forced to resign in 1959 following a corruption scandal involving the policy of state ownership of land. He would be succeeded by two shortlived govenments of Moshe Dayan and Shimon Peres which both lasted less than a year.

Levi Eshkol would succeed to the premiership in 1960, and continued the previously stalled reforms of Sharett, fully abolishing the martial law that governed the Israeli Arab population and ordering that the formerly practiced discriminatory laws that governed the martial occupation be dismantled. Economic difficulties, and continued tensions with the country's Arab neighbours would dog his premiership, but his decision to pursue strong relations with the US, while simultaneously remaining neutral towards the Soviet bloc made him a respected figure internationally. The trial and execution of Adolf Eichmann in 1961 would further capture the world's attention.

Nevertheless, continued tensions would soon see the country finding itself gearing up for war as the 1960s drew to a close.
 

Turquoise Blue

Ambiguously Tibby
Patreon supporter
Location
Kemr, FK
Reds!: Three's A Crowd Edition

William McKinley (Republican) 1897-1905

Philander Chase Knox (Republican) 1905-1913
1904: def. Thomas E. Watson (Populist), William F. Vilas (Democratic) and William Randolph Hearst (Independence)
1908: def. John A. Johnson (Populist), Oscar Underwood (Democratic) and William Randolph Hearst (Independence)

Joseph W. Bailey (Democratic Populist, then National Union) 1913-1918*
1912: def. William Randolph Hearst (Independence), Eugene V. Debs (Independent Populist) and Nicholas Murray Butler (Republican)
1916: def. William Randolph Hearst (Independence) and Eugene V. Debs (Socialist Labor)

Warren G. Harding (National Union, then Republican) 1918-1923*
1920: def. William Randolph Hearst (Common Platform) and Samuel Ralston (Populist)

William P. Jackson (Republican) 1923-1929
1924: def. Jack Reed (Common Platform) and Joseph Taylor Robinson (Populist)

Herbert Hoover (Populist-Republican, then National Union) 1929-1933
1928: def. Norman Thomas (Common Platform)

William Randolph Hearst (Common Platform) 1933*
1932: def. Huey Long (Share Our Wealth) and Herbert Hoover (National Union)

Douglas MacArthur (Military coup, then Government of Preservation) 1933-1935*
William Z. Foster (Common Platform, then Popular Front) 1933-1935

William Z. Foster (Common Platform) 1935-
1936: unopposed

In 1932, William Randolph Hearst finally won on his sixth attempt. Taking advantage of people's anger with the National Unionists for the Great Depression, he pushed forward a "Common Man's Platform" and with Huey Long being seen as an opportunist for breaking off the Populists when they got unpopular, he cleaned house, sweeping in a landslide. The only thing between him and a successful presidency was the Military

For you see, while the establishment closed ranks in the 20s, Hearst, out of sheer ambition or perhaps a feeling of solidarity with the similarly-despised Socialists, invited the Socialists into his house and convinced them that working together would be good for the country

Hence the Common Platform. And it got the establishment to despise Hearst all the way, seeing him as no better than the Reds. With his announced cabinet including such people as Norman Thomas, C. E. Ruthenberg and even Jack Reed, the military decided that this was a Socialist Administration, one that needed to be Dealt With. And so the wealthy man who funded his way to the Presidency died at the Oval Office desk when soldiers barged in and fired at the man sitting. As he bled out over the desk, ramifications started to be felt all over the country

For while William Randolph Hearst was no socialist, he, after a fashion, was seen as a reliable ally. And as new President William Foster was sworn in, he pledged to "uphold Comrade Hearst's vision" and deal with MacArthur's coup for good

MacArthur fought long and bitterly hard, but finally in 1935 he was captured and executed. As the USA died in the flames, President Foster and Common Platform announced the formation of the Union of Independent Socialist Republics, or UISR. And while it reforged itself as a socialist republic, it decided to maintain the USA's form of elections for one more cycle

While Common Platform, already by this time fracturing, won most seats, the top spot was unopposed. Comrade Foster would carry on Comrade Hearst's vision for the final years of the old bourgeois republic and the birth of the new

Long live Marxism-Hearstism! Long live the Union of Independent Socialist Republics!
 

Turquoise Blue

Ambiguously Tibby
Patreon supporter
Location
Kemr, FK
Prime Ministers of the Republic of Examplia
01: John Villar Mooreshead (One majority) 1951-1957
1951: def. Tom Brookes (Two)
1954: def. Tom Brookes (Two)
02: Tom Brookes (Two majority, then
Two - The Liberals minority) 1957-1959
1957: def. John Villar Mooreshead (One)
03: John Villar Mooreshead (One majority) 1959-1968
1959: def. Tom Brookes (Two - The Liberals) and Hamilton Reyes (Two (Original))
1962: def. George Dern (Two - The Liberals), Manuel Alvarez (Social Labour) and Hamilton Reyes (Two (Original)
1965: def. Richard Ardern ("Reunified" Two) and Manuel Alvarez (Social Labour)
04: Richard Ardern ("Reunified" Two majority, then Two minority) 1968-1973
1968: def. John Villar Mooreshead (One) and Manuel Alvarez (Social Labour)
1971: def. Franklin Smalls (One) and Manuel Alvarez (Social Labour)
05: Duncan Tune (One-National Two coalition) 1973-1982
1973: def. Richard Ardern (Two), William Lamm (Social Labour) and Jabez Silva (National Two)
1976: def. Richard Ardern (Two), William Lamm (Social Labour) and Jabez Silva (National Two)
1979: def. Samuel Catts (TWO.The Liberals), Joseph Proud-Bellamy (Social Labour) and Jabez Silva (National Two)
06: Samuel Catts (TWO.The Liberals-Social Labour coalition, then majority) 1982-1995
1982: def. Duncan Tune (One), Joseph Proud-Bellamy (Social Labour) and Jabez Silva (National Two)
1985: def. Stanley Howlin (One) and Joseph Proud-Bellamy (Social Labour)
1988: def. Stanley Howlin (One), Joseph Proud-Bellamy (Social Labour) and Annabeth Random (Three - The Real Alternative)
1992: def. Jay Mixson (One), Joseph Proud-Bellamy (Social Labour) and Annabeth Random (Three - The Real Alternative)
07: Madison O'Malley (One-Two Unionist-Three - The Real Alternative "Progressive Coupon") 1995-1997
1995: def. Samuel Catts (TWO.The Liberals), William Pitt (Two Unionist), Annabeth Random (Three - The Real Alternative) and Liz Fry (Social Labour)
08: Joseph Proud-Bellamy, 3rd Earl of Proudhon (Social Labour-led "Wartime Government") 1997-2005

09: Madison O'Malley (One-Two Unionist coalition, then majority) 2005-2011
2005: def. Liz Fry (Social Labour), William Pitt (Two Unionist), Quentin Lyle (TWO.The Liberals) and Zephyr Raincoat (Three - The Real Alternative)
2009: def. Skylar White (Two), Liz Fry (Social Labour), William Pitt (Two Unionist) and Zephyr Raincoat (Three - The Real Alternative)
10: Frankie Edison (One majority) 2011-2014
11: William Pitt (Two-Two Unionist coalition, then Two majority) 2014-2015*
2014: def. Skylar White (Two), Frankie Edison (One), Zephyr Raincoat (3ARTH) and Bobbie Black (Social Labour)
12: Skylar White (Two majority) 2015-2022
2017: def. Simon Bright Eyes (One), Miranda Nixon (3ARTH), Frankie Edison (One (Secular)) and Bobbie Black (Social Labour)
13: Frankie Edison (One (Secular)-Social Labour-3ARTH coalition, then One (Secular)-Social Labour coalition) 2022-2027
2022: def. Skylar White (Two), Bobbie Black (Social Labour), Simon Bright Eyes (One) and Miranda Nixon (3ARTH)
2026: def. Danny Bloom (Two), Alex Thorsson (One), Bobbie Black (Social Labour), Jack Proud-Bellamy (Socialist Four) and Miranda Nixon (3ARTH)
14: Cameron Davies (One (Secular)-Social Labour coalition, then One (Secular)-led "Remain United" coalition) 2027-2032
2031: def. Tammy Tyler (Two), Alex Thorsson (One), Jack Proud-Bellamy (Socialist Four) and Bobbie Black (Social Labour)
15: Fergus MacDonald (Two majority) 2032-
2032: def. Alex Thorsson (One), Cameron Davies (One (Secular)), Jack Proud-Bellamy (Socialist Four) and Harry Bleak (Threecology)

As the Secular Ones reel from falling down to third, the impact of the Exexit referendum continue to be felt as Social Labour, the once great left-wing party of unions, has shrank down to merely a coalition partner of the Seculars and was finally wiped out this election, replaced totally by Jack Proud-Bellamy's Socialist Four League. Meanwhile, the greenie Threes has returned to Parliament under a new name, that of, erm, "Threecology"

As the radical liberal Fergus MacDonald announce his cabinet, Examplia quakes at the thought of the radical Twoism they can expect
 

wilcoxchar

Well-known member
A quick idea I had after reading today that Andrew Cuomo and Beau Biden formed a friendship partly over being the sons of prominent politicians.


The Palindrome of History:

George H. W. Bush (TX)/Dan Quayle (IN): Republican, 1989-1993
Mario Cuomo (NY)/Joe Biden (DE): Democratic, 1993-2001
Mary Landrieu (LA)/Mel Carnahan (MO): Democratic, 2001-2005

Fred Thompson (TN)/Tommy Thompson (WI): Republican, 2005-2009
Robin Carnahan (MO)/Mitch Landrieu (LA): Democratic, 2009-2017
Beau Biden (DE)/Andrew Cuomo (NY): Democratic, 2017-2025

Ben Quayle (AZ)/George P. Bush (TX): Republican, 2025-2029
 

moth

Mothleton
Location
Portsmoth

Part One​


1989-1993: Andrew Harris/Richard DuPont (Democratic)
def. 1988: William Taft/Graham Bilk (Republican)
def. 1992: Rufus H. Law/Patricia Clark (Republican)

1993-1993: Richard DuPont/vacant (Democratic)
1993-1993: Richard DuPont/Curtis Johnson (Democratic)


Richard DuPont always wanted to be a somebody. Born in America’s first state on the banks of the namesake, he found little dignity growing up in the crushing poverty of the Great Depression. Despite his name, his family had no money to speak of; his father was a day labourer paving highways and building parks. His mother worked mixing chemicals at the company that bore his family name, but from which they didn't bear the fortunes. By the time DuPont was fifteen, both were dead. By the time he was twenty, he was an engineer, fighting Chinese troops while on the backfoot in Korea. Returning home in 1953, he entered the mechanics trade, taking a job for Chrysler in Newark. He was quick to affiliate with the United Auto Workers, and by 1958 had become a Union Rep. His ambition was not limited to these mere flirtations with the trade unions, however. At the age of 30, he found himself the Democratic Mayor of Newark. At the end of his term, he entered the Delaware General Assembly.

This was not the House he had his ambitions limited to. Finding feet as a fiery orator and an effective campaigner, DuPont quickly took sight of Delaware’s At-Large seat. Harris McDowell’s defeat in the 1966 federal election put an opening into the Democrats three-man congressional delegation, one that DuPont sought to fill; at the age of 37, he fought the primaries, and beat William V Roth in the general election, taking Delaware for the Democrats. Among the more liberal members of the House, DuPont was narrowly re-elected thrice, before finally being taken out by Republican Pete du Pont (no relation). Defeat was but a minor set back. His time in the House left him hungry to rise higher. During the lull of his political life, DuPont accepted an executive position at Chrysler. For the first time in his life, money was no problem. Expensive suits, sharp shoes, and slicked hair; his transformation from a scruffy trade unionist fire-spitter to a slick CDM’er was in itself a reflection of the transformation in Democratic Party, away from McGovernites and towards the Jimmy Carter's. Winning the Democratic nod in 1976, DuPont stormed the state and took the Senate seat on the coattails of Carter’s landslide. He remained there for the next 12 years.

DuPont’s time in the senate can broadly be summarised with his transformation from a CDM’er to an Atari Democrat, and from a peacenik to a hawk. In 1988, he decided to forego reelection. Instead he would run for President. The field was predictably crowded; Vice President Taft was largely seen as weak and ineffectual, despite running a bastard of a campaign for nomination. DuPont’s own campaign was aggressive, well-funded, but incoherent. His liberal fire traded little currency after his 12 years as a moderate. Sharp shoes and well-cut cloth did little to impress the people of Iowa or New Hampshire. Coming a weak third, DuPont suddenly regretted his promise to surrender his Senate seat. At 57, his career wasn’t over, but it was certain that it couldn't continue in Delaware. He quit the campaign shortly after crushingly disappointing returns in South Carolina. The charismatic and young Andrew Harris, a mere decade younger but with the energy of a man twice that, romped his way across the country, leaving the middle-aged DuPont wondering why he didn’t run in ’84.

And then a call came. Harris offered DuPont position as running mate. With little to lose, DuPont accepted, and with it, he was brought into office with Harris on the back of a landslide. His time as Vice President was unhappy; the reelection itself was drag. Neither him nor Harris got on well, although did their best to hide this behind closed doors. Chafing under the notion that he was just in the backseat, DuPont began making his overtures to becoming the driver. Indeed, it is understood that he was prepping his own campaign for ’96 before ’92 ended. Harris’ sudden death of an embolism in 1993, shortly following his second inauguration, took the nation by shock. DuPont wanted to be President, but not like this. Sworn in and given the keys to the kingdom, once his own Vice President was in place, he set out on his plan. It was one that would fight the poverty DuPont knew all too well, to break up the monopolies he started his career rallying against, to bring in new labor laws, Medicare for all, and a million other nice things that, even with a Democratic Congress, he’d have never accomplished. His dream was to be the next FDR. His destiny was to be another Harry Truman But instead he is remembered for these nice things.

And for making the decision to select a black man as his Vice President.

Richard DuPont was shot only once. The bullet split his heart in Reno; he was dead before he hit the ground. The crowd shrieked in horror as the gunman turned the pistol on himself. He had been angry that the President has picked a black man as Vice President; he was angry because his daddy taught him to be when they desegregated the schools. He had voted for Harris and DuPont, he even shook his hands with the Vice President when he came into town to promise that the Democrats would bring the jobs back. And now both men lay dead on slabs, and Curtis Johnson was President.


1993-1994: Curtis Johnson/vacant (Democratic)
1994-1997: Curtis Johnson/Mitch O’Rourke (Democratic)


Curtis Johnson never wanted to be President. Even as a young boy, the idea repulsed him. As a young man, he derided fellow activists who dreamed of assuming the office. For him, the power of the Presidency was White Power; the White House was built by slaves for their Master; the brick and mortar that made Washington was soaked in black blood. As he grew older, taking part in the Civil Rights movement on the front lines, taking beatings by police while marching arm in arm with his community, Johnson's stance didn't soften, but he increasingly viewed the power of Washington as one that could be used against the white structure, and for the benefit of those who suffered beneath it. Elected to the 7th District of Maryland in 1976, for the next thirteen years Johnson became a strong voice in the black congressional caucus, although never stood out among his peers. He would in his later half of his career serve on the Foreign Affairs Committee, although never Chaired.

Johnson was considered to be largely unremarkable. Next to others in the BCC, such as the firespeaker Malcom Woodrow of New York's 16th, and the parliamentarians such as Abe L. Smith of Mississippi's 2nd, he was hardly a stand our figure, to the point that the Maryland Congressman was intending to retire to the quiet life of academia in 1994. His unremarkably may have been why he became Vice President; when President Harris died and President DuPont was tasked with choosing the man to occupy second place, Johnson was top of the short list. After some debate with his friends, Johnson reluctently accepted. He felt it his duty to do so; he was no Sherman. The position was basically ceremonial, in Johnson’s mind, and there was no chance he'd end up in that palace of white supremacy. Not to mention that, as he would later claim, DuPont merely needed him to 'satisfy the black vote'. But to be the first black Vice President presented a chance to do more than that, it was the chance to provide a shining example of how far a black man in America could go. To show to the community Johnson had pounded pavement and been beaten with nightsticks during the Civil Rights era for what the fight was for. Resigning his beloved 7th District, Johnson took the oath and keys to the door of the Number One Observatory Circle. Preparing for the next four years, Johnson remarked that he had “time to think and time to act”. DuPont’s assassination mere months later cut that time short.

Thrust into the safe-room of a North Dakotan Trade Show, and sworn in while the Secret Service made sure another assassin wasn’t lurking in the shadows, the third President in a single year wasn’t feeling particularly secure. Curtis Johnson was the first Black President in US history. He was also the first to have been placed into office despite having never faced the electorate. Calming a nation shaken by the sight of two Presidential caskets in six months, Johnson should have been a unifying figure, but rather he was one who lacking in a certain presence. It was clear to everyone that he didn’t want to be President. From the way he walked, talked, stood, and sat, every inch of him screamed out in horror at becoming the owner of that House he so despised. His first television broadcast to the grief-stricken nation rang hollow as he struggled with his composure and his tone, unable to strike 'Presidential', and settling on 'diplomatic'. Behind the scenes, he declared this to his wife, his children, his staff, and anyone who’d listen how much he hated his job, the White House, and the agony it caused him to stand beneath a painting of Washington and Jefferson and have to smile. But for three years he soldiered on, with his Vice President, the former Governor of Rhode Island Mitch O’Rourke, at his side. A liberal domestic policy, such as expansion of healthcare, of welfare, and support of labor unions, with outreach to the black communities, was pursued. A more ambitious foreign policy followed.

Johnson was in a unique position as President: Communism in Eastern Europe had transitioned into capitalism. The Soviet Union has become the People’s Federation, and Germany had reunited. America had won the cold war; but could it win the peace? Foreign Aid and investment in the Easter Bloc skyrocketed. Billions upon billions were poured into the formed communist bloc, propping up fragile economies as they found their feet, funding pro-democracy programmes, and helping fund and restructure militaries that had once been poised to destroy America. Pressure was put onto South Africa to end apartheid; tensions were eased in the Congo as Johnson saw peace as a priority. In Northern Ireland, both Johnson and O’Rourke tried to help with peace talks, although Prime Minister Campbell was frosty at best towards his American peer- a consequence of his Eton-to-Oxford upbringing, Johnson would remark in his memoirs, although O'Rourke's Irish roots irked the Conservative Establishment. Stateside, some would call Johnson a traitor for his actions abroad; his skin colour made these calls easy for the right to make. Others saw Johnson’s ambition as fearful, as his new Pax Americana could settle American homogeny for another century, but leave it open to globalisation. Johnson's foreign policy, however, was largely approved of. The economy had a surplus, taxes were low, Johnson's programmes were largely uncontroversial, even if those from the right would make issue of the increased welfare system. After the 1994 midterms returned the Democrats with majorities in Congress, Johnson felt he could be more ambitious as he weighed his reelection chances. However events north of the Border in Canada would prove fatal.

The resounding success of the Quebec sovereignty movement bore its fruits following referenda in October 1995. Although irksome, Johnson was prepared to work with both Quebec and Canada, even if the former was bound economically to the latter. However, in the following year, something strange happened: Canada collapsed. Quebec turned out to be merely the first domino. Saskatchewan followed, as did Alberta, British Columbia, Manitoba, and ultimately Yukon. The five would unify within weeks as the ‘Western Union’, transforming into a markedly conservative petrostate. Quebec itself became a failed state within a few weeks of the Western Union’s emergence; strongmen took control and shortly thereafter French speaking militiamen crossed into Ontario, and declared the French speaking regions of the Province Pays d'en-haut. America watched in stunned silence as Canada tore itself apart, reacting only when the economy took a blow. By the time of the election, the dark shroud of a recession had swept over the land. The programmes Johnson had spent the surplus on were now centre stage at policy debates; stories of welfare queens and cheats and of how the money sent abroad flooded the nightly news. Canada and the recession ultimately killed Johnson's chances of reelection. Despite his best attempts, the President couldn’t step up for America, and his failure to provide a confident voice left a gaping void in the political system. Dropping out of the primaries, he left his Vice President to clean up; but O’Rourke was too tightly tied to the President and was defeated in November.

Following his successors inauguration, Johnson retired from public life. Taking a position at the University of Maryland Eastern Shore, he taught politics, resurfacing from time to time give opinion, make public appearances on behalf of the BCC, and to write his memoirs. He remained in Maryland until his death in 2010.
 
Last edited:

Part One​


1989-1993: Andrew Harris/Richard DuPont (Democratic)
def. 1988: William Taft/Graham Bilk (Republican)
def. 1992: Rufus H. Law/Patricia Clark (Republican)

1993-1993: Richard DuPont/vacant (Democratic)
1993-1993: Richard DuPont/Curtis Johnson (Democratic)


Richard DuPont always wanted to be a somebody. Born in America’s first state on the banks of the namesake, he found little dignity growing up in the crushing poverty of the Great Depression. Despite his name, his family had no money to speak of; his father was a day labourer paving highways and building parks. His mother worked mixing chemicals at the company that bore his family name. By the time he was fifteen, both were dead. By the time he was twenty, he was an engineer fighting Chinese troops while the back foot in Korea. Returning home in 1953, DuPont entered mechanics, taking a job for Chrysler in Newark. He affiliated quickly with the United Auto Workers, and by 1958 he had become a Union Rep. His ambition was not limited to these mere flirtations with the trade unions, however. At the age of 30, he was mayor of Newark; at the end of his term, he entered the Delaware General Assembly.

This was not the House he had his ambitions limited to. A fiery orator and an effective campaigner, DuPont quickly took sight of Delaware’s At-Large seat. Harris McDowell’s defeat in the 1966 HoR election put an opening into the three-man Congressional delegation, one that DuPont was quick to fill; at the age of 37, he fought and William V Roth and took Delaware for the Democrats. Among the more liberal members of the House, DuPont was narrowly re-elected thrice, before finally being taken out by Republican Pete du Pont (no relation). This was no matter to DuPont; his time in the House left him hungry to rise higher. Entering an executive position at Chrysler, money quickly became no problem for DuPont. Noted for his expensive suits, sharp shoes, and slick hair, his transformation from a scruffy trade unionist fire-spitter to a slick CDM’er was itself a reflection of the transformation in Democratic Party, away from McGovern and towards Jimmy Carter. Winning the Democratic nod in 1976, DuPont took the Senate seat on the coattails of Carter’s landslide; he would remain there for the next 12 years.

DuPont’s time in the senate can broadly be summarised with his transformation from a CDM’er to an Atari Democrat, from a peacenik to a hawk. In 1988, he decided to forego election; instead he would run for President. The field was predictably crowded; Vice President Taft was largely seen as weak and ineffectual, despite running a bastard of a campaign for nomination. DuPont’s campaign was aggressive, well-funded, but incoherent. His liberal fire traded little currency after his 12 years as a moderate. Sharp shoes and well-cut cloth did little to impress Iowa or New Hampshire. Coming third, DuPont regretted surrendering his Senate seat. At 57, his career wasn’t over, but it was certain that it wouldn’t continue in Delaware. He quit the campaign shortly after crushingly disappointing returns in South Carolina. The young and handsome Andrew Harris romped his way across the country, and the middle-aged DuPont was left wondering why he didn’t run in ’84.

And then a call came. Harris offered DuPont position as running mate. With little to lose, DuPont accepted- and with it, he was brought into office with Harris on a landslide. His time in office was unhappy; the reelection was drag. Neither him nor Harris got on well. Chafing under the notion that he was just in the backseat, DuPont wanted to be the driver. Indeed, it is understood that he was prepping his own campaign for ’96 before ’92 ended. Harris’ sudden death of an embolism in 1993, shortly following inauguration took the nation by shock. DuPont wanted to be President, but not like this. Sworn in and given the keys to the kingdom, there was much DuPont did; and once his own Vice President was in place, he set out on a vast legislative plan, one to fight the poverty DuPont knew too well, to break up the monopolies he started his career rallying against, to bring in new labor laws and Medicare for all and a million other nice things that, even with a Democratic Congress, he’d have never accomplished a single thing, and his dreams of being the next FDR would have been foiled. Instead, he is remembered for these nice things.

And for making the decision to select a black man as his Vice President.

Richard DuPont was shot only once. The bullet split his heart in Reno; he was dead before he hit the ground. The crowd screamed; the gunman turned the pistol on himself. He had been angry that the President has picked a black man as Vice President; he was angry because his daddy taught him to be when they desegregated the schools. He had voted for DuPont; he even shook his hand when the former Vice President shook his hand and promised to bring the jobs back. And now they both lay dead on slabs, and Curtis Johnson was President.


1993-1994: Curtis Johnson/vacant (Democratic)
1994-1997: Curtis Johnson/Mitch O’Rourke (Democratic)


Selected to be Vice President shortly after President DuPont’s ascension as a way of, in DuPont’s own words, ‘satisfy the black vote’, the former Maryland Congressman makes history when his predecessor dies and he becomes America’s first black President, and the first to become President despite having never been voted for. Running an administration largely on the promise of not seeking re-election, Johnson pursues a moderate domestic policy, however has an ambitious foreign policy.

Curtis Johnson never wanted to be President. Even as a young boy, the idea repulsed him. As a young man, he derided fellow activists who dreamed of assuming the office. For him, the power of the Presidency was White Power; the White House was built by slaves for their Master; the brick and mortar that made Washington was soaked in black blood. As he grew older, taking part in the Civil Rights movement on the front lines, taking beatings by police while marching arm in arm with his community, Johnson's stance didn't soften, but he increasingly viewed the power of Washington as one that could be used against the white structure, and for the benefit of those who suffered beneath it. Elected to the 7th District of Maryland in 1976, for the next thirteen years Johnson became a strong voice in the black congressional caucus, although never stood out among his peers. He would in his later half of his career, serve on the Foreign Affairs Committee, although never Chaired.

Johnson was considered to be largely unremarkable. Next to others in the BCC, such as the firespeaker Malcom Woodrow of New York's 16th, and the parliamentarians such as Abe L. Smith of Mississippi's 2nd, he was hardly a stand our figure, to the point that the Maryland Congressman was intending to retire to the quiet life of academia in 1994. His unremarkably may have been why he became Vice President; when President Harris died and President DuPont was tasked with choosing the man to occupy second place, Johnson was top of the short list. After some debate with his friends, Johnson reluctently accepted. He felt it his duty to do so; he was no Sherman. The position was basically ceremonial, in Johnson’s mind, and there was no chance he'd end up in that palace of white supremacy. To be the first black Vice President presented a chance to provide a shining example of how far a black man in America could go; to show to the community Johnson had pounded pavement and been beaten with nightsticks during the Civil Rights era for what the fight was for. Resigning his beloved 7th District, Johnson took the oath and keys to Number One Observatory Circle. Preparing for the next four years, Johnson remarked that he had “time to think and time to reflect”. DuPont’s assassination mere months later cut that time short.

Thrust into a safe-room and sworn in while the Secret Service made sure another assassin wasn’t lurking in the shadows, the third President in a single year wasn’t feeling particularly secure. Curtis Johnson was the first Black President in US history. He was also the first to have been placed into office despite having never faced the electorate. Calming a nation shaken by two Presidential caskets in six months, Johnson should have been a unifying figure, but he was one who lacking in a certain presence. It was clear to everyone that he didn’t want to be President. From the way he walked, talked, stood, and sat, every inch of him screamed out in horror at becoming the owner of a House he so despised. His first television broadcast to the grief-stricken nation rang hollow as he struggled with his composure. Behind the scenes, he declared this to his wife, his children, his staff, and anyone who’d listen how much he hated his job, the white house, and everything. But for three years he soldiered on, with his Vice President, the former Governor of Rhode Island Mitch O’Rourke, at his side. A moderate domestic policy, such as expansion of healthcare, of welfare, and support of labor unions, with outreach to the black communities, was formed. A more ambitious foreign policy followed.

Johnson was in a unique position as President: Communism in Eastern Europe had transitioned into capitalism. The Soviet Union has become the People’s Federation, and Germany had reunited. America had won the cold war; but could it win the peace? Foreign Aid and investment in the Easter Bloc skyrocketed. Billions upon billions were poured into the formed communist bloc, propping up fragile economies as they found their feet, funding pro-democracy programmes, and helping fund and restructure militaries that had once been poised to destroy America. Pressure was put onto South Africa to end apartheid; tensions were eased in the Congo as Johnson saw peace as a priority. In Northern Ireland, both Johnson and O’Rourke tried to help with peace talks, although Prime Minister Campbell was frosty at best towards his American peer- a consequence of his Eton-Oxford upbringing, Johnson would remark. Stateside, some called Johnson a traitor; his skin colour made these calls easy for the right to make. Others saw Johnson’s ambition as fearful; his new Pax Americana could settle American homogeny for another century, but leave it open to globalisation. Johnson's foreign policy, however, was largely approved of. The economy had a surplus, taxes were low, Johnson's programmes were largely uncontroversial, even if those from the right would make issue of the increased welfare system. After the 1994 midterms returned the Democrats with majorities in Congress, Johnson felt he could be more ambitious as he weight his reelection chances. However events north of the Border in Canada would prove fatal.

The resounding success of the Quebec sovereignty movement bore its fruits following referenda in October 1995. Although irksome, Johnson was prepared to work with both Quebec and Canada, even if the former was bound economically to the latter. However, in the following year, something strange happened- Canada collapsed. Quebec was merely the first domino. Saskatchewan followed, as did Alberta, British Columbia, Manitoba, and Yukon. The latter four would form the ‘Western Union’, a markedly conservative petrostate. Quebec itself was a failed state within a few weeks of the Western Union’s emergence; strongmen took control, and shortly thereafter French speaking militia crossed into Ontario, and declared the north of the Province Pays d'en-haut. America watched as Canada tore itself apart, and the economy took a blow. By the time of the election, a recession had swept through America. The programmes Johnson had spent the surplus on were now centre stage; stories of welfare queens and cheats, and of how the money sent abroad could be spend in America flooded the nightly news. The recession killed Johnson's chances of reelection. The President, despite his attempts, couldn’t step up, and his failure to provide a confident voice left a gaping void in the political system. Quitting the Primaries, he left his Vice President to clean up; but O’Rourke was too tightly tied to the President.

Following his successors inauguration, Johnson retired from public life. Taking a position at the University of Maryland Eastern Shore, he taught politics, where he remained until his death in 2010.
That's probably the most personality-driven post in here. Could be a short story in its own right.
 

Turquoise Blue

Ambiguously Tibby
Patreon supporter
Location
Kemr, FK
Presidents of the First Symphonian Republic
01: Andromeda Cass (Liberal Republican, supported by Socialists) 1184-1196
1184: def. Shaindel O'Berne (Viridian), Omar Brady, 2nd Viscount Barleybone (Monarchist)
1190: def. Kuwat Boyd (Viridian), Omar Brady, 2nd Viscount Barleybone (Monarchist)
"The Mother of the New Republic"
The prophetic visionary Andromeda Cass was elected in 1184 in a landslide over conservative elder lawyer Shaindel O'Berne who had ties to the far-right Nationalist Party for the Restoration of Democracy, and thus was unappealing to a much more radical-thinking people, and the Monarchists who were sore about the Republic being a thing and calling for the restoration of the Monarchy and so chose an elder peer who was a loud critic of "the radical wild-eyed way" Cass and the Liberals were doing it. But Cass won

In her twelve years as President, Cass oversaw the formation of many "Republican ethics" that would later on develop into core values of Symphonia for centuries. Yet the Liberal Republicans were tiring after many years in power and lost the 1189 election to the Viridians - now rebranded as a moderate pro-republic green-y centre-conservative party. Cass however, won 1190 handily on unbeatable personal popularity over local unknown planetary governor Kuwat Boyd and Omar Brady running yet again

Declining to run for a third term, she chose to hand over to a new generation of leaders

02: Lucas Ewart (Independent, supported by Viridians and Monarchists) 1196-1208
1196: def. Mitra Azenov (Liberal Republican, supported by Socialists)
1202: def. Renata Napoletani (Liberal Republican), Edite Heath (Democratic Socialist)
"Child of the Valkyrie"
Lucas Ewart was not his mother the once-dictator of the Empire. That much was clear. While Jordis had fiery nationalist passion, Lucas was much more withdrawn. Still conservative, he had a much more establishment bent to him than his mother had. And he was the only candidate the centrist Viridians and conservative Monarchists could agree to as a common candidate to kick out the Lib Reps. It took them years to persuade him to throw his hat into the ring, such was his hesistance at running due to being the son (and "heir" according to some Nat holdouts) of a Basic supremacist dictator who tore the country apart in such a way that it tore apart the credibility of a thousand-years-old Empire

But nominated he was, and in a close and bitter election with the Lib Rep-Socialist common candidate the Presiding Officer of the Senate Mitra Azenov, the centre-conservatives seized victory. They was to have their man in the Technicolour Hall for the next six years. In those six years, Lucas Ewart would have to deal with the ministry of someone who once encouraged his mother to embrace her nationalist fantasies and fund her rise to power only to turn on her and orchestrate her downfall and death [according to Lucas], that of Callope Kedzierski. The relationship between President and Premier has never been as cold nor as personal nor as bitter as the one between Ewart and Kedzierski

As Kedzierski oversaw a social revolution, President Ewart kept aloof, only saying that as President, he was to remain the head of state and keep out of government affairs. But when Kedzierski started to flounder, Ewart, perhaps out of a sense of sheer cold-blooded vengeance, refused to accept any proposed new elections or anybody to replace Kedzierski. No, the woman herself wanted to stay, and Ewart wanted her to stay. It was a destructive loop that ended up with the destruction of Kedzierski as a political force

Re-elected handily over a split opposition, Ewart had his eyes on a third term. But the Liberal Republicans, sore about the way he destroyed their beloved Premier, dug out extremely old documents that suggested that, instead of the clueless son he claimed to be, that he actually helped further his mother's fascist regime. The whole Ewart-Kedzierski feud ended up with everyone destroyed in politics. What a tragedy

As the President denied those documents, he nevertheless announced that he was not running for a third term "following in Cass' path"

03: Violet Leon (Independent, supported by Viridians and Monarchists) 1208-1214
1208: def. Edite Heath (Democratic Socialist, supported by Liberal Republicans)
"Head In The Clouds"
The Viridians and Monarchists, reeling from the Ewart Letters, scrambled to find a new common candidate. And one they did in Fleet Admiral Violet Leon. A respected admiral, she oversaw the growth of the Further Space Fleet that would keep order in Symphonia's frontier. And she was a very popular and well-known person, especially in adventure comics enjoyed by the youth where her daring adventures were breathlessly told

The 1208 election was expected to be close, but in the end people rallied to the Admiral over the Senator. However, Leon proved to be a rather partisan president [unlike the more personal feud Ewart had] and this alienated left-leaning supporters which doomed her re-election

04: Neptune Dirix (Independent, supported by Liberal Republicans and Democratic Socialists) 1214-1222
1214: def. Violet Leon (Independent, supported by Viridians and Monarchists)
"Love's Labour's Lost"
The presidency of Neptune Dirix would be remembered poorly. At the start, it was well. The prominent labour leader, philanthropist and adoptive father of five orphans won over a weary country tired of their partisan, insufferable, president, and won easily

Then everything went to shit. Over his eight years (a law was passed extending the term from six years to eight in 1210), things just fell apart. The economy stagnated. Social issues turned back. A government devoid of ideas. A president who waffled on everything. The two government parties turning on to each other and resulting into the Dem Socs leaving. In 1222, the people wanted a new face

05: Cristiano Van Hoorn (Union, then Union, supported by Community, then Republican Union) 1222-1251*
1222: def. Neptune Dirix (Independent, supported by Liberal Republicans), Govinda Yuen (Democratic Socialist)
1230: def. Astrid Molnar (Liberal Republican), Alexa Begbie (Democratic Socialist)
1238: def. Aura Stevens (Independent, supported by planetary councils), Ismini Ibbot (Liberal Republican, supported by Democratic Socialists)
1246: def. Elzbieta Siskin (Community), Takis Pekkanen (Development)
"Old Flint"
The presidency of General Van Hoorn can be a case study on how Symphonian politics radically shifted during the Middle Period of the First Republican Era. This traditional man with traditional views was first elected President in 1222 on a "no fuss" non-partisan while not being non-partisan ticket of firm conservatism and military views. While Symphonia faced its first major war, Premier Siskin and President Van Hoorn firmly led the country through it. Siskin was of the localist-y liberal-conservative Community Party, contrasting with Van Hoorn's more traditional unitarian view of society - "one people, one nation" - that increasingly defined his Union Party. Yet they got on well, especially as their parties were in wartime coalition together. When the war was finished in 1237, questions started to be Asked about the future of the country

And an eccentric businesswoman with a zeal for building announced her independent campaign for the Presidency, backed up by many planetary councils, the first time that was used to qualify someone to be on the ballot. Aura Stevens claimed that "in order to go into the future, we have to build, build, build. We must ignore tradition and build monuments to our greatness. Build homes, build space stations, build!" And she had appeal. The 1238 election was closer than many thought it would be, but Van Hoorn managed to be the first President to be elected to a third term. With Stevens and her new Development Party criticising Van Hoorn as "King Cristiano", many feared that he would increasingly rule for life

There were two elections in 1246, one which was the general election which returned a Community majority under Cai Rodrigues. Rodrigues was a firm libertarian, deploring Van Hoorn's traditional views, and they managed to convince former Premier Siskin to come out of retirement to run for the Presidency in the presidential election later that year. The Liberal Republicans and Democratic Socialists, acutely aware of the shaky path their candidate would have even if united, and saw both Community and Development as dangerous - to them Development was representative of the radical pro-business view of industry, "More building, more perfection!" and Community a libertarian party that would destroy everything - so they swallowed their hesistance and approached the dwindling Union Party and President Van Hoorn to arrange an alliance or merger

Emerging from that was the "Republican Union", a broad-tent 'party' based around two things - Social Responsibility and National Unionism. And in a close three-way election, General Van Hoorn pulled it off yet again. A fourth term. Even as Community and Development shouted themselves hoarse about "King Cristiano", the Republican Union would later go on to win the 1249 general election, showing people supported them

Some muttering about possibly asking President Van Hoorn to run for a fifth term in 1254, eight more years on to his thirty two, would cease when he slumped over his desk, dead. Serving his country took too much, and people panicked. What was they to do when their President dies?

--: Tendai Lewis (Republican Union, then Democratic Socialist) 1251-1252
--: Angelica Notoriano (Community) 1252-1254
"Premiers in Duty of the President"
Premier Tendai Lewis was informed that by the Constitution of 1184, that he would have to serve as "Acting President" as long as he was Premier, until the regularly scheduled election in 1254. With the Republican Union falling apart with the death of President Van Hoorn, he announced that the Democratic Socialists would be once a thing again. This was followed by the Liberal Republicans doing the same. The Union Party? They were by that point just the party of the President and his own family, and his family chose to back the Lib Reps instead

The 1252 election was a bitter disappointment for the ex-Republican Union as Community won a majority and Angelica Notoriano assumed duties of the President as the new Premier. This she handled fairly non-controversially

06: Caron Bisset (Community, supported by Noruives Liberal League, then by Democratic Socialists and Liberal Republicans) 1254-1270
1254: def. Aura Stevens (Development, supported by planetary councils), Wilfrid Garret (Democratic Socialist), Andrina Kocsis (Liberal Republican)
1262: def. Takis Pekkanen (Development)
"Shifting Winds"
The presidency of Caron Bisset can be defined by one word - "chaos". With Community and Development both trying to woo over the liberals and socialists, they became... well, odd. Community by the 1250s became a centrist regionalist party, arguing for more power to the regions and dropped the explicit libertarianism while Development went full blown neoliberal, arguing that Community was too social conservative. And so the coalitions of the Parliament of the time was one where Development and Community were at times supported and opposed by the Lib Reps and Dem Socs. In 1254, Bisset was opposed by the other three parties which split enough to enable him to win the election in a blowout

But by 1262, Development enjoyed a majority and threw its coalition partners out, which meant that Community could persuade them to back them and their party in their search for power. Hence why the two endorsed Bisset in his search for re-election against Governor Pekkanen

But by 1270, the tide was turning against both Community and Development as people increasingly turned to the Left

07: Laura Biancardi (Democratic Socialist, supported by Liberal Republicans (and Development before 1278)) 1270-1283
1270: def. Caron Bisset (Community, supported by "Maverick" Liberal Republicans, Democratic Socialists and Development)
1278: def. Polly Walton (Community, supported by Development)
"Love's Labour's Won"
President Biancardi was the first left-wing president since her adopted father Neptune Dirix. And she followed in his footsteps, rising to become the new head of the solar trade union that he once helmed. And in 1270, she ran for the Democratic Socialist nomination and managed to win it, earning the Lib Rep support and with Development eager to kick out Bisset, they jumped on the Biancardi bandwagon

Even though the embattled president managed to get support from the other three parties, it wasn't enough and he went down to defeat to the popular Biancardi. The Lib Reps led government and the Dem Socs had their woman in the Technicolour Hall. With radicalism on the menu, the Lib Reps and Dem Socs eagerly passed many laws, with Development only on board for the "Build Many Houses" and eventually leaving in the 1275 election that nevertheless returned a mandate for radical policies with only Lib Reps and Dem Socs. Reforms apiece were passed, health was renovated, necessary drugs had their price limit decreased, support of co-operatives emphasised, etc.

In 1278, Development allied with Community to stop the "socialism" of the Biancardi-Archambault government, yet faced a humiliating landslide as the people rallied behind their popular President. Even more radicalism was set and Symphonia was set to become a Socialist Republic with the dizzying possibilities that a new constitutional convention promised...

And then Top Men said "enough". The military stepped in. Business backed them. A New Republic would be established, yes. But not the Socialist Republic the President wished. It would be a New Republic with a pro-business constitution. The Presidency would be abolished too. As Community and Development merged as the Union for the New Republic and had a government backed by the military, the Left was tossed out

The era of the Presidency was over

--: Post of President suspended, post merged into Premier as part of the Second Republic 1283
 
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Avalanches

darkly horny
Location
Tampa, FL

Part One​


1989-1993: Andrew Harris/Richard DuPont (Democratic)
def. 1988: William Taft/Graham Bilk (Republican)
def. 1992: Rufus H. Law/Patricia Clark (Republican)

1993-1993: Richard DuPont/vacant (Democratic)
1993-1993: Richard DuPont/Curtis Johnson (Democratic)


Richard DuPont always wanted to be a somebody. Born in America’s first state on the banks of the namesake, he found little dignity growing up in the crushing poverty of the Great Depression. Despite his name, his family had no money to speak of; his father was a day labourer paving highways and building parks. His mother worked mixing chemicals at the company that bore his family name, but from which they didn't bear the fortunes. By the time DuPont was fifteen, both were dead. By the time he was twenty, he was an engineer, fighting Chinese troops while on the backfoot in Korea. Returning home in 1953, he entered the mechanics trade, taking a job for Chrysler in Newark. He was quick to affiliate with the United Auto Workers, and by 1958 had become a Union Rep. His ambition was not limited to these mere flirtations with the trade unions, however. At the age of 30, he found himself the Democratic Mayor of Newark. At the end of his term, he entered the Delaware General Assembly.

This was not the House he had his ambitions limited to. Finding feet as a fiery orator and an effective campaigner, DuPont quickly took sight of Delaware’s At-Large seat. Harris McDowell’s defeat in the 1966 federal election put an opening into the Democrats three-man congressional delegation, one that DuPont sought to fill; at the age of 37, he fought the primaries, and beat William V Roth in the general election, taking Delaware for the Democrats. Among the more liberal members of the House, DuPont was narrowly re-elected thrice, before finally being taken out by Republican Pete du Pont (no relation). Defeat was but a minor set back. His time in the House left him hungry to rise higher. During the lull of his political life, DuPont accepted an executive position at Chrysler. For the first time in his life, money was no problem. Expensive suits, sharp shoes, and slicked hair; his transformation from a scruffy trade unionist fire-spitter to a slick CDM’er was in itself a reflection of the transformation in Democratic Party, away from McGovernites and towards the Jimmy Carter's. Winning the Democratic nod in 1976, DuPont stormed the state and took the Senate seat on the coattails of Carter’s landslide. He remained there for the next 12 years.

DuPont’s time in the senate can broadly be summarised with his transformation from a CDM’er to an Atari Democrat, and from a peacenik to a hawk. In 1988, he decided to forego reelection. Instead he would run for President. The field was predictably crowded; Vice President Taft was largely seen as weak and ineffectual, despite running a bastard of a campaign for nomination. DuPont’s own campaign was aggressive, well-funded, but incoherent. His liberal fire traded little currency after his 12 years as a moderate. Sharp shoes and well-cut cloth did little to impress the people of Iowa or New Hampshire. Coming a weak third, DuPont suddenly regretted his promise to surrender his Senate seat. At 57, his career wasn’t over, but it was certain that it couldn't continue in Delaware. He quit the campaign shortly after crushingly disappointing returns in South Carolina. The charismatic and young Andrew Harris, a mere decade younger but with the energy of a man twice that, romped his way across the country, leaving the middle-aged DuPont wondering why he didn’t run in ’84.

And then a call came. Harris offered DuPont position as running mate. With little to lose, DuPont accepted, and with it, he was brought into office with Harris on the back of a landslide. His time as Vice President was unhappy; the reelection itself was drag. Neither him nor Harris got on well, although did their best to hide this behind closed doors. Chafing under the notion that he was just in the backseat, DuPont began making his overtures to becoming the driver. Indeed, it is understood that he was prepping his own campaign for ’96 before ’92 ended. Harris’ sudden death of an embolism in 1993, shortly following his second inauguration, took the nation by shock. DuPont wanted to be President, but not like this. Sworn in and given the keys to the kingdom, once his own Vice President was in place, he set out on his plan. It was one that would fight the poverty DuPont knew all too well, to break up the monopolies he started his career rallying against, to bring in new labor laws, Medicare for all, and a million other nice things that, even with a Democratic Congress, he’d have never accomplished. His dream was to be the next FDR. His destiny was to be another Harry Truman But instead he is remembered for these nice things.

And for making the decision to select a black man as his Vice President.

Richard DuPont was shot only once. The bullet split his heart in Reno; he was dead before he hit the ground. The crowd shrieked in horror as the gunman turned the pistol on himself. He had been angry that the President has picked a black man as Vice President; he was angry because his daddy taught him to be when they desegregated the schools. He had voted for Harris and DuPont, he even shook his hands with the Vice President when he came into town to promise that the Democrats would bring the jobs back. And now both men lay dead on slabs, and Curtis Johnson was President.


1993-1994: Curtis Johnson/vacant (Democratic)
1994-1997: Curtis Johnson/Mitch O’Rourke (Democratic)


Curtis Johnson never wanted to be President. Even as a young boy, the idea repulsed him. As a young man, he derided fellow activists who dreamed of assuming the office. For him, the power of the Presidency was White Power; the White House was built by slaves for their Master; the brick and mortar that made Washington was soaked in black blood. As he grew older, taking part in the Civil Rights movement on the front lines, taking beatings by police while marching arm in arm with his community, Johnson's stance didn't soften, but he increasingly viewed the power of Washington as one that could be used against the white structure, and for the benefit of those who suffered beneath it. Elected to the 7th District of Maryland in 1976, for the next thirteen years Johnson became a strong voice in the black congressional caucus, although never stood out among his peers. He would in his later half of his career serve on the Foreign Affairs Committee, although never Chaired.

Johnson was considered to be largely unremarkable. Next to others in the BCC, such as the firespeaker Malcom Woodrow of New York's 16th, and the parliamentarians such as Abe L. Smith of Mississippi's 2nd, he was hardly a stand our figure, to the point that the Maryland Congressman was intending to retire to the quiet life of academia in 1994. His unremarkably may have been why he became Vice President; when President Harris died and President DuPont was tasked with choosing the man to occupy second place, Johnson was top of the short list. After some debate with his friends, Johnson reluctently accepted. He felt it his duty to do so; he was no Sherman. The position was basically ceremonial, in Johnson’s mind, and there was no chance he'd end up in that palace of white supremacy. Not to mention that, as he would later claim, DuPont merely needed him to 'satisfy the black vote'. But to be the first black Vice President presented a chance to do more than that, it was the chance to provide a shining example of how far a black man in America could go. To show to the community Johnson had pounded pavement and been beaten with nightsticks during the Civil Rights era for what the fight was for. Resigning his beloved 7th District, Johnson took the oath and keys to the door of the Number One Observatory Circle. Preparing for the next four years, Johnson remarked that he had “time to think and time to act”. DuPont’s assassination mere months later cut that time short.

Thrust into the safe-room of a North Dakotan Trade Show, and sworn in while the Secret Service made sure another assassin wasn’t lurking in the shadows, the third President in a single year wasn’t feeling particularly secure. Curtis Johnson was the first Black President in US history. He was also the first to have been placed into office despite having never faced the electorate. Calming a nation shaken by the sight of two Presidential caskets in six months, Johnson should have been a unifying figure, but rather he was one who lacking in a certain presence. It was clear to everyone that he didn’t want to be President. From the way he walked, talked, stood, and sat, every inch of him screamed out in horror at becoming the owner of that House he so despised. His first television broadcast to the grief-stricken nation rang hollow as he struggled with his composure and his tone, unable to strike 'Presidential', and settling on 'diplomatic'. Behind the scenes, he declared this to his wife, his children, his staff, and anyone who’d listen how much he hated his job, the White House, and the agony it caused him to stand beneath a painting of Washington and Jefferson and have to smile. But for three years he soldiered on, with his Vice President, the former Governor of Rhode Island Mitch O’Rourke, at his side. A liberal domestic policy, such as expansion of healthcare, of welfare, and support of labor unions, with outreach to the black communities, was pursued. A more ambitious foreign policy followed.

Johnson was in a unique position as President: Communism in Eastern Europe had transitioned into capitalism. The Soviet Union has become the People’s Federation, and Germany had reunited. America had won the cold war; but could it win the peace? Foreign Aid and investment in the Easter Bloc skyrocketed. Billions upon billions were poured into the formed communist bloc, propping up fragile economies as they found their feet, funding pro-democracy programmes, and helping fund and restructure militaries that had once been poised to destroy America. Pressure was put onto South Africa to end apartheid; tensions were eased in the Congo as Johnson saw peace as a priority. In Northern Ireland, both Johnson and O’Rourke tried to help with peace talks, although Prime Minister Campbell was frosty at best towards his American peer- a consequence of his Eton-to-Oxford upbringing, Johnson would remark in his memoirs, although O'Rourke's Irish roots irked the Conservative Establishment. Stateside, some would call Johnson a traitor for his actions abroad; his skin colour made these calls easy for the right to make. Others saw Johnson’s ambition as fearful, as his new Pax Americana could settle American homogeny for another century, but leave it open to globalisation. Johnson's foreign policy, however, was largely approved of. The economy had a surplus, taxes were low, Johnson's programmes were largely uncontroversial, even if those from the right would make issue of the increased welfare system. After the 1994 midterms returned the Democrats with majorities in Congress, Johnson felt he could be more ambitious as he weighed his reelection chances. However events north of the Border in Canada would prove fatal.

The resounding success of the Quebec sovereignty movement bore its fruits following referenda in October 1995. Although irksome, Johnson was prepared to work with both Quebec and Canada, even if the former was bound economically to the latter. However, in the following year, something strange happened: Canada collapsed. Quebec turned out to be merely the first domino. Saskatchewan followed, as did Alberta, British Columbia, Manitoba, and ultimately Yukon. The five would unify within weeks as the ‘Western Union’, transforming into a markedly conservative petrostate. Quebec itself became a failed state within a few weeks of the Western Union’s emergence; strongmen took control and shortly thereafter French speaking militiamen crossed into Ontario, and declared the French speaking regions of the Province Pays d'en-haut. America watched in stunned silence as Canada tore itself apart, reacting only when the economy took a blow. By the time of the election, the dark shroud of a recession had swept over the land. The programmes Johnson had spent the surplus on were now centre stage at policy debates; stories of welfare queens and cheats and of how the money sent abroad flooded the nightly news. Canada and the recession ultimately killed Johnson's chances of reelection. Despite his best attempts, the President couldn’t step up for America, and his failure to provide a confident voice left a gaping void in the political system. Dropping out of the primaries, he left his Vice President to clean up; but O’Rourke was too tightly tied to the President and was defeated in November.

Following his successors inauguration, Johnson retired from public life. Taking a position at the University of Maryland Eastern Shore, he taught politics, resurfacing from time to time give opinion, make public appearances on behalf of the BCC, and to write his memoirs. He remained in Maryland until his death in 2010.
This might be my favorite post in the entire thread. I love it, very stylistic.
 

Turquoise Blue

Ambiguously Tibby
Patreon supporter
Location
Kemr, FK
Schroedinger's Brexit

Prime Ministers of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
Theresa May (Conservative majority, then minority) 2016-2019
2017: def. Jeremy Corbyn (Labour), Nicola Sturgeon (SNP) and Tim Farron (Liberal Democrat)

Asked for a firm Brexit agreement, Theresa May was pushed to desperation. And then she had it. The most innovative idea. The most crackpot. But an idea that she managed to get the Parliament and the EU to sign off on...

From the day of Brexit forth, there were to be two Britains. Both covering the same land, but different people...

Prime Ministers of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland (Leave)
Boris Johnson (Conservative majority, then Conservative-Independence coalition) 2019-2026
2019: def. Jeremy Corbyn (Labour), Gerard Batten (Independence), Arlene Foster (Democratic Unionist)
2023: def. Jeremy Corbyn (Labour), Carl Benjamin (Independence), Kate Hoey (Democratic Unionist)
John Cryer (Labour majority) 2026-2037
2026: def. Boris Johnson (Conservative), Anne-Marie Waters (Democratic Unionist), Carl Benjamin (Independence)
2031: def. Anne-Marie Waters (Democratic Independent), Jacob Rees-Mogg (Conservative)
Anne-Marie Waters (Democratic Independent-Conservative coalition, then Democratic Independent majority) 2037-2043
2037: def. John Cryer (Labour), Michael Gove (Conservative)
2042: def. Michael Gove (Conservative), John Cryer (Labour)
Leave Parliament suspended by monarchy "to further the Great Reconciliation" 2043

Prime Ministers of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland (Remain)
Theresa May (Conservative minority supported by Liberal Democrats) 2019-2021
Emily Thornberry (Labour majority) 2021-2033
2021: def. Theresa May (Conservative), Andrew Adonis and Vince Cable (Progressive-Liberal Democrat Agreement), Nicola Sturgeon (SNP)
2026: def. Andrew Adonis (Advance Ahead!), Alun Cairns (Conservative), Sian Berry and Patrick Harvie (Green), abstainment (SNP)
Andrew Adonis (Advance Ahead! majority [inc. Progressives, Liberal Democrats, Women's Equality]) 2033-2039
2033: def. Ruth Davidson (Conservative), Emily Thornberry (Labour), Sian Berry and Patrick Harvie (Green), David Elston (Pirate)
Stephen Kinnock (Labour-Conservative coalition, then Labour-Conservative-Advance Ahead! coalition) 2039-2043
2039: def. Alex Chalk (Conservative), Andrew Adonis (Advance Ahead!), Loz Kaye (ViSiON), Sian Berry and Shahrar Ali (Green)
2043: def. Loz Kaye (ViSiON), Alex Chalk (Conservative), Andrew Adonis (Advance Ahead!), Rachel Ashton (Plaid Cymru), Sian Berry (Green)
Remain Parliament suspended by monarchy "to further the Great Reconciliation" 2043

With the NHS being funded by the Leavers and slashed by the Remainers, while immigration is clamped down by Leavers and opened wide by Remainers, while Scotland is both in and not in the Union and of course, the European Question, Britain is at the brink of collapse as government confusion envelopes all as both Parliaments face crisis, one from an increasingly incoherent coalition, the other from a much too coherent one. Much to the anger of Leave PM Anne-Marie Waters and annoyance of Remain PM Stephen Kinnock, the monarchy chooses to step in

Citing the rise of riots, the sharp increase of confusion, the collapse of national consensus, the monarchy has suspended both Parliaments and well, according to the release - "all power shall go to the Crown for the duration". Time will tell what King William decides...
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This was really more of a piss-take than a serious take at what it would actually look like. I welcome people to take real tries at the idea
 

Ares96

First in Friendship, Fourth in Obesity
Published by SLP
I’m not sure a “serious take” on Brexit literally splitting Britain in half is something achievable or desirable. What you’ve got is plenty good enough.
 

Warthog

a product of cultural adsorption
Location
Mzansi
Schroedinger's Brexit

Prime Ministers of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
Theresa May (Conservative majority, then minority) 2016-2019
2017: def. Jeremy Corbyn (Labour), Nicola Sturgeon (SNP) and Tim Farron (Liberal Democrat)

Asked for a firm Brexit agreement, Theresa May was pushed to desperation. And then she had it. The most innovative idea. The most crackpot. But an idea that she managed to get the Parliament and the EU to sign off on...

From the day of Brexit forth, there were to be two Britains. Both covering the same land, but different people...

Prime Ministers of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland (Leave)
Boris Johnson (Conservative majority, then Conservative-Independence coalition) 2019-2026
2019: def. Jeremy Corbyn (Labour), Gerard Batten (Independence), Arlene Foster (Democratic Unionist)
2023: def. Jeremy Corbyn (Labour), Carl Benjamin (Independence), Kate Hoey (Democratic Unionist)
John Cryer (Labour majority) 2026-2037
2026: def. Boris Johnson (Conservative), Anne-Marie Waters (Democratic Unionist), Carl Benjamin (Independence)
2031: def. Anne-Marie Waters (Democratic Independent), Jacob Rees-Mogg (Conservative)
Anne-Marie Waters (Democratic Independent-Conservative coalition, then Democratic Independent majority) 2037-2043
2037: def. John Cryer (Labour), Michael Gove (Conservative)
2042: def. Michael Gove (Conservative), John Cryer (Labour)
Leave Parliament suspended by monarchy "to further the Great Reconciliation" 2043

Prime Ministers of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland (Remain)
Theresa May (Conservative minority supported by Liberal Democrats) 2019-2021
Emily Thornberry (Labour majority) 2021-2033
2021: def. Theresa May (Conservative), Andrew Adonis and Vince Cable (Progressive-Liberal Democrat Agreement), Nicola Sturgeon (SNP)
2026: def. Andrew Adonis (Advance Ahead!), Alun Cairns (Conservative), Sian Berry and Patrick Harvie (Green), abstainment (SNP)
Andrew Adonis (Advance Ahead! majority [inc. Progressives, Liberal Democrats, Women's Equality]) 2033-2039
2033: def. Ruth Davidson (Conservative), Emily Thornberry (Labour), Sian Berry and Patrick Harvie (Green), David Elston (Pirate)
Stephen Kinnock (Labour-Conservative coalition, then Labour-Conservative-Advance Ahead! coalition) 2039-2043
2039: def. Alex Chalk (Conservative), Andrew Adonis (Advance Ahead!), Loz Kaye (ViSiON), Sian Berry and Shahrar Ali (Green)
2043: def. Loz Kaye (ViSiON), Alex Chalk (Conservative), Andrew Adonis (Advance Ahead!), Rachel Ashton (Plaid Cymru), Sian Berry (Green)
Remain Parliament suspended by monarchy "to further the Great Reconciliation" 2043

With the NHS being funded by the Leavers and slashed by the Remainers, while immigration is clamped down by Leavers and opened wide by Remainers, while Scotland is both in and not in the Union and of course, the European Question, Britain is at the brink of collapse as government confusion envelopes all as both Parliaments face crisis, one from an increasingly incoherent coalition, the other from a much too coherent one. Much to the anger of Leave PM Anne-Marie Waters and annoyance of Remain PM Stephen Kinnock, the monarchy chooses to step in

Citing the rise of riots, the sharp increase of confusion, the collapse of national consensus, the monarchy has suspended both Parliaments and well, according to the release - "all power shall go to the Crown for the duration". Time will tell what King William decides...
=====
This was really more of a piss-take than a serious take at what it would actually look like. I welcome people to take real tries at the idea
Spectacular!

does it require a conscious force of will for you to perceive the other country occupying the same land?

And if so does this result in the return of Galahad to evict Mogg from Somerset?
 
I’m not sure a “serious take” on Brexit literally splitting Britain in half is something achievable or desirable. What you’ve got is plenty good enough.
I think @Sideways split Britain Geographically between remain and leave voting constituencies.

Which would mean I'd have to cross the border just to see my parents 30 minutes away