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Lists of Heads of Government and Heads of State

Roger II

Well-known member
Doesn't that make it easier for him to go in? No question about being a peer but still a respected elder statesman. Maybe it goes over easier if he agrees to step in on condition that he not stand for election as party leader and that he resign as PM prior to the next general election? Or would that not help.
 

Lapsed Pacifist

The Notorious R.A.B
The background is that following the secession of Scotland in a narrow referendum and a botched attempt at the reunification of Ireland leads to a Donbass-esque frozen conflict, the Conservatives are crushed by nationalist Labour Party under Peter Shore, who, living up to his reputation of "the only possible Labour Party leader of whom a Conservative leader had cause to walk in fear", leads the country for almost two decades, with Britain becoming much more insular and protectionist, withdrawing from multiple trans-Atlantic defense treaties and fiercely protecting its remaining imperial holdings, all the while upholding autarkic democratic socialism at home.

The Conservatives, receiving the blame for the effective collapse of the UK, implode into three or four successor parties. Most notably, the rural-focused, conservationist Country-Green-Democratic Alliance, the proto-Thatcherite New Tories and the transnational British Unionists. The Liberals also re-emerge as the dominant party of economic liberalism and internationalism in the vacuum. In this TL the rump UK never joins the European Community in the 1970s, which has subsequently evolved into a centralized, French-dominated European Confederation.

1973-1991 Peter Shore (Labour)
1975 (Majority) def. Reginald Mauling (Conservative), Jeremy Thorpe (Liberal), Enoch Powell (Independent Conservative)
1980 (Majority) def. Keith Joseph (New Conservative), Peter Walker ('One Nation' Conservative), Jon Pardoe (Liberal), Richard Body (Country), Norman St John-Stevas (Christian Democratic)
1984 (Minority) def. Peter Walker ('One Nation' Conservative), Jon Pardoe (Liberal), Richard Body (Country), Keith Joseph (New Conservative), Derek Enright (Christian Democratic)
1986 (Majority) def. Richard Body (Country Democrats), Alan Beith (Liberal), Margaret Bray (New Conservative), Peter Walker ('One Nation' Conservative), Tim Beaumont (Ecology)


Shore dies suddenly of a heart attack in 1991. Soon after, a dossier emerges revealing the Labour government's involvement in providing military aid to militias in Ulster. This, coupled with a stagnant economy, an increasingly corrupt and authoritarian public image and an alliance with the far-right spells disaster for Shore's successor, the former Minster of State for the Arts:

1991-1995 Robert Kilroy-Silk (Labour)
1991 (Minority with National Action confidence and supply) def. Richard Body & Tim Beaumont (Democratic & Green Alliance), Alan Beith & Michael Portillo (Liberal-New Conservative alliance), Michael Heseltine ('Continuity Conservative'), Max Mosley (National Action), David Owen (New Labour)

1995-2003 Nicholas Soames (Democratic & Green Alliance)
1995 (National Government with New Conservatives, Liberals, & Independent Labour), def. Alan Beith & Michael Portillo (Liberal-New Conservative alliance), Robert Kilroy-Silk (Labour), Ian Wrigglesworth & Ken Livingstone (Independent Labour), Michael Heseltine ('Continuity Conservative')
1997 (Majority) def. Frank Field (People's Labour), Michael Meadowcroft (Liberal), Ian Wrigglesworth (Radical Labour), John Redwood (New Conservative), Michael Heseltine (Unionist)
2001 (Coalition with Unionists) def. Margaret Beckett (People's Labour), Michael Meadowcroft (Liberal). Nick Bourne (Unionist), John Redwood (New Conservative), Margaret Hodge (Radical)


2003-2006 David Alton (Alliance)

2006-2008 Sarah Brinton (Liberal)
2006 (Coalition with Alliance & Unionists) def. Margaret Beckett (People's Labour) David Alton (Alliance), John Redwood (Freedom), Christopher Hitchens (Radical), Nick Bourne (Unionist)
2008 (Minority) def. Frank Field (People's Labour), Tom Burke (Alliance), John Redwood (Freedom), Oona King (Radical), Andrew Brons (Reform UK), Emma Nicholson (Unionist)


2009-2012 Frank Field (People's Labour)
2009- (Minority with Socialist Alternative confidence and supply) def. John Redwood & Andrew Brons (Freedom & Reform UK), Oona King (Radical), Philip Blond (Alliance),
Sarah Brinton (Liberal), Glenda Jackson & Billy Bragg (Socialist Alternative-Engage)


2012-2013 Simon Danzcuk (People's Labour)

2013-2018 Frank Goldsmith (Alliance)
2013 (Coalition with Liberals & Social Justice). def. Simon Danzcuk (People's Labour), Alan Duncan (Liberal), Oona King (Social Justice), Nadine Dorries (National), Graham Gove (Unionist), Glenda Jackson & John McDonnnell (Left Equality), Noel Edmonds (Independent)

2018- Nadine Dorries (National)
2018 (Grand Coalition with People's Labour) def. Kate Hoey (People's Labour), Frank Goldsmith (Alliance), Andy Burnham (Social Justice), Alan Duncan (Liberal), Guto Bebb (Plaid Cymru), John McDonnell (Left Equality), Graham Gove (Unionist), Noel Edmonds (Edmond's REAL England)


The worst nightmares of the liberal centre have manifested. True Blue and Blue Labour have united on an agenda of 'taking back control of our streets', British services for British workers, reducing immigration, withdrawal from the EFTA and an elected English parliament, while rolling back the powers of the Welsh, Cornish and Yorkshire Assemblies. Despite deriding each other as a 'racist' and a 'Marxist' respectively during the campaign, the new Prime Minister and Home Secretary seem to get on surprisingly well.

Oh well, at least Noel Edmonds wasn't given a Cabinet job.
 
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Japhy

We have no choice but to say: Ye, Aaron Burr
Published by SLP
Location
Army of the Potomac
Pronouns
He/Him
Talk Talk, Fight Fight v 0.5

Presidents of the Republic of Vietnam (South), Later President of the Federal Republic of Southern Vietnam, Vietnamese Confederation
1967-1971: Nguyễn Văn Thiệu / Nguyễn Cao Kỳ (National Social Democratic Front)
1967: Trương Đình Dzu /Trương Đình Dzu (“Dove” Independent)
1971-1975: Nguyễn Văn Thiệu / Trần Văn Hương (NSDF)
1971: Unopposed
1975: Trần Văn Hương / Nguyễn Văn Huyền (NSDF)
1975: Cancelled
1975-1977: Dương Văn Minh / Vũ Văn Mẫu (Independent / Forces for National Reconciliation)
1976: Nguyễn Cao Kỳ as Supreme Leader of the National Defence Committee
1975-1979: Dương Văn Minh / Trương Như Tảng (Independent / Alliance of National, Democratic, and Peace Forces)
1979-1982: Trương Đình Dzu / Trương Như Tảng (Vietnamese Fatherland Front --- Vietnamese Worker’s and Farmers Party / ANDPF)

1979: Dương Văn Minh / Nguyễn Thị Bình (VFF --- Independent / People’s Revolutionary Party, With support of the Revived Struggle Movement)

This is something I have had coming down the pipeline for sometime though its often been something that I've been worried about doing so consider this me hoisting up a test flag.

The fall of South Vietnam, like many decisive historical events is actually a bit more of a close-run thing then pop history will often think it is. Not only were there several chances for the South to actually blunt the 1975 offensive that dropped the curtain on more then a quarter-century of war in the country but there were political lifelines out as well. South Vietnam and North Vietnam were both at their limits in the final conflict and contrary to the 'revisionist' school there was considerable thought in the Communists of the North and the South towards what Victory would look like short of the hard to imagine at January 1st 1975 Image of the Tanks crashing of the RVN Presidential Palace.

Two things doomed the RVN that year to break first, one was the incompetence and strategic failures of President Thieu that denied the ARVN (Which was seeing a considerable increase in fighting quality compared to a decade before hand) any reserve forces, and the decision of the United States Government to secretly pilfer the 1974-1975 military support stockpiles to resupply the Israelis without letting it out into the open how utterly battered the IDF was in the aftermath of the Yom Kippur War. Here, political opponents of Golda Meir do leak that information out to the public, and the US Congress simply increases funding for support to the Israelis, the RVN stockpiles conveniently fogotten by them and thus, delivered. Following this, the French pressure on the Americans to see if Thieu can be removed as a means of seeking a Finlandized Piece is picked up by the State Department and the CIA. Thus as the 1975 Offensive commences the RVN is moving assets about, cutting deals, keeping families secured (Shockingly ARVN troops fought well when they knew their families were safe and not being abandoned on the Highway of Tears), and better defensive postions are being secured.

1975 will be defined by a series of absolutely bloody set piece battles as RVN and North Vietnamese Regular Troops go at it. The Viet Cong of the decade past are a hollow shell of themselves and the North is determined to win the war themselves this time (Actually True) meaning that Hue, Da Nang and Ban Me Thot become bloodbaths watched by the entire war. And then, when the Monsoon season finally returns, the French get their wish and "Big Mihn" the man who murdered the Diem Brothers in 1963 becomes President again, with calls for Communist inclusion in the government and a final, concession filled peace deal. Oppositon in the RVN and the Communist forces is high, fighting continues but it rapidly becomes a race to see if one side or the other can hold out just long enough to see exhaustion overtake the other.

Meanwhile the Central Highlands are Burning, the Killing Fields are underway, the Sino-Soviet-Vietnamese relationship is spiraling, and in 1976 Ronald Reagan is running for the Republican Presidential Nomination against a sitting President. The world wants to wash its hands of a war that it has never been able to. And the story I have in mind takes place.

I've actually gone both ways on if the South survives in the Story, but I figured for the sake of a list I should offer the "maximum" Southern Win. Vietnam on Paper and only on Paper reunified, Communist political factions assured key positions in the Southern regime, but Independence, even with only a paper pushing small army and Big Minh still hoping to establish himself as a dictator and open trade and travel with the Western World sees Vietnam heading towards a sort of Non-Aligned Sort of Communism, even as North and South and the USSR stay relatively close in the face of the Maoist behemoth.
 
Leaders of the Communist Party of China

1943-1959: Mao Zedong
1959-1963: Zhang Wentian
1963-0000: Liu Shaoqi

Peng Dehuai is the most repulsive villain and traitor to the Revolution that history has ever seen! Together with Zhang Wentian and Huang Kecheng, he commands the absolute loyalty of China's bourgeoisie and undermines the socialism of the Chinese people through rightism masquerading as pragmatism! Peng is the premier running dog of Western capitalism and KMT reactionaries! At Lushan, he spread lies; from Beijing, he spreads misery! To recover the Party and the nation, we the youth must abandon and trample upon the banner of Peng, and raise the banner of Liu! Only Liu Shaoqi can save the Party!
—Pamphlet Criticizing the Opportunists' Clique's Obstruction of the Revolutionary March of History
 
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Thande

UP THE WORKERS!
Published by SLP
I've not done one of those 'electoral history of an individual' ones yet, so here's one, inspired by something @OwenM suggested a while back:

Electoral history of Martin Winter (aka an Unlikely Number of Martins)
1999-2004: 1 of 3 Labour councillors for Stainforth ward, Doncaster Metropolitan Borough Council
2001: Candidate for Labour selection for candidacy for directly-elected Mayor of Doncaster
2001 Martin Vickers def. Martin Winter
2004-2005: 1 of 3 Labour councillors for Stainforth & Moorends ward, Doncaster Metropolitan Borough Council
2005-2009: Labour MP for Doncaster North
2005 def. Martin Williams (Community Group with Lib Dem endorsement), Martin Drake (Conservative), (all others >5%)
2009 Labour whip withdrawn due to MPs' expenses scandal

2009-2010: Independent MP for Doncaster North
2010: Independent candidate for Doncaster North
2010 Sandra Holland (Labour) def. Martin Greenhalgh (Conservative), Martin Williams (Community Group with Lib Dem endorsement), Martin Winter (Independent, inc.), (all others >5%)
2011: Independent candidate for Stainforth & Moorends ward, Doncaster Metropolitan Borough Council
2011 David Martin (Community Group) def. Ken Keegan (Labour, inc.), Martin Winter (Independent), Martin Drake (Conservative)
2012-2012: Independent councillor for Stainforth & Moorends ward, Doncaster Metropolitan Borough Council
2012 def. Paul Bissett (Liberal Democrat), John Sheppard (Labour), Martin Drake (Conservative) Stewart Rayner (Community Group)
2012-2013: Doncaster First--Independent Alliance councillor for Stainforth & Moorends ward, Doncaster Metropolitan Borough Council
2013-2014: Doncaster First--Independent Alliance Directly-elected Mayor of Doncaster
2013 def. Mick Maye (Liberal Democrat), Tony Revill (Labour), Martin Drake (Conservative)
2014-2016: UKIP Directly-elected Mayor of Doncaster
2016 Local government suspended by commissioners, remanded into custody
 
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Sideways

assigned sideways at birth
Published by SLP
Location
Teignmouth, Devon
Pronouns
She/Her
A Million to One Chance

2010-2015: David Cameron (Conservative) Coalition with Nick Clegg (Liberal Democrat)

2010: David Cameron (Conservative) [306] Gordon Brown (Labour) [258] Nick Clegg (Liberal Democrat) [57] Peter Robinson (DUP) [8] Alex Salmond (SNP) [6] Gerry Adams (Sinn Fein) [5] Iuen Wynn Jones (Plaid Cymru) [3] Margaret Ritchie (SDLP) [3] Caroline Lucas (Green Party England & Wales) [1] David Ford (Alliance) [1] Sylvia Herman (Independent) [1] John Bercow (Speaker) [1]

The Browne Review into student tuition fees was delayed until February and in deference to the Liberal Democrats it was agreed to leave a decision on the matter until after the Local Elections.

2011 AV Referendum: 50.1% Yes, 49.9% No (35.1% turnout)

The Conservatives initially ran a highly negative campaign on AV for the No side, which faltered after leaked emails described how they planned to cut off the Lib Dems from victory. David Cameron faced constant calls for a debate and finally when it happened it was between Ed Miliband and Nick Clegg, with David Miliband representing the "maybe" side. Things got worse for Cameron when he experienced a "brain fade" in the middle of an interview and couldn't answer basic questions on the problem with AV. With the tide slowly turning Yes edged to victory by a tiny margin.

David Cameron had been embarrassed by the dramatic failure of his own constitutional reform - elected Police and Crime Commissioners, and had lost authority with his own party. This, combined with the small margin of the Lib Dem's victory made many Conservative backbenchers reject the legitimacy of the referendum results. The Bill eventually passed only with the support of Labour.

The incident poisoned many Lib Dems against working closely with the Conservatives, leading to their decision to abstain on tuition fees. The Bill passed only with support from Labour following an amendment reducing the increase to £5k.

2012-2017: William Hague (Conservative) Coalition with Nick Clegg (Liberal Democrat)

2012: David Miliband (Labour) [288] David Cameron (Conservative) [277] Nick Clegg (Liberal Democrat) [66] Peter Robinson (DUP) [6] Alex Salmond (SNP) [5] Gerry Adams (Sinn Fein) [5] Iuen Wynn Jones (Plaid Cymru) [4] Patsy McGlone (SDLP) [3] Mike Nesbitt (UUP) [2] Natalie Bennett (Green Party England & Wales) [1] Naomi Long (Alliance) [1] Sylvia Herman (Independent) [1] John Bercow (Speaker) [1]

The 2012 election ended with the Conservatives gaining the most votes but Labour having the most seats allowing the Liberal Democrats a chance to pick their choice of coalition partners. Following the removal of David Cameron the two parties agreed to a referendum on STV, to be held in 2016. 2013 saw the legalisation of gay marriage and the non-renewal of Trident, in 2014 the devolved governments were granted new powers and in 2017 a new Gender Recognition Act granted self-ID for trans people of binary identities. In general it was felt that the Liberal Democrats had the upper hand in negotiations. The largest point of conflict between the two parties was the Snooper's Charter, which rumbled on as an issue throughout the term.

2014 Scottish Independence Referendum: 44.8% Yes, 55.2% No (83.9% turnout)

2016 STV Referendum: 42.8% Yes, 57.2% No

2017-2022: David Miliband (Labour) with Nicola Sturgeon (SNP)

2017: David Miliband (Labour) [278] William Hague (Conservative) [265] Nicola Sturgeon (SNP) [53] Nick Clegg (Liberal Democrat) [10] Nigel Farage (UKIP) [8] Arlene Foster (DUP) [6] Caroline Lucas and Darren Hall (Green Party England & Wales) [4] Robin Swann (UUP) [2] Gerry Adams (Sinn Fein) [5] Leanne Wood (Plaid Cymru) [2] Patsy McGlone (SDLP) [3] Naomi Long (Alliance) [1] Sylvia Herman (Independent) [1] Claire Wright (Independent) [1] John Bercow (Speaker) [1]

The Labour-SNP Coalition was an opportunity for both projects to develop their constitutional ideas. For Labour this meant reorganisation of the House of Lords. The new system would be made up half of experts and political leaders with appointed by the Lords Appointments Commission, a quarter with Lord Senators appointed to represent the different regions based on a proportion of votes in the last election, and a quarter by direct election using the D'Hondt system. The number of Peers was capped at 600.

The Labour-SNP government extended the Named Person Scheme to England and Wales, rewrote abortion law to formally legalise it, adopted the Nordic Model to assist sex workers, introduced a sugar tax, and banned advertising of junk food.

2019: English Regional Assemblies Referendum: 34.1% Yes, 65.9% No

English Regional Assemblies were meant to be introduced without a referendum, however an amendment introduced by Labour backbenchers stopped this and brought the idea to the public, where it floundered, serving mostly to ignite interest in an English Assembly and to provide another arena for the now constant UKIP internal struggles between the Carswellites, Faragists and the #FreeTommy party grassroots.

2022: Boris Johnson (Conservative) [388] David Miliband (Labour) [219] Nicola Sturgeon (SNP) [12] Jo Swinson (Liberal Democrat) [7] Emma Little Pengelly (DUP) [6] Michelle O'Neill (Sinn Fein) [5] Margaret Ritchie (SDLP) [3] Neil McEvoy (Plaid Cymru) [2] Robin Swann (UUP) [2] Caroline Lucas (Green Party England & Wales) [2] Naomi Long (Alliance) [2] Nigel Farage (UKIP) [1] John Bercow (Speaker) [1]

Achieving the first majority government in 12 years Boris plans to introduce a referendum on an English Parliament in 2023 and is negotiating with the EU in preparation for a referendum on Brexit. His party has benefited from the years long collapse of UKIP and has cannibalised it in many areas, improving the party's support in the north at the expense of Labour. Labour's response is, against all common sense, to turn to the left under Katy Clark. With Labour making itself unelectably left wing and opportunities to unify his party through a referendum on Brexit, it is likely that Boris Johnson will remain in power a very, very long time.
 

Thande

UP THE WORKERS!
Published by SLP
Not sure why but this made me laugh quite a bit.
I had got that far and then decided it didn't have enough of that yet to be realistic for either Doncaster or Winter.

The UKIP defection is probably the least realistic bit, because the previous results imply the coalition was avoided so where are their votes coming from in order to have the same surge as OTL - but I just liked the idea of it being a suitably unscrupulous bit of bandwagon-jumping.
 

Alex Richards

Lifetime cathedrals built: 8
Patreon supporter
Published by SLP
Location
Derbyshire
Would the Lib Dems really drop that far without the tuition fees sword hanging over them (which presumably would have hit them in 2012 if it was that big an issue)?
 

moth

Mothleton
Location
Portsmoth
That is an absurdly big drop for what, on paper at least, seems to have been an actually successful period in Government, the failed referendum on STV notwithstanding.
 

Alex Richards

Lifetime cathedrals built: 8
Patreon supporter
Published by SLP
Location
Derbyshire
That is an absurdly big drop for what, on paper at least, seems to have been an actually successful period in Government, the failed referendum on STV notwithstanding.
I mean there's still austerity, still being in government, still going into coalition with the Tories, so I'd expect a drop, but probably more like the 30s or low 40s.

Which is still potentially losing half their seats and a big defeat of course.
 

Japhy

We have no choice but to say: Ye, Aaron Burr
Published by SLP
Location
Army of the Potomac
Pronouns
He/Him
I'm not normally one to try and format-lawyer things @Sideways, but it seems to me that presenting every party leader in Bold makes it a bit harder to read. May just be the colors though.

That said for being an ignorant Yank the after effects seem quite fun to me. I feel like AV settings are really interesting.
 

Sideways

assigned sideways at birth
Published by SLP
Location
Teignmouth, Devon
Pronouns
She/Her
I'm not normally one to try and format-lawyer things @Sideways, but it seems to me that presenting every party leader in Bold makes it a bit harder to read. May just be the colors though.

That said for being an ignorant Yank the after effects seem quite fun to me. I feel like AV settings are really interesting.
No, format lawyering is useful. I am literally trying to work on a format. This forum has a limited colour pallet but hex codes are pretty easy to do so I was using the colour scheme from wikipedia, which is probably too bright. I think that's likely a big part of the problem

I mean there's still austerity, still being in government, still going into coalition with the Tories, so I'd expect a drop, but probably more like the 30s or low 40s.

Which is still potentially losing half their seats and a big defeat of course.
You could be right. I was working on the assumption that two extra years in government plus them already being re-elected once, plus more of a rise for UKIP and the Greens, plus a more centrist Labour Party would all lead to further squeezing of the Lib Dem number of seats.
 
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Alex Richards

Lifetime cathedrals built: 8
Patreon supporter
Published by SLP
Location
Derbyshire
You could be right. I was working on the assumption that two extra years in government plus them already being re-elected once, plus more of a rise for UKIP and the Greens, plus a more centrist Labour Party would all lead to further squeezing of the Lib Dem number of seats
The counter to this is that the instinctive 'oh no you've gone into coalition now you're terrible' and 'damn you student loans' votes would have left in 2012 so I'd expect the remaining vote-base to be more resilient- there's probably a lot of people who have gone 'Lib Dem 2010-Non Voter 2012-UKIP/Green 2017' but that wouldn't really affect Lib Dem seats held in 2012.

I suppose I'm just struggling to see what's the big thing between 2012 and 2017 that causes massive numbers of people to defect from the party.
 

moth

Mothleton
Location
Portsmoth
You could be right. I was working on the assumption that two extra years in government plus them already being re-elected once, plus more of a rise for UKIP and the Greens, plus a more centrist Labour Party would all lead to further squeezing of the Lib Dem number of seats
If they were cut down during the reelection I could see it, but reelected with a comfortable increase of nearly 10 seats? Even if UKIP and Greens surge and Labour lurched back into the centre, a base clearly exists ITTL for the LibDems (not to mention that Labour lurching to the centre would do more to eat into UKIP than the LibDems), one that would likely keep heads in the high 20s low 30s seat wise when the crunch comes, unless at some point in those 2 years they elected the ghost of Cyril Smith as Leader.