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Lists of Heads of Government and Heads of State

claybaskit

Active member

1952: (Robert A. Taft )Richard Nixon(Republican)*


1956: Richard Nixon (Charles Halleck(Republican)


1961-1962: Lyndon Johnson/Hubert Horatio Humphrey (Democrat)**


1960: Hubert Horatio Humphrey / Edmund Brown ( Democratic)

1964:
Hubert Horatio Humphrey / Edmund Brown ( Democratic)


1968-1973: Nelson Rockefeller/ George W. Romney (Republican)


*died of cancer
** Assainated
 

TheHatMan98

Well-known member
Oxford Academic Survey: Top 10 Prime Ministers of the 20th Century

(Or what happens when you stick every major British figure in a lottery, and try justify the results on a bottle of Johnnie Walker)

  1. Herbert Morrison (1942-1953) [1]
  2. Douglas Hogg (1924-1925, 1929-1936) [2]
  3. J.R. Clynes (1936-1942) [3]
  4. James Prior (1977-1986) [4]
  5. Anthony Eden (1954-1962) [5]
  6. Arthur Henderson (1908-1910, 1918-1920, 1925-1929) [6]
  7. Walter Long (1916-1918, 1920-1924) [7]
  8. Spencer Cavendish (1895-1908) [8]
  9. Tony Blair (1994-2000) [9]
  10. John Smith (1988-1994) [10]
[1] The Greatest British Prime Minister of the 20th Century, as voted for by the nation's finest academics. Not merely someone who won the war, as predecessors and successors did, but one that one who won the peace too. In addition to being the man who saw out the final (and arguably, hardest) days of the 2ndWW, Herbert Morrison was the man who conducted the peace that would govern Britain diplomatically, and the Consensus that governed it domestically, for the next 20 years. For his expert insight into municipal socialism, intra-Commonwealth diplomacy and local governance, Morrison rarely appears outside the to 10in any list, and here appears as the finest PM of the 20th Century.

[2] Douglas Hogg: he who set interwar Britain on the right path, and defined what modern conservativism means for the next 100 years. Although he was never popular in his own time, Douglas Hogg’s time in office writes better than he lived it, as the man who reaffirmed One Nationism in a Tory Party prone to Nationalism and Reaction, his moderation of the Right in the turbulent 30’s not only guided Britain through the Slump that proved ruinous for Europe and the Americas, but led its transmission from Empire to Commonwealth and guided it to the first hammer blow against fascism in the Suez War. Thought of better now than then, Hogg always defines the top of these kind of lists as what a PM can accomplish in turbulent times. A man who put Empire before Party, Hogg is the man all Young Conservatives hope to be.

[3] Hero of the Labour Right, Clynes not only established the Labour Party as a force that could take socialism to governance and keep it there by constitutional means, but one that proved its credentials for sound economics and patriotism beyond doubt. Clynes would secure the financial dominance of the Commonwealth, in spite of Indian Home Rule, after the Wall Street Crash, but led the allies of democracy against fascism and Stalinism, first in Spain, then across Europe in the 2nd WW. In defiance of a western ‘Market’ and eastern ‘State’ economy, as well as needing to forge a new path from his predecessor, Clynes introduced the ‘social’ aspect of Socialism with the Credit system of Mosely and Douglas that would balance Britain in its Production of Peace and the Consumption of War with fascist powers. The only reason he does not ascend the top spot in this (and other lists) is the failure of Clynes and his government to save Scandinavia for the United Nations, and the vote of no confidence that ensured he could not finish the work started in 1940.

[4] The controversial Father of the Nation, Jim Prior remains a fond twinkle of the eye of the average Briton, as the man who led it a way from the ravages of the 60s and 70s extremism. Prior not merely managed to reaffirm the Tory Position as ‘the Party of Government’, but redefined the British economy from the Morrisonion consensus. The Social Economy remains the driving force behind Britain’s economy to this day, first fostered under ‘Our Jim’, as such this, and his place in expanding Britain from being a mainly Commonwealth trader, define his position in the Top 5.

[5] Man of the Commonwealth should read the epithet of Sir Anthony Eden, for better or worse. It was Eden who simultaneously took a post-War Conservative Party kicking and screaming from its Edwardian, die-hards into the 20th Century and kept Britain as the moral conscience of the Western Democracies in the Cold War. Eden never flinched from accepting the Conservative position as the junior Party in the Wartime Coalition – a feat many of his senior colleagues managed – but neither did he give up on the solidarity of the British Commonwealth of his youth. As America kept badgering corners of the former British Empire to be less ‘Communist’, Eden was always ready to stand it the way of Washington or Moscow’s way, whether at Nasserist Cairo, Calcutta, Canberra or Apartheid Cape Town. Eden showed Britain as not the third Party between a Capitalist West or Communist East, but for a brief time the best of either sphere, a happy middle ground, that remains the ambitions of whichever Party in Global Politics.

[6] The indefatigable force behind Labour’s drive to power in the latter half of the 20th Century, ‘Uncle Arthur’ oversaw Labour from its highest heights and lowest lows pre-War and highest heights and lowest lows post-War. Not merely the man who proved that Labour could govern bit the man who proved (after a few false starts) that a socialist party could govern responsibly. For more than 10 years, Henderson flogged and drilled Hardie’s socialists away from Revolution towards a more Constitutional methodology after the turbulent 1890s, before he became the first Labour PM. After the false start of the People’s Budget (overturned by Roseberry in the 1910 election), Henderson was determined to prove Labour as Patriotic as any in British politics at the time, and defied MacDonald’s challenge in 1915 to join the Wartime govt., which proved more of a boost the his and Party popularity that allowed them to take the Khaki election in 1918. He consequently define post-War Global disarmament, and his govt of the 20s would lay the foundations of a welfare state that included a basic standard of living for the working class, state intervention in National Industry and attempt to redistribute Wealth that defined Labour until the 1960s. The dawn of the 1930s coincided with his retirement from frontline politics, and the polarised position of the times meant he could never quite reconcile with a Labour Party that had moved beyond him.

[7] He who won the War, but lost the Peace. Long was the die-hard Unionist, who at the darkest hour of the Haig Offensive and the Palestine Campaign, brought out the best in the British Empire. As France prevaricated, and the Liberals quarrelled, Long provided the quiet serenity that gave them breathing room, but never doubted the result would be victory. After the Liberals finally discredited themselves as a Party of Power, Long filled a vacuum that opened the space for the Victories of 1917: the triumph of British dreadnoughts at Sylt; blunting of the Central Powers Offensive in the Autumn; and, the innovation of allied tanks in the Great Offensive that brough the Kaiser to his knees. However, Peace was not to be Long’s suit, he remained intransigent to Irish Nationalism that resulted in the Kerry Massacres of 1918, and his threats of deploying British troops occupying Germany to Ireland definitively cost the Coalition the next election. However even after the return to power in 1920, Long still could not dance to the tune of popular opinion opining a policy of ‘consistent punishment’ that repudiated Labour on commitments regarding Irish partition; German occupation and reparation; Naval armaments, and Imperial-American trade.

[8] The first PM of the Century, and a man whose actions would define the first half of the Century. Appointed to rescue the Nation by the Queen at an Alliance of Liberals and Conservatives at the head of the ’95 Emergency, Cavendish’s tenure would be defined by one of stability at Home and Abroad. A Premiership split traditionally in two halves (pre and post Centennial), the only Liberal Unionist to hold the Premiership define his tenure by first Tsarist measures to the Unions and Working Class, grinding them underfoot with Scotland Yard and the Army, then a Bismarkian strategy of trying to out do them with the introduction of State Pensions, establishment of labour exchanges and electoral reform. Simultaneously, Cavendish reached an Entente with France and Russia that drew Britain into the Continental Alliance system. Despite the best of intentions however, all these culminated in Cavendish’s worst desires, a Labour government – not that he lived to see it…

[9] Blair was the man that saw out the end of the century, and for that remains hard done by. Although he tried his best to define a ‘New’ Labour Party, his efforts remained under cut by events within his own Party and Globally. As his predecessor had seen off the Left of the Party, Blair was left to establish the meaning of its Right. This Problem was not helped by shackling of Labour to the Liberals in the ‘Millennium Coalition’, Blair was consequently left trailing behind in the wake of a government even bigger than himself. With personalities like Ashdown, Prescott and Mowlam, Blair struggled to compete effectively. Nevertheless, Blair is commonly diagnosed as having peaked too early, but is accepted to be in the middle of a comeback that could reshape British politics amidst the Sterling Collapse.

[10] Really, Smith was defined more by what he didn’t do than what he did. A career cut short by his premature death, Smith was in the middle of rehabilitating Labour to Prior’s Social Economy and Britain and the Commonwealth to a world without a stand-off between Washington, Moscow and London. While Marxism crumbled, and Socialism scrounged for an alternative, Smith tried his best to fill the gap in the ability and limitations of State power, but was consistently undermined by the short comings of his own health. No doubt that had his physical health matched his intellectual, Smith would be much further astride this list.

1895-1908: Spencer Cavendish, Duke of Devonshire (Emergency, later Liberal Unionist)
1895 (Emergency Government) vs. Henry Hyndman (Social Democratic Federation) and O'Donovan Rossa (Irish Republican Brotherhood)
1896 (Majority, with Conservative and Liberal Unionist) def. William E. Gladstone (Liberal), John Dillon (INF)
1901 (Majority, with Conservative and Liberal Unionist) def. Henry Campbell-Bannerman (Liberal), John Dillon (IPP), Kier Hardie (LRC)
1906 (Minority, with Conservative and Liberal Unionist) def. Henry Campbell-Bannerman (Liberal), Kier Hardie (Labour Party), John Redmond (IPP)


1908: George Curzon, Lord Curzon (Conservative)

1908-1910: Arthur Henderson (Labour)
1908 (Minority, with S&C from IPP and some Liberal) def. George Curzon, Lord Curzon (Conservative), Henry Campbell-Bannerman (Liberal), John Redmond (IPP)

1910-1916: Archibald Primrose, Earl Roseberry (Liberal)
1910 (Minority, with S&C from Labour and IPP) def. George Curzon, Lord Curzon (Conservative), John Redmond (IPP), Arthur Henderson (Labour)
1915 (Wartime Coalition, with Conservative)


1916-1918: Walter Long (Unionist)
1916 (Wartime Coalition, with Liberal, some Labour, some IPP)

1918-1920: Arthur Henderson (Labour)
1918 (Minority, with S&C from Anti-Coalition Liberal and IPP) def. Walter Long (Unionist), David Lloyd George (Anti-Coalition Liberals), Eamon de Valera (Sinn Fein), Edward Grey (Pro-Coalition Liberals), John Dillon (IPP)

1920-1924: Walter Long (Unionist)
1920 (Majority) def. Arthur Henderson (Labour), Eamon de Valera (Sinn Fein), David Lloyd George (Radicals), Edward Grey (Liberals)

1924-1925: Douglas Hogg (Conservative)

1925-1929: Arthur Henderson (Labour)
1925 (Coalition, with Radicals) def. Douglas Hogg (Conservative), David Lloyd George (Radicals), Sir John Simon (Liberal)

1929-1936: Douglas Hogg (Conservative)
1929 (Majority) def. Arthur Henderson (Labour), Sir John Simon (Liberal), David Lloyd George (Radicals)
1933 (Majority) def. J.R. Clynes (Labour), Sir John Simon (Liberal)


1936-1942: J.R. Clynes (Labour)
1936 (Majority) def. Douglas Hogg (Conservative), Sir John Simon (Liberal)
1940 (Majority) def. Kingsley Wood (Conservative), Leslie Hore-Belisha (Liberal)


1942-1953: Herbert Morrison (Labour)
1942 (Wartime Coalition, with Conservatives and Liberals) def. Kingsley Wood (Conservative), Leslie Hore-Belisha (Liberal), Harry Pollitt (CPGB)
1945 (Majority) def. Samuel Hoare (Conservative), Sir Archibald Sinclair (Liberal)
1950 (Majority) def. Anthony Eden (Conservative), Sir Archibald Sinclair (Liberal)


1953-1954: Ellen Wilkinson (Labour)

1954-1962: Anthony Eden (Conservative)
1954 (Majority) def. Ellen Wilkinson (Labour), Violet Bonham Carter (Liberal)
1959 (Majority) def. Aneurin Bevan (Labour), Violet Bonham Carter (Liberal)


1962-1964: Reginald Maudling (Conservative)

1964-1969: Denis Healy (Labour)
1964 (Majority) def. Reginald Maudling (Conservative), Donald Wade (Liberal), John Gollan (CPGB), Tony Cliff (International Socialists)

1969-1973: Enoch Powell (Conservative)
1969 (Minority) def. Denis Healy (Labour), Tony Cliff (International Socialists), Donald Wade (Liberal), John Gollan (CPGB), John O’Brien (National Front)

1973-1977: Peter Shore (Labour)
1973 (Minority, S&C from IS and Liberal) def. Enoch Powell (Conservative), Tony Cliff (International Socialists), Eric Lubbock (Liberal), John O’Brien (National Front), John Gollan (CPGB)

1977-1986: James Prior (Conservative)
1977 (Majority) def. Peter Shore (Labour), Eric Lubbock (Liberal), Tony Cliff (International Socialists), John O’Brien (National Front)
1981 (Majority) def. Shirley Williams (Labour), Eric Lubbock (Liberal)
1985 (Majority) def. John Smith (Labour), Richard Wainwright (Liberal)


1986-1988: Edwina Currie (Conservative)

1988-1994: John Smith (Labour)
1988 (Majority) def. Edwina Currie (Conservative), Richard Wainwright (Liberal)
1993 (Majority) def. Edwina Currie (Conservative), Alan Beith (Liberal)


1994-2000: Tony Blair (Labour)
1998 (Coalition, with Liberal) def. Kenneth Clarke (Conservative), Alan Beith (Liberal)
 
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AnActualFam

Member
Location
Somewhere at Sea
Pronouns
He/Him
Edited this. forgot Jeremy Hunt's tenure as the shortest lasting PM in history (July-November 2019).

Now trying to work out how this govt would deal with COVID, and when the next election would be held. Would folks want to read more?
I know I may be late, but as someone who has spent a very stupid amount of time with the online Electoral Calculus thing this is amazing and I love it so much. If you would continue this I would totally read more.
 

SoldierOfChrist

Well-known member
Not that Longstreet's successor Lamar would need to worry about it; between the disenfranchisement of rebels by the loyalty oaths, the groundswell of anger from poor whites, and much tutting by those who didn't believe it Constitutional (the good kind, not the rebellious kind) for him to stand for election, he came a distant third and only succeeded in splitting the Democratic vote.
Bet this guy left himself wide open for Cincinnatus jokes
 

Blackentheborg

I can hear the blood on the moon
Location
Llareggub, Wales
Pronouns
He/Him
Oxford Academic Survey: Top 10 Prime Ministers of the 20th Century

(Or what happens when you stick every major British figure in a lottery, and try justify the results on a bottle of Johnnie Walker)

  1. Herbert Morrison (1942-1950) [1]
  2. Douglas Hogg (1924-1925, 1929-1936) [2]
  3. J.R. Clynes (1936-1942) [3]
  4. James Prior (1977-1986) [4]
  5. Anthony Eden (1950-1962) [5]
  6. Arthur Henderson (1908-1910, 1918-1920, 1925-1929) [6]
  7. Walter Long (1916-1918, 1920-1924) [7]
  8. Spencer Cavendish (1895-1908) [8]
  9. Tony Blair (1994-2000) [9]
  10. John Smith (1988-1994) [10]
[1] The Greatest British Prime Minister of the 20th Century, as voted for by the nation's finest academics. Not merely someone who won the war, as predecessors and successors did, but one that one who won the peace too. In addition to being the man who saw out the final (and arguably, hardest) days of the 2ndWW, Herbert Morrison was the man who conducted the peace that would govern Britain diplomatically, and the Consensus that governed it domestically, for the next 20 years. For his expert insight into municipal socialism, intra-Commonwealth diplomacy and local governance, Morrison rarely appears outside the to 10in any list, and here appears as the finest PM of the 20th Century.

[2] Douglas Hogg: he who set interwar Britain on the right path, and defined what modern conservativism means for the next 100 years. Although he was never popular in his own time, Douglas Hogg’s time in office writes better than he lived it, as the man who reaffirmed One Nationism in a Tory Party prone to Nationalism and Reaction, his moderation of the Right in the turbulent 30’s not only guided Britain through the Slump that proved ruinous for Europe and the Americas, but led its transmission from Empire to Commonwealth and guided it to the first hammer blow against fascism in the Suez War. Thought of better now than then, Hogg always defines the top of these kind of lists as what a PM can accomplish in turbulent times. A man who put Empire before Party, Hogg is the man all Young Conservatives hope to be.

[3] Hero of the Labour Right, Clynes not only established the Labour Party as a force that could take socialism to governance and keep it there by constitutional means, but one that proved its credentials for sound economics and patriotism beyond doubt. Clynes would secure the financial dominance of the Commonwealth, in spite of Indian Home Rule, after the Wall Street Crash, but led the allies of democracy against fascism and Stalinism, first in Spain, then across Europe in the 2nd WW. In defiance of a western ‘Market’ and eastern ‘State’ economy, as well as needing to forge a new path from his predecessor, Clynes introduced the ‘social’ aspect of Socialism with the Credit system of Mosely and Douglas that would balance Britain in its Production of Peace and the Consumption of War with fascist powers. The only reason he does not ascend the top spot in this (and other lists) is the failure of Clynes and his government to save Scandinavia for the United Nations, and the vote of no confidence that ensured he could not finish the work started in 1940.

[4] The controversial Father of the Nation, Jim Prior remains a fond twinkle of the eye of the average Briton, as the man who led it a way from the ravages of the 60s and 70s extremism. Prior not merely managed to reaffirm the Tory Position as ‘the Party of Government’, but redefined the British economy from the Morrisonion consensus. The Social Economy remains the driving force behind Britain’s economy to this day, first fostered under ‘Our Jim’, as such this, and his place in expanding Britain from being a mainly Commonwealth trader, define his position in the Top 5.

[5] Man of the Commonwealth should read the epithet of Sir Anthony Eden, for better or worse. It was Eden who simultaneously took a post-War Conservative Party kicking and screaming from its Edwardian, die-hards into the 20th Century and kept Britain as the moral conscience of the Western Democracies in the Cold War. Eden never flinched from accepting the Conservative position as the junior Party in the Wartime Coalition – a feat many of his senior colleagues managed – but neither did he give up on the solidarity of the British Commonwealth of his youth. As America kept badgering corners of the former British Empire to be less ‘Communist’, Eden was always ready to stand it the way of Washington or Moscow’s way, whether at Nasserist Cairo, Calcutta, Canberra or Apartheid Cape Town. Eden showed Britain as not the third Party between a Capitalist West or Communist East, but for a brief time the best of either sphere, a happy middle ground, that remains the ambitions of whichever Party in Global Politics.

[6] The indefatigable force behind Labour’s drive to power in the latter half of the 20th Century, ‘Uncle Arthur’ oversaw Labour from its highest heights and lowest lows pre-War and highest heights and lowest lows post-War. Not merely the man who proved that Labour could govern bit the man who proved (after a few false starts) that a socialist party could govern responsibly. For more than 10 years, Henderson flogged and drilled Hardie’s socialists away from Revolution towards a more Constitutional methodology after the turbulent 1890s, before he became the first Labour PM. After the false start of the People’s Budget (overturned by Roseberry in the 1910 election), Henderson was determined to prove Labour as Patriotic as any in British politics at the time, and defied MacDonald’s challenge in 1915 to join the Wartime govt., which proved more of a boost the his and Party popularity that allowed them to take the Khaki election in 1918. He consequently define post-War Global disarmament, and his govt of the 20s would lay the foundations of a welfare state that included a basic standard of living for the working class, state intervention in National Industry and attempt to redistribute Wealth that defined Labour until the 1960s. The dawn of the 1930s coincided with his retirement from frontline politics, and the polarised position of the times meant he could never quite reconcile with a Labour Party that had moved beyond him.

[7] He who won the War, but lost the Peace. Long was the die-hard Unionist, who at the darkest hour of the Haig Offensive and the Palestine Campaign, brought out the best in the British Empire. As France prevaricated, and the Liberals quarrelled, Long provided the quiet serenity that gave them breathing room, but never doubted the result would be victory. After the Liberals finally discredited themselves as a Party of Power, Long filled a vacuum that opened the space for the Victories of 1917: the triumph of British dreadnoughts at Sylt; blunting of the Central Powers Offensive in the Autumn; and, the innovation of allied tanks in the Great Offensive that brough the Kaiser to his knees. However, Peace was not to be Long’s suit, he remained intransigent to Irish Nationalism that resulted in the Kerry Massacres of 1918, and his threats of deploying British troops occupying Germany to Ireland definitively cost the Coalition the next election. However even after the return to power in 1920, Long still could not dance to the tune of popular opinion opining a policy of ‘consistent punishment’ that repudiated Labour on commitments regarding Irish partition; German occupation and reparation; Naval armaments, and Imperial-American trade.

[8] The first PM of the Century, and a man whose actions would define the first half of the Century. Appointed to rescue the Nation by the Queen at an Alliance of Liberals and Conservatives at the head of the ’95 Emergency, Cavendish’s tenure would be defined by one of stability at Home and Abroad. A Premiership split traditionally in two halves (pre and post Centennial), the only Liberal Unionist to hold the Premiership define his tenure by first Tsarist measures to the Unions and Working Class, grinding them underfoot with Scotland Yard and the Army, then a Bismarkian strategy of trying to out do them with the introduction of State Pensions, establishment of labour exchanges and electoral reform. Simultaneously, Cavendish reached an Entente with France and Russia that drew Britain into the Continental Alliance system. Despite the best of intentions however, all these culminated in Cavendish’s worst desires, a Labour government – not that he lived to see it…

[9] Blair was the man that saw out the end of the century, and for that remains hard done by. Although he tried his best to define a ‘New’ Labour Party, his efforts remained under cut by events within his own Party and Globally. As his predecessor had seen off the Left of the Party, Blair was left to establish the meaning of its Right. This Problem was not helped by shackling of Labour to the Liberals in the ‘Millennium Coalition’, Blair was consequently left trailing behind in the wake of a government even bigger than himself. With personalities like Ashdown, Prescott and Mowlam, Blair struggled to compete effectively. Nevertheless, Blair is commonly diagnosed as having peaked too early, but is accepted to be in the middle of a comeback that could reshape British politics amidst the Sterling Collapse.

[10] Really, Smith was defined more by what he didn’t do than what he did. A career cut short by his premature death, Smith was in the middle of rehabilitating Labour to Prior’s Social Economy and Britain and the Commonwealth to a world without a stand-off between Washington, Moscow and London. While Marxism crumbled, and Socialism scrounged for an alternative, Smith tried his best to fill the gap in the ability and limitations of State power, but was consistently undermined by the short comings of his own health. No doubt that had his physical health matched his intellectual, Smith would be much further astride this list.
1615108052293.png

OH SHID IS THAT THE RETURN OF THE TOP TEN RANKED FORMAT I SEE?!
(also great list btw, love the writeups)
 

claybaskit

Active member
35. Richard Nixon Republican Henry Cabot Lodge
def. John F. Kennedy Democratic Lyndon B. Johnson

36. Henry Scoop Jackson Democratic Wilbur Mills
def. Richard Nixon Republican Henry Cabot Lodge



1.Two days before the 1960 presidential debates J.f.k.'s Addison's acts up and the t.v. debates are cancelled. Kennedy also does not call m.l.k when he is in jail.
Once in office President Nixon orders the u.s. invasion of Cuba. Throughout Nixon's term as president racial riots break out all across the u.s.


2.Washington Senator Henry Jackson defeats Nixon in 1964.presidnet elect Jackson has promised to get a civil rights bill passed through congress. it looks feasible since the Democrats have majority in house and senate.
 
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Makemakean

Rootless Rōnin
Pronouns
Logical, unlike those in German
35. Richard Nixon Republican Henry Cabot Lodge
def. John F. Kennedy Democratic Lyndon B. Johnson

36. Henry Scoop Jackson Democratic Wilbur Mills
def. Richard Nixon Republican Henry Cabot Lodge



1.Two days before the 1960 presidential debates J.f.k.'s Addison's acts up and the t.v. debates are cancelled. Kennedy also does not call m.l.k when he is in jail.
Once in office President Nixon orders the u.s. invasion of Cuba. Throughout Nixon's term as president racial riots break out all across the u.s.


2.Washington Senator Henry Jackson defeats Nixon in 1964.presidnet elect Jackson has promised to get a civil rights bill passed through congress. it looks feasible since the Democrats have majority in house and senate.
Any particular reason why through is in blue?
 

Tsar of New Zealand

Sir Humphrey was the protagonist, change my mind
Location
Where people are one and they get things done
Pronouns
He/him/his
One of the few lists in this thread that I desperately want to see expanded upon thanks to the prose and imagination.
I actually tried to write a US presidential list in the world of a Confederate victory, based off Joshua ben Ari's idea of a post-Confederate Civil War North America as well as two concepts from TL-191 that particularly bothered me...
OH SHID IS THAT THE RETURN OF THE TOP TEN RANKED FORMAT I SEE?!
(also great list btw, love the writeups)
Follow-up, experimenting with a new format.

Each Dixie Boy Must Understand...

Historical rankings of the Presidents of the United States of America, per the Study of American Leadership, 2007

1. [LIST BEGINS]

...

4. John Sherman (Unionist, 1885 - 1893)
Restored American national pride after the "years of shame" with victory in the War of 1887. Reincorporated Northern Virginia and (following a plebiscite) Kentucky; secured the independence of Cuba and the restored Mexican Republic. Vetoed proposed Oriental Exclusion Acts and advocated for civil rights and stronger regulation of business, ushered in the Fifth Era of U.S. politics (c. 1884 - 1924). Reputation harmed in recent years by critical analysis of 'genocidal' policies towards American Indians [1], and monetarist criticism of the economic impacts of adherence to a strict gold standard.

...

19. George Pendleton (Democratic, 1873 - 1877)
Flawed response to the Panic of 1873 overshadowed his very real and enduring successes with public service reform. Regarded as a good President but not quite great. Harshly criticised at the time for his Administration's acquiescence to the Confederate annexation of Cuba, which alongside continued economic malaise resulted in his failure to secure renomination and contributing to the acrimony of the 1876 election.

...

23. Horatio Seymour (Democratic, 1865 - 1873)
Credited with ensuring Missouri, Maryland, and 'Restored' Virginia (reconfigured as Kanawha in 1865) remained in the Union. Pledged 'return to normalcy' and 'reconciliation' with the C.S; however, 'Reconciliation' policies failed to win the enduring friendship of the Confederacy or its allies. Successfully completed the first Transcontinental Railroad, otherwise maintained policies of limited government interference. Ranking is consistent with general reputation as 'middle-tier' President.

...

36. Abraham Lincoln (Republican, 1861 - 1865)
Election triggered the War of Secession over Southern states' fears that he would impose abolition. Defeat at the hands of the C.S.-British-French alliance sparked national despair, fractured the Republican Party, and set back America's entry to the world stage by decades. Enduring domestic policy successes (Homestead Act, land-grant universities, Transcontinental Railroad) have partially rehabilitated his reputation in recent years, particularly among members of the Labor Party (due to Lincoln's role in the establishment of the Socialist Party, a Labor predecessor). Although no longer universally vilified, remains indelibly marked by the War of Secession.

37. James G. Blaine (Republican, 1881 - 1885)
Second and final Republican President, his Administration was deeply discredited by failure of the Mexican Intervention, and destabilised by split of the Republican Party between "Half-Breeds" (who joined with Fremont's Liberty Party and moderate Democrats to form the Unionist Party), "Red-Raggers" (Socialists), and "Die-Hards". Initiated important military reforms carried out by Sherman Administration, otherwise pursued a timid foreign policy. Further impeded by deep corruption that tarnished the rump Republican Party's reputation for years, leading to the breakdown of the Fourth Era of U.S. politics (fl. 1856 - 1888).

...

41. Samuel Tilden (Democratic, 1877 - 1881)
Penultimate President elected as a Democratic Party candidate. Won a closely-contested election under questionable circumstances. Attempted to revive the economy from the depths of the Long Depression, but ultimately failed. Removed twelve stars from the flag to recognise the independence of the Confederate States. In addition to continuing use of the 'Democratic' label in the C.S., this secured the Democratic Party's reputation in the U.S. as the party of defeatism / treason and sealed its eventual demise at the federal level.

...

44. [LIST ENDS]

[1] As terminology may indicate, TTL is...not rosy in the area of Native American relations.
 

Tsar of New Zealand

Sir Humphrey was the protagonist, change my mind
Location
Where people are one and they get things done
Pronouns
He/him/his
And in the traditional format:

1861 - 1865: Abraham Lincoln (Republican)
1860 (with Hannibal Hamlin) def. John Breckenridge (Southern Democratic), John Bell (Constitutional Union), Stephen Douglas (Northern Democratic)
1865 - 1873: Horatio Seymour (Democratic)
1864 (with Clement Vallandigham) def. William Seward (Republican), John Frémont (Radical Democracy), George McClellan (American)
1868 (with Francis Blair) def. Salmon P. Chase (Republican), Charles Sumner (Radical)

1873 - 1877: George Pendleton (Democratic)
1872 (with Jeremiah Black) def. Schuyler Colfax (Republican), Henry Wilson (Liberty)
1877 - 1881: Samuel Tilden (Democratic)
1876 (with Allen Thurman) def. Benjamin G. Brown (Republican), John Frémont (Liberty), William Robert Taylor (Reform)
1881 - 1885: James Blaine (Republican)
1880 (with Benjamin G. Brown) def. Samuel Tilden (Democratic), Powell Clayton (Union and Liberty)
1885 - 0000: John Sherman (Unionist)
1884 (with Benjamin Butler) def. Thomas Hendricks (Democratic), William Wheeler (Republican), Abraham Lincoln (Socialist)
 

rosa

Well-known member
1981 - 1981: Fmr. Governor Ronald Reagan (Republican)
1980 (with George H.W. Bush) def. Pres. Jimmy Carter (Democratic), Rep. John Anderson (Independent)
1981 - 1981: Vice President George H.W. Bush (Republican)
• 1981 Assassinations of Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush
1981 - 1981:
Secretary Al Haig (Acting Republican)
1981 - 1981: Speaker Tip O'Neil (Democratic)
• 1981 Succession Crisis Resolved, Ann Armstrong (R) appointed to the Vice Presidency by Pres. O'Neal (D)
• 1981 Resignation of Tip O'Neil


1981 - 1985: Vice President Ann Armstrong (Republican)

1985 - 1990: Senator Gary Hart (Democratic)
1984 (with Geraldine Ferraro) def. Pres. Ann Armstrong (Republican), Fmr. Rep. John Anderson (National Union)
1988 (with Dick Cheney) def. Fmr. Secretary Al Haig (Republican), Fmr. Senator Eugene McCarthy (National Union)
• 1989 Impeachment and Resignation of Gary Hart

1990 - 1991:
Vice President Dick Cheney (Republican)
• Al Haig (R) appointed to the Vice Presidency by Pres. Cheney (R)
• Resignation of Dick Cheney (1991 Coup D'etat)

1991 - 1994:
Vice President Al Haig (Non-Partisan)
• Declaration of a national emergency and postponement of the 1992 elections, due to the 1991 SARS epidemic
• Attempted cancelation of the 1992 elections; declared unconstitutional; elections held in 1993


1994 -
Present: Fmr. Senator George McGovern (Non-Partisan)
1993 (with Ann Richards) def. Pres. Al Haig (Non-Partisan-Republican), Senator Jim Jeffords (Independent Republican), Governor Edwin Edwards (Anti-Corruption), Mayor Marion Berry (Democratic)
 

Time Enough

"Enthusiastic Cis Male Partner"
Pronouns
He/Him
1991 - 1994: Vice President Al Haig (Non-Partisan)
• Declaration of a national emergency and postponement of the 1992 elections, due to the 1991 SARS epidemic
• Attempted cancelation of the 1992 elections; declared unconstitutional; elections held in 1993
“I am in control here” he says before failing to take control. If anything he makes things worse.
 

Qaz_plm

White Castle soda bet
Location
Inbetween dreams and reality
Pronouns
She/her
From a thing I'm working that's AH as background
1929-1933:Hiram Johnson/Frank Orren Lowden(Republican)
1928:Al Smith/Joe T.Robinson(Democratic)
1933-1941:Franklin D. Roosevelt/John Nance Garner(Democratic)
1932:Hiram Johnson/Frank Orren Lowden(Republican)
1936:Charles L.McNary/Warren Green(Republican)

1941-1946:Franklin D.Roosevelt/Henry Wallace(Democratic) ±
1940:Robert A.Taft/Arthur Vandenberg(Republican)
1944:Harold Stassen/Earl Warren(Republican)

1946-1953:Henry Wallace/Huey Long(Democratic)

1948:Robert A.Taft/Joseph W. Martin Jr.(Republican),Strom Thurmond/Fielding L .Wright(Dixiecrat)
1953-1961:Douglas MacArthur/Earl Warren(Republican)
1952:Adlai Stevenson/Alben W.Barkley(Democratic)
1956:Estes Kefauver/Robert S.Kerr(Democratic)

1961-1963:John F.Kennedy/Lyndon B.Johnson(Democratic) ±
1960:Nelson Rockfeller/Cecil H. Underwood(Republican),Harry F.Byrd/Strom Thurmond(Southern Democrat)
1963-1965:Lyndon B.Johnson/Wayne Morse(Democratic)
1964:Barry Goldwater/Willam E.Miller(Republican)
1965-1971:Lyndon B.Johnson/Eugene McCarthy(Democratic) ±

1968:George Romney/Hiram Fong(Republican),George Wallace/Harland Sanders(American Independent)
1971-1973:Eugene McCarthy/John Connolly(Democratic)
1973-1977:Paul Laxalt/Ronald Reagan(Republican)
1972:Eugene McCarthy/John Connolly(Democratic)
1977-1981:George Wallace/Birch Bayh(Democratic)

1976:Paul Laxalt/Ronald Reagan(Republican)
1981-1989:Ronald Reagan/Howard Baker(Republican)
1980:George Wallace/Birch Bayh(Democratic)
1984:Gary Hart/Joe Biden(Democratic)

1989-1997:Gerry Ferraro/Dick Gephardt(Democratic)
1988:Bob Dole/Pete du Pont(Republican)
1992:Phil Gramm/Bob Dornan(Republican),Ross Perot/Lowell Weicker(Independent)

1997-2001:Ross Perot/Dick Lamm(Union of Independents)
1996:Dick Gephardt/Al Gore(Democratic),Oliver North/Steve Forbes(Republican)
2001-2009:Trent Lott/Donald Rumsfeld(Republican)
2000(First Round):Bill Bradley/Douglas Wilder(Democratic),Ross Perot/Dick Lamm(Union of Independents),Ralph Nader/Peter Camejo(Green)
2000(Second Round):Bill Bradley/Douglas Wilder(Democratic)
2004(First Round):Wesley Clark/John Edwards(Democratic),Hunter S.Thompson/Ralph Nader(Green),Donald Trump/Ron Paul(Union of Independents)

2004(Second Round):Wesley Clark/John Edwards(Democratic)
2009-2017:Jesse Jackson Jr./Sam Nunn(Democratic)
2008(First Round):Mitt Romney/Eric Cantor(Republican),Jello Biafra/Howie Hawkins(Green),Cynthia McKinny/Bob Barr(Union of Independent)

2008(Second Round):Mitt Romney/Eric Cantor(Republican)
2012(First Round):Newt Gingrich/Herman Cain(Republican),John McCain/Gary Johnson(Union of Independents)Jill Stein/Ajamu Barka(Green)

2012(Second Round):Newt Gingrich/Herman Cain(Republican)
2017-2019:John McAfee/Michael Flynn(Union of Independents)
2016(First Round):Sam Nunn/Tim Kaine(Democratic),Howie Hawkins/Dennis Lambert(Green),Mike Bloomberg/Jim Webb(Republican)
2016(Second Round):Sam Nunn/Tim Kaine(Democratic)

2019-2020:John McAfee/Ted Cruz(Republican) ±
2020-2021:Ted Cruz/Vacant(Republican)

Yes I know most of it is very unrealistic
 

Time Enough

"Enthusiastic Cis Male Partner"
Pronouns
He/Him
Can't Get You Out Of My Head:

Paramount Leader of China:
1978-1987: Deng Xiaopeng (CCP-Deng Thought)
1987-1995: Zhang Ziyang (CCP-Tuanpai)

1995-2007: Hu Jintao (CCP-Tuanpai)
2007-2010: Liu Yandong (CCP-Tuanpai)
2010-: Bo Xilai (CCP-New Left)

President of Russia:
1991-1993: Boris Yeltsin (Independent)

1991 (With Alexander Rutskoy) def: Nikolai Ryzhkov (CPSU), Vladimir Zhirinovsky (LDPSU), Aman Tuleyev (CPSU)
1993-1996: Alexander Rutskoy (Independent)
1996-2008: Alexander Lebed (Rodina)

1996 (With Dmitry Rogozin) def: Albert Makashov (CPRF), Ruslan Khasbulatov (Social Democrats), Grigory Yavlinsky (Yabloko)
2000 (With Dmitry Rogozin) def: Viktor Anpilov (CPRF), Ruslan Khasbulatov (Social Democrats), Eduard Liminov (National Bolsheviks), Grigory Yavlinsky (Yabloko)
2004 (With Sergey Baburin) def: Viktor Anpilov (CPRF), Mikhail Gorbachev (Social Democrats), Eduard Liminov (National Bolsheviks), Grigory Yavlinsky (Yabloko), Yegor Letov (Oborona)

2008-2016: Sergey Baburin (Rodina)
2008 (With Andrey Savelyev) def: Eduard Liminov (National Salvation Front), Alexander Rutskoy (Left Front), Yegor Letov (Oborona)
2012 (With Andrey Savelyev) def: Zakhar Prilepin (National Salvation Front), Maxim Suraykin (Left Front), Natalia Chumakova (Oborona)

2016-2020: Zakhar Prilepin (For Russia-Left Front)
2016 (With Darya Mitina) def: Andrey Savelyev (Rodina), Nadya Tolokno (Oborona)
2020-: Alexei Navalny (Rodina)
2020 (With Anna Kushchenko) def: Zakhar Prilepin (For Russia), Darya Mitina (Left Front), Nadya Tolokno (Oborona)

*Footage of Chaos in Russia during the Mid 90s, shootings, murders and businessmen in gaudy Suits are surrounded by bodyguards*

Curtis: Attempts to bring the Western concept of freedom and individualism had come to a grinding halt in Russia. Crime was rampant and with the death of Boris Yeltsin in the wake of the Constitutional Crisis it was without guidance as it continued into anarchy.

Into this chaos, came Alexander Lebed a man who sought to return Russia to order, using a vision of the future which took influence from the Pan-Slavic Nationalism of the past. But by bringing these visions back from the past, dark and sinister forces would come back with them.


*Footage of China in the Mid 00s, gangsters in gaudy Suits drive by, Farmers are crushed by police officer and protests occur*

Curtis: China in the Mid 2000s had become like Russia in the Early 1990s, Individualism and Money weren’t able to fill the void of the Chinese people. Crime was rampant, Corruption was endemic and a general sense of fear and malaise took over. But into this void would come a charismatic and enigmatic individual, one of the so called Princelings, children of the Cultural Revolution.

His name was Bo Xiali and his vision for China would have be one that would unite the Chinese people under the old ideas espoused during the Cultural Revolution. But by bringing back the forces of the past, Bo would bring back the demons that had been kept dormant since the Revolution.
 

Oppo

Erik Ƭ̵̬̊
Pronouns
any pronouns
1991-1993: Boris Yeltsin (Independent)
1991 (With Alexander Rutskoy) def: Nikolai Ryzhkov (CPSU), Vladimir Zhirinovsky (LDPSU), Aman Tuleyev (CPSU)
1993-1996: Alexander Rutskoy (Independent)
1996-2008: Alexander Lebed (Rodina)

1996 (With Dmitry Rogozin) def: Albert Makashov (CPRF), Ruslan Khasbulatov (Social Democrats), Grigory Yavlinsky (Yabloko)
2000 (With Dmitry Rogozin) def: Viktor Anpilov (CPRF), Ruslan Khasbulatov (Social Democrats), Eduard Liminov (National Bolsheviks), Grigory Yavlinsky (Yabloko)
2004 (With Sergey Baburin) def: Viktor Anpilov (CPRF), Mikhail Gorbachev (Social Democrats), Eduard Liminov (National Bolsheviks), Grigory Yavlinsky (Yabloko), Yegor Letov (Oborona)

2008-2016: Sergey Baburin (Rodina)
2008 (With Andrey Savelyev) def: Eduard Liminov (National Salvation Front), Alexander Rutskoy (Left Front), Yegor Letov (Oborona)
2012 (With Andrey Savelyev) def: Zakhar Prilepin (National Salvation Front), Maxim Suraykin (Left Front), Natalia Chumakova (Oborona)

2016-2020: Zakhar Prilepin (For Russia-Left Front)
2016 (With Darya Mitina) def: Andrey Savelyev (Rodina), Nadya Tolokno (Oborona)
2020-: Alexei Navalny (Rodina)
2020 (With Anna Kushchenko) def: Zakhar Prilepin (For Russia), Darya Mitina (Left Front), Nadya Tolokno (Oborona)
Really like this list - Prilepin is a quite interesting choice with his Soft NazBol ideology.
 

Time Enough

"Enthusiastic Cis Male Partner"
Pronouns
He/Him
Really like this list - Prilepin is a quite interesting choice with his Soft NazBol ideology.
Yeah, he also seemed like a type who would be happy to briefly ally with old school Marxist-Leninist/Stalinists for political gain before everything bursts into flame. He seems like one of the few competent Nat-Bol types (I say despite the fact he now leads a party that contains Steven Segal).

Also includes Technocratic Moderate Nationalist Alexei Navalny because it turns out that he’s allied himself with Nationalists and his own Nationalist tendencies.
 

Wolfram

Well-known member
Location
North Campus, Austin, Texas
Pronouns
he/him
Tsars of All The Russias (what if russia but japan with a hint of nepal)

1825-1861: Nikolay II Pavlovich
1861-1863: Aleksandr II Nikolayevich [1]
1863-1868: Konstantin I Alexandrovich [2]
1868-1895: Kseniya Konstantinovna [3]
1895-1914: Kseniya Konstantinovna (with Kirill Afanasiyevich Donskoy as Konsul [4])
1914-1925: Kseniya Konstantinovna (with Georgy Kirillovich Donskoy as Konsul)
1925-1944: Aleksandr III Gustavovich (with Georgy Kirillovich Donskoy as Konsul) [5]
1944-1948: Aleksandr III Gustavovich (with Pyotr Georgievich Donskoy as Konsul)
1948-1949: Aleksandr III Gustavovich (with Mikhail Georgievich Donskoy as Konsul)
1949-1961: Aleksandr IV Aleksandrovich (with Mikhail Georgievich Donskoy as Konsul)
1961-1967: Pyotr IV Aleksandrovich (with Mikhail Georgievich Donskoy as Konsul)
1967-1977: Pyotr IV Aleksandrovich (with Kirill Mikhailovich Donskoy as Konsul)
1977-1979: Konstantin II Petrovich (with Kirill Mikhailovich Donskoy as Konsul) [6]
1979-1982: Ivan VII Aleksandrovich (with Kirill Mikhailovich Donskoy as Konsul) [7]
1982-1984: Nikolay II Ivanovich (with Kirill Mikhailovich Donskoy as Konsul) [8]
1984-2015: Konstantin II Petrovich [9]
2015-: Aleksandr V Konstantinovich [10]

[1] The notion that Aleksandr's bodyguards deliberately failed to prevent his assassination by leftist revolutionary Nikolay Ishustin in order to shuffle the vaguely pacifistic and liberal young tsar off the stage has been a popular conspiracy theory ever since it happened, but there has been no evidence produced for it.
[2] The sheltered young tsar was content to leave most of his government in the hands of his advisors, but may have been planning to move forward with emancipating the serfs before his sudden death of meningitis. The 1990 exhumation of his body revealed no sign of poison, but could not conclusively rule it out.
[3] Despite the expectation that the throne would go to Konstantin's 23-year-old brother Vladimir, a combination of concerns about Volodya's tendencies towards lecherousness and binge-drinking and the desire by entrenched military interests to have a more easily-controlled monarch led to the crowning of Tsesarevna Kseniya. Kseniya's tightly-controlled childhood molded her into what appeared to be the perfect face on a "perfect dictatorship..."
[4] ...until Admiral Kirill Donskoy, the hero of the Nipponese War, shared his awesome scheme with the Tsarina - that the Russia she sincerely loved and believed in would be better served by having its trust placed in two people - a Tsarina as its spiritual leader and a Konsul, like the Nipponese institution of the shyogun, as its temporal ruler. And he knew just the right man for the job.
[5] Kseniya's son, unlike her, was, like most Russians, deeply aware both of his total control by the Konsul and his inability to do much about that. He spent the first few years of his reign a virtual prisoner in the Gatchina Palace before Georgy, the grimmer and more reactionary son of Kirill, decided he wasn't a threat.
[6] The Konsul's plans (or, rather, that of the Pryetor - even the shogun was increasingly being sidelined in favor of his staff by the '60s) were slightly derailed when the tsar took the opportunity of the Kupala Night parade to abruptly drive onto the grounds of the Dutch Embassy and request asylum. After a tense few weeks of standoff, the tsar and his family were allowed to abdicate and seek exile in Hungary.
[7] Konstantin II's uncle, who took over as one of the few loyal Romanovs left, became massively unpopular very quickly - though the precise nature of what happened would be covered up, rumors spread quickly that the tsar had been murdered or deposed, and someone most Russians had regarded with a healthy dose of cynicism became sainted practically overnight. Rumors spread that Ivan drank the blood of infants and sacrificed virgins for Satanic power rituals, and a rather unstable young Air Force cadet decided to take matters into his own hands, stealing a bomber during a training exercise and crashing it into the Gatchina Palace, leaving a long radioactive gash in the earth (the atomic bomb he took along for the ride failed to detonate in a nuclear way, but successfully managed to spray the courtyard with phoebium). One of Kirill Mikhailovich's guards decided this was probably the signal for a revolution, shot the Konsul, and was promptly beaten to death by his surprisingly sturdy victim.
[8] Nobody's actually sure where Nikolay II was during his reign, and the evidence he ever existed is scant. But while his reign was ongoing, Konstantin Petrovich secretly drove to Varna, got on a ship, and steamed into Odessa, announcing that his abdication had been made under duress, was illegitimate, and that he, the legitimate Tsar of All the Russias, would take back his old title, sweep aside the Konsulate, and institute a kinder, gentler era of Russian history, including towards nationalists. Then he assembled a massive army, secured commitments from foreign powers, and began to steamroll, first through Ukraine, then up into Moscow and St. Petersburg, and then all the way to the Pacific. Kirill Mikhailovich died of a heart attack (not helped by the fact that he had been shot not two years ago, and his successor Gregor Kirillovich was found in a crashed plane in the Kamchatka Mountains, hoping to regroup in Alaska and secure an independent empire in the Trans-Bering.
[9] Remember when Konstantine promised to "take back his old title, sweep aside the Konsulate, and institute a kinder, gentler era of Russian history, including towards nationalists"? Look, two out of three ain't bad.
[10] Hopes that the new tsar would be more liberal than his father have not especially come to fruition, but he has at least opened up the new elite, in the grand spirit of more 👏🏻 Tatar 👏🏻 woman 👏🏻 Okhrana 👏🏻 agents. Between that and his genuine charisma, recently charming audiences from Alki to Havana on a tour of North America, Russian soft power is growing like it hasn't since the time of Peter the Great.
 

Bolt451

Hello to our posters from NooOOORTH CAR-O-LIN-A
Location
Sandford, Gloucestershire
Pronouns
She/Her
The Long Parliament Part 4: This got a little out of hand

2019-2021: Naomi Long (Alliance Party leading Labour-Unite To Remain-Alliance second referendum coalition
)


The plan for the Long Government (Waggishly called the Long Parliament) was originally to last a year, with a september 2020 election to follow the Brexit and electoral reform referendums. This was later conditionally extended and agreed that the coalition would remain in place in the event that Britain voted to leave the EU under the “Labour Deal” (sometimes dubbed the “Starmer Deal”. Then the government would vote through a permanent trade relationship with the EU built on the same principles. It was argued in the press this was to prevent a Conservative/Brexit victory in a September election leading to a much harder permanent deal.

So Kier Starmer set about renegotiating the deal with the EU who were a little fatigued by the British response to Brexit but also hopeful of a softer Brexit that would help both British and EU economies. The deal would go to a referendum on April 2nd 2020 with the deal or the revoking of article 50 being voted through by 1st May 2020. The electoral reform referendum was delayed to September 2020 to spread out campaigning.

Then COVID Happened. From earliest rumblings in Wuhan China the virus spread through the globalised world. Britain had its first cases on 29th January 2020, two days before WHO declares an emergency. A month later Britain confirms its first cases to be passed within the country. From there cases start to surge. The Cheltenham Horse Racing Festival is allowed to go ahead but with crowds turned away. This backfires as many crowds still arrive in Cheltenham and cases rocket amongst both race goers and the town itself which continues to be a hotspot for cases for some time and there are several days of clashes between police and race goers with shops and pub windows smashed across the town. Various other events such as the London Marathon are closed. On 9th March the Prime Minister makes her first regular press conference on the virus behind a podium labelled “Stay Home, Save Lives”. The image of the Prime Minister, usually flanked by Dr Chris Whitty or by one of her cabinet becomes an iconic image of 2020, quite a minor quirk of political history turns into Long being regarded as one of Britain’s most iconic (and in some circles greatest) peacetime Prime Ministers.

She announced the establishment of a national lockdown from the 16th of March where pubs, bars, restaurants, sporting evenues, non-essential shops and countless other venues would be shut and people are ordered to stay home except for exercise and to go to work and people are to work from home if possible. The following day she outlined the government’s response to the lockdown alongside the Chancellor Annelise Dodds. The government would reimburse businesses for wages of people who would have to be furloughed, a range of increases in benefits such as income support to those working part time. Support for businesses was rapidly rolled out and supported. A large amount of money is also put into setting up a test and trace system. Taking cues from other countries as soon as possible testing of people arriving was proposed although not rolled out until July, something the government was greatly criticised for. Even Parliament became an online experience, with MPs streaming in and assembled by the BBC to form a virtual commons with screens on each of the benches. Some MPs would attend, usually the Prime Minister and the leader of the Opposition, Esther McVey.

The opposition criticised this for spending money Britain did not have and damaging the economy needlessly. Several Brexit party MPs go so far as to call Covid a hoax and support various conspiracy theories. Several Brexit Party MPs were arrested for taking part in anti-lockdown protests. Meanwhile in June Deputy Prime Minister Jeremy Corbyn was hospitalised after testing positive for Covid.

Despite all that was going on an EU deal was put together by March. Despite Starmer’s aim of a “Norway Plus” deal this was quickly vetoed by Norway as a threat to Norwegian interests. From here a separate agreement with the Norway EFTA agreement as a framework. Britain would remain aligned with the EEA, in the economics area in all but name with further framework for the possibility of formally joining the EFTA in the future. The Northern Ireland backstop would remain in place as would freedom of movement. This was greatly criticised from both sides. The Conservatives and the Brexit party called it a betrayal of brexit and the Lib Dems pointed out it’d be easier to just stay in the EU

However by the start of April It was agreed that it would be unsafe for people to go to the polls in April, Britain asked the EU for an extension to hold the . Given the circumstances the EU agreed and the referendum would be carried out alongside the electoral reform campaign on what the papers quickly dubbed “Democracy day”

The first lockdown eventually ended on the first of July with shops opening under strict safety measures. Masks are required in shops and on public transport and pubs can only open to groups of six who must be sat outdoors.

The economy saw a slow uptake but recovery was very slow as many businesses weren’t working at full capacity and people were hesitant to go out. Many people, including the government were wary of a second wave.

The referendums of September were incredibly chaotic with strict limits on campaigning being carried out. Most campaigning was done online or by post with widespread proliferation of “fake news” on both electoral reform and the EU referendum. Various TV programs and online streams were held on platforms like Facebook Live and Twitch. Both referenda saw widespread postal voting. Something that some voices, notably Nigel Farage criticised for being open to tampering.

The Conservatives were lacklustre in their campaigning with most Conservatives supporting the deal on the principle it’d allow revision in the future and for Britain to move away from the EU in the future. The Brexit party actually called for a boycott of the referendum calling it a “stitch up” of the brexit process and instead pushed ahead for leaving the EU in a future parliament. As such the remain vote, supported by the Prime Minister won with 60% of the vote and Britain revoked article 50, remaining in the EU. This was immediately criticised by the Brexit party for being a false result and a conspiracy by the EU to keep Britain “In shackles”

The electoral reform referendum was similarly chaotic with a lot of misinformation about the risks of moving away from the First Past the Post system. There was a lot of confusion amongst the public over the competing proposals, their advantages and disadvantages. The first question result was 54% in favour of replacing First Past the Post with the second question result being 34% of people picking the Additional Member System to replace it.

The government's implementation of the AMS system would involve the creation of 390 (60% of seats) single member constituencies and 260 regional list constituencies elected by the D’Hondt method made up of between 12 and 40 seats (it was decided the lists would use the same regions as the European elections, something Nigel Farage took offence at, instead suggesting lists for each of the constituent nations)

In October cases of Covid-19 started to rise and some pointed the finger at the referenda increasing infection. Some put it to people getting more relaxed about Covid. The government introduced a lockdown from 19th October and Britain would go into “The Winter without a Christmas” as Britain remained in lockdown save for some limited mingling on Christmas day itself (this also lead to widespread traffic jams and several people needing to be airlifted from freezing cars). The Conservatives and the Brexit Party exploited this and both started to finally catch up on the Coalition parties who were doing quite well in the polls over their handling of Covid with the Lib Dems topping the polls for much of autumn on a 1-2 of Covid and the second Europe referendum.

Winter did bring news of the development of several Covid Vaccines which by January started to be administered across the continent and in February Naomi Long unveiled the governments plans to relax lockdown in stages. Hopefully ending lockdown entirely by August. For the Conservatives though this isn’t fast enough.

Finally on the eight of March the Prime Minister announced Britain would go to the polls in May under its new electoral system. She also announced her intention to step down as leader of the Alliance Party at the end of her term as Prime Minister. The Coalition parties (“Unite to Remain” now at a successful end) are hoping they can “win the peace” but may yet come to regret holding the election while lockdown is still in place. Tensions are high amongst some of the electorate and Esther McVey is promising a quicker return to normality. Meanwhile some in the Brexit party are calling for a third referendum.

As the polls stand the bookies favour another woman Prime Minister. McVey or Swinson. Britain’s Third (and first non conservative) woman prime minister is etched into history. As is the eighteen months of the Long Ministry
 
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