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Lists of Heads of Government and Heads of State

Bolt451

Godspeed, you! Rat Empress.
@AlfieJ

#FBPE

2016-2019: Theresa May (Conservative)
2017 (Minority, with DUP confidence and supply) def. Jeremy Corbyn (Labour), Nicola Sturgeon (Scottish National), Tim Farron (Liberal Democrat), Arlene Foster (Democratic Unionist), Gerry Adams (Sinn Fein)
2019-2019: Jeremy Corbyn (Labour)
2019 (Majority) def. Theresa May (Conservative), Nicola Sturgeon (Scottish National), Vince Cable (Liberal Democrat), Arlene Foster (Democratic Unionist), Mary Lou McDonald (Sinn Fein)
2019-2021: Nick Houghton, Baron Houghton of Richmond (Crossbencher leading Progressive Directorate, with Back Together and Military backing)
2021-2025: Philip Lee (Back Together)
2021 (Progressive Unity List) def. scattered independents
2025-2029: James Chapman (National Progressive Union)
2025 (Sole Legal Party) def. unopposed

Nobody paid much attention to the steady radicalisation of a certain section of Remain voters. Anna Soubry and Chuka Umunna flounced off with a few hangers on to create Back Together but barely held on to the three seats in 2019 when Labour won the most paper thin of majorities over Theresa May who was still leader mostly because no one else wanted to bear the responsibility. But in the first few months of the Corbyn premiership, a few more Labour MPs defected to Back Together, and his proposals for radically reforming the military was the last straw. A military coup, backed by Back Together, formed a so-called Progressive Directorate. A bare handful of people from other parties agreed to participate, in a government which made its objectives military preparedness against Russia, rejoining the European Union and forming a sensible, centrist economic policy.

Of course, the EU was a little bit worried about reopening negotiations with Britain at all, let alone with a military dictatorship which had dressed itself in garments of progress. But in the face of an increasingly unstable Vladimir Putin sabre-rattling in the Baltic, they agreed to allow Britain to have a 'Special Arrangement' that was supposed to encourage a transition back to proper democracy.

This path back to democracy would prove difficult, as it became clear that the Progressive Directorate's policies had simply forced more of the population into identifying as Leavers. Scotland and Northern Ireland were returned to semi-civilian rule fairly rapidly, given that the SNP and the new government in Stormont were willing collaborators. But in England and Wales, the grip only tightened. Finally, it became clear that the EU would no longer tolerate continued military rule, and an election was held in which only parties on the Progressive Unity List were allowed to stand and the ballot paper simply asked Yes or No.

What the new 'Guided Parliament' did not expect was that Back Together's partners on the ballot would prove troublesome. The SNP wanted independence, the Fianna Fail majority in Northern Ireland wanted reunification of their island, the New Social Democrats wanted more left wing economic policy, the Christian Democrats wanted to re-examine social policy. Four years of infighting ensued, encouraged by the scattering of Independents who had managed to win seats. The nail in the coffin for British democracy was the European Emergency that occurred as the EU had to deal with its Special Arrangement with Britain. The somewhat authoritarian states of Eastern Europe saw this as cart blanche for them to formalise their de facto domestic arrangements, while populist Eurosceptic parties of both right and left flavours got a shot in the arm as the reality of trying to argue with Brussels or implement anti-austerity economic policies sank in. As the established order crumbled in Italy, France and even Germany, Russia was able to move into the Baltics with nary a shot fired. The petty squabbles that dominated the Unity List could not be allowed when the real issue of the day was the Russians interfering in other countries. The Progressive Unity List was merged into a single party and opposition parties were banned. The more troublesome MPs from the List parties were purged.

It was a new day in Great Britain.
Ha! Fantastic stuff Bob :) Enjoyable list from a really stupid premise :)
 
Mao-jong

1949-74: Deng Xiaoping (Deng Xiaoping Thought)
1974-77: Mao Zedong (Zongfa-Honour the Patriarch)
1977-87: Hua Gaofeng (Hua Gaofeng Thought) (Slow and Steady Progress)
1987-2001: Hu Jintao (Hua Gaofeng Thought) (Great Unity)
2001-2005: Xi Jinping (The Great Whatever)
2005- : Jiang Zemin (Socialism with a Chinese Face)
 

Japhy

.44 Caliber Abolitionist
Published by SLP
Location
Albany, NY
Pronouns
He/Him
Not what I decided to use for my Utopia/Glass half full world but something I thought was at least worth a brief write up.

"Cannot Be Won And Must Never Be Fought"

1981-1988: Ronald W. Reagan / George H. W. Bush (Republican)
1980: James E. Carter / Walter F. Mondale (Democratic), John B. Anderson / Patrick J. Lucey (Independent)
1984: Walter F. Mondale / Geraldine A. Ferraro (Democratic)
1988-1989: George H. W. Bush / Lynn M. Martin (Republican)
1989-1997: Mario M. Cuomo / Charles S. Robb (Democratic)

1988: Marion G. “Pat” Robertson / Alan K. Simpson (Republican)
1992: H. Ross Perot / John S. McCain III (Independent), Patrick J. Buchanan / M. Elizabeth A. H. Dole (Republican)
1997-2001: Charles S. Robb / Michael S. Dukakis (Democratic)
1996: A. Lamar Alexander, Jr. / Jack F. Kemp (Republican), H. Ross Perot / Angus S. King, Jr. (Reform)
2001-2009: J. Danforth Quayle / Christine Todd Whitman (Republican)
2000: Charles S. Robb / Michael S. Dukakis (Democratic), William J. Clinton / Jesse G. Ventura (Reform)
2004: Richard A. Gephardt / Joseph I. Lieberman (Democratic)
Ronald Reagan was not over the course of his administration the most popular President in American History, but by the mid 1980s he had secured a more-than-comfortable reelection and was viewed by most Conservative Republicans to have delivered on being the promised figure after decade upon decades of defeat and betrayal since Bob Taft had the nomination stolen from him in 1952. His charisma was enough to at least leave most Americans outside of the GOP roughly content with the idea that at the very least, the President meant well, though for many Americans, specifically Racial, and Sexual Minorities he could only at best be said to be disinterested and at worst malevolent as Crack and AIDS wracked their way across the country.

His 1986 summit with his new Soviet counterpart Gorbachev turned everything though. Reagan the hawk and Reagan the madman and Reagan the fiercest Anti-Communist in America made an offer to the USSR, massive cash injections, investment and grain discounts, almost whatever the General Secretary could ask for if the USSR would agree with Reagan to walk forward into the glorious morning of a world without Nuclear Weapons. After intense consultation with his economic and military advisers Gorbachev agreed. Reagan had not consulted with anyone outside of his inner circle, who were opposed but none the less using the Bully Pulpit of his office he forced it forward. The 1987 Disarmament Treaty, that followed used up all of Reagan's political and diplomatic capital but eventually Mitterrand and Thatcher came aboard and within a year of its signing so too would Deng, the United Nations Security Council Powers all agreed, by 2001 none of them would maintain nuclear arsenals, with a small stockpile to be maintained under UN auspices for a further ten years, all to be done under a legion of observers and full disclosure. In America Democrats were baffled, divided and torn as Reagan flew to Stockholm to accept a Nobel peace prize. The Republicans were equally confused and enraged but even as they'd been bullied into helping secure a one vote majority to approve the Treaty, most were sharpening the knives in preparation for revenge.

Republican would use Iran Contra as a weapon to destroy their President in a fit of madness, the rage and division overflowed forcing George H. W. Bush to stand down after the New Hampshire Primary in 1988, and no matter what he could do or say he was unable to lead the party back towards decorum or unity, in the end the intensely divisive political novice from Virginia won the nomination repelling moderate Republicans as the GOP became for a time, no more then a component of the Evangelical Moral Majority. Democrats were barely able to keep the lid on things themselves, settling on a compromise position about the Reykjavik Treaty, cautious optimism and demands for withdrawal clauses if any power started to cause questions. With victory certain and popular pressure intense, Mario Cuomo jumped into the race comfortably securing the nomination before winning a landslide victory on par with that of Lyndon Johnson in 1964.

Cuomo would spend his term attempting to revitalize American Social Liberalism and fighting off the "New Democrats" and Jerry Brown types who while holding a good deal of momentum suddenly seemed to have lost any means of claiming that they could win back the Reagan Democrats. Cuomo's great foreign policy victory would come in 1990 when the second Reykjavik Treaty would see many other potential or actual nuclear powers such as Post-Apartheid South Africa, India, Pakistan, Israel, Argentina and Brazil agree to join in the nuclear weapons ban. By the end of the Century nearly every country in the world had signed on, with notable exceptions including Saddam Hussein's Iraq, the Islamic Republic of Iran, the DPRK, and the Junta in Myanmar.

1992 would see divisions in the Republican Party into a disastrous third place as Pat Buchanan's need to talk about the nazis in a less then negative light doomed the campaign and caused his Vice Presidential nominee to resign the ticket in an October surprise that was never quite worked out. In 1996 Gorbachev and Cuomo would meet in Helsinki and agree to an official end to the Cold War, with very quiet US Intelligence Aid being provided to help the Soviets deal with the growing danger of the Islamic Insurgency in its Central Asian Republics.

Vice President Robb was easily able to brush off a Primary challenge by Senator Al Gore and defeat a resurgent GOP as well as the Reform Party which rode high after Perot's impressive result in 1992. Robb would oversee a booming economy and liberalize trade with the PRC while maintaining Cuomo's domestic politics and expanding them with the passage of the 1998 American Healthcare Act.

In 2000 Robb though would be defeated, mostly due to party fatigue and the world for a moment held its breath. Dan Quayle, the first Republican President in twelve years campaigned talking tough as the final countdown to disarmament approached, and many feared that he would toss the whole treaty apart. In the end he would meet with the new Soviet Premier, in Istambul shortly after the transition from the USSR to the USS, and agreed to stay the course. In 2002 the last US and Soviet warheads, a pair of gravity bombs were officially dismantled. While the last Chinese bombs would be dismantled a week later and questions about the Iraqi arsenal would remain until the UN-NATO Air Campaign toppled the regime there in 2007 that date, 15 years after Reagan had sacrificed everything became known as Disarmament Day, which over the past few years has slowly moved towards being a government recognized holiday in the United States.

It is said that Ronald Reagan, long ago having ridden off into the sunset of disgrace and dementia watched the official ceremony at his home in California, in the few lucid years he had left between his impeachment and the loss of his mind he had developed a close friendship with his one time rival and then brother-in-arms as far as being an exile from his own party went, Jimmy Carter who was with him for the ceremony, and would deliver the eulogy at his funeral two years later, noting that whatever their differences were, Reagan had gladly accepted the costly burdens of making the world a safer place. And while few Republicans or Democrats would ever be willing to publicly admit it, as the world moved forward without the nightmare of nuclear winter and atomic horror hanging above it the results seemed to speak for themselves.
 
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Mumby

Always mysterious!
Published by SLP
Location
Municipal Commune of Bourne
Pronouns
He/Him
Reform Blil Clinton is a nice touch.
I wanted to play around with the New Democrats failing. Considering the cliche of Jerry Brown being the hero of reform it seemed fun.
It reminds me a bit of that list @AlfieJ did where Tony Blair goes off in a huff when Neil Kinnock decides to hang on in 1992.
 

SoldierOfChrist

Les ombres chinoises
Mao-jong

1949-74: Deng Xiaoping (Deng Xiaoping Thought)
1974-77: Mao Zedong (Zongfa-Honour the Patriarch)
1977-87: Hua Gaofeng (Hua Gaofeng Thought) (Slow and Steady Progress)
1987-2001: Hu Jintao (Hua Gaofeng Thought) (Great Unity)
2001-2005: Xi Jinping (The Great Whatever)
2005- : Jiang Zemin (Socialism with a Chinese Face)
Could you explain this? I know the rightist tendency was strong in the Party from the beginning, but it would take a drastically changed post-war situation for someone like Deng to rise to the top in '49, especially if Mao is still alive as he apparently is.
 
Could you explain this? I know the rightist tendency was strong in the Party from the beginning, but it would take a drastically changed post-war situation for someone like Deng to rise to the top in '49, especially if Mao is still alive as he apparently is.
Mao gets malaria on the Long March and isn't at his most presenatble when the time comes. Then again "Shuffling-the-Decks" aren't generally about hard periodical accuracy. They're more about the comedy.
 
Three Lions '97

POD: England beats Germany in penalties and eventually wins Euro '96. This causes John Majors numbers to increase enough so that Blair is forced into a coalition with Ashdown. Side note, Roger Knapman doesn't lose his seat meaning Kilroy doesn't leave UKIP.

1997-2004: Tony Blair (Labour-Liberal Democrat coalition)

1997: Tony Blair (Labour), John Major (Conservative), Paddy Ashdown (Lib.Dem.), David Trimble (UUP)
2001: Tony Blair (Labour), Michael Portillo (Conservative), Paddy Ashdown (Lib.Dem.)

2004-05: Tony Blair (Labour-Lib.Dem. minority)
2005-15: Sebastian Coe (Conservative)

2005: Sebastian Coe (Conservative), Progressive Alliance (Tony Blair (Labour), Simon Hughes (Lib.Dem.)), George Galloway (RESPECT), Robert Kilroy-Silk (UKIP)
2010: Sebastian Coe (Conservative), Vince Cable (Progressives), Jeremy Corbyn (RESPECT), Robert Kilroy-Silk (UKIP), Caroline Lucas (Green)
2015: Jack Straw (Progressive)

2015: Jack Straw (Progressive), Sebastian Coe (Conservative), Dianne Abbot (RESPECT), Mike Hookem (UKIP), Caroline Lucas (Green)
 

Cevolian

Well-known member
The Cherry Blossom Blooms: a 2-26 timeline
On the 26th February 1936 a coup removed the legitimate Japanese government and led to the rise of the ultranationalist Shōwa Cloque dictatorship. Following the ideology of the "Imperial Way" the Shōwa cloque took Japan to war with the USA in 1939 after "provocation" by President Roosevelt. The ultimate collapse of the Empire of Japan and its successor the Kodaha Shogunate led to the emergence of the modern Republic of Japan, based on Konoe's ideology of the "new direction". Since 1950 with the election of independents calling for a a second Shōwa Restoration to both the Presidency and a parliamentary majority, the future of the Republic seems grim.

Prime Ministers of the Empire of Japan

1936-1938: Hiranuma Kiichirō (Independent backed by Shōwa Clique)
1938-1939: Sadao Araki (Independent backed by Shōwa Clique)
1939-1940: Sadaro Araki (Military Government backed by Shōwa Clique and Imperial Household)
1940-1940: Ikki Kita (Independent backed by Shōwa Radicals and Militarist Soldiers)

Shogun of the Kodaha Shogunate

1940-1942: Ikki Kita (Kodaha)
1942-1942: Hiranuma Kiichirō (Independent)
1942-1942: Fumimaro Konoe (Atarashī Hōkō-sei)

President of the Republic of Japan

1942-1945: Fumimaro Konoe (Atarashī Hōkō-sei)
1942 def. Hiranuma Kiichirō (Ōrudou~ei)
1945-1946: Tetsu Katayama (Socialist)
1946-1949: Tetsu Katayama (Independent - United Reform)
1946 def. Shūmei Ōkawa (Independent - National Anti-Capitalists)

1949-1950: Tetsu Katayama (Socialist)
1950-0000: Shūmei Ōkawa (Independent - Shōwa Restoration)
1950 def. Tetsu Katayama (Socialist), Jōtarō Kawakami (Independent - United Reform)
 

Bolt451

Godspeed, you! Rat Empress.
Three Lions '97

POD: England beats Germany in penalties and eventually wins Euro '96. This causes John Majors numbers to increase enough so that Blair is forced into a coalition with Ashdown. Side note, Roger Knapman doesn't lose his seat meaning Kilroy doesn't leave UKIP.

1997-2004: Tony Blair (Labour-Liberal Democrat coalition)
1997: Tony Blair (Labour), John Major (Conservative), Paddy Ashdown (Lib.Dem.), David Trimble (UUP)
2001: Tony Blair (Labour), Michael Portillo (Conservative), Paddy Ashdown (Lib.Dem.)

2004-05: Tony Blair (Labour-Lib.Dem. minority)
2005-15: Sebastian Coe (Conservative)

2005: Sebastian Coe (Conservative), Progressive Alliance (Tony Blair (Labour), Simon Hughes (Lib.Dem.)), George Galloway (RESPECT), Robert Kilroy-Silk (UKIP)
2010: Sebastian Coe (Conservative), Vince Cable (Progressives), Jeremy Corbyn (RESPECT), Robert Kilroy-Silk (UKIP), Caroline Lucas (Green)
2015: Jack Straw (Progressive)

2015: Jack Straw (Progressive), Sebastian Coe (Conservative), Dianne Abbot (RESPECT), Mike Hookem (UKIP), Caroline Lucas (Green)
If Gareth Southgate Had Not Played
This is very good! :D and a great title!
 

SoldierOfChrist

Les ombres chinoises
Prime Ministers of Anglo-Egyptian Sudan

1951 - 1952: Abd al-Rahman al-Mahdi (National Umma Party)
1951: Boycotted by pro-Egyptian opposition

Prime Ministers of Egyptian Sudan

1952 - 1954: Ismail al-Azhari ("Nile Valley" Unionist)
1954 - 1954: Babiker Awadalla (Independent)

Presidents of the Republic of Egypt and Sudan

1954 - 1957: Abdel Gamal Nasser (Revolutionary Command Council represented by Sudanese Council of Delegates)

Presidents of the Republic of Sudan

1957 - 1958: Hassan at-Taheer Zarouq (Democratic Front)
1957 def: Ismail al-Azhari (National Union), Mahmoud Mohammed Taha (Republican Brothers)
1958 - 1961: Mustafa Othman Makkawi † (Military leading National Union)
1961 - 0000: Tijani al-Mahi (National Union)
1962 def: Ali al-Mirghani (People's Party)

Sudan achieves home rule in 1951 after accelerated negotiations with Attlee and Farouk, three years after its first parliamentary elections. Abd al-Rahman al-Mahdi is easily elected Prime Minister, but quickly alienates his nominal allies in the south by filling the government with members of his own National Umma Party. Seizing on the momentum of Naguib's coup in Cairo, Ismail al-Azhari allies himself with the Khatmiyya Sufi order and junior army officers to overthrow al-Mahdi and the Umma. A new deal is struck between al-Azhari, Naguib, and a significantly wearier Attlee ending British co-rule. Al-Azhari attempts to keep Sudan united with Egypt while battling a growing insurrection in the largely Christian south, but Naguib, despite his own Sudanese heritage, proves less than enthusiastic to provide aid. Naguib's replacement by Nasser in 1954 coincides with al-Azhari's own forced resignation. The succeeding government is fraught and reluctantly persuaded by Nasser to come to a negotiated settlement with the de facto independent south; the Republic of Equatoria declares its independence from Egyptian Sudan on 1 February 1956. In Khartoum, the office of Prime Minister is abolished and Nasser becomes President of Egypt and Sudan.

The Ansar led by al-Mahdi from his exile in Mecca forms a lasting bond with the Egyptian Muslim Brotherhood, while Mirghani's Khatmiyya takes up the banner of independence for the north as well and calls for a return to Islamic governance. Nasser and his allies on the Sudanese Delegate Council crack down on all three groups, with varying success; many junior officers in Sudan turn away from Nasserism to join the clandestine Sudanese Communist Party, which also agitates from separation from Egypt. With the situation spiraling out of control, the Delegate Council dissolves itself and calls for new assembly elections in 1957, hoping to force a referendum on independence. The Communist-led Democratic Front sweep the election and immediately declare an independent Republic of Sudan. Faced with a potentially devastating conflict, Nasser acquiesces but begins cultivating dissent within the Sudanese officer corps. A Nasser-backed coup takes place the following year, ensuring a friendly government on Egypt's southern border.
 

Mumby

Always mysterious!
Published by SLP
Location
Municipal Commune of Bourne
Pronouns
He/Him
wen u say something as a joke and it doesnt go away

@Comisario @Meadow @Lord Roem

1945-1952: Clement Attlee (Labour)
1945 (Majority) def. Winston Churchill (National Government - Conservatives, Liberal Nationals, National Labour), Sir Archibald Sinclair, 4th Baronet (Liberal)
1950 (Majority) def. Winston Churchill (Woolton-Teviot-Palmer Pact - Conservatives, National Liberals, National Labour), Clement Davies (Liberal)

1952-1957: Anthony Eden (Conservative - Anti-Socialist)
1952 (Anti-Socialist Union with Liberals and ASWM) def. Clement Attlee (Labour)
1957-1960: Rab Butler (Conservative - Anti-Socialist)
1957 (Anti-Socialist Union with ASWM and Liberals) def. Herbert Morrison (Labour)
1960-1961: Iain Macleod (Conservative - Anti-Socialist)
1961-1971: Tony Greenwood (Labour)
1961 (Majority) def. Iain Macleod (Anti-Socialist Union - Conservatives, Liberals, Anti-Socialist Workers' Movement)
1966 (Majority) def. Iain Macleod (Anti-Socialist Union)

1971-1976: Francis Noel-Baker (Anti-Socialist Union)
1971 (Majority) def. Tony Greenwood (Labour), Desmond Donnelly (Independent Workers' Movement)
1975 (Minority) def. Barbara Castle (Labour), John Kingsley Read (British Workers' Front)

1976-1978: Enoch Powell (Anti-Socialist-BWF Coalition)
 
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Sideways

Attack and Dethrone Albus Dumbledore
Published by SLP
Location
Teignmouth, Devon
Pronouns
She/Her
2010-2015: David Cameron (Conservative)

2015: David Cameron (Conservative) [330] Ed Miliband (Labour) [232] Nicola Sturgeon (SNP) [56] Nick Clegg (Liberal Democrat) [8] Peter Robinson (DUP) [8] Gerry Adams (Sinn Fein) [4] Leanne Wood (Plaid Cymru) [3] Alasdair McDonnell (SDLP) [3] Mike Nesbitt (UUP) [2] Nigel Farage (UKIP) [1] Natalie Bennett (Green Party England & Wales) [1] Sylvia Herman (Independent) [1] John Bercow (Speaker) [1]

Just months after taking office, David Cameron was hit by a most unusual scandal. A major Tory donor accused him of fucking a dead pig as part of a University initiation. This was originally treated as a humourous aside, but as further allegations against Oxford drinking societies emerged it rapidly became clear that this would turn into a major national scandal. Cameron was deposed very quickly, leaving a battle for new leader of the party.

Conservative 2015 Leadership Election

First Ballot
Theresa May: 95
Michael Gove: 76
Oliver Letwin: 73
Philip Hollobone: 43
Stephen Crabb: 41


Second Ballot
Theresa May: 119
Michael Gove: 91
Stephen Crabb: 73
Philip Hollobone: 66
Oliver Letwin: 42


David Cameron was the fourth major party leader to be replaced since the start of 2015, and even the hint of a Tory leadership election caused a surge of membership to the party. Support for Hollobone surprised many people in the parliamentary party, worse still, surprise revelations against Stephen Crabb and Michael Gove meant that he would have been placed on the member's ballot. After frenzied negotiations he stood down for Theresa May and was made Home Secretary.

2015-2016: Theresa May (Conservative)

Theresa May attempted to reboot the Conservative government, offering national investment and a "small but strong state". Her first challenge, however, was to complete the EU renegotiation deal that Cameron had started and win the referendum. She refused help from Labour and attempted to brand the Referendum materials with as much Conservative colours as possible. She refused debates but wrote a personal letter from the Office of the Prime Minister to all voters, and used her signature and face on billboards. The "Britain Remain: A Strong, Stable EU in the National Interest" campaign was not entirely successful.

2016 EU Referendum: Leave: 59.2% Remain 40.8%

Conservative 2016 Leadership Election

First Ballot
Amber Rudd: 189
Theresa Villiers: 99
Philip Hollobone: 89
Zac Goldsmith: 32


Second Ballot
Amber Rudd: 178
Theresa Villiers: 138
Philip Hollobone: 93


Third Ballot
Theresa Villiers: 166
Amber Rudd: 163


Membership Ballot
Theresa Villiers: 63.2%
Amber Rudd: 36.8%


A concerted effort was made, in the 2016 Conservative Leadership election, to keep Hollobone off the nominations list. Meanwhile other candidates attempted to take his vote.

July 2016-September 2016: Theresa Villiers (Conservative)

Promising a hard Brexit and policies including a Burqa ban and increased military funding, Villiers attempted to push her party to the right. She had also, during the campaign, agreed with one of Hollobone's policies: to hold a snap election. This was believed to be a safe bet. Labour were attempting to unseat Jeremy Corbyn and the painful, drawn out, procedure was affecting them in the polls while the Conservatives experienced their second membership surge with a meaningful vote for Prime Minister on offer for members.

September 2016-February 2017: Jeremy Corbyn (Labour) coalition with Nicola Sturgeon (SNP)

2016: Theresa Villiers (Conservative) [281] Jeremy Corbyn (Labour) [279] Nicola Sturgeon (SNP) [49] Tim Farron (Liberal Democrat) [17] Arlene Foster (DUP) [9] Gerry Adams (Sinn Fein) [6] Leanne Wood (Plaid Cymru) [4] Colum Eastwood (SDLP) [1] Mike Nesbitt (UUP) [1] Caroline Lucas (Green Party England & Wales) [1] Sylvia Herman (Independent) [1] John Bercow (Speaker) [1]

Pulling themselves together quickly and rallying around the newly re-elected Jeremy Corbyn, the Labour Party did surprisingly well in the national elections. While they were placed second it became clear that the SNP could not feasibly work with anyone else. They were however unhappy backing a Labour government, the government collapsed on the issue of Scotland remaining in the Customs Union.

2017-????: Philip Hollobone (Conservative)

2017: Philip Hollobone (Conservative) [345] Jeremy Corbyn (Labour) [256] Tim Farron (Liberal Democrat) [14] Nicola Sturgeon (SNP) [13] Arlene Foster (DUP) [10] Gerry Adams (Sinn Fein) [7] Leanne Wood (Plaid Cymru) [2] Caroline Lucas (Green Party England & Wales) [1] Sylvia Herman (Independent) [1] John Bercow (Speaker) [1]

Finally in a position of leadership, Hollobone pushed his "Brexit Army" across the country, taking seats that had previously been considered unwinnable, such as Mansfield. Finally, the Conservatives had a healthy majority. Already the government has repealed laws against ocean plastics pollution and deadlines on carbon reduction, which they felt was making the country uncompetitive, affirmative action and positive discrimination have been banned, and the government is moving towards its targets to ban burqas in public buildings and legalise fox hunting. Perhaps most significantly, Britain is set to leave the EU on 2 August. The long battle towards Brexit is finally coming to an end and stability seems to have returned.