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Lists of Heads of Government and Heads of State

Walpurgisnacht

Unlike a presidential dog
Location
Banned from the forum
Pronouns
He/Him
I Want To Get Off Mr Eden's Wild Ride
1955-1957: Sir Anthony Eden (Conservative)
def 1955: (Majority) Clement Attlee (Labour), Clement Davies (Liberal)
1957-1959: Sir Anthony Eden (Loyalist Conservatives)
1959-1959: Admiral Louis Mountbatten (Temporary Military Administration)
1959-1963: Hugh Gaitskell (Labour)
def 1961: (Majority) Rab Butler (Anti-Eden Conservative), Dick Crossman (Independent Labour), Bob Boothby (Loyalist Conservatives), Frank Owen (Liberal), Stanley Evans (Pro-Eden Labour)
1963-1966: George Brown (Labour)
1966-1975: Nigel Birch (New Conservative)
def 1966: (Majority) George Brown (Labour), Jennie Lee (Independent Labour), Enoch Powell (Loyalist Conservatives), Violet Bonham Carter (Liberal)
def 1971: (Grand Coalition with Labour) Tony Greenwood (The Third Way: An Independent Britain), Denis Healey (Labour), Enoch Powell (British People's Party), Eric Lubbock (Liberal)

1975-1977: Tony Greenwood (The Third Way)
def 1975: (Non-Alignment Alliance with British People's Party and Liberals) Nigel Birch (New Conservative), Enoch Powell (British People's Party), Denis Healey (Labour)
1977-1980: Colonel David Stirling (Independent)
1980-1990: David Stirling (National Salvation Movement)
def 1980: (Minority) Boycott Election (The Third Way), Ian Gilmour (Democratic Alliance)
def 1985: cancelled

1990-1991: Major Patrick Wall (National Salvation Movement)
1991-XXXX: Ralph Miliband (Socialist Coalition)
def 1991: (Majority) Michael Keith Smith (Britannia), Michael Heseltine (Democratic), Keith Nilsen (CPGB), Patrick Wall (National Salvation)

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Melvyn Bragg: Hello, I'm Melvyn Bragg, and welcome back to the Culture Review. We have three first-rate guests lined up for you tonight, and first up is Professor Matthew Kneale, who is here to talk about his new book Exile From The Garden: How Anthony Eden Shaped Modern Politics. Professor Kneale, what would you say the central message of your book is?

Matthew Kneale: There is a famous maxim that the right man in the right place can change history forever. Anthony Eden provides an equally apposite corollary: the wrong man in the right place can change everything as well...

MB: Yes, you take a fairly harsh line on Eden in your book, don't you... What would you say about the way that recent portrayals of Eden have depicted him, monstered in The Throne and humanised by dissident academics?

MK: Well, obviously depictions of Eden as a cackling baby-eater are ahistorical and hardly worth discussing, but I take issue with the claim that those seeking to smooth off his edges are 'dissident'. Indeed, it has become almost fashionable in some circles, as we come up to the sixtieth anniversary of Suez, to paint Eden as a victim of circumstance--some even claiming that any Prime Minister in his shoes would have felt obliged to demonstrate that Britain still had power. This is patently absurd.

It is conceivable that most alternative PMs in 1955 would have decided to pressure Nasser into giving back the canal--Morrison, for example, was a major cheerleader of Eden's efforts. It is less likely, however, that any other leader would have continued with said military intervention for four years, in the face of massive international pressure from both sides of the Cold War--Khruschev even, at one point, considered threatening Britain with missile bombardment before being persuaded to reconsider by General Zukhov--and increasingly chilly public opinion as more and more British young men left their blood on Egyptian sands.

Some less ambitious revisionist takes have far more substance to them. It was indeed true that, by 1956, Eden was increasingly dependent on Benzadrine due to his acute cholangitis, and as such shouldn't be considered fully responsible for his actions. However, not only is it clear that Eden would have gone to war without drugs, such an argument is less an exoneration of Eden and more a condemnation of the wider government apparatus. If, as many political diaries attest, by late 1958 Eden was taking around 2 grams a day, sleeping for less than four hours each night, and wracked by muscle tremors and psychosis, why on Earth weren't his decisions challenged sooner?

MB: He was challenged, though, wasn't he? The party split? Mountbatten interfered?

MK: Yes, the thing about the Anti-Eden Conservatives was that, besides a few principled figures like Nutting, their opposition was rather too little and too late. Butler, for example, might have smothered the war in its crib, had he been sterner in his opposition earlier on, but history repeated himself and just like in '38 he only began opposing evil once it became worth his career to do so. Still, he jumped ship at least. Others with private doubts, like Selwyn Lloyd, stayed with Eden to the end--Lloyd largely because by this time he was as steeped in blood as Eden himself.

As for Mountbatten, his intervention was a frankly tactless blunder. The last days of the Eden ministry were a complete chaotic jumble, with moderates trying to talk Eden round to de-escalation and the hardliners predicting boots in Cairo by Christmas, and the government hamstrung by rebellion and unable to do anything. In this fevered atmosphere, all sorts of bizarre things were being thrown around. It's unlikely that serious plans were actually drawn up to postpone the general election if there was a vote of no confidence, any more than Nasser was to be paid reparations--something which was thrown at the peace faction by the hardliners. Nevertheless, the rumours of British democracy being under threat was enough for the first Sea Lord to join with American forces in actually threatening it.

The Mountbatten coup--and it was a coup, no bones about it--could have easily spiralled into dictatorship. Indeed, we have records of Clark Clifford trying to persuade Mountbatten to extend military rule to "ensure stability". Luckily for Britain, Mountbatten saw his intervention, dramatic though it may have been, with military policemen escorting the PM out in handcuffs, as being a mere temporary blip, and quickly installed the Leader of the Opposition as PM. And luckily for Mountbatten, Gaitskell was perfectly willing to work with the US on Soviet containment. In a lot of ways, Mountbatten's coup was a perfect storm, much like the disaster of Eden's premiership--a lot of details lined up to make it successful. And it still paved the way for Stirling's junta two decades later.

MB: Which of course is the main theme of your book--but surely Stirling's assumption of power was in part a response to political realities of the time?

MK: Yes, and those political realities were just as much indirectly shaped by Eden as Stirling was! The only thing that was more a product of Suez than Stirling was the governing coalition he usurped. A mutual dislike for American dominance and a desire for Britain to go its own way--whether that meant joining with Desai and Tito or with Salan and Franco--was the only thing that prevented Greenwood and Powell from not going at each other's throats. On every issue bar foreign policy their two parties were opposed, and the fact that an anti-NATO right-wing party was even viable was entirely a result of Eden!

Before British forces pushed into Suez, anti-American feeling marked one out as a radical leftist, either of the peacenik or bearhugger variety. But with Mountbatten's coup, suddenly a right-wing narrative of continued imperial dominance if only the Yanks hadn't stabbed Eden in the back was palatable to the general public. These views quickly began to trickle into Parliament, led by those who had held them for decades. On the Left, the opposite slowly began to take shape--Gaitskell owing his Premiership to Langley meant that those Labour MPs who were unable to stomach American foreign policy jumped ship to a new designation, allowing for an odd sabre-rattling social democracy to become the official position of the old party. The Grand Coalition of 1971 would have seemed insane 20 years before, but Labour had changed enough in the meantime that it made sense. Foreign policy, not the economy, now defined British politics.

The Stirling junta didn't destroy this definition, it just made it so that a pro-NATO position was almost completely nonviable. The major political parties we have today--a broad leftist alliance, a populist sabre-rattling right, and a centre to centre-right small-l liberal third party--can all trace their heritage back to the alliances formed in the Seventies as a reaction to the events of the Eden ministry. And it's more than just the parties, there's a reason why I called my book Exile From The Garden. It's not just a bad pun on Eden's name, it's in recognition of the fact that, once Britain had consumed that apple of knowledge, had learnt that its interests weren't NATO's interests, there was no going back. It is unlikely that any politician today will have the sheer influence on the future that one drug-addled imperialist had in 1956.

MB: Thank you Professor Kneale, that was very interesting. Guests still to come include a slam poet from Croydon, an expert on Ancient Sumerian petroglyphs, and a devotee of edible mushrooms...but first, Lloyd Hoggart is here to talk about the life of former Labour cabinet minister, master of St Edmund's College, and my predecessor as host of this programme, Norman St John-Stevas...
 

Nyvis

Token Marxist
Location
Paris
Pronouns
She/Her
I Want To Get Off Mr Eden's Wild Ride
1955-1957: Sir Anthony Eden (Conservative)
def 1955: (Majority) Clement Attlee (Labour), Clement Davies (Liberal)
1957-1959: Sir Anthony Eden (Loyalist Conservatives)
1959-1959: Admiral Louis Mountbatten (Temporary Military Administration)
1959-1963: Hugh Gaitskell (Labour)
def 1961: (Majority) Rab Butler (Anti-Eden Conservative), Dick Crossman (Independent Labour), Bob Boothby (Loyalist Conservatives), Frank Owen (Liberal), Stanley Evans (Pro-Eden Labour)
1963-1966: George Brown (Labour)
1966-1975: Nigel Birch (New Conservative)
def 1966: (Majority) George Brown (Labour), Jennie Lee (Independent Labour), Enoch Powell (Loyalist Conservatives), Violet Bonham Carter (Liberal)
def 1971: (Grand Coalition with Labour) Tony Greenwood (The Third Way: An Independent Britain), Denis Healey (Labour), Enoch Powell (British People's Party), Eric Lubbock (Liberal)

1975-1977: Tony Greenwood (The Third Way)
def 1975: (Non-Alignment Alliance with British People's Party and Liberals) Nigel Birch (New Conservative), Enoch Powell (British People's Party), Denis Healey (Labour)
1977-1980: Colonel David Stirling (Independent)
1980-1990: David Stirling (National Salvation Movement)
def 1980: (Minority) Boycott Election (The Third Way), Ian Gilmour (Democratic Alliance)
def 1985: cancelled

1990-1991: Major Patrick Wall (National Salvation Movement)
1991-XXXX: Ralph Miliband (Socialist Coalition)
def 1991: (Majority) Michael Keith Smith (Britannia), Michael Heseltine (Democratic), Keith Nilsen (CPGB), Patrick Wall (National Salvation)

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Melvyn Bragg: Hello, I'm Melvyn Bragg, and welcome back to the Culture Review. We have three first-rate guests lined up for you tonight, and first up is Professor Matthew Kneale, who is here to talk about his new book Exile From The Garden: How Anthony Eden Shaped Modern Politics. Professor Kneale, what would you say the central message of your book is?

Matthew Kneale: There is a famous maxim that the right man in the right place can change history forever. Anthony Eden provides an equally apposite corollary: the wrong man in the right place can change everything as well...

MB: Yes, you take a fairly harsh line on Eden in your book, don't you... What would you say about the way that recent portrayals of Eden have depicted him, monstered in The Throne and humanised by dissident academics?

MK: Well, obviously depictions of Eden as a cackling baby-eater are ahistorical and hardly worth discussing, but I take issue with the claim that those seeking to smooth off his edges are 'dissident'. Indeed, it has become almost fashionable in some circles, as we come up to the sixtieth anniversary of Suez, to paint Eden as a victim of circumstance--some even claiming that any Prime Minister in his shoes would have felt obliged to demonstrate that Britain still had power. This is patently absurd.

It is conceivable that most alternative PMs in 1955 would have decided to pressure Nasser into giving back the canal--Morrison, for example, was a major cheerleader of Eden's efforts. It is less likely, however, that any other leader would have continued with said military intervention for four years, in the face of massive international pressure from both sides of the Cold War--Khruschev even, at one point, considered threatening Britain with missile bombardment before being persuaded to reconsider by General Zukhov--and increasingly chilly public opinion as more and more British young men left their blood on Egyptian sands.

Some less ambitious revisionist takes have far more substance to them. It was indeed true that, by 1956, Eden was increasingly dependent on Benzadrine due to his acute cholangitis, and as such shouldn't be considered fully responsible for his actions. However, not only is it clear that Eden would have gone to war without drugs, such an argument is less an exoneration of Eden and more a condemnation of the wider government apparatus. If, as many political diaries attest, by late 1958 Eden was taking around 2 grams a day, sleeping for less than four hours each night, and wracked by muscle tremors and psychosis, why on Earth weren't his decisions challenged sooner?

MB: He was challenged, though, wasn't he? The party split? Mountbatten interfered?

MK: Yes, the thing about the Anti-Eden Conservatives was that, besides a few principled figures like Nutting, their opposition was rather too little and too late. Butler, for example, might have smothered the war in its crib, had he been sterner in his opposition earlier on, but history repeated himself and just like in '38 he only began opposing evil once it became worth his career to do so. Still, he jumped ship at least. Others with private doubts, like Selwyn Lloyd, stayed with Eden to the end--Lloyd largely because by this time he was as steeped in blood as Eden himself.

As for Mountbatten, his intervention was a frankly tactless blunder. The last days of the Eden ministry were a complete chaotic jumble, with moderates trying to talk Eden round to de-escalation and the hardliners predicting boots in Cairo by Christmas, and the government hamstrung by rebellion and unable to do anything. In this fevered atmosphere, all sorts of bizarre things were being thrown around. It's unlikely that serious plans were actually drawn up to postpone the general election if there was a vote of no confidence, any more than Nasser was to be paid reparations--something which was thrown at the peace faction by the hardliners. Nevertheless, the rumours of British democracy being under threat was enough for the first Sea Lord to join with American forces in actually threatening it.

The Mountbatten coup--and it was a coup, no bones about it--could have easily spiralled into dictatorship. Indeed, we have records of Clark Clifford trying to persuade Mountbatten to extend military rule to "ensure stability". Luckily for Britain, Mountbatten saw his intervention, dramatic though it may have been, with military policemen escorting the PM out in handcuffs, as being a mere temporary blip, and quickly installed the Leader of the Opposition as PM. And luckily for Mountbatten, Gaitskell was perfectly willing to work with the US on Soviet containment. In a lot of ways, Mountbatten's coup was a perfect storm, much like the disaster of Eden's premiership--a lot of details lined up to make it successful. And it still paved the way for Stirling's junta two decades later.

MB: Which of course is the main theme of your book--but surely Stirling's assumption of power was in part a response to political realities of the time?

MK: Yes, and those political realities were just as much indirectly shaped by Eden as Stirling was! The only thing that was more a product of Suez than Stirling was the governing coalition he usurped. A mutual dislike for American dominance and a desire for Britain to go its own way--whether that meant joining with Desai and Tito or with Salan and Franco--was the only thing that prevented Greenwood and Powell from not going at each other's throats. On every issue bar foreign policy their two parties were opposed, and the fact that an anti-NATO right-wing party was even viable was entirely a result of Eden!

Before British forces pushed into Suez, anti-American feeling marked one out as a radical leftist, either of the peacenik or bearhugger variety. But with Mountbatten's coup, suddenly a right-wing narrative of continued imperial dominance if only the Yanks hadn't stabbed Eden in the back was palatable to the general public. These views quickly began to trickle into Parliament, led by those who had held them for decades. On the Left, the opposite slowly began to take shape--Gaitskell owing his Premiership to Langley meant that those Labour MPs who were unable to stomach American foreign policy jumped ship to a new designation, allowing for an odd sabre-rattling social democracy to become the official position of the old party. The Grand Coalition of 1971 would have seemed insane 20 years before, but Labour had changed enough in the meantime that it made sense. Foreign policy, not the economy, now defined British politics.

The Stirling junta didn't destroy this definition, it just made it so that a pro-NATO position was almost completely nonviable. The major political parties we have today--a broad leftist alliance, a populist sabre-rattling right, and a centre to centre-right small-l liberal third party--can all trace their heritage back to the alliances formed in the Seventies as a reaction to the events of the Eden ministry. And it's more than just the parties, there's a reason why I called my book Exile From The Garden. It's not just a bad pun on Eden's name, it's in recognition of the fact that, once Britain had consumed that apple of knowledge, had learnt that its interests weren't NATO's interests, there was no going back. It is unlikely that any politician today will have the sheer influence on the future that one drug-addled imperialist had in 1956.

MB: Thank you Professor Kneale, that was very interesting. Guests still to come include a slam poet from Croydon, an expert on Ancient Sumerian petroglyphs, and a devotee of edible mushrooms...but first, Lloyd Hoggart is here to talk about the life of former Labour cabinet minister, master of St Edmund's College, and my predecessor as host of this programme, Norman St John-Stevas...
Tremendous work!
 

Kaiser Julius

Well-known member
US answer to to my PM Cummings list.

2005-09: John Kerry/John Edwards (Democrat)
2004: George Bush/Dick Cheney (Republican)
2009-12: John McCain/Walter Jones (Republican)
2008: John Kerry/John Edwards (Democrat)
2012-17: Walter Jones/Mitch Daniels (Republican)
2012: Hillary Clinton/Jack Reed (Democrat)
2017-21: Rudi Gulliani/Jeff Sessions (Republican)
2016: Evan Bayh/Penny Pritzker (Democrat)
2021- : Keith Ellison/Pete Buttigieg (Democrat)
2020: Rudi Gulliani/Jeff Sessions (Republican)
 
As a follow up to my list of PMs list for a federal UK here, I present the heads of government of the nations, regions and great cities of the UK. As you can see this is all fairly set since the 1920s, with the only new devolved administration being Cornwall, which was recognised as its own nation in 1999. England was not given nationhood by itself because of its demographic dominance and was instead divided into regions. The 'Great Cities' are basically the cities large enough to successfully lobby to be hived off from other devolved institutions for various reasons. Other large cities, like Dublin, Birmingham and Manchester etc. are mostly the capitals or administrative centres of their devolved administrations.

In terms of powers, the devolved assemblies have responsibilities for local police, education and public housing (albeit in all cases within a Westminster-created framework), among other things. In addition, the Irish and Scottish governments have responsibility for Irish and Scottish law. All devolved assemblies are a unicameral assembly which have elections every 4-7 years (exact regulations regarding timing vary) with a cabinet and First Minister being appointed by the local Lord Lieutenant (usually a minor member of the Royal Family, with the exception of Ireland where it is often a local Irish judge or notable) in the same manner to the monarch appointing the PM in Westminster. Although the exact title of the First Minister does differ (especially in the nations they often formally have a local Celtic title) but their powers are basically the same. The major exception are the Great Cities, where instead of a First Minister and Lord Lieutenant they have directly elected Metropolitan Mayors and an Assembly elected at fixed four-year intervals. The First Ministers/Metropolitan Mayors can send a fixed number of representatives to the Senate in Westminster (the replacement for the House of Lords), who serve at the First Minister's/Metropolitan Mayor's pleasure.

Hope that makes sense. If you think I've screwed up somewhere then let me know. I've not worked out the leaders of the opposition and the precise makeups of the government but where there are long tenures then rest assured that there is lots of constituting and reconstituting of coalitions. (Also, for those you who found the idea of Charles Haughey as British PM a bit much, how about David Trimble, Bertie Ahern and Enda Kenny all serving in the same cabinet?) Pre-emptive apologies for the sheer length...

Heanavek Stannator of Cornwall
May 1999 - May 2011: Andrew George (Liberal)
May 2011 - June 2015: Sarah Newton (Unionist)
June 2015 - June 2019: Andrew George (Liberal)
June 2019 - : Steve Double (Unionist)

Taoiseach of Ireland
April 1916 - February 1931: Joseph Devlin (Irish Parliamentary)
February 1931 - November 1932: W.T. Cosgrave (Nationalist)
November 1932 - September 1934: James Craig (Irish Unionist)
September 1934 - November 1938: Arthur Maxwell (National Coalition)
November 1938 - April 1939: James Craig (Irish Unionist)
April 1939 - February 1948: Henry Dockrell (National Coalition)
February 1948 - June 1951: William Norton (Labour)
June 1951 - June 1954: Basil Brooke (Unionist)
June 1954 - March 1957: James Everett (Labour)
March 1957 - August 1963: Basil Brooke (Unionist)
August 1963 - March 1973: Liam Cosgrave (Unionist)
March 1973 - July 1977: Brendan Corish (Labour)
July 1977 - June 1981: Charles Haughey (Unionist)
June 1981 - March 1982: John Hume (Labour)
March 1982 - December 1982: Garret FitzGerald (Unionist)
December 1982 - March 1987: John Hume (Labour)
March 1987 - December 1994: Albert Reynolds (Unionist)
December 1994 - June 1997: Dick Spring (Labour)
June 1997 - September 2002: David Trimble (Unionist)
September 2002 - May 2008: Bertie Ahern (Unionist)
May 2008 - March 2011: Enda Kenny (Unionist)
March 2011 - June 2020: May Lou McDonald (Labour)
June 2020 - : Leo Varadkar (Unionist)

Heid Meinister of Scotland
October 1924 - May 1929: Harry Hope (National Coalition)
May 1929 - October 1931: Arthur Henderson (Labour)
October 1931 - June 1949: Walter Elliot (National Coalition)
June 1949 - March 1958: John Hope (Unionist)
March 1958 - August 1962: Arthur Woodburn (Labour)
August 1962 - June 1971: Gordon Campbell (Unionist)
June 1971 - September 1975: Willie Ross (Labour)
September 1975 - October 1980: David Steel (Liberal)
October 1980 - July 1984: Russell Johnston (Liberal)
July 1984 - September 1986: Michael Ancram (Unionist)
September 1986 - May 1994: John Smith (Labour)*
May 1994 - October 2000: Donald Dewar (Labour)*
October 2000 - May 2003: Jack McConnell (Labour)
May 2003 - May 2007: David McLetchie (Unionist)
May 2007 - August 2013: Gordon Brown (Labour)
August 2013 - May 2018: Michael Gove (Unionist)
May 2018 - : Jim Murphy (Labour)

Prif Weinidog of Wales
October 1924 - March 1933: Goronwy Owen (National Coalition)
March 1933 - July 1945: Gwilym Lloyd George (National Coalition)
July 1945 - December 1946: Lewis Jones (National Coalition)
December 1946 - December 1954: Jim Griffiths (Labour)
December 1954 - October 1957: Megan Lloyd George (Unionist)
October 1957 - March 1979: Cledwyn Hughes (Labour)
March 1979 - October 1989: Elystan Morgan (Labour)
October 1989 - May 1993: Barry Jones (Labour)
May 1993 - December 2009: Alun Michael (Labour)
December 2009 - December 2018: Carwyn Jones (Labour)
December 2018 - : Nia Griffith (Labour)

First Ministers of East Anglia
May 1926 - July 1935: Hilton Young (National Coalition)
July 1935 - April 1947: Geoffrey Shakespeare (National Coalition)
April 1947 - September 1950: Sidney Dye (Labour)
September 1950 - January 1963: Harwood Harrison (Unionist)
January 1963 - May 1971: Harmar Nicholls (Unionist)
May 1971 - May 1988: Jim Prior (Unionist)
May 1988 - May 1997: John Garrett (Labour)
May 1997 - April 2005: Bill Rammell (Labour)
April 2005 - June 2012: Eric Pickles (Unionist)
June 2012 - June 2017: Kelvin Hopkins (Labour)
June 2017 - : David Gauke (Unionist)

First Ministers of Mercia
May 1926 - December 1931: Walter Higgs (National Coalition)
December 1931 - August 1946: Peter Bennett (National Coalition)
August 1946 - February 1956: John Mellor (National Coalition, Unionist (after June 1949))
February 1956 - July 1958: Herbert Bowden (Labour)
July 1958 - December 1966: Enoch Powell (Unionist)
December 1966 - September 1978: Maurice Foley (Labour)
September 1978 - May 1998: Eric Varley (Labour)
May 1998 - October 2002: Geoffrey Robertson (Labour)
October 2002 - June 2005: Stephen Byers (Labour)
June 2005 - June 2010: Alan Duncan (Unionist)
June 2010 - June 2017: Vernon Coaker (Labour)
June 2017 - : Sajid Javid (Unionist)

First Ministers of North East England
May 1926 - January 1958: Charles Trevelyan (National Coalition, Unionist (after June 1949))
January 1958 - July 1973: Andrew Cunningham (Labour)
July 1973 - October 1976: James Boyden (Labour)
October 1976 - April 1987: Gordon Adam (Labour)
April 1987 - April 1991: Peter Vanneck (Unionist)
April 1991 - April 1999: Nick Brown (Labour)
April 1999 - : Martin Callanan (Unionist)

First Ministers of North West England
May 1926 - January 1931: Theodore Carr (National Coalition)*
January - February 1931: Donald Howard (National Coalition)
February 1931 - December 1945: Levi Collison (National Coalition)
December 1945 - January 1950: Gustav Renwick (National Coalition, Unionist (after June 1949))
January 1950 - February 1958: Alex Hargreaves (Labour)
February 1958 - April 1959: Edward Spears (Unionist)
April 1959 - October 1980: William Whitelaw (Unionist)
October 1980 - April 1985: Elaine Kellett-Bowman (Unionist)
April 1985 - September 1999: Margaret Beckett (Labour)
September 1999 - August 2011: Robert Atkins (Unionist)
August 2011 - February 2018: Andy Burnham (Labour)
February 2018 - : Saj Karim (Unionist)

First Ministers of South East England
May 1926 - February 1928: Ernest Lamb (National Coalition)
February 1928 - September 1935: Bertram Falle (National Coalition)
September 1935 - June 1950: Arthur Marsden (National Coalition)
June 1950 - May 1969: Lionel Heald (Unionist)
May 1969 - May 1991: Diana Elles (Unionist)
May 1991 - October 1994: Arthur Bottomley (Labour)
October 1994 - January 2013: Peter Skinner (Labour)
January 2013 - : Annelise Dodds (Labour)

First Ministers of Wessex
May 1926 - November 1927: Francis Mildmay (National Coalition)
November 1927 - November 1928: Walter Ayles (Labour)
November 1928 - March 1933: Robert Bruford (National Coalition)
March 1933 - January 1945: Robert Bernays (National Coalition)*
January - September 1945: George Davies (National Coalition)
September 1945 - September 1953: Tom Horabin (Liberal)
September 1953 - December 1958: David Eccles (Unionist)
December 1958 - December 1966: Robert Grimston (Unionist)
December 1966 - January 1991: Henry Plumb (Unionist)
January 1991 - April 2005: Caroline Jackson (Unionist)
April 2005 - May 2011: Neil Parish (Unionist)
May 2011 - : Molly Scott Cato (Green)

First Ministers of Yorkshire and the Humber
May 1926 - April 1933: George Muff (Labour)
April 1933 - December 1946: Thomas Dugdale (National Coalition)
December 1946 - May 1955: James Milner (Labour)
May 1955 - May 1959: Thomas Dugdale (Unionist)
May 1959 - December 1961: James Milner (Labour)
December 1961 - September 1969: Denis Healey (Labour)
September 1969 - February 1976: Alice Bacon (Labour)
February 1976 - June 1990: Robert Battersby (Unionist)
June 1990 - October 1998: John Prescott (Labour)
October 1998 - October 1999: Norman West (Labour)
October 1999 - March 2003: David Bowe (Labour)
March 2003 - February 2013: Timothy Kirkhope (Unionist)
February 2013 - : Richard Corbett (Labour)

Metropolitan Mayors of Belfast
June 1921 - October 1929: Edward Carson (Irish Unionist)
October 1929 - June 1933: Dawson Bates (Irish Unionist)
June 1933 - June 1945: Crawford McCullagh (National Coalition)
June 1945 - June 1953: H. Montgomery Hyde (National Coalition, Unionist (after June 1949))
June 1953 - June 1957: Jack Beattie (Labour)
June 1957 - June 1965: Martin Kelso Wallace (Unionist)
June 1965 - June 1973: Stratton Mills (Unionist)
June 1973 - June 1981: Gerry Fitt (Labour)
June 1981 - June 1989: Cecil Walker (Unionist)
June 1989 - June 1997: Martin Smyth (Unionist)
June 1997 - June 2005: Peter Robinson (Unionist)
June 2005 - June 2009: Alex Maskey (Labour)
June 2009 - June 2013: Naomi Long (Liberal)
June 2013 - June 2017: Nichola Mallon (Labour)
June 2017 - : Sammy Wilson (National)

Metropolitan Mayors of London
May 1924 - May 1928: George Hume (National Coalition)
May 1928 - May 1932: William Ray (National Coalition)
May 1932 - November 1940: Herbert Morrison (Labour)
November 1940 - May 1948: Charles Latham (Labour)
May 1948 - May 1964: Isaac Hayward (Labour)
May 1964 - May 1968: Bill Fiske (Labour)
May 1968 - May 1972: Desmond Plummer (Unionist)
May 1972 - May 1976: Reginald Goodwin (Labour)
May 1976 - May 1984: Horace Cutler (Unionist)
May 1984 - May 1992: Andrew McIntosh (Labour)
May 1992 - May 2000: Pauline Green (Labour)
May 2000 - May 2004: Ken Livingstone (Labour)
May 2004 - May 2008: Ken Livingstone (Socialist)
May 2008 - May 2016: Boris Johnson (Unionist)
May 2016 - : Sadiq Khan (Labour)

Metropolitan Mayors of Merseyside
May 1924 - December 1928: Archibald Savage (National Coalition)*
December 1928 - May 1932: Warden Chilcott (National Coalition)
May 1932 - May 1946: Reginald Purbrick (National Coalition)
May 1946 - May 1966: Tom Brown (Labour)
May 1966 - May 1986: Simon Mahon (Labour)
May 1986 - May 1998: John Evans (Labour)
May 1998 - May 2010: Mike Storey (Liberal)
May 2010 - : Joe Anderson (Labour)
 

Alex Richards

A crack Papal-Venetian-Dutch Negotiating Team
Patreon supporter
Published by SLP
Location
Derbyshire
Only thoughts that immediately come to mind is I think the regions are a bit too modern in England. 1920s Yorkshire would definitely not include North Lincolnshire, and this is a period where you've got Manchester, Liverpool and Birmingham all sitting on county boundaries and so likely to be split off as separate things. I also can't help but think that if London is being given devolution here as the County of London, it's more likely that we see an administration for the Home Counties (probably including Oxfordshire), a small East Anglia and an enlarged Wessex that includes Hampshire.
 

Elektronaut

ITV versus the Racists
Only thoughts that immediately come to mind is I think the regions are a bit too modern in England. 1920s Yorkshire would definitely not include North Lincolnshire, and this is a period where you've got Manchester, Liverpool and Birmingham all sitting on county boundaries and so likely to be split off as separate things. I also can't help but think that if London is being given devolution here as the County of London, it's more likely that we see an administration for the Home Counties (probably including Oxfordshire), a small East Anglia and an enlarged Wessex that includes Hampshire.
They're a bit too modern, aye. There were regional concepts back then, but they were more ad hoc I think. The analogous internal regional organisation for the Tories up here was termed 'Northern Counties' and encompassed most of the north east, plus Boro, plus Cumberland.
 

Alex Richards

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They're a bit too modern, aye. There were regional concepts back then, but they were more ad hoc I think. The analogous internal regional organisation for the Tories up here was termed 'Northern Counties' and encompassed most of the north east, plus Boro, plus Cumberland.
Cumbria appears to have been one of the more artificial creations of the 1974 era really. Westmoreland was generally seen as linking in with Lancashire, Cumberland as being a definitively separate thing that had more in common with Newcastle. (Well, the really artificial thing came earlier when the Barony of Kendal was joined with the Barony of Westmoreland rather that splitting along the hills).

Which, looking at things, makes me wonder how much the building of the M6 actually transformed that concept by creating a fast, all-weather route between Carlisle and Kendal.
 
Those are all good thoughts. My thinking on the divisions is that Manchester and Birmingham would be the administrative centres of North-West England and Mercia, respectively, which would solve the problems them sitting uncomfortably in the pre-1890 counties.

Take your point about the southern divisions too. One of the advantages of using 'Wessex' as a name is that it can encompass more or less whatever you like. I did think about a 'Home Counties' region surrounding London but thought that looked a little silly when I sketched it on a map. The other thought I had was this 'Greater London' just including all of historic Middlesex, Surrey, Essex and Kent, as a way of making it more competitive for the Unionists but maybe that's a bit silly.
 

Catalunya

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Behind every fascism there is a failed revolution.

2009 - 2017: Barack H. Obama / Joseph ‘Joe’ R. Biden Jr. (Democrat)

2008: John S. McCain III / Sarah L. Palin (Republican)
2012: W. Mitt Romney / Paul D. Ryan (Republican)

2017 - 2021: Donald J. Trump / Michael ‘Mike’ R. Pence (Republican)
2016: Hillary D. Rodham Clinton / Timothy ‘Tim’ M. Kaine (Democrat)


2021 - 2025: Joseph ‘Joe’ R. Biden Jr. / Kamala D. Harris (Democrat)
2020: Donald J. Trump / Michael ‘Mike’ R. Pence (Republican)

2025 - 2033: Tucker S. M. Carlson / Joshua ‘Josh’ D. Hawley (Republican)
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2028: Anthony ‘Tony’ J. Blinken / Ayanna S. Pressley (Democrat), Mark Ruffalo / Lee J. Carter (Independent)

2033 - 20##: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez / Chokwe Antar Lumumba (Democrat)
2032: Joshua ‘Josh’ D. Hawley / Matthew ‘Matt’ T. Shea (Republican)

Made some very minor adjustments to this list. Namely: Harris as nominee in 2024 instead of Biden and Blinken as the nominee in 2028.
 
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