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Lists of Heads of Government and Heads of State

Mumby

Always mysterious!
Published by SLP
Location
Municipal Commune of Bourne
Pronouns
He/Him
No but it often comes up in the 1910s and 1920s where again it's in living memory. And even later, then the press would bring up its discredited nature. I don't accept that it would just be ignored in the US.
tbf it didn't stop people in the uk insistently bringing up the prospects of a national government in the 1970s and last year, when the last example of that Did Appeasement.
 

theev

Chief Strategist of the UMass Democrats
Pronouns
he/him
tbf it didn't stop people in the uk insistently bringing up the prospects of a national government in the 1970s and last year, when the last example of that Did Appeasement.
Yeah, I think we might be giving the average voter a bit too much credit if we think they'll be taking a serious and comprehensive look at the historical implications of political names. Trump basically got away with America First and that was literally Lindbergh's Nazi organization.
 

Thande

The Great and Powerful Wizard, Opnohop Moy
Published by SLP
No but it often comes up in the 1910s and 1920s where again it's in living memory. And even later, then the press would bring up its discredited nature. I don't accept that it would just be ignored in the US.
OK, I certainly agree with the first part, I think the second part would depend on the nature of the press at the time and how it's viewed by the wider populace. Regardless, I think you've made your point that it would have to be justified in-timeline rather than being seen as an automatic obvious choice.

Wasn't Churchill-Attlee called a National Government at the time as well?
I've mentioned this before, but back when the coalition formed in 2010, there was a fella on Atlas who combined the post-election polls to compare "National Government" to "Labour". No idea why, because (as this was still the honeymoon period) it made Labour look like it was doing much worse in the polls than it was. Maybe that insular Labour thing where people still regard Ramsay Mac et al as a visceral wound as though it happened last week, and he was going for that comparison?
 

Stuyvesant

Just wait until I actually get my shit together
Location
The Place Beyond The Pines
Pronouns
he/him
Governors of the Republic of the State of New York (Third Constitution)

1850-1862: Maarten Van Buren (Locofoco Whig)
1862-1863: John Dix (Locofoco Whig) [Acting]
1863-1886: Horatio Seymour (Bucktail Whig)

1863 def. John Dix (Locofoco Whig), John Bidwell (Radical), J. Gregory Smith (Green Mountain)
1886: Abram Hewitt (Bucktail Whig) [Acting]
1886-1894: Leon Abbett (Radical)

1886 def. William R. Grace (Locofoco Whig), Richard Croker (Bucktail Whig) Ebenezer J. Ormsbee (Green Mountain)
1894-1895: Davis Hanson Waite (Radical) [Acting]
1895-1900: Levi P. Morton (Locofoco Whig)

1895 def. Richard Croker (Bucktail Whig), Edward H. Gillette (The Land), Daniel De Leon (Working Men’s), Josiah Grout (Green Mountain)
1899 Constitutional Referendum:50.013% Yes, 49.987% No


A sequel to my last New York list, showing the breadth of the Second Party System, and then the rural awakening that saw the birth of the Third.
 

OwenM

The patronising flippancy of youth
Location
Colwyn Bay/Manchester
Pronouns
He/him
OK, I certainly agree with the first part, I think the second part would depend on the nature of the press at the time and how it's viewed by the wider populace. Regardless, I think you've made your point that it would have to be justified in-timeline rather than being seen as an automatic obvious choice.


I've mentioned this before, but back when the coalition formed in 2010, there was a fella on Atlas who combined the post-election polls to compare "National Government" to "Labour". No idea why, because (as this was still the honeymoon period) it made Labour look like it was doing much worse in the polls than it was. Maybe that insular Labour thing where people still regard Ramsay Mac et al as a visceral wound as though it happened last week, and he was going for that comparison?
As a tangent to this, I just found something on AH.com where you were complaining about (I think) Brown treating the Ministry of All the Talents as something to be emulated and how this was historically illiterate.
 

OwenM

The patronising flippancy of youth
Location
Colwyn Bay/Manchester
Pronouns
He/him
Shockingly convergent, and not really sure it fits, but for a bit of fun:

List of football champions in the English Workers' Commonwealth

English Football Championship
(Council teams under Olympic system)
1919-20 Birmingham XI
1920-21 London XI
1921-22 Huddersfield XI
1922-23 Bolton and District XI
1923-24 Newcastle XI
1924-25 Sheffield Federated XI
1925-26 Bolton and District XI
1926-27 Cardiff XI
1927-28 Blackburn and District XI
1928-29 Bolton and District XI
1929-30 London XI
1930-31 Birmingham XI
1931-32 Newcastle XI
English Football Championship First Group
(Council teams under league system)
1932-33 London XI
1933-34 London XI
1934-35 London XI
English Football Championship Group A
(Society teams under league system)
1935-36 Sunderland Falcon
1936-37 Manchester Clarion
1937-38 London Arsenal
1938-39 Liverpool Red Banner
(Interrupted by war)
English Football Championship Group One
1946-47 Liverpool Clarion
1947-48 London Arsenal
1948-49 Portsmouth Partisan
1949-50 Portsmouth Partisan
1950-51 London Falcon
1951-52 Manchester Locomotive
 

Dom

my word is my bond
Moderator
Patreon supporter
Location
Auckland via London
Pronouns
He/him
Shockingly convergent, and not really sure it fits, but for a bit of fun:

List of football champions in the English Workers' Commonwealth

English Football Championship
(Council teams under Olympic system)
1919-20 Birmingham XI
1920-21 London XI
1921-22 Huddersfield XI
1922-23 Bolton and District XI
1923-24 Newcastle XI
1924-25 Sheffield Federated XI
1925-26 Bolton and District XI
1926-27 Cardiff XI
1927-28 Blackburn and District XI
1928-29 Bolton and District XI
1929-30 London XI
1930-31 Birmingham XI
1931-32 Newcastle XI
English Football Championship First Group
(Council teams under league system)
1932-33 London XI
1933-34 London XI
1934-35 London XI
English Football Championship Group A
(Society teams under league system)
1935-36 Sunderland Falcon
1936-37 Manchester Clarion
1937-38 London Arsenal
1938-39 Liverpool Red Banner
(Interrupted by war)
English Football Championship Group One
1946-47 Liverpool Clarion
1947-48 London Arsenal
1948-49 Portsmouth Partisan
1949-50 Portsmouth Partisan
1950-51 London Falcon
1951-52 Manchester Locomotive
Is there a West Ham equivalent?
 

Uhura's Mazda

have i told you lately that i love you
Published by SLP
Location
Tamaki Makaurau
From Broken October by Craig Harrison

List of Prime Ministers of New Zealand
1975-1985: Barrett Lindsay (National)
1985:
Barrett Lindsay (National minority, ↓48)
1985 def: John Yates (Labour, 41), Rawiri Tamehana (Maori Party, 4), Bruce Atkinson (Country League, 3), Gordon Drysdale (Social Credit, =3), Hongi Harawira (Ind. Maori, 1)

When the gentlemanly Mr. Lindsay defeated Robert Muldoon to become leader of the opposition in 1974, he couldn't have predicted the rise of the third parties that would ensue over the next decade, largely in protest against the overwhelming greyness of the major blocs. Lindsay was a past master in the art of compromise - and his talents in this field inevitably led to policy drift and a lack of clear leadership, as Maori and Pasifika communities became increasingly ghettoised, unionists became increasingly intransigent, and students became increasingly shrill. For a time, the nation of New Zealand remained outwardly placid - especially as the frontier of the Communist threat now extended as close as the jungles of Papua New Guinea - but the situation roiled beneath the surface. A defeat in parliament over the sale of Maori land to American mining speculators (caused when both National Maori MPs defected to the Maori Party under the influence of the prophet Tawhiao) led to a snap election, in which National only pulled through thanks to a confidence and supply agreement with the hang-em-and-flog-em Country League Party.

But Lindsay the compromiser was not to remain in power for long at the head of his minority government: the compromiser became himself compromised, firstly by discoveries of corruption in the ranks of Cabinet, and secondly by the revelation (by an Australian mining company) that Lindsay's own son had shares in the American mining company favoured by his father's government. Lindsay, ever a gentleman, resigned immediately, despite not having known about his son's pecuniary interest.

1985: Douglas Kendrick (National minority)

Kendrick was the conservative, anti-American attack dog of the Lindsay government, and when he ascended to the premiership he immediately disincentivised northern hemisphere investments in New Zealand. Kendrick favoured the Australians, but the public fear that the Overseas Investments Act might presage a deal with the South Africans kicked off student demonstrations which combined with a separate waterfront strike, and turned into violent riots in the main centres. As a precaution against further clashes, Kendrick ordered the internment of known extremists, including Wiremu Kennedy of the Polynesian People's Action Group, who perished after a day-long standoff with police. His compadres survived him and struck back by briefly occupying the Maori Affairs building and then stealing the Treaty of Waitangi from the National Archives.

The actions of PPAG, who now 'went bush' in the East Coast, inspired further race riots and a flow of young urban Maori to the guerilla camps of the organisation. Meanwhile, Douglas Kendrick assumed emergency powers and sent the Army in to pacify the demonstrations - which ended calamitously when a young Private opened fire on a group of peaceful protesters in Hastings. New Zealand now approached a state of civil war, prompting the recall of the crack Blue Beret battalions from Papua New Guinea and the release of the interned Maori prophet Tawhiao - a canny move, which split the Maori community between revolutionaries and millenarians.

Kendrick's reign ended shortly afterwards, when the Prime Minister - about to give a speech in which he would speciously claim that the PPAG was funded by international Communism - was gunned down alongside his Deputy on the steps of the Beehive by a rogue police officer. The number three man in the Cabinet, Evans Fendalton, was also present but unable to take over, being hospitalised on account of being in shock.

1985:
Major-General Murray Haywood (Military)

General Haywood was asked to take over for one day by the Emergency Cabinet, or until such a time as Mr. Fendalton could contest a leadership election against the new liberal standard-bearer, Bill Russell. Haywood served dutifully until the Cabinet meeting the following morning.

1985:
Evans Fendalton (National minority)

At this Cabinet meeting, Fendalton showed up still under the influence of the drugs given him at the hospital, and verbally laid into the liberal faction for even daring to oppose him. In protest, the Russellites walked out, leaving Fendalton to win easily among the two thirds of Cabinet who remained. Unfortunately, Fendalton's premiership came to an end several hours later, when he showed up at Broadcasting House raving about Communists and demanding to be allowed to address the nation, at which point General Haywood consulted with Bill Russell and they came to a decision that Fendalton would have to be sent to a mental hospital. Mr. Fendalton has not yet emerged.

1985: Bill Russell (National minority)

Russell was now confirmed as Prime Minister by Cabinet and caucus, raising hopes for a liberal compromise with the guerillas and a peaceful conclusion to the present crisis. Unfortunately, by evening-time General Haywood had been handed certain documents (by the CIA, as it later transpired) which proved that Russell had been using insider knowledge to speculate in the mining industry. Haywood, now thoroughly tired of politicians, declared himself to be the new Prime Minister and - although briefly opposed by the constitutionalist Vice-Admiral Sharpe in a battle between Army and Navy on the curfewed streets of Wellington - pressed his claim thoroughly. Russell was then sent to a camp for political prisoners on Stewart Island, where he later died. Admiral Sharpe died of an overdose of barbiturates shortly after the military takeover.

1985-1986:
Major-General Murray Haywood (Military)

Now established in his dominance, the rigid General Haywood imposed martial law, which saw immediate success. A terrorist guerilla captured during the sabotage of the Napier oil refinery gave away the location of the PPAG camp during a session of enhanced interrogation by the Blue Berets, and Haywood proceeded to napalm the area. Although the leaders got away, they elected to return to a civilian phase for the time being, and Haywood's regime became secure - excepting from the direction of the pesky international community with its Communists and its human rights activists.

Although it initially seemed that the mining contracts would go to South Africa, it emerged that Haywood's discussions were in fact on the subject of racial pass laws and their implementation - the contracts actually went to the original American firm, which was grateful to the CIA for its outlay in their interest. The CIA rounded off its involvement in the New Zealand crisis by assisting Haywood to win his referendum that January:

Martial Law Referendum: 98% Yes, 2% Maybe

The new Labour Government in the UK, though, which was backed up in this matter by the Liberal Coalition Party, did not see this referendum as a legitimate outpouring of national sentiment, and persuaded Queen Elizabeth to send a note of reprimand to Haywood through the Governor-General, Sir Willis Edmond. Inevitably, Edmond was summarily evicted from Government House and General Haywood became New Zealand's first President. This actually solved a fiddly problem for the British Government, as the upcoming Commonwealth Games would otherwise have been boycotted by the African members.

Hail Haywood!
 

Thande

The Great and Powerful Wizard, Opnohop Moy
Published by SLP
As a tangent to this, I just found something on AH.com where you were complaining about (I think) Brown treating the Ministry of All the Talents as something to be emulated and how this was historically illiterate.
Well done Past Me From 2007, there's a good example of what I was talking about.
 

Thande

The Great and Powerful Wizard, Opnohop Moy
Published by SLP
I don't think this is too plausible, the POD is the sort of thing that was discussed at the time but probably would never actually happen, but an idea I had:

List of Presidents of the United States since 1933
1933-1945: Franklin D. Roosevelt† (Democratic)
1932 def: Herbert Hoover (Republican)
1936 def: Alf Landon (Republican)
1940 def: Wendell Willkie (Republican)
1944 def: Thomas E. Dewey (Republican)

1945-1953: Harry S Truman (Democratic)
1948 def: Thomas E. Dewey (Republican), Strom Thurmond (States' Rights Democratic)
1953-1957: Estes Kefauver (Democratic)
1952 def: Dwight D. Eisenhower (Republican), Robert A. Taft (Ind. Republican)
1957-1961: William F. Knowland (Republican)
1956 def: Estes Kefauver (Democratic), John C. Stennis (Southern Platform Democratic)
1961-????: Stuart Symington (Democratic)
1960 def: William Knowland (Republican)

Basically the idea here is that the (probably idle) threat of Taft to be drafted as a third party candidate actually happens, which I suspect would require something like a health scare from Eisenhower and an alleged cover-up by his supporters for Taft and his supporters not to fall behind the ticket in the end even without concessions. Kefauver's handling of Korea goes badly and Knowland rises to public prominence due to being a recurring critic of the administration's foreign policy in the East. Kefauver is also regarded as a slippery slope towards civil rights by disappointed southern Democrats, who split the vote once again after failing to wrest the nomination from him. Knowland and his party then, however, get the blowback from Sputnik and recession not unlike Eisenhower in OTL, and Symington, picked as a unity Democratic candidate, romps to victory.

This is an interesting example of what we were arguing about above - I used the term 'Southern Platform Democratic' for Stennis ('Manifesto' would be an unlikely convergence with a Democrat in the White House, I think) because I thought 'States' Rights Democratic' would be associated with Thurmond's failure to make an impact in 1948 - but this might well be a wrong judgement considering the people Stennis would be trying to appeal to.

This is also probably an example of a weaker Republican revival on other levels of government in the 1950s compared to OTL, with the House probably only briefly in Republican hands from 1955 to 1959.
 

Major Crimson

Here occasionally and quietly
A quick and simple list taken from @Charles EP M.'s wonderful Doctor Who-PM inversion from last year. There was a longer draft that tried to find space for various companions leading a variety of third parties, but there was no way to fit everyone and I don’t know enough DW to know who to cut. Feel free to picture the many actors discussed as alternate Doctors as failed leadership candidates and ministers.

1963–1966: William Hartnell (Conservative)
1966–1969: Patrick Troughton (Labour)
1966 (Minority with Liberal support) Def. William Hartnell (Conservative), Roger Dell (Liberal)
1969–1974: John Pertwee (Conservative)
1969 (Majority) Def. Patrick Troughton (Labour), Rodger Dell (Liberal)
1974–1981: Tom Baker (Labour)
1974 (Majority) Def. John Pertwee (Conservative), Peter Pratt (Liberal)
1979 (Majority) Def. Peter Cushing (Conservative), Geoffrey Beevers (Liberal)

1981–1984: Peter Moffett (Labour)
1984–1987: Colin Baker (Conservative)
1984 (Coalition with Liberals) Def. Peter Moffett (Labour), Anthony Ainley (Liberal)
1987–1996: Percy Kent-Smith (Conservative)
1987 (Majority) Def. Peter Moffett (Labour), Anthony Ainley (Liberal), Frances Carroll (Centre Democrats)
1991 (Majority) Def. John Hurt (Labour), Anthony Ainley (Liberal), Frances Carroll (Centre Democrats)

1996–2005: Paul McGann (Labour)
1996 (Majority) Def. Percy Kent-Smith (Conservative), Eric Roberts (Liberal)
2000 (Majority) Def. David Bradley (Conservative), Derek Jacobs (Liberal)

2005: Chris Eccleston (Labour)
2005–2010: David McDonald (Conservative)
2005 (Majority) Def. Chris Eccleston (Labour), John Simm (Liberal)
2010–2013: Matthew Smith (Labour)
2010 (Minority with Liberal support) Def. David McDonald (Conservative), John Simm (Liberal)
2013–2017: Peter Dougan (Conservative)
2013 (Majority) Def. Matthew Smith (Labour), Michelle Gomez (Liberal)
2017–20??: Jodie Whittaker (Labour)
2017 (Majority) Def. Peter Dougan (Conservative), Michelle Gomez (Liberal)
2021 (Majority) Def. Richard Grant (Conservative), Sacha Dhawan (Liberal), Jo Martin (Green)
About 70 million years ago I did a version of this on the other place:

Prime Ministers of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland:


1957-1963: Harold Macmillan (Conservative)
Defeated 1960: Aneurin Bevan (Labour), Jo Grimmond (Liberal)

1963-1967: Sir William Hartnell (Conservative)
Defeated 1963: Paddy Troughton (Labour), Jo Grimmond (Liberal)

1967-1970: Paddy Troughton (Labour)
Defeated 1967: Sir William Hartnell (Conservative), John Pertwee (Liberal)

1970-1974: John Pertwee (Liberal-Moderate, then Democratic Alliance)
Defeated 1970: Paddy Troughton (Labour), Iain Macleod (Moderate), Enoch Powell (Conservative)

1974-1981: Stewart Baker (Labour)
Defeated 1974: John Pertwee (Democratic Alliance), Enoch Powell (Conservative)
Defeated 1979: Shirley Williams (Democratic Alliance), Enoch Powell (Conservative), John Pardoe (Continuity Lib-Mod)

1981-1984: Peter Davison (Democratic Alliance)
Defeated 1981: Tony Benn (Labour), Julian Amery (Conservative), John Pardoe (Continuity Lib-Mod)

1984-1986: Colin Baker (Tory with D.A. Confidence and Supply)
Defeated 1984: Peter Davidson (Democratic Alliance), Tony Benn (Labour), John Pardoe (Centre)

1986-1989: Percy Kent-Smith (Centre-D.A.-Tory Coalition)
Defeated 1986: Ian "Mik" Mikardo (Labour),: Alan Beith (Democratic Alliance), Colin Baker (Tory)






NUCLEAR WAR - VARIOUS GOVERNMENTS 1989-1996

British Civil War - 1995-2002:

John McGann - McGann Military Government
vs
Vince Hurt - Popular Front


Prime Minister of the United Commonwealth of Britain:


2002-2005: Vince Hurt (Popular Front)
Defeated 2002: Mike Cameron-Clegg (Modern Tory), Ronnie Ecclestone Junior (Unity), Sue Benn (New Labour)

May - December 2005: Ronnie Ecclestone Jnr (Unity-Mod. Tory)
Defeated May 2005: Dave McDonald (Popular-New Labour Alliance), William Rees-Mogg (Modern Tory), Jimmie Cruddas (Revival Democratic Alliance)

2005-2011: Dave McDonald (Progressive)
Defeated December 2005: Ronnie Ecclestone Jnr (Unity), Michael Ashdown (Democratic Alliance), William Rees-Mogg (Modern), Robert Smith (Liberal)
Defeated 2010: Michael Ashdown (Democratic Alliance), Graham Brady (Modern), Nicholas Campbell (Liberal), Benjamin Johnson (Unity)

2011: Steve Tate (Progressive)

2011-2013: Robert Smith (Liberal-Democratic Alliance Coalition)
Defeated 2011: Steve Tate (Progressive), Alexander Pickering (Democratic Alliance), Julian Rees-Mogg (Modern)

2013-2017: Malcolm Cipaldi (Progressive)
Defeated 2013: Amanda Cable (Democratic Alliance), Robert Smith (Liberal), Julian Rees-Mogg (Modern)
 

Mumby

Always mysterious!
Published by SLP
Location
Municipal Commune of Bourne
Pronouns
He/Him
this is more of a thought experiment than a serious list

1945-1950: Harold Laski (Labour)
1950-1951: Alice Bacon (Labour)
1951-1955: Frederick Marquis, 1st Earl of Woolton (Conservative)
1955-1957: Oliver Poole, 1st Baron Poole (Conservative)
1957-1963: Quintin Hogg, 2nd Viscount Hailsham (Conservative)
1963-1964: John Hare, 1st Viscount Blakenham (Conservative)
1964-1970: Ray Gunter (Labour)
1970-1974: Peter Thomas (Conservative)
1974-1976: Ray Gunter (Labour)
1976-1979: John Chalmers (Labour)
1979-1990: Peter Thorneycroft, Baron Thorneycroft (Conservative)
1990-1997: Chris Patten (Conservative)
1997-2007: Richard Rosser (Labour)
2007-2010: Dianne Hayter (Labour)
2010-2016: Andrew Feldman, Baron Feldman of Elstree (Conservative)
2016-2019: Patrick McLoughlin (Conservative)
2019-0000: Ben Elliot (Conservative)
 

Time Enough

European Pollution Police Force
Pronouns
He/Him
Prime Ministers of Great Britain:
1828-1830: Arthur Wellesy (Tory)
1830-1835: Thomas Pictorn (Whig)
1830 (Majority) def: Arthur Wellesy (Tory), Sir Edward Knatchbull (Ultra-Tories)
1835-1842: Arthur Wellesy (Tory)
1835 (Majority) def: Thomas Pictorn (Whig)
1840 (Majority) def: John Ponsonby (Whig), John Hobhouse (Radical)

1842-1848: Charles Gordon-Lennox (Tory)
1842 (Majority) def: John Ponsonby (Whig), John Hobhouse (Radical), Fergus O'Connor (Chartist)
1846 (Majority) def: Gilbert Elliot-Murray-Kynynmound (Whig), John Hobhouse (Radical), Fergus O'Connor (Chartist)

1848-1854: British Civil War

Chief Legislators of the British Commonwealth:
1854-1860: Cooperative Chartist Committee
1860-1864: George Julian Harney (Workers)
1860 def: George Henry Evans (Cooperative), John Bright (Radical)
1864-1872: George Henry Evans (Cooperative)
1864 def: George Julian Harney (Workers-Marxist), George Odger (Workers-Labour), John Bright (Radical)
1868 def: George Julian Harney (Workers-Marxist), George Odger (Workers-Labour), Wilfred Lawson (Radical)

1872-1876: George Julian Harney (Workers-Marxist)
1872 def: Wilfred Lawson (Cooperative-Radical), George Odger (Workers-Labour), John Bedford Leno (Radical-Chartist), Joseph Chamberlain (Municipal)
1876-1884: George Holyoake (Cooperative)
1876 def: George Julian Harney (Workers-Marxist), Alexander Macdonald (Workers-Labour), Charles Bradlaugh (Radical), Joseph Chamberlain (Municipal), William Morris (Commonweal)
1880 def: Friedrich Engels (Workers-Marxist), Henry Broadhurst (Workers-Labour), Joseph Chamberlain (Municipal-Radical), William Morris (Commonweal)

1884-1892: Joseph Chamberlain (Municipal)
1884 def: Edward Owen Greening (Cooperative), Friedrich Engels (Workers-Marxist), Henry Broadhurst (Workers-Labour), William Morris (Commonweal)
1888 def: Edward Owen Greening (Cooperative), John Burns (Workers-Marxist), Henry Broadhurst (Workers-Labour), William Morris (Commonweal)

1892-1896: George Cadbury (Municipal)
1892 def: Beatrice Webb (Cooperative), Tom Mann (Workers), Eleanor Marx (Commonweal)
1896-: Tom Mann (Workers)
1896 def: Beatrice Webb (Cooperative), George Cadbury (Municipal), Eleanor Marx (Commonweal), Oscar Wilde (Collective)
1900 def: Arthur Llewelyn Davies (Cooperative), Austen Chamberlain (Municipal), Eleanor Marx (Commonweal), John Turner (Collective)
1901: New Legislative Body established, Chief Legislator replaced by the role of the Democratic Committee voted for by the people.


Who would have thought that making various military men Prime Minister would destroy the tiny element of British democracy that existed from 1828 to 1848.

Well in the end the people answered and by answered I mean a Chartist Revolution followed by a Civil War would occur. Once the war was done a new Democracy of the People was a established, the Monarchy abolished and a Parliament formed. Elections for Chief Legislator which was conducted by the members themselves were done after elections for the Legislature and Prime Minster had occurred. It says a lot about the fluid nature of the early Commonwealth that a Marxist would be elected twice to Chief Legislator. Even then though the Legislature would usually vote in a Cooperative or Municipal Socialist into office, which indicates the general nature of British Chartist and Socialist beliefs from 1848 onwards. The unification of Marxist and Labour factions of the Workers and the raise of the Anarcho-Communist/Anarcho-Syndicalist Commonweal and Collective parties would signal the death blow of the balance of power being between Cooperative and Municipal. Tom Mann would win in 1896 and after four years of working with Cooperative Prime Minister Albert Grey he would begin moves to replace the legislator position with something more democratic after the election of George Lansbury to the role of Prime Minister. Now in 1901 the position of Chief Legislator has been replaced with something remarkably similar to the Cooperative Chartist Committee that helped rebuild Britain after the Civil War, now maybe Britain will be able to carry on the spirit of Democratic Cooperative Revolution into the 20th Century.
 
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