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Lists of Heads of Government and Heads of State

Thande

But whatever you do, do not, under any circumstanc
Published by SLP
I'm culpable of it as much as the next person but the National Union getting revived is a thing we probably need to do less. It was a cheap term that was never meaningful in 1864 and prominently was tarnished by Andrew Johnson's attempts to create a new party. Much like the Federalists before Hamiltons rehabilitation in the 1890s/1900s it's really a term we should avoid.

That said it's a good list @Time Enough
I had a similar thought when I saw in "If Gordon Banks Had Played" the use of the term "National Conservatives" to describe Tories who had crossed the floor to keep Labour in power - yes it gives you an AH 'aaaaah' feeling, but why on earth would they seek a comparison with Ramsey Mac considering what happened to him? Of course, there is the option of 'not the name they picked, but the one their opponents/the meedja pejoratively gave to them and stuck'.

I think for the US, there is a window of plausibility for 'National Union' as there will be a slice of the population who know enough about history to recognise the intended comparison, but not enough to know about how it turned out. I don't think the same is true of 'Federalist' for most of US history.
 

Bolt451

Godspeed, you! Rat Empress.
Heads of the House of Windsor (from 1973, heads of the Windsor foundation)
(more British Republics stuff)
Royalist titles in brackets)


1931-1943: George VI, Former David, Prince of Wales
1943-1962: Mary, Princess Royal (Mary II)
1962-1967: The Hon Lady Mary Windsor (Mary II)
1967-1994: Mr Edward Windsor (Edward VIII)
1994-Present: Mrs Victoria Windsor-Bennett (Elizabeth II)



According to Royalists the heir apparent is the Olympic archer Charlie Windsor who they style “Charles, Prince of Wales” although with the exception of Charlotte Windsor (Cousin to Charlie and niece to Victoria) the family have formally renounced all claims to a British th
 

Time Enough

Civil Rights Cowboy
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Left on the Cutting Room Floor: An Alternate Presidents List:
1933 - 1941: Franklin Delano Roosevelt (Democratic)

1932 (With John Nance Garner) def: Herbert Hoover (Republican)
1936 (With John Nance Garner) def: Alf Landon (Republican), Huey P. Long (Union)

1941-1949: Bronson M.Cutting (Republican)
1940 (With Robert A.Taft) def: Huey P. Long (Democratic), Gerald Nye (America First), William Lemke (Union)
1944 (With Thomas Dewey) def: Scott Lucas (Democratic), Henry A.Wallace (Popular Front), Hamilton Fish III (Conservative)

1949-1957: Jerry Voorhis (Democratic)
1948 (With Alben W. Barkley) def: Thomas Dewey (Republican), Glen H Lacy (Popular Front), Everett Dirksen (Conservative)
1952 (With Claude Pepper) def: John W.Bricker (Republican)

1957-1965: Harold Stassen (Republican)
1956 (With Henry Cabot Lodge Jr.) def: Lyndon B. Johnson (Democratic), John Gates (American Labor)
1960 (With George W. Romney) def: Lyndon B. Johnson (Democratic), John Gates (American Labor), Strom Thurmond (Conservative)

1965-1969: George W. Romney (Republican)
1964 (With Barry Goldwater) def: Stuart Symington (Democratic), Dorothy Ray Healey (American Labor)
1969-1973: Eugene McCarthy (Democratic)
1968 (With Russell B.Long) def: George W.Romney (Republican), Barry Goldwater (Libertarian)
1973-1977: Howard Baker (Republican)
1972 (With John Volpe) def: Eugene McCarthy (Democratic), Russell B.Long (Union)
1977-: Mo Udall (Democratic)
1976 (With Kevin White) def: Howard Baker (Republican), George Wallace (Union)
1980 (With Jerry Brown) def: Daniel J. Evans (Republican), Cesar Chavez (American Labor)


A list in which two deaths in 1935 are averted, Bronson M. Cutting and Huey Long. Long running as a Union candidate takes the wind out of Roosevelt’s sails a bit and makes the Republicans reconsider who they should run next. In 1939, Roosevelt has a heart attack and afterwards decides against running in 1940, allowing Long to gain the nomination against a field that includes the equally radical Henry A.Wallace. The Republicans go with Bronson M. Cutting, a Pro-New Deal Republican who is seen as a safe choice by Americans against the radicals of Nye, Long and Lemke and wins the election.

Cuttings time as President is very similar to Roosevelt’s, America still enters the Second World War and all that. The major difference is the 1944 election is more chaotic, as the Democrats wanting to avoid getting another radical go with the moderate Scott Lucas, which causes Henry A. Wallace to storm out with a number of Progressives and form the Popular Front with the SPA and other Left Wing groups. Cuttings nomination of Thomas Dewey, a fellow Liberal Republican causes some of the Republican Conservatives to set up the Conservative Party though there declined ballot space due to Hamilton Fish III’s views. So yet again Cuttings wins.

The Post War world is similar though Cuttings is less enthusiastic to support a Marshall type plan which leads to several Communist and Socialist groups winning in Europe. This draws the ire of Anti-Communists and Conservatives. Alongside that, Corruption and the Red Scare occurs as Republicans are seen as having let the Communists for infiltrating the US Government. When Cuttings steps down and Dewey runs as the Republican candidate a mixture of Anti-Communism and Left Wing folks who believe that Cuttings hasn’t done enough allows Voorhis who combines Social Democratic and Social Gospel ideas with Anti-Communism to become President.

Voorhis’s time in office is about implementing more Liberal Left policies and allowing trade unions to strengthen, it’s also about ridding America of Communist influence as the CPUSA is banned and investigations into Communist influence occur. Voorhis is rather popular and manages to win a second term on a more aggressively Left Wing platform with Claude Pepper as his VP. Even the Anti-Communist rhetoric of John Bricker doesn’t work against Voorhis. But Voorhis hits a quagmire when it comes to pushing through Anti-Segregation legislation though he manages to get some Civil Rights bills through. But as time goes on the Government is seen as bloated by many and the offer of Harold Stassen of Liberal rule with scaling back of certain sections appeals to many.

As the Civil Rights movement gains steam and Communism starts to spread in Asia, Stassen is Liberal Internationalist in behaviour as he deals with chaos abroad and home. When he leaves in 1965 America is seen as a bit of a boiling pot about to pop. The Romney/McCarthy years are one of malaise, crisis within Parties (as the Republicans battle between there Libertarian and Moderate Conservative/Liberal side, whilst the Democrats are battling between there Left Wing and Southern Populist sides).

When Baker is elected in he’s seen as a breath of fresh air but that’s quickly soured by chaos aboard due to the Chinese-India War and battles yet again erupting in the Republican Party allows Udall to become President. Promising to finally finish of Desegregation (left hanging by the Romney/McCarthy years) and implement more liberal reforms he wins handily and finally finishes the work that Voorhis started...
 

Time Enough

Civil Rights Cowboy
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I wonder if you can do something like that with Anton Cermak
Maybe, he’d probably work best in a ‘FDR dies early 20s, Prohibition is worse, America needs a Mayor who’s tough on crime, tough on the causes of crime...’ style world. Also you’re kind of limited to the 30s with him because he was already in his 50s by then.
 

Time Enough

Civil Rights Cowboy
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Hmm, just thinking back to what @Thande said about making stable countries and I have a vague idea for a list in which Tito dies in 1953, Milovan Đilas manages to takeover and we get a successful Democratic Socialist Yugoslavia. But that’s about it really, so if anyone wants to take it and run I’d be happy to help.
 

Japhy

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I had a similar thought when I saw in "If Gordon Banks Had Played" the use of the term "National Conservatives" to describe Tories who had crossed the floor to keep Labour in power - yes it gives you an AH 'aaaaah' feeling, but why on earth would they seek a comparison with Ramsey Mac considering what happened to him? Of course, there is the option of 'not the name they picked, but the one their opponents/the meedja pejoratively gave to them and stuck'.

I think for the US, there is a window of plausibility for 'National Union' as there will be a slice of the population who know enough about history to recognise the intended comparison, but not enough to know about how it turned out. I don't think the same is true of 'Federalist' for most of US history.
I really like the "The British public would be too smart but Americans are morons" energy in this post. But no I think it would inevitably come up through the press.
 

OwenM

The patronising flippancy of youth
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I had a similar thought when I saw in "If Gordon Banks Had Played" the use of the term "National Conservatives" to describe Tories who had crossed the floor to keep Labour in power - yes it gives you an AH 'aaaaah' feeling, but why on earth would they seek a comparison with Ramsey Mac considering what happened to him? Of course, there is the option of 'not the name they picked, but the one their opponents/the meedja pejoratively gave to them and stuck'.

I think for the US, there is a window of plausibility for 'National Union' as there will be a slice of the population who know enough about history to recognise the intended comparison, but not enough to know about how it turned out. I don't think the same is true of 'Federalist' for most of US history.
I'm not entirely sure they actually formed a party as such in that anyway (at least at first), I think they would self-describe as Conservatives in a National Government. Personally I'd also associate it at least as much with Lloyd George (admittedly not necessarily much better) and Simon. But that may just be me.

If they were to choose a historical name I think Constitutionalist (or maybe Moderate) would have been the most obvious choice, but is possibly not well known enough in the first place.
 
I had a similar thought when I saw in "If Gordon Banks Had Played" the use of the term "National Conservatives" to describe Tories who had crossed the floor to keep Labour in power - yes it gives you an AH 'aaaaah' feeling, but why on earth would they seek a comparison with Ramsey Mac considering what happened to him? Of course, there is the option of 'not the name they picked, but the one their opponents/the meedja pejoratively gave to them and stuck'.
The author themselves said on this very site that the whole concept there was unfliable on plausibility grounds so you may be overthinking this just a tad.
 
A quick and simple list taken from @Charles EP M.'s wonderful Doctor Who-PM inversion from last year. There was a longer draft that tried to find space for various companions leading a variety of third parties, but there was no way to fit everyone and I don’t know enough DW to know who to cut. Feel free to picture the many actors discussed as alternate Doctors as failed leadership candidates and ministers.

1963–1966: William Hartnell (Conservative)
1966–1969: Patrick Troughton (Labour)
1966 (Minority with Liberal support) Def. William Hartnell (Conservative), Roger Dell (Liberal)
1969–1974: John Pertwee (Conservative)
1969 (Majority) Def. Patrick Troughton (Labour), Rodger Dell (Liberal)
1974–1981: Tom Baker (Labour)
1974 (Majority) Def. John Pertwee (Conservative), Peter Pratt (Liberal)
1979 (Majority) Def. Peter Cushing (Conservative), Geoffrey Beevers (Liberal)

1981–1984: Peter Moffett (Labour)
1984–1987: Colin Baker (Conservative)
1984 (Coalition with Liberals) Def. Peter Moffett (Labour), Anthony Ainley (Liberal)
1987–1996: Percy Kent-Smith (Conservative)
1987 (Majority) Def. Peter Moffett (Labour), Anthony Ainley (Liberal), Frances Carroll (Centre Democrats)
1991 (Majority) Def. John Hurt (Labour), Anthony Ainley (Liberal), Frances Carroll (Centre Democrats)

1996–2005: Paul McGann (Labour)
1996 (Majority) Def. Percy Kent-Smith (Conservative), Eric Roberts (Liberal)
2000 (Majority) Def. David Bradley (Conservative), Derek Jacobs (Liberal)

2005: Chris Eccleston (Labour)
2005–2010: David McDonald (Conservative)
2005 (Majority) Def. Chris Eccleston (Labour), John Simm (Liberal)
2010–2013: Matthew Smith (Labour)
2010 (Minority with Liberal support) Def. David McDonald (Conservative), John Simm (Liberal)
2013–2017: Peter Dougan (Conservative)
2013 (Majority) Def. Matthew Smith (Labour), Michelle Gomez (Liberal)
2017–20??: Jodie Whittaker (Labour)
2017 (Majority) Def. Peter Dougan (Conservative), Michelle Gomez (Liberal)
2021 (Majority) Def. Richard Grant (Conservative), Sacha Dhawan (Liberal), Jo Martin (Green)
 

Turquoise Blue

Exhaustingly Tibby
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I was born ready for that conversation.

But nothing with the Greenbacks would be better then the time @Turquoise Blue turned them into a 20th Century Party called The Greens.
You really do flatter me, Japhy. But thanks!

TBH, I do genuinely see any successful Greenback Party dropping the "-back" bit eventually to become a more generic party name and all. Really depends on how far they get and how "establishment" they end up, but yeah.
 

Thande

But whatever you do, do not, under any circumstanc
Published by SLP
I really like the "The British public would be too smart but Americans are morons" energy in this post. But no I think it would inevitably come up through the press.
Not at all what I meant; more that it would still be well within living memory in the UK in the "Gordon Banks" example. I am much more talking about the media establishment than the general public, who would most probably not recognise the term "National Labour" (after all, that was long before formal party labels appeared on ballots; Edgar Wallace's biography I think describes Lloyd George's Own Family Party as something like 'a faction of the Liberals').
 

OwenM

The patronising flippancy of youth
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Not at all what I meant; more that it would still be well within living memory in the UK in the "Gordon Banks" example. I am much more talking about the media establishment than the general public, who would most probably not recognise the term "National Labour" (after all, that was long before formal party labels appeared on ballots; Edgar Wallace's biography I think describes Lloyd George's Own Family Party as something like 'a faction of the Liberals').
Doesn't it come up in Gordon Banks how people could self-describe as anything at that point as well, with "Labour Loyalists" standing against the Labour splitters in some seats despite Labour officially not?
 

Time Enough

Civil Rights Cowboy
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Inspired by discussions recently about what if the LRC never occurred and the possible effect on the Prime Ministers of Britain (Liberal-Labour takes the Liberal whip and is essentially an offshoot of the Liberal Party):

Prime Ministers of the United Kingdom:
1900-1902: Marquess of Salisbury (Conservative)

1900 (Majority) def: Henry Campbell Bannerman (Liberal), Keir Hardie (Independent Labour Party), John Redmond (Irish Parliamentary Party)
1902-1906: Arthur Balfour (Conservative)
1906-1910: Henry Campbell Bannerman (Liberal)
1906 (Majority) def: Arthur Balfour (Conservative), Keir Hardie (ILP), Arthur Richardson (Liberal-Labour), John Redmond (IPP)
1910-1915: H.H.Asquith (Liberal)
1910 (Majority) def: Arthur Balfour (Conservative), Fred Jowett (ILP-SDF Alliance), Arthur Richardson (Liberal-Labour), John Redmond (IPP), William O'Brien (All for Ireland)
1915-1918: David Lloyd George (Liberal leading War Coalition)
1918-1921: Bonar Law (Conservative)

1918 (Majority) def: David Lloyd George (Liberal), George Lansbury (ILP), Ramsay MacDonald (Liberal-Labour), Samuel Perry (Cooperative Party), Henry Hyndman (National Socialist Party), David Robb Campbell (Ulster Labour Party), Joseph Devlin (Irish Nationalist Party), Various Irish Nationalists
1921-1924: Sir William Joynson-Hicks (Conservative)
1921 (Majority) def: Christopher Addison (Liberal), George Lansbury (ILP), Ramsay MacDonald (Liberal-Labour), Samuel Perry (Cooperative Party), Henry Hyndman (National Socialist Party), David Robb Campbell (Ulster Labour Party), Joseph Devlin (Irish Nationalist Party), Micheal Collins (Sinn Fein)
1924: General Strike, Collapse of Joynson-Hicks Goverment

1924-1930: David Lloyd George (Liberal)
1924 (Majority) def: Sir William Joynson-Hicks (Conservative), Clement Attlee (ILP), Ramsay MacDonald (Liberal-Labour), Samuel Perry (Cooperative Party), Tom Kennedy (National Socialist Party), David Robb Campbell (Ulster Labour Party), Joseph Devlin (Irish Nationalist Party), Lintorn Rotha Orman (Action)
1928 (Coalition with Cooperative Party) def: Eric Geddes (Conservative), Clement Attlee (ILP), George Alfred Spencer (Liberal-Labour), Alfred Barnes (Cooperative Party), Oswald Mosley (National Socialist Party), Jack Bettie (Ulster Labour Party), Joseph Devlin (Irish Nationalist Party), Lintorn Rotha Orman (Action)

1930-1932: William Wedgewood Benn (Liberal)
1932-1935: Arthur Steel-Maitland (Conservative)
1932 (Majority) def: William Wedgewood Benn (Liberal), Edgar Lansbury (ILP), Alfred Barnes-G.D.H Cole (Cooperative Party), Oswald Mosley (National Socialist Party), Jack Bettie (Ulster Labour Party), Joseph Devlin (Irish Nationalist Party), Lintorn Rotha Orman (Action), Wyndham Lewis (Futurist), Hugh MacDiarmid (Scottish Socialist Party), Sylvia Pankhurst (Socialist Party of Great Britian)
1935-1937: Neville Chamberlain (Conservative)
1937-1940: Malcolm MacDonald (Liberal)
1937 (Majority) def: Neville Chamberlain (Conservative), Clement Attlee (ILP), Alfred Barnes-A.V.Alexander (Cooperative Party), Oswald Mosley (National Socialist Party), Jack Bettie (Ulster Labour Party), Micheal Collins (Sinn Féin-Irish Nationalist), William Joyce (Action), Wyndham Lewis (Futurist), Hugh MacDiarmid (Scottish Socialist Party), Sylvia Pankhurst (Socialist Party of Great Britian)
1940-1945: Malcolm MacDonald (Liberal leading War Coalition)
1945-1947: Malcolm MacDonald (Liberal)

1945 (Coalition with ILP) def: Harold Macmillan-Oswald Mosley (New Democratic), Ellen Wilkinson (ILP), Jack Bettie (Ulster Labour Party), Micheal Collins (Sinn Féin), John Beckett (Social Credit), Eric Linklater (Scottish Social Democratic Party), Geoffrey Trease-Ted Grant (Socialist Party of Great Britian)
1947-: Harold Macmillan (New Democratic)
1947 (Majority) def: Malcolm MacDonald (Liberal), Nye Bevan (ILP), Jack Bettie (Ulster Labour Party), Micheal Collins (Sinn Féin), John Beckett (Social Credit), Eric Linklater (Scottish Social Democratic Party), Geoffrey Trease-Tom Driberg (Socialist Party of Great Britian), Ted Grant (Socialist Labour)
1951 (Majority) def: Malcolm MacDonald (Liberal), Nye Bevan (ILP), Micheal Collins (Sinn Féin), John Beckett (Social Credit), Eric Linklater (Scottish Social Democratic Party), Geoffrey Trease-Konni Zilliacus (Socialist Party of Great Britian), Ted Grant (Socialist Labour)


1955 Election:
In Government:
Harold Macmillan (New Democratic)


Opposition:
Evan Durbin (Liberal)
Nye Bevan (ILP)
John Beckett (Social Credit)
Eric Linklater (SSDP)
Konni Zilliacus-Jill Craigie (SPGB)
Ted Grant (Socialist Labour)


Abstaining:
Sean MacBride (Sinn Féin)