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Lists of Heads of Government and Heads of State

Mumby

Always mysterious!
Published by SLP
Location
Municipal Commune of Bourne
Pronouns
He/Him
A rather grim thought I had this week, about the Prohibition Party becoming the electoral vehicle of the KKK.

All Too Visible


1913-1924: Woodrow Wilson (Democratic)
1912 (with Thomas R. Marshall) def. Theodore Roosevelt (Progressive), William Howard Taft (Republican), Eugene V. Debs (Socialist)
1916 (with Thomas R. Marshall) def. Charles Evans Hughes (Republican), Eugene V. Debs (Socialist)
1920 (with William Gibbs McAdoo) def. Nicholas M. Butler (Republican), Wayne Wheeler (Prohibition), Bill Haywood (Socialist)

1924-1929: William Gibbs McAdoo (Democratic)
1924 (with Edward Young Clarke) def. Hiram Wesley Evans (Prohibition), Hiram Johnson (Republican), Benjamin Gitlow (Socialist)
1929-1933: Edward L. Jackson (Republican/Prohibition Fusion)
1928 (with Theodore G. Bilbo) def. William Gibbs McAdoo (Democratic), Al Smith (Progressive/Popular Front Fusion)
 

Mumby

Always mysterious!
Published by SLP
Location
Municipal Commune of Bourne
Pronouns
He/Him
Darkly fascinating.
my idea was america never gets stuck into ww1 - the 18th amendment still passes but Wilson has the political capital to veto the Volstead Act and night get overriden. actual enforcement of the amendment ends up devolved to states and often into the hands of the most notable anti-alcohol paramilitary that there is...
 

Time Enough

European Pollution Police Force
Pronouns
He/Him
When the Long Fellow is Replaced by the Big..: An Alternate Taoiseach List:

President of the Executive Council:
1923-1925: Micheal Collins (Sinn Féin leading Reconstruction Coalition)
1925-1931: Kevin O'Higgins (Cumann na nGaedheal)

1925 (Majority) def: Micheal Collins (Sinn Féin), William X. O'Brien (Labour), Jim Larkin (Irish Workers Party), Denis Gorey (Farmers Party), Michael Hennessy (Business Party), William Redmond (National League Party)
1931-1933: Micheal Collins (Sinn Féin)
1931 (Majority) def: Kevin O'Higgins (Cumann na nGaedheal), William X. O’Brien (Labour), Jim Larkin (Irish Workers Party), Micheal Hennessy (Business League Party), James Dillon (National Centre Party), Eoin O'Duffy (National Corporate League)

Taoiseach of the Irish Republic:
1933-1939: Micheal Collins (Sinn Féin)

1934 (Majority) def: W. T. Cosgrave (Aontas Críostaí), William X. O’Brien (Labour), Jim Larkin (Irish Workers Party), Eoin O'Duffy (National Corporate League)
1938 (Coalition with Labour) def: John A. Costello (Aontas Críostaí), Archie Heron (Labour), Jim Larkin (Irish Workers Party), Eoin O'Duffy (National Corporate League)

1939-1945: Micheal Collins (Sinn Féin leading Emergency Government)
1945-1949: John A. Costello (Aontas Críostaí)
1945 (Majority) def: Micheal Collins (Sinn Féin), Archie Heron (Labour), James Larkin Jnr (Irish Workers Party), Ernest Blythe (National Reform), Peadar Cowan (Vanguard)
1949-1953: Micheal Collins (Sinn Féin)
1949 (Coalition with Labour) def: John A. Costello (Aontas Críostaí), Archie Heron (Labour), James Larkin Jnr (Irish Workers Party), Ernest Blythe (National Reform), Peadar Cowan (Vanguard)
1953-1960: Liam Cosgrave (Aontas Críostaí)
1953 (Majority) def: Micheal Collins (Sinn Féin), Archie Heron (Labour), James Larkin Jnr (Irish Workers Party), Ernest Blythe (Muintir na hÉireann), Peadar Cowan (Vanguard)
1957 (Majority) def: Seán MacBride (Sinn Féin), Noël Browne (Labour), Roddy Connelly (Irish Workers Party), Micheal J. Flanagan (Muintir na hÉireann), Peadar Cowan (Vanguard)

1960-1964: Seán MacBride (Sinn Féin)
1960 (Coalition with Labour) def: Liam Cosgrave (Aontas Críostaí), Brendan Corish (Labour), Noël Browne (Socialist Labour), Roddy Connelly-Peadar Cowan (Workers Vanguard), Micheal J. Flanagan (Muintir na hÉireann)
1964-1970: James Dillon (Aontas Críostaí)
1964 (Majority) def: Seán MacBride (Sinn Féin), Noël Browne (Labour), Brendan Corish (Democratic Labour), Dominic Behan-Miriam Daly (Workers Vanguard), Micheal J. Flanagan (Muintir na hÉireann)
1968 (Coalition with Muintir na hÉireann) def: Seán MacBride (Sinn Féin), Noël Browne (Labour), Tomás Mac Giolla-Miriam Daly (Workers Vanguard), Micheal J. Flanagan (Muintir na hÉireann)

1970-1973: Neil Blaney (Aontas Críostaí)
1973-:Garret FitzGerald (Sinn Féin)
1973 (Majority) def: Neil Blaney (Aontas Críostaí), Eileen Desmond (Labour), Tomás Mac Giolla-Miriam Daly (Workers Vanguard), Micheal J. Flanagan (Muintir na hÉireann), Seamus Costello (Daonlathas Clé)

A list for a world where Éamon de Valera was killed in the aftermath of the 1916 Easter Uprising, after a brief Irish Civil War Micheal Collins takes control of Sinn Féin and turns it into a Left Wing Populist Party but his charms only last for so long, leading to Sinn Féin often partnering up with Labour in coalitions. Meanwhile Cumann Na nGaedheal unites with a number of similar Irish Conservative/Liberal Parties and creates Aontas Críostaí which is a Conservative Christian Democratic Party. Eventually the balance of power between the parties, with Sinn Féin partnering up with Labour (and implementing social reform, creating large farmers Co-Ops and the creation of a welfare state) and Aontas Críostaí cornering the Conservative vote is shattered with the Dillon & Blaney Governments who are forced to enter coalition with Micheal J.Flanagan and Muintir na hÉireann, which doesn’t work out as Flanagan forced Blaney to implement Social Credit style policies which drives Ireland into recession (and that’s before we get into the Anti-Semitism). The chaos of these years allows Sinn Féin to capitalise on it and win it’s first majority in nearly fourty years...
 

theev

Chief Strategist of the UMass Democrats
Pronouns
he/him
1853-1853: David Rice Atchison (Democratic)
1853-1853: William R. King (Democratic)
1852 (with vacant): Winfield Scott (Whig)
1853-1858: David Rice Atchison (Democratic)
1853 (with Stephen A. Douglas): Millard Fillmore (Know-Nothing), John J. Crittenden (Whig), Joshua Giddings (Free Soil)
1858-1862: James Buchanan (Democratic)
1857 (with John A. Quitman): Nathaniel P. Banks (Northern Know-Nothing), Samuel Morse (Southern Know-Nothing), John C. Fremont (Free Soil & National Liberty)
1862-1862: William A. Seward (Opposition)
1861 (with Cassius Clay): John A. Quitman (Democratic), John J. Crittenden (American), Sam Houston (People's), James Guthrie (Independent Democratic)
1862-1864: Cassius Clay (Opposition)
1864-1865: Solomon Foot (Opposition)
1865-1873: George B. McClellan (Democratic)
1864 (with George H. Pendleton): Solomon Foot (Opposition), John C. Fremont (Radical)
1868 (with George H. Pendleton): Salmon P. Chase (Opposition), Charles Sumner (Radical)

1873-1873: Horace Greeley (Opposition)
1872 (with Francis P. Blair Jr.): Thomas A. Hendricks (Democratic), Benjamin F. Butler (Radical)
1873-1877: Francis P. Blair Jr. (Opposition)
1877-1881: Allen G. Thurman (Democratic)
1876 (with David S. Terry): Rutherford B. Hayes (Opposition), Benjamin F. Butler (Radical)
1881-1881: Ambrose Burnside (Opposition)
1880 (with Charles Guiteau): Allen G. Thurman (Democratic)
1881-1885: Charles Guiteau (Opposition)
1884 (with Chester A. Arthur): Jay Gould (Democratic) [Disputed]

1885-0000: Charles Guiteau (Opposition)

1885-0000: Jay Gould (Democratic)

1884-0000: Simon Landis (Naturalist)

It is 1888 and America is in flames. The nation stands alongside its graveyard of Presidents: Pierce from that train wreck, King from chronic illness, Seward from a botched Confederate kidnapping, Clay when Confederate bombs destroyed much of the White House, Greeley from poor health, and Ambrose from poorer health; and its graveyard of political organizations from the decrepit Whigs to the disjointed Know-Nothings to Sam Houston's ego vessel to a Radical Party unable to cope with a rapidly disintegrating America. Now, as Civil War continues to tear through the country many wonder if America will finally come under the influence of the worms in Guiteau's brain, or the greed in Gould's, or even Simon Landis' terroristic religious fundamentalists. To the nation's south Confederate border patrols, hopelessly defending an outstretched empire doomed to fall apart, fire on those attempting to cross the border in either direction.
 
1853-1853: David Rice Atchison (Democratic)
1853-1853: William R. King (Democratic)
1852 (with vacant): Winfield Scott (Whig)
1853-1858: David Rice Atchison (Democratic)
1853 (with Stephen A. Douglas): Millard Fillmore (Know-Nothing), John J. Crittenden (Whig), Joshua Giddings (Free Soil)
1858-1862: James Buchanan (Democratic)
1857 (with John A. Quitman): Nathaniel P. Banks (Northern Know-Nothing), Samuel Morse (Southern Know-Nothing), John C. Fremont (Free Soil & National Liberty)
1862-1862: William A. Seward (Opposition)
1861 (with Cassius Clay): John A. Quitman (Democratic), John J. Crittenden (American), Sam Houston (People's), James Guthrie (Independent Democratic)
1862-1864: Cassius Clay (Opposition)
1864-1865: Solomon Foot (Opposition)
1865-1873: George B. McClellan (Democratic)
1864 (with George H. Pendleton): Solomon Foot (Opposition), John C. Fremont (Radical)
1868 (with George H. Pendleton): Salmon P. Chase (Opposition), Charles Sumner (Radical)

1873-1873: Horace Greeley (Opposition)
1872 (with Francis P. Blair Jr.): Thomas A. Hendricks (Democratic), Benjamin F. Butler (Radical)
1873-1877: Francis P. Blair Jr. (Opposition)
1877-1881: Allen G. Thurman (Democratic)
1876 (with David S. Terry): Rutherford B. Hayes (Opposition), Benjamin F. Butler (Radical)
1881-1881: Ambrose Burnside (Opposition)
1880 (with Charles Guiteau): Allen G. Thurman (Democratic)
1881-1885: Charles Guiteau (Opposition)
1884 (with Chester A. Arthur): Jay Gould (Democratic) [Disputed]

1885-0000: Charles Guiteau (Opposition)

1885-0000: Jay Gould (Democratic)

1884-0000: Simon Landis (Naturalist)

It is 1888 and America is in flames. The nation stands alongside its graveyard of Presidents: Pierce from that train wreck, King from chronic illness, Seward from a botched Confederate kidnapping, Clay when Confederate bombs destroyed much of the White House, Greeley from poor health, and Ambrose from poorer health; and its graveyard of political organizations from the decrepit Whigs to the disjointed Know-Nothings to Sam Houston's ego vessel to a Radical Party unable to cope with a rapidly disintegrating America. Now, as Civil War continues to tear through the country many wonder if America will finally come under the influence of the worms in Guiteau's brain, or the greed in Gould's, or even Simon Landis' terroristic religious fundamentalists. To the nation's south Confederate border patrols, hopelessly defending an outstretched empire doomed to fall apart, fire on those attempting to cross the border in either direction.
Thank you for introducing me to Simon Landis. He doesn't even have a Wikipedia page although his book The Social War does. The page is hilarious. "Self-published in 1872 to commercial failure, and is regarded by some critics as being one of the worst novels ever written."
 

Stuyvesant

Just wait until I actually get my shit together
Location
The Place Beyond The Pines
Pronouns
he/him
Governors of the Republic of the State of New York:
1789-1837: Alexander Hamilton (Whig) [1]

def. 1789 George Clinton (Democracy)
1798-1801: Connecticut Valley War between New England Alliance and New York

1821-1823: New Jersey War sees New Jersey split between New York and Columbia
1824: New York Assembly ratifies Treaty of Boston, leading to the foundation of the Third Continental Congress
1837-1841: de jure: Alexander Hamilton (Whig), de facto: Maarten Van Buren and William L. Marcy (Whig) Leading Albany Regency [2]
1841-1862: Maarten Van Buren (Van Burenite Whig/Equal Rights then Locofoco Whig) [3]

def. 1841 William L. Marcy (Marcyite Whig), Robert D. Owen (Working Men's/Radical), Charles Paine (Green Mountain)
1849 Constitutional Referendum:57% Yes, 43% No
[4]

[1] Alexander Hamilton remade New York in his image following the failure of the Philadelphia Convention, a centralized Republic under his iron fist. Various underlings came and went, but the Governor remained, making sure he was indispensable. However, as time wore on, Hamilton’s grip on the political landscape loosened, and a series of simmering conflicts began across various regions including but not limited to, the Renssalaerwyck Rent War, the Champlain Rebellion, the Salt City Uprising, and the Long Island Tax Revolt.

[2] After Hamilton suffered a stroke in 1837 that left him bedridden, there were rumbles of an attempt to declare him incapable of governance, but because no one in the Whigs wanted to be the one who knifed the Old Man and the Governor was a lifetime appointment, he remained Governor. And so, a ‘Regency’ was formed, led by the two major players in the Whig Apparatus to enforce the Old Man’s increasingly disconnected diktats.

[3] When the Old Man died, a power struggle broke out between Marcy’s Tammany Hall Old Guard and Van Buren’s Reformists, and the eventual result was two Whig Tickets. This would normally be an excellent opportunity for the Democracy Party, but they also split, between the Radicals advocating for mass Land Reform and Redistribution and John Slingerlands’ Moderates who simply sought the abolition of the Patroons and expansion of the Franchise. The Radicals would eventually support Robert Owen’s Utopian Candidacy, and the moderates would endorse Van Buren, and given the final vote’s narrow margin, there is no doubt, the Equal Rights label won him the election.

[4] The Second Constitution of the Republic of the State of New York was a dramatic departure for the Republic, but the major changes were thus: Abolition of the Autonomous Regions, expansion of the Franchise to Universal Male Suffrage, and turning New York from a Unitary State to a Federal one.

(@Japhy)
 
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Uhura's Mazda

have i told you lately that i love you
Published by SLP
Location
Tamaki Makaurau
List of CEOs of Consentia

2004-2013: Craig Davenport

Consentia began as an enterprise dedicated to service delivery and customer excellence, under the management of Craig Davenport, a man with an MBA and a baseball cap. The New Labour government of the UK was in the process of streamlining its education offer by contracting out to third parties for certain elements of the programme - in this case, it was judged that the sexual education of teenagers could be more ergonomically delivered by the staff and resources of Consentia Ltd., a team of whom would come into each school for a couple of weeks a year and deliver an intensive education-style course to the students. This had the twin objectives of firstly, enabling individual schools to cut down on their banana budgets, and secondly, enabling teachers to avoid the awkwardness of sex ed lessons in order to actually teach (i.e. achieve improved outcomes in the league tables).​
Put briefly, Consentia supplied enthusiastic youth-adjacent practitioners and up-to-the-minute resources to all Local Education Authorities in return for an initially modest fee. Naturally, however, both the Consentia Team Members and their lessons were extremely cringeworthy, and the videos using skateboarding as a metaphor for cunnilingus were mocked by observational stand-up comedians for decades to come. Worst of all, it has been proven by social scientists that the "It's rad to be gay!" slogan dissuaded huge numbers of young people from coming out until they had recovered from the cringe, which in many cases took years.​

2013-2019: Rachael Vickers

When Davenport resigned as CEO amidst a spate of revelations regarding the employment of Team Members who had not been compelled to have police background checks, Rachael Vickers was poached from another firm in the government-contract sector (AnaLITica, subcontracted by MI5 to compile lists of people who had borrowed extremist literature from libraries) and instituted a more serious business culture, predicated on customer satisfaction and measurable efficiency. Consentia also diversified under the Vickers regime, with the firm exploring broader opportunities after being hired by the Coalition government to investigate sex crimes - the state police had struggled with an endemic failure to close cases in the sector, and it was hoped that the use of outside specialists would enable detectives to get back to their real jobs: paperwork and the solving of serial murders in sleepy Cotswold villages.​
While the arrest records did not markedly improve with privatisation, and in fact declined sharply, Consentia were justly praised for bringing a new sense of business efficiency to the task at hand, with victims being issued with pamphlets that were much glossier than previous, and being interviewed by Team Members in open-plan offices, with nice biscuits and beanbags, rather than the grim police-station interview rooms that were formerly used.​

2019-2032: Xavier Powers

Vickers' successful tenure came to a conclusion as she left to head up Defendr (formerly the HMS Defender), and she was replaced by Xavier Powers, who had revolutionised the HR department by turning all the Consentia Team Members into zero-hours contractors. Some stakeholders claimed that this made the staff less dedicated to customer service in both the sex education and criminal investigation ventures as they were worn down by long-term stress, but Powers had the foresight to create an expectation that the workforce would be constantly refreshed by rapid staff turnover.​
Soon after Powers rose to the top, Coronavirus hit Britain, which might have had negative consequences for the business but for the fact that so much important work was done by the state-contracting sector that the firms couldn't be allowed to fail. The state, however, could definitely be allowed to go under, especially after Covid-21, by which point the ailing banks were calling in several centuries-worth of sovereign debt. Hard-pressed, the Sunak government retreated from further elements of what was once called the 'state sector' - the welfare system became DooWoP, a tech startup based around matching subscribers (formerly 'jobseekers') with patrons, in return for a subscription fee of just 69% of the minimum wage.​
Consentia itself diversified its portfolio by taking on democracy services. The ads for their new app, TikBox, gave nothing away as to its nature (they were just music samples called 'InspiringTrack256.wav' played over black-and-white footage from American civil rights rallies), but it quickly emerged that Consentia were bringing democracy to the masses in ways never seen before. After signing the Terms and Conditions, users were able to vote on every matter coming before Parliament, which was now bound to comply with the wishes of the people. Now, of course, such an innovative app with such a cringeworthy name would inevitably only be used by a minority of people, so Consentia ensured that the results were representative by feeding through their patented AI algorithm.​
For some reason, the results of this process always aligned with the wishes of the Conservative Government (Brought To You By PowersCorp Holdings Ltd).​
 
Lord Protectors of Great Britain after WW3 (29 October 1962-8 February 1963)

1963-1972: Sir Richard Hull

1972-1986: Sir Walter Walker

1986-1986: Sir Julian Thompson

1986-1996: Roy Hattersley-Social Democracy

1996-2006: Lord John Attlee-National Union

2006-2006: Donny Gluckstein - Unified Trades League

2006-2016: Raymond Jolliffe-National Liberal

2016-present day:William Hague-Unified Trades League
Lord Protectors of Great Britain

1963–1972: Sir Richard Hull (Military (Reconstructionist)) leading Government of National Reconstruction
1972–1986: Sir Walter Walker (Military (Anti-Communist)) leading National Unity Government
1986: Sir Julian Thompson (Military (Reformist)) leading Transitional Government
1986-1996: Roy Hattersley (Social Democracy) *
1986 Def. Sir Airey Neave (National Union), Sir Ian Gilmour (National Liberal), Eric Heffer (Independent (Trade Unionist))
1996–2006: John Attlee, 3rd Earl Attlee (National Union)
1996 Def. Giles Radice (Social Democracy), Michael Heseltine (National Liberal), Tony Wedgewood-Benn (Trade Unionist Coalition)
2006: Donny Gluckstein (Unified Trades League) **
2006 Def. Raymond Jolliffe, 5th Baron Hylton (National Liberal), Godfrey Bloom (National Union), Alan Johnson (Social Democracy)
2006–2016: Raymond Jolliffe, 5th Baron Hylton (National Liberal)
2016–Present: William Hague (Unified Trades League) ***
2016 Def. Charles Kennedy (Social Democracy), Richard Drax (National Union), Nicola Ann Morgan (National Liberal)

* Following the March Days in ’86 and the restoration of power to parliament, the position of Lord Protector was made largely ceremonial and elected to a single 10-year term.
** Winning on a minority of the vote (the tradition-obsessed Council of State would never countenance reforming First Past the Post) Gluckstein’s election was immediately declared void by the Nation Union parliament on a technicality. Installing the runner-up candidate avoid a public backlash, this clear coup against the growing Left still led to mass protests.
*** With a majority of the popular vote this time, the beloved Bill Hauge has taken back the premiership for socialism. The victory of a man who had once led the youth opposition to Walker’s regime has marked a key turning point in the revival of left-wing politics – especially as it preceded Katy Clark, the first PM to be born after WWIII and Britain’s first women leader, taking a UTL-led coalition into power.
 

iupius

Joe Biden, on the grassy knoll, with a Solero
Cloverfield, or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Throw the Mystery Box into the Sea

Spoilers ahead for those who haven’t seen the films, obviously. Had a little Cloverfield marathon this weekend, and thought it might be fun to have a crack at piecing the world of the films together. I know the jury’s still out on the degree to which the films properly overlap – alternate dimensions ahoy – but figured I’d try and weave it together into one unfortunate world.

Haven’t really done anything like this before, so thank you to @Mumby and @Japhy, your list styles in particular were of great help in constructing the final product.

---

America still bears the scars of 2008. The economy, already on the verge of overheating, never fully recovered from the annihilation of New York. Any remaining trust in the political system crumbled overnight when the Bush administration gave the infamous early-morning order to initiate Hammerdown and throw every MOAB within range at Manhattan. As bedside alarms went off, and It stubbornly refused to die, George W. Bush became only the second president in U.S. history to authorise the deployment of nuclear weapons. He remains the first and only to use them on American soil.

When the dust finally settled, It’s corpse lay motionless in what had been Central Park. We still don’t know what it was. A replica of It’s skeleton went on display at the Smithsonian in 2013 – It’s real bones are far too irradiated for a public exhibit – and drew record crowds, but we have been able to ascertain precious little about It. Whatever It had been, it had reduced New York from the “City That Never Sleeps” to a graveyard in less than eight hours.

Meanwhile, hell descended on Washington. Millions marched in the streets demanding to know why the government hadn’t been It coming, or arguing either for or against it’s fallout management strategy. Congressional Democrats wilfully threw the book at the White House. Bowing to popular demand, an impeachment process on rocket boosters raced through the House of Representatives, although the president would be given a metaphorical stay of execution given its proximity to election day. Barack Obama, on the cusp of the Democratic nomination when It arrived, would sweep to victory in November and end John McCain’s political career.

The economic recovery proved extraordinarily difficult. The NYSE stock exchange had set up shop pretty quickly in Chicago, but the domino effect of insurance companies going under, followed by several of the big banks, overwhelmed the White House. The economic migrants from the tri-state area alone prompted a rat race for what jobs remained in cities across the country; the mayors of America’s largest cities became celebrities overnight as their available work forces surged, even as employment plummeted. Neither the assassination of Osama Bin Laden – by Seal Team, drone strikes seeming too close for comfort after Hammerdown – or the dumping of Jim Webb made an impact on the president’s abysmal approval ratings. And when Mitt Romney crumbled under the pressure during the Republican primaries, victim of a groundswell of anger at The Politicians! And Bankers! Who Had Failed To See It Coming, the right’s unity ticket took to the stage in Tampa. Nobody was surprised when the Huckabee campaign swept through the swing states – the early calls of Ohio, Florida, and New York were the death knell for the ailing Democrat campaign nationwide.

Nobody remembers much about the first few years of the Huckabee administration. Much like with the second Bush administration and 9/11, students of political history were prone to skip the malaise of 2013, 2014, and 2015 and turn straight to the chapters on the Lake Charles War. Nobody much knows how that one started, either. Conspiracy theories abounded again, but They were gone as soon as they’d arrived. A series of gradually wider blackouts preceded Their appearance over Lake Charles, Louisiana. They detonated something caustic over Lake Charles and Baton Rouge, and set about on a bombing campaign over Cajun country. Local police and the National Guard swiftly stood aside as the White House rolled the military in town, but they weren’t much good against what dropped from Their ships either. Within hours, much of Louisiana, and later Texas, became a battleground. In many places, the air hung toxic. Crops rotted. Animals died. People burned.

Through brute force, although less gung-ho than in 2008 for political reasons, the military managed to take back the southern seaboard. We’re all familiar with the stories of that – the raising of the flag over Minute Maid Park; the naval bombardment of Galveston; the burning of the Texan oil fields; the heroism of the New Orleans search rescue teams (petitions to put Bayou, the nation’s favourite German Shepherd, on the twenty dollar bill had surprising grassroots traction). As Huckabee remarked after They died, we know little of God’s creation, but we know much of human nature. It had all the makings of an American success story until their defeat prompted the frying of all electronics as far as Appalachia. Urban areas shut down, what remained of the economy went into freefall, and Americans huddled in the dark until, when things returned to something approaching normality, they trudged in line to boot Huckabee from office.

Economic stagnation and energy crisis brought with them fresh challenges. The Villaraigosa and Walsh administrations invested heavily in fields of solar panels in the western plains, only to meet head-on the intransigence of western Republican governors and elected officials. Protests erupted yet again, and Montana’s governor was propelled to political stardom for his “take those shining bastards down” comment, caught live on CNN as the president flew into Billings. Villaraigosa himself would resign just over eighteen months into office, as the gold of the L.A. boom turned an ugly shade of dehydrated yellow amidst a bribery scandal, but President Walsh kept the administration chugging along, beating back an ultimately anticlimactic Republican challenge in 2020 but failing to garner much enthusiasm either way.

Then again, American politics in the late-2010s and early-2020s was not a particularly enthusiastic place. The population looked elsewhere for that, especially when they finally replaced their TVs and iPads. Eccentric billionaire Elon Musk was the source of much of that, amazing enthralled fans with new technologies at a time where life consisted of rebuilding much of the old. His collaboration with various global governments on manned and unmanned orbital launches, and his regular appearances on Colbert, Kimmel, and Taylor, made him by far the most popular man in America. His “Look Up” ethos and insistence that America’s energy future could be secured out there in the cosmos through technological innovation caught the moment. Was it entirely realistic, or sensible? Not a jot. But it tapped into the optimism that Americans hadn’t truly felt for over a decade. His 2020 donation of $1 billion to the Treasury to help pay down the national debt – described by the man himself as a “wedding present for the nation” after his marriage to MacKenzie Tuttle (née Bezos), and a cheap stunt by his detractors – was the news event of the summer. Both the GOP and the Democrats (to Walsh’s uneasy attention) wanted him on their ticket – enough to push through the Equal Opportunity to Govern bill, ironically only after Orrin Hatch himself had vacated his Senate seat for Mia Love. Musk would pass on a slap-dash 2020 bid, and keep himself busy at NASA during Walsh’s rather lacklustre second term.

Musk would walk it in ’24, of course. He was hardly one of America’s best presidents, but he was one of the more fun. Stymied at home after eschewing party labels to win the White House as an independent, he focused his attention on foreign policy, with the Shepherd programme the forefront of the Musk administrations’ international efforts. The pact was signed at the G8 in Montreal, with only minor rumblings from the Kremlin, still transitioning to a post-Putin political system, and Tom Mulcair, disgruntled at being overshadowed in his own backyard. The groundwork had been laid under the Walsh administration, and Musk wasted no time in pushing the Montreal Pact to action with the enthusiastic support of Johnson and Hamon. The mandate of the International Space Station would be extended further to include work on a particle accelerator and a plan to finally crack the riddle of perpetual motion. The world was watching – and kept watching, given the rate of failure when the Shepherd went online. Rumours that Musk pressured NASA and partners for more frequent testing, pushing the machine harder and harder in the run-up to the 2028 election, cannot be confirmed.

On 4 February 2028, the Shepherd team tried again. For a brief, wonderful moment, hope. There’s a famous snap, lost to history now, of President Musk standing on the Resolute Desk, arms outstretched in triumph, a beautiful snapshot of the twenty-six second period where a better world seemed, finally, to have arrived. And then the dimensions cracked, the ISS vanished, and It appeared on the South Lawn. As major cities around the world suddenly found their CBDs occupied by beasts from another dimension, the world sighed, wearily, and lurched back into crisis.


List of Presidents of the United States (2001-)

2001-2009: George W. Bush (Republican)
2000 (with Richard B. Cheney) def. Albert A. Gore, Jr. (Democratic), Ralph Nader (Green)
2004 (with Richard B. Cheney) def. John F. Kerry (Democratic)

2009-2013: Barack H. Obama II (Democratic)
2008 (with James H. Webb, Jr.) def. John S. McCain III (Republican)
2013-2017: Michael D. Huckabee (Republican)
2012 (with Newton L. Gingrich) def. Barack H. Obama II (Democratic)
2017-2018: Antonio R. Villaraigosa (Democratic)
2016 (with Martin J. Walsh) def. Michael D. Huckabee (Republican)
2018: Resignation of President Antonio R. Villaraigosa (Democratic)

2018-2025: Martin J. Walsh (Democratic)
2018: Senate confirmation of Terrycina A. Sewell (Democratic) as Vice President
2020 (with Terrycina A. Sewell) def. Ryan K. Zinke (Republican)

2025-present: Elon R. Musk (Independent - 'Look to the Stars')
2024 (with Randall M. Hultgren) def. Louis B. Gohmert, Jr. (Independent Republican), Carlton W. Reeves (Independent Democratic)
2028: Declaration of nationwide State of Emergency
 
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Time Enough

European Pollution Police Force
Pronouns
He/Him
Tugwell Over The White House: An Alternate Presidents List
1929-1934: Herbert Hoover (Republican)

1929 (With Charles Curtis) def: Al Smith (Democratic), Norman Thomas (Socialist Party of America)
1932 (With Charles Curtis) def: Albert Ritchie (Democratic), Henry A.Wallace ('Progressive' Democratic), Norman Thomas (SPA), William Z. Foster (Communist Party of the USA)

1934-1937: Charles Curtis (Republican)
1937-1941: Rexford Tugwell (Democratic)

1936 (With Huey Long) def: Charles Curtis (Republican), Upton Sinclair (SPA-EPIC), Earl Bowder (CPUSA)
1941–1945: Rexford Tugwell (National Union)
1940 (With Thomas Dewey) def: Huey Long (‘Share the Wealth’ Democrat), Clarence Senior (Popular Front), Robert A.Taft (Independent Republican)
1945-1953: Rexford Tugwell (National)
1944 (With Vito Marcantonio) def: Huey Long (CommonWealth), Hugh De Lacy (Popular Front), Henry A.Wallace (Libertarian), Robert A.Taft (Conservative)
1948 (With Brien McMahon) def: Huey Long (CommonWealth), Angelo Herndon (Popular Front), Jerry Voorhis (Libertarian), Robert Rice Reynolds (Conservative)

1953-1957: Huey Long (CommonWealth)
1952 (With Lyndon B.Johnson) def: Rexford Tugwell (National), Earl Bowder (Popular Front), Glen H.Taylor (Libertarian), Strom Thurmond (Conservative)
1957-:Brien McMahon (National)
1957 (With Richard Nixon) def: Huey Long (CommonWealth), Gus Hall (Popular Front)
 

Sideways

Attack and Dethrone Albus Dumbledore
Published by SLP
Location
Teignmouth, Devon
Pronouns
She/Her
Prime Ministers of the United Kingdom since 1945 In A World Where Superpowers and Super Science are Real (From the Goose Green 'Verse or MCU-1982):
Nice work. May I suggest breaking up the paragraphs a bit and not presenting text in colour? It may make it easier to read

Some stakeholders claimed that this made the staff less dedicated to customer service in both the sex education and criminal investigation ventures as they were worn down by long-term stress, but Powers had the foresight to create an expectation that the workforce would be constantly refreshed by rapid staff turnover.
Chills, honestly
 

Walpurgisnacht

Build a glass asylum
Location
Sussex By The Sea
Pronouns
He/Him
Remember that gimmick from a week ago?

Well,

WalpurgisBrit(ain)

Prime Ministers of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

2010-2012: Norman Baker (Liberal Democrats)
def 2010: (Coalition with New Conservatives) David Cameron (New Conservatives), David Miliband (Social Democratic Labour), Caroline Lucas (Green), Gordon Brown (Labour)
2011 Schengen Area Referendum: JOIN 61%, REMAIN 39%

2012 Voting System Referendum: PR 53%, FPTP 47%
2012-2015: Norman Baker (New Britain Group minority)
2015-2017: Caroline Lucas (Green)
def 2015: (Coalition with Socialist Labour) Norman Baker (New Britain Group), Benjamin Zephaniah (Socialist Labour), Andy Burnham (Social Democratic Labour), Simon Singh (Rationalist)
2016 Monarchy Referendum: ABOLISH 78%, RETAIN 22%

2017-xxxx: Lisa Nandy & Jon Lansman (Co-Operative Commonwealth)
def 2017: (Popular Front with LRC, Abolish The State, and Poale Zion) Owen Smith (Social Democratic Labour), John Trickett (Socialist Labour), Frances O'Grady (LRC), Luciana Berger (Poale Zion), Lena Worwood (Ecology), collective leadership (Abolish The State), Bill Drummond (Discordian)
2018 Voting System Referendum: STV 55%, RETAIN PR 41%, FPTP 4%
def 2019: (Popular Front with LRC, Abolish The State, Poale Zion, and Municipalist) Alex Sobel & John McDonnell (United Labour), Anna Taylor (XR), Charlotte Nichols (Poale Zion), Andrew Pakes (LRC), Anntoinette Bramble (Municipalist), collective leadership (Abolish The State), "KING MOB" (Spoiled Ballot), Melanie Barber (Folkist)


The sudden explosion in the Liberal Democratic vote in 2010 came as a major shock to most observers, but was obvious in retrospect. The Iraq war, the financial crisis, and the expansion of the security state had created a mood of discontent with the way things were, and when one of the Labour leadership's most frequent critics started a new party intended "to revive the spirit of social democracy" it was clear Brown was doomed. Floods of new voters, impelled by what was described as "Bakermania", gave the Lib Dems, if not a majority, at least a workable minority. A government was formed with the aid of David Cameron's modernised Conservatives, and from the steps of No10 Baker promised a new dawn that would combine the best of Left and Right for Britain.

It couldn't last. While the Government's poll ratings saw a bump after securing British entrance to the Schengen zone, the public quickly became disillusioned with the Lib Dems, and what they saw as willing collusion in a Conservative agenda of welfare cuts, privatisations, and environmental neglect. An increasingly militant far-Left gained council seats and polling ground, and Miliband's increasingly naked careerism allowed the Greens to rise rapidly as the main opposition to the government, but the real threat to the coalition came from within. After failing to win any ground campaigning against both European integration and voting reform, David Cameron took the New Conservatives out of coalition. Facing a party revolt, Baker looked at the healthy state of his personal ratings, and decided to try a rebrand...

After a record number of by-elections, the New Britain Group was just about holding together, if you squinted. The anti-Establishment energy of Bakermania had been diverted down a thousand twisting channels, and as a result Britain now had a TV comedian for a Home Secretary and Howling Lord Hope for Chancellor. The Direct Democracy initiatives Baker had introduced only served to confuse the work of government further--polls, and thus policy, swung frequently between Marxism, technocracy, liberalism, and at one point the principles of Thomas More's Utopia. It was clear that the British public would go any direction, as long as it seemed like it went forward. The only remotely unifying public concerns were support for a stronger welfare state, and support for more environmental action. It was no surprise when the party seen as offering both managed to win out in the next election.

Lucas's government, backed by the resurgent Socialist Labour, would be a marked contrast to the last three years. With a strong mandate and wide-ranging emergency powers to tackle climate change, complete decarbonisation of the UK was merely the beginning. As the state expanded, on paper to prevent environmental catastrophe, the business and corporate sector shrunk. It is estimated that the last non-government owned business shut shop in April 2016, a week after Derek Wall's jubilant declaration at the Spring Conference that "British capitalism is dead.". The abolition of the monarchy and the subsequent seizure of Crown land seemed to be the crown jewel of the administration, but the public tide was turning under them. While the British public were firmly against business, they seemed disenchanted with a monolithic state that seemed as unresponsive and faceless as the corporations it replaced. The surprise smash hit that was the TV adaptation of the Illuminatus! trilogy served as advance warning for the rise of a new force in British politics, which was rapidly reshaping the moribund New Britain Group and reaching out to dissatisfied Coalition members.

Ten years after Brown stepped down, Great Britain has one of the oddest political systems in Europe, with a libertarian-centralist split having replaced the conventional left-right divide entirely, and none of the parties of ten years ago survive. After the annihilation of the New Conservatives by the electorate, the only parliamentary party to advocate for a more free-market system is the minor Folkists, who are more concerned with local customs and real ale than economics. The Social Democrats and the Socialists are co-operating once more on a new party, but its resemblance to New Labour is slim at best. Since Lucas's downfall when half her party left under her, the former Greens have been taken over by their own youth wing, and are increasingly orientated towards extra-parliamentary action. The direct successor to the Liberals is currently run by Discordians openly making a joke out of the political process, eschewing legislation in favour of putting whoopee-cushions under the green benches. The governing parties are united only by a shared determination to dismantle the government in favour of local communes, co-operatives, and kibbutzes. Somehow, this system retains the support of the British public, but with a flu pandemic, a changing climate, and Chukka Ummuna still at large, Britain has many a challenge ahead for it.