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Lists of Heads of Government and Heads of State

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First Secretaries of the Scottish Assembly: A Collaborative List
1979-1982: Sir Samuel Curran (Independent)
1982-1988: Donald Dewar (Labour)

1981 (Majority) def: Tam Galbraith (Conservative Unionist), Russell Johnston (Liberal), Robert Maclennan (Social Democratic Party), Stephen Maxwell (Scottish CommonWealth Party), Gordon Wilson (Scottish National Party)
1984
(Coalition with Liberal's) def: George Younger (Conservative Unionist), Russell Johnston (Liberal), Robert Maclennan (SDP), Margo MacDonald (SCWP), Micheal Forsyth (Democratic Unionist Party of Scotland), Gordon Wilson (SNP)
1988-1996: Margo MacDonald (Scottish CommonWealth Party)
1988 (Confidence and Supply with Social & Liberal Democrats & Labour 'Left') def: Donald Dewar (Labour), *Bob McTaggart (Labour 'Left'), George Younger (Conservative Unionist), Robert Maclennan (Social & Liberal Democrat), Micheal Forsyth (DUPoS), Willie McRae (SNP)
1992 (Majority) def: John McAllion (Labour), George Younger (Conservative), Charles Kennedy (Lib Dems), Micheal Forsyth (DUPoS), Tom Moore (SNP), Robin Harper (Green)

1996-1999: Michael Forsyth (Democratic Unionist Party of Scotland)
1996 (Coalition with Conservatives) def: Margo MacDonald (SCWP), John McAllion (Labour), George Younger (Conservative), Ming Campbell (Lib Dems), Robin Harper (Green)
1999-2010: Mike Gove (Democratic Unionist Party of Scotland)
2000 (Majority) def: Alex Salmon (SCWP), Jack McConnell (Labour), George Younger (Conservative), Ming Campbell (Lib Dems), Robin Harper (Green)
2004 (Majority) def: Alex Neil (SCWP), Jack McConnell (Labour), Annabel Goldie (Conservative), Micheal Moore (Lib Dems), Robin Harper-Alison Johnstone (Green)
2008 (Majority) def: Colin Fox (SCWP), Katy Clark (Labour), Micheal Moore (Lib Dems), Robin Harper-Alison Johnstone (Green)

2010-2012: Steven Gordon (Democratic Unionist Party of Scotland)
2012-2018: Ian Murray (Labour)

2012 (Confidence and Supply with Lib Dems) def: Steve Gordon (DUPoS), Peter Mullan (SCWP), Annabel Goldie (Conservative), Jo Swinson (Lib Dems), Murdo Fraser (Scottish Democratic Party), Alison Johnstone-Maggie Chapman (Green)
2016 (Majority) def: George Hargreaves (DUPoS), Peter Mullan (SCWP), Jo Swinson (Lib Dems), Murdo Fraser (SDP), Alison Johnstone-Maggie Chapman (Green), Richard Leonard (‘Socialist’ Labour)

2018-XXXX: Ruth Davidson (Labour)
2020 (Majority) def: George Hargreaves (DUPoS), Cat Boyd (SCWP), Christine Jardine (Lib Dems), Murdo Fraser (SDP), Maggie Chapman-Lorna Slater (Green), Rhea Wolfson (Socialist Labour)

*Still part of the Labour Party, the Labour Left is considered by many to be it’s own informal grouping due to it’s big prescence MacDonald’s early Government.
1979-1982: Sir Samuel Curran (Independent)(1)
1982-1988: Donald Dewar (Labour) (2)
1988-1996: Margo MacDonald (Scottish CommonWealth Party) (3)
1996-1999: Michael Forsyth (Democratic Unionist Party of Scotland) (4)
1999-2010: Mike Gove (Democratic Unionist Party of Scotland) (5)
2010-2012: Steven Gordon (Democratic Unionist Party of Scotland) (6)
2012-2018: Ian Murray (Labour) [7]
2018-XXXX: Ruth Davidson (Labour) [8]

(1) The Scottish Referendum of 1979 followed from the Scotland Act of 1978, it required a simple straight majority to pass (an attempted amendment by George Cunningham to require a minimum 40% of the total registered electorate to vote was narrowly defeated). The referendum passed narrowly by 51% but a on very low turnout of 32% of the registered electorate. This, along with the recent deaths of the two front runners to be First Secretary Geoffrey Shaw and John P. Mackintosh was seen as a very inauspicious start and many commentators predicated the new Assembly wouldn't last.

And it probably wouldn't have if not for Labour appointing the Principal of the University of Strathclyde, Sir Samuel Curran, to the position. An unexpected appointment (even to Curran himself who thought someone was playing a joke when he received his first summons) Sir Samuel threw himself into the role with gusto, seeing himself as Scotland's primary representative on the world stage, something that didn't always go down well with the Secretary of State. However he worked well with the Callaghan government and was privately relieved when it survived a no confidence scare in 1979.

A serious minded, gifted administrator he guided the development of the new assembly and prepared it for its first elections in 1981. Seeing his work as a midwife for the new regime he stood aside once the Assembly elections had successfully concluded. A popular figure until his death he is well regarded as the father of the assembly and sober, hardworking statesman. All the more surprising when you consider he was never activly seeking the role.


(2) Dewar had been out of parliamentary politics for years before the referendum vote, but by being one of the main faces for 'yes' he was able to jump forward as the obvious candidate for Labour's successful government. He oversaw a hugely ambitious plan to transform Scotland: to improve the schools, to bring in land reform, to abolish the feudal system of land tenure, to bring in national parks, and, once the Conservatives took power in Westminster, to oppose every Tory policy possible.

However, he'd been out of the parliamentary game for too long and had too little recent experience, and a lot of Dewar's early years were spent trying to keep control of his own party and keep control of his own bills. An attempt to sack any minister or aide who briefed against fellow Labour MSAs did impose some order, at the expense of making him look more like he was struggling for control. This perception cost Labour in the second Assembly elections, forcing Dewar to form a Lib-Lab coalition to keep a majority. With hindsight, we can see some of his reforms did get through - and Labour was quite united against the feudal system - but the reputational damage lingered.

(3). The leader of the infamous 79 split of the SNP the Scottish Commonwealth Party was inspired partially by the party of the same name from the 40s, a combination of Libertarian Socialists, Radical Labour Members, Euro-Communists and Social Democrats and Scottish Nationalists the Party steadily gained in popularity lead by the charismatic Margo MacDonald and her vision of a Federal Social Democratic Scotland similar to the Scandinavian countries. As the Dewar Government became more unpopular the popularity for the CommonWealth Party grew.

In 1988 Assembly election the party would narrowly scrap due to reform being popular but Labour being tainted causing Margo to become First Secretary. Margo would gain the support of Liberals and the Labour Left in terms of implementing Social Democratic ideals and Federalist ideas. The main problem though would be balancing the books and with the Conservatives threatening to cut funding Margo decided to sell off Scottish Oil (one of the victories of the Dewar government) which lead to a split with certain Scottish Nationalists.

An attempt to kill Margo MacDonald in 1990 by Radical Scottish Nationalists failed and in 1991 she would win a slim majority. With the books balanced she was able to implement much of her original ideas including increased rights for Sex Workers, a more Federalised system and increased use of Nationalised industries and Co-Ops. Of course these weren’t popular with everyone and a referendum over legalisation of Marijuana would be the last straw for the Religious and Conservatives in Scotland as 1996 loomed.

(4) Everyone knew that there was going to be a backlash against the alliance of the Scottish CommonWealth Party and Labour that had held power in the devolved Parliament, however few people the early 1990s would have put money on the Democratic Unionist Party of Scotland. Initially one of the most bizarre political experiments, DUPoS began in 1983 as a small band of Unionists in Scotland finally loosing their temper with the Conservative's in Westminster. Unable to claim sole ownership of the Unionist mantel however, they soon decided to emulate Ian Paisley's party based in Ulster and formed a pact of sorts.

As the decade turned, DUPoS turned increasingly morally, fiscally and socially conservative as the Conservatives turned more Liberal and Free Market, and with this the Party gained increased traction and overtake the mainstream Scottish Conservative Party. Its new leader, Michael Forsyth was the embodiment of the new agenda and became famous for attacks directed more at his Unionist opponents than the Scottish government. Only after the Marijuana referendum did Forsyth lead DUPoS in for the kill against MacDonald. In the following election, Forsyth managed to one up the Ulster DUP by crossing the Religious divide after he received an endorsement from the Catholic Archbishop of St Andrews. A cluster of seats in Glasgow that would have made the difference shocked everyone when they turned DUPoS, however the border seats remained traditional Tory and Forsyth had to govern with his Unionist rivals.

The coalition rocked to and fro for three years. The focus was on domestic and social policy: MacDonald's protection of Sex workers was overturned with a flat out ban on them; increased conditions on unemployment benefits increased, although relaxed for child support and child benefits increased; finally an tightening on divorce law which sent changes to the law back further than anywhere in the UK since the 1960s. Things were going well until Forsyth finally snapped. During a meeting with the Scottish Conservatives, Forsyth was called (not for the first or last time) 'Judas' one time too many, and heated argument broke out of which the end was nearly the break up of the DUPoS led coalition. However, his Party was not with Forsyth and he was duly ejected from leadership rather than break up the coalition.

(5) "Michael II", the political satirists called him and draw him as a Stuart monarch - something that felt became a little worrying as it seemed nothing would depose him. The fact he was both extremely cocky and a nerdy swot should surely have counted against him, but it covered up a highly cynical, targeted mindset great for political machinations. The Conservatives would lament that he had briefly been one of them until he was told by the Conservative Research Department he was "insufficiently Conservative" and "insufficiently political" - likely why he'd ended up with the DUPoS.

His first election was won by predominantly focusing on winning Conservative seats, dumping all the blame for unpopular or unfinished policies on them. The next election would again see a majority DUPoS win, this time fuelled by appeals to Decency and Standards in the face of the horrifically socialist and libertine Labour government in Westminster - and a scandal involving the CommonWealth bigwig Salmond. With twelve years of power, Gove continued to oversee a government of social conservative policies, a sweeping "free school" revamp of the Scottish education system, and looser restrictions on business. He also was able to attract several businesses, though not as many as his propaganda claimed, up to Scotland from Labour-ruled London.

But fifteen years of very conservative control meant an exhausted government with growing corruption and crapping-up scandals, and a seething demographic of young Scots looking down south and seeing places that looked more fun - and Gove had spent a lot of time cracking down on the 'Second Wave of Rave' that rippled across Scotland under the DUPoS. Cannily, he resigned as leader shortly before the election so someone else would have to try and win.

(6) Steven Gordon was the leader of the ‘Left Wing’ of the DUPoS, advocating for a mixture of Social Conservatism and Social Democracy and his sincere belief that he could allow the DUPoS to continue staying in power through gaining the Scottish Blue Labour vote as it was dealing with it’s own battle between the Progress candidate Douglas Alexander and the SCG candidate John McAllion. But Steven Gordon was betting on the wrong horse.

The Labour Government in Westminster, the Scottish CommonWealth Party and the Liberal Democrat’s watched in glee as the Gordon government collapsed. First there was the ‘Orange Rave Surge’ of the Scottish CommonWealth Party in local elections lead by former actor Peter Mullan, there was the ‘Murdo split’ in which Murdo Fraser created the Scottish Democratic Party with 12 DUPoS MPs who were angry at the Social Democracy aspects of Gordon’s Government and finally came the Hargreaves incident.

George Hargreaves was considered by many to be the person who should have won the DUPoS leadership election and he had spent the years since the election letting Gordon know it. When Gordon considered loosening the Scottish Divorce Laws under pressure from the Westminster Labour Government Hargreaves lost it, going on an hour long tirade in the Assembly before calling for another leadership election. Although Gordon managed to win it was by a hair and by the time the 2012 election came the DUPoS was exhausted. The so called ‘Conservative Coalition’ had collapsed and in it’s wake the other parties of Scotland’s would pick up the scraps.

[7] Ian Murray was not the man many expected to see come out ahead when the dust of the 2012 election settled. The handpicked choice of the national leadership in London to not as much unite the party as beat the establishment into shape and liquidate any left-wing insurgents he came across, the young Edinburgh AM had managed to in the short eleven months between his ascension to the leadership and election day not only emerge as the premier voice of the opposition but also seize back the center ground from Gordon and the DUPoS. He accomplished those feats partly through a highly disciplined message of Change and Clean Government that gave no one any hint that it was technically a center-left social democratic outfit he was running and partly by successfully associating the SCWP with the radicalism of the MacDonald years and the decades of right-wing governance that followed. In the landslide that followed it almost looked like Labour would have a majority of their own but in the end it would become necessary to strike a deal with the LibDems.

More than one Scottish lefty would complain that the policies implemented by the Murray government stood a fair bit to the right of the ones promised by the 2012 DUPoS manifesto, but throughout his first term the First Secretary rode high in the polls. The Scottish education system saw itself practically drowned in money to the extent that not even the EIS raised to much of a fuss when the charter scheme was implemented. Same sex marriage was introduced in Holyrood a full year ahead of Westminster and a broad package of civil protections for women and sexual minorities were introduced. On the more mechanical side the old Goveite patronage networks were at least partly rooted out (to be replaced by Murrayite ones some say) and the EU flag was flown from Holyrood for the first time in decades. Scotland was, in the words of a government spokesman, brought into the 21st century.

Soon after his reelection, which saw Labour's plurality decrease somewhat, Murray announced his resignation. Rumors points to anything from a sexy job at the UN to a brewing scandal or palace coup, but the official reason remains that he wished to serve his community in another role.


[8] One of the 'Class of '12' AMs that Murray's government brought in, Davidson was both openly gay and married when she took power - a walking symbol of social change in Scotland. To some extent, this has cause damage to the DUPoS as it exposed faultlines between hardcore 'culture warriors' and homophobes in that party and those willingly to at least publicly shift position. With socially liberal views, aid for schools and disadvantaged parents, pro-business leanings, and Tough On Crime measures, she managed to perfectly colonise the Scottish centre and has left the Liberal Democrats feeling a bit lost for their own USP.

Whether this will see her to another Labour victory depends on how she continues to deal with the new Conservative government in Westminster, as she's been accused of not standing up enough for Scottish seperate interests.
 

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Prime Ministers of the United Kingdom (since 1945)
1945–1953: Clement Attlee (Labour)
1945: landslide def. Winston Churchill (Conservative), Archibald Sinclair (Liberal)
1950: workable majority def. Winston Churchill (Conservative), Clement Davies (Liberal)

1953–1955: Aneurin Bevan (Labour)
1955–1962: Anthony Eden (Conservative)
1955: majority def. Aneurin Bevan (Labour), William Beveridge (Liberal)
1956: landslide def. Aneurin Bevan (Labour), Douglas Jay (Democratic Socialists), William Beveridge (Liberal)
1961: workable majority def. Harold Wilson (Labour), Anthony Crosland (Democratic Socialists), Jo Grimond (Liberal)

1962–1966: Peter Thorneycroft (Conservative)
1966–1973: Harold Wilson (Democratic Labour)
1966: landslide def. Peter Thorneycroft (Conservative), Jo Grimond (Liberal)
1971: workable majority def. Iain Macleod (Conservative), Eric Lubbock (Liberal)

1973–1979: Barbara Castle (Democratic Labour)
1974: workable majority def. Iain Macleod (Conservative), Eric Lubbock (Liberal)
1979–1984: Geoffrey Howe (Conservative)
1979: majority def. Barabara Castle (Democratic Labour), Eric Lubbock (Liberal)
1984–1989: Douglas Hurd (Reform)
1984: workable majority def. James Callaghan (Democratic Labour), Eric Lubbock (Liberal), Geoffrey Howe (Conservative)
1989–1999: John Smith (Democratic Labour)
1989: landslide def. Douglas Hurd (Reform), Norman Tebbit (Conservative), David Steel (Liberal)
1993: landslide def. John Major (Conservative), Alan Haselhurst (Reform), Menzies Campbell (Liberal)
1997: workable majority def. John Major (One Nation), Menzies Campbell (Liberal)

1999–2001: Margaret Beckett (Democratic Labour)
2001–2007: Chris Patten (One Nation)
2001: workable majority def. Margaret Beckett (Democratic Labour), Menzies Campbell (Liberal)
2005: majority def. Gordon Brown (Democratic Labour), Malcolm Bruce (Liberal)

2007–2011: George Osborne (One Nation)
2007: workable majority def. Gordon Brown (Democratic Labour)
2011–2018: Yvette Cooper (Democratic Labour)
2011: workable majority def. George Osborne (One Nation), Chris Huhne (Liberal)
2015: landslide def. Jesse Norman (One Nation), Chris Huhne (Liberal)

2018–Present day: Chucka Umunna (Democratic Labour)

2018: workable majority def. George Freeman (One Nation), Chris Huhne (Liberal), Laura Pidcock (Socialist)
 
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Peace and Freedom

1969-1977: Richard Nixon (Republican)
1968 (With Spiro Agnew) def: Hubert Humphrey (Democratic)
1972 (With Spiro Agnew) def: Henry M.Jackson (Democratic)

1977-1981: Spiro Agnew (Republican)
1976 (With Tom McCall) def: Philip Hart (Democratic), Eugene McGovern (Peace & People’s)
1981-1986: Jerry Brown (Democratic)
1980 (With Walter Mondale) def: Spiro Agnew (Republican), Tom McCall (New Front), Joe Lieberman (Reform)
1984 (With Mike Gravel) def: Mark Hatfield (Republican), Ronald Regan (‘Liberal’ Republican)

1986-1993: Mike Gravel (Democratic, then Peace and Freedom)
1988 (With Bernie Sanders) def: Gary Hart (Democratic), John Chafee (Republican)
1993-1997: Bernie Sanders (Peace and Freedom)
1992 (With LaDonna Harris) def: Joe Biden (Democratic), Jack Kemp (Republican)
1997-: Paul Wellstone (Democratic)
1996 (With Ron Dellums) def: Bernie Sanders (Peace and Freedom), Al D'Amato (Republican)

How Mike Gavel became President is a long and tricky road but it probably has a lot to due with the corruption and malaise that started to deep through America during the Nixon and Agnew years as well as the raise in Right Wing Conservatism under Agnew too (who only really won the ‘76 election due to the Democrats fielding a candidate who turned out to be dying and Eugene McGovern creating a new party to show the Democrats what they were missing). By 1980 the Republican Party was splitting at the sides with a number of folks defecting to Tom McCall’s New Front or the bizarre political vehicle that was Joe Lieberman’s Reform (it’s catchphrase being ‘Neither Left or Right, but Forward’) whilst the Democrats coalesced around Jerry Brown, the Liberal Californian heartthrob who beat down Agnew in 1980.

Jerry Brown’s presidency would be about Liberal Reform and clearing out the corruption that Nixon/Agnew has brought. Brown would be a mostly popular president though his support of minority rights and handling of early start of the AIDS Crisis (which would involve a public health campaign with advice about safe sex and hospital wards for AIDS sufferers being made) would lead to Brown angering the Right of America. This became even for prominent with Mike Gravel’s nomination to the Vice Presidency in 84 (a man who has made a political career out of pissing off Nixon and Agnew). For many Right Wingers this would be a step too far and the press would lambast Brown for his campaign and presidency and for one man he would take things further.

How Ted Kaczynski managed to get a bomb to Jerry Brown is unknown but it’s impact would be shocking. Loosing a hand and large amounts of blood, Brown would resign from the Presidency and Gravel would take his place. Gravel’s couple of years in office as a Democrat were uncontroversial, mainly continuing the program Brown set out. But when Gravel tried to be nominated as the Presidential candidate for 88 he would be turfed out by a coalition of Conservatives and Moderates. Angered and seeing the possibility of his own plans being scuppered, Gravel would form a Left Wing coalition of sorts called ‘Peace and Freedom’ after one of the parties in the coalitions name.

With support from celebrities, prominent ‘Progressive’ Democrats, Jesse Jackson’s Rainbow coalition and even Jerry Brown, Chaffee spending more time trying to heal the Republicans wounds and Gary Hart’s infidelities catching up with him. Mike Gravel would win the Presidency as a Third Party. Gravel’s Presidency would be filled with Reform, Drug Decriminalisation, Social Liberalism and even attempts at Democratic Socialism in places. But his increasingly odd international positions and way of running the country started to look awkward to the Peace and Freedom folks.

Gravel wouldn’t try a third term instead giving the nomination to Bernie Sanders who’s Left Wing populism would win our against a more Conservative field. But by now the wheels were starting to fall off the Peace and Freedom machine, other parties like the SDUSA and DSA capitalising on the vacuum that was left in it’s wake. Sanders main aim accomplishments would be the Socialisation of American Healthcare under Medicare, Increased funding for City mayors and councils and decreasing the military’s budget. Still Sanders meant nothing without the Peace and Freedom machine and even though he was relatively popular, people wanted to return to an old reliable party instead. The Democrats nomination of a Left Wing candidate under Paul Wellstone and his VP Ron Dellums would put a final nail into the Peace and Freedoms dreams of a Third Term for some time.
 
Archmages of the Order of the Illuminated Seers
Nicholas Flamel 1363-1507
Cornelius Agrippa 1507-1535
Nicholas Flamel 1535-1570
John Dee 1570-1608
Michael Maier 1608-1622
Thomas Vaughan 1622-1666
Johann Georg Gitchel 1666-1710
Emanuel Swedenborg 1710-1762
Franz Anton Mesmer 1762-1814
Nicholas Flamel 1814-1840
Allan Kardoc 1840-1869
Andrew Jackson Davis 1869-1881
Helena Blavatsky 1881-1891
Rudolf Steiner 1891-1925
Aleister Crowley 1925-1948
Gerald Gardener 1948-1964
L. Ron Hubbard 1964-1970
Carlos Castenada 1970-1998
Alan Moore 1998-2020
Claire Boucher 2020-


The Order of the Illuminated Seers is a body dedicated to the discovery of occult knowledge and keeping it out of the hands of those who might abuse it. The Order was founded by the alchemist Nicholas Flamel, the discoverer of the Philosopher's Stone. Flamel structured the group so that no man within the Order may know all of the hidden knowledge possessed by adepts-not even himself. Over the centuries, the Order has integrated an array of practices and beliefs into its midst from the traditional to the new. Masters of Hermetics rub shoulders with Wiccans, shamans get into pissing contests with Thelemites and Theosophists clash with chaos magic practitioners. The various arts each have their own skill in allowing adepts to attain spiritual awakening, as well as combat outer threats.

The Order has all the traits one would expect of a secret society that manipulates the world for their own gain, but it wields surprisingly little power politically speaking. It has been weakened by periodic threats to its very existence (from the Inquisition's fires to the Satanic panic), missteps by the group itself (Hubbard's time as a leader is looked on as embarrassing by those who remember it) and feuds within the group over what the agenda ought to be (there was a schism in the 1920's as a result of the rise of fascism most notably and it took a good 50 years to track down the last of the pro-Nazi occultists ). Plus a large chunk of the group views world affairs as too mundane and boring for masters of the spiritual arts. However, that may change under Boucher's leadership. Flamel has finally died at the ripe old age of 690 leaving the Order's traditionalist weakened. The world is ripe for the birth of a new aeon and she has the perfect idea about who might be the man best fit to usher it in...
 

Time Enough

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Peace in Our Time:

Prime Ministers of Great Britain:
1935-1937: Stanley Baldwin (Conservative leading National Government)

1935 (Majority) def: Clement Attlee (Labour), John Simon (National Liberal), Herbert Samuel (Liberal), Ramsay MacDonald (National Labour), James Maxton (Independent Labour Party), Harry Pollitt (CPGB), Oswald Mosley (British Union of Fascists)
1937-1938: Neville Chamberlain (Conservative leading National Government)
1938: Lord Halifax (Conservative leading National Government)
1938: Hoare Samuel (Conservative leading National Government)
1938: Euan Wallace (Conservative leading National Government)
1938: Creation of British Union and new ‘National Government Elections’

Prime Ministers of British Union:
1938-1940: Kingsley Wood (National leading Pandemic Government)

1938 (With Harold Balfour) def: Stafford Cripps (Popular Front), Oswald Mosley (Unionist)
1940-1943: Harold Balfour (National leading Pandemic Government)
1940 (With Duff Cooper) def: Stafford Cripps (Popular Front), Oswald Mosley (Unionist), William Beveridge (Democratic Federation)
1943-1946: Archibald Wavell (Independent leading Reconstruction Government)
1943 (With Tom Wintringham) def: Aneurin Bevan (Popular Front), Oswald Mosley (Unionist), Tom Driberg (Democratic Federation)

Prime Ministers of British Federation:
1946-1950: Malcolm MacDonald (National)

1946 (Majority) def: Bessie Braddock (Popular Front), Oswald Mosley (Unionist), Tom Driberg (Democratic)
1950-1958: Richard Crossman (Popular Front)
1950 (Majority) def: Malcolm MacDonald (National), Oswald Mosley (Unionist), Tom Driberg (Democratic)
1954 (Majority) def: Harold Macmillan (National), John Amery (Unionist), Tom Driberg (Democratic)

1958-1960: Harry Wilson (Popular Front)
1958 (Coalition with Democratic) def: Harold Macmillan (National), John Amery (Unionist), Megan Lloyd-George (Democratic)
1960-1965: Iain MacLeod (National)
1960 (Majority) def: Harry Wilson (Popular Front), John Amery (Unionist), Megan-Lloyd George (Democratic)
1965-1970: Jo Richardson (Popular Front)
1965 (Majority) def: Iain MacLeod (National), John Amery (Unionist), Tony Benn (Democratic)
1970-: Tony Benn (Democratic)
1970 (Coalition with New Left) def: Jo Richardson (Popular Front), Julian Amery (National), John Amery (Unionist), Ralph Miliband-Doris Lessing (New Left)

1938, the year that everything changed. An inexplicable pandemic that caused humans to become aggressively violent would spread from London and would rather quickly take over the South. Thankfully the relatively quick infection time and the lack of quick travel causes the infected to stall on the border of the Midlands as the British Government regroups. After some hasty Prime Minister changes it’s decided that a Pandemic Government should be formed. Using a temporary electing system, a Prime Minister and Deputy Minister are voted out of a four new Parliamentary groups; National (One National Tories, National Labour, Labour Right Wing and Liberal Nationals), Popular Front (Labour Left, ILPers, Communists and assorted Socialists), Unionists (Right Conservatives, Fascists, Corporatists and assorted Nazi sympathisers) and eventually Democratic (Liberals, Christian Socialists and Left Wing oddballs). National mainly wins the election until the Wavell forms a Reconstruction Government (With Communist Military Organiser and Commune organiser Tom Wintringham) as the infected are dealt with.

After the crisis passes an election is organised and the old reliable National wins first. But Malcolm MacDonald’s avoidance of anything too Radical leads to the Popular Front win 1950 lead by the charismatic Richard Crossman, but after becoming a bit too close to the Paris Commune he’s ousted by his moustached pipe smoking former comrade Harry Wilson who’s forced to form a coalition with the Democratic Party.

He’s followed by Iain MacLeod who’s middle of the road attitude doesn’t work when the economy nearly collapses when another outbreak occurs in America. He’s replaced by the outspoken radical Leftist and Feminist Jo Richardson who’s central planning antics piss off the bubbling New Left lead by Ralph Miliband. The surprising victory of Democratic Party lead by Tony Benn who’s entered a coalition with the New Leftists signifies a change in politics post pandemic after the last 24 years of Popular Front/National battling each other in the wake of the near destruction of Britain.
 

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Light of the North: Britain as Singapore

Prime Ministers of the Republic of Britain:
1959-1990: Tony Benn (People’s Union Party)

1959 (Majority) def: Richard Crossman (British Progressive Alliance), Hugh MacDiarmid (Pan Celtic Union), Ian Mikardo (Workers Party)
1963 (Majority) def: Harold Wilson (Socialist Front), George Brown (United Progressive People’s Party), Richard Crossman (British Progressive Alliance), Ian Mikardo (Workers Party), Hugh MacDiarmid (Pan Celtic Union)
1968 (Majority) def: Various Independents
1972 (Majority) def: Various Independents
1976 (Majority) def: Various Independents
1980 (Majority) def: Various Independents
1984 (Majority) def: Dipak Nandy (Workers Party), Paul Boateng (Democratic Justice Party)
1988 (Majority) def: Dipak Nandy (Workers Party), Paul Boateng (Democratic Justice Party)

1990-2004: John Major (People’s Union Party)
1991 (Majority) def: Dipak Nandy (Workers Party), Paul Boateng (Democratic Justice Party)
1997 (Majority) def: Dipak Nandy (Workers Party), Paul Boateng (British People’s Party), Rupa Huq (Democratic Justice Party)
2001 (Majority) def: Helen Clark (Workers Party), Paul Boateng (British Democratic Front), Rupa Huq (Democratic Justice Party)

2004-: Hilary Benn (People’s Union Party)
2006 (Majority) def: Helen Clark (Workers Party), Paul Boateng (British Democratic Front) , Rupa Huq (Democratic Justice Party)
2011 (Majority) def: Helen Clark (Workers Party), Paul Boateng (British People’s Party), Rupa Huq (Democratic Justice Party), Lisa Nandy (Reform Party), Ed Miliband (Solidarity Party)
2015 (Majority) def: Helen Clark (Workers Party), Paul Boateng (British People’s Party), Rupa Huq (Democratic Justice Party), Lisa Nandy (Reform Party), Ed Miliband (Democratic Power Party), Frank Field (Solidarity Party)


2020 Election Postponed due to Bird Flu-The North Sea Times:
In the wake of the recent Bird Flu epidemic the planned 2020 election has been postponed until 2021. Deputy Prime Minister Keir Starmer announced that “Due to the safety of the public, we have decided to postpone the 2020 election to 2021. We hope to curb the outbreak as efficiently as possible and that requires postponing the election”. President Diane Abbott has also said that “Due to this pandemic we have to value the safety of the nation over all else”.


Leader of the opposition Workers Party Rebecca Long-Bailey has said that “We support dealing with the pandemic to ensure the safety of our nation but we hope to see an election run in the future”. Prime Minister of Britain Hilary Benn himself as remarked that he hopes that the election can occur by Spring 2021...


The Art of Charlie Clarke Hoy Government Funding has been Cancelled!
In comic news, the comic The Art of Charlie Clarke Hoy by Gabrielle Bell has had it’s funding cancelled due to ‘sensitive content’. The comic which follows Britain from the early years of the Ian Mikardo attempts to deal with the American occupiers to the rise of future Prime Minister Tony Benn and his one time political ally Harold Wilson as followed through the eyes of fictional comic creator Charlie Clarke Hoy as been controversial since it’s inception. Gabrielle Bell has mentioned that it’s actually increased sales of the comics limited run...
 
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He/Him
If your wondering why I chose Benn well not only does his age match up close to Lee Kuan Yew but his early years as a Gaitskellite Technocrat line up decently with Lee Kuan Yew’s Technocratic ambitions as well.

From there it became a case of, finding the right folks for the other parties, which I managed to do with some help from @Tom Colton

Also my favourite comparison is Ian Mikardo to David Marshall
 

Time Enough

European Pollution Police Force
Pronouns
He/Him
Social Credit Britannia!
1935-1937: Stanley Baldwin (Conservative leading National Government)

1935 (Majority) def: Clement Attlee (Labour), John Simon (National Liberal), Herbert Samuel (Liberal), Ramsay MacDonald (National Labour), James Maxton (Independent Labour Party), Harry Pollitt (CPGB), Oswald Mosley (New Party), John Hargreaves (Social Credit)
1937-1943: Kingsley Wood (Conservative)
1940 (Coalition with National) def: Clement Attlee (Labour), Malcolm MacDonald (National), Archibald Sinclair (Liberal), Frenner Brockway (ILP), Harry Pollitt (CPGB), Oswald Mosley (New Party), Rolf Gardiner (Social Credit)
1943: Anthony Eden (Conservative Caretaker)
1943-1947: Oliver Baldwin (Labour)

1943 (Majority) def: Anthony Eden (Conservative), Malcolm MacDonald (National), Richard Acland (Liberal), Philip Pritain-Frenner Brockway (Popular Front), R.Palme Dutt (CPGB), Oswald Mosley (New Social Credit)
1947-1955: Norman Smith (Labour)
1947 (Majority) def: Anthony Eden (Conservative), Malcolm MacDonald (National), Richard Acland (Liberal), Philip Piratin-Frenner Brockway (Popular Front), R.Palme Dutt (CPGB), Oswald Mosley (New Social Credit)
1951 (Majority) def: Rab Butler (Conservative), Reginald Maudling (National), Megan Lloyd-George (Liberal), Philip Pritain-Ruth Dodds (Popular Front), R.Palme Dutt (CPGB), Rolf Gardiner (New Social Credit)
1955-: Rab Butler (Conservative)
1955 (Majority) def: Norman Smith (Labour), Reginald Maudling (National), Megan Lloyd-George (Liberal), Philip Pritain-Ruth Dodds (Popular Front), R.Palme Dutt (CPGB), Oswald Mosley (New Social Credit)

Simple concept here, Conservative goes down the Keynesian root under the rule of Kingsley Wood whilst after losing yet another election Oliver Baldwin bucks Labour's ideals and concepts through bringing about Monetary Reform/Social Credit inspired ideas to the party. When he gets promoted to the House of Lords, Baldwin promotes one of his core followers Norman Smith to be his House of Commons PM. Labour manages to three terms until being bucked by the Keynesian/Kingsley Wood influenced leader Rab Butler. Meanwhile the Far Left breaks between the Democratic Socialist 'Popular Front' and the Marxist-Leninist Communist Party of Great Britain, the various National parties merge into some vaguely Paternalistic Conservative National party, the Right merges into the Keynesian/Social Credit hybrid of the New Social Credit party.

Outside of this, Fascism stays mainly in Italy and Germany gets slapped down near Czechoslovakia leading to a Military Coup whilst the Soviet Union hovers on the sidelines consuming countries here and there.
 

Sideways

Attack and Dethrone Albus Dumbledore
Published by SLP
Location
Teignmouth, Devon
Pronouns
She/Her
Social Credit Britannia!
1935-1937: Stanley Baldwin (Conservative leading National Government)

1935 (Majority) def: Clement Attlee (Labour), John Simon (National Liberal), Herbert Samuel (Liberal), Ramsay MacDonald (National Labour), James Maxton (Independent Labour Party), Harry Pollitt (CPGB), Oswald Mosley (New Party), John Hargreaves (Social Credit)
1937-1943: Kingsley Wood (Conservative)
1940 (Coalition with National) def: Clement Attlee (Labour), Malcolm MacDonald (National), Archibald Sinclair (Liberal), Frenner Brockway (ILP), Harry Pollitt (CPGB), Oswald Mosley (New Party), Rolf Gardiner (Social Credit)
1943: Anthony Eden (Conservative Caretaker)
1943-1947: Oliver Baldwin (Labour)

1943 (Majority) def: Anthony Eden (Conservative), Malcolm MacDonald (National), Richard Acland (Liberal), Philip Pritain-Frenner Brockway (Popular Front), R.Palme Dutt (CPGB), Oswald Mosley (New Social Credit)
1947-1955: Norman Smith (Labour)
1947 (Majority) def: Anthony Eden (Conservative), Malcolm MacDonald (National), Richard Acland (Liberal), Philip Piratin-Frenner Brockway (Popular Front), R.Palme Dutt (CPGB), Oswald Mosley (New Social Credit)
1951 (Majority) def: Rab Butler (Conservative), Reginald Maudling (National), Megan Lloyd-George (Liberal), Philip Pritain-Ruth Dodds (Popular Front), R.Palme Dutt (CPGB), Rolf Gardiner (New Social Credit)
1955-: Rab Butler (Conservative)
1955 (Majority) def: Norman Smith (Labour), Reginald Maudling (National), Megan Lloyd-George (Liberal), Philip Pritain-Ruth Dodds (Popular Front), R.Palme Dutt (CPGB), Oswald Mosley (New Social Credit)

Simple concept here, Conservative goes down the Keynesian root under the rule of Kingsley Wood whilst after losing yet another election Oliver Baldwin bucks Labour's ideals and concepts through bringing about Monetary Reform/Social Credit inspired ideas to the party. When he gets promoted to the House of Lords, Baldwin promotes one of his core followers Norman Smith to be his House of Commons PM. Labour manages to three terms until being bucked by the Keynesian/Kingsley Wood influenced leader Rab Butler. Meanwhile the Far Left breaks between the Democratic Socialist 'Popular Front' and the Marxist-Leninist Communist Party of Great Britain, the various National parties merge into some vaguely Paternalistic Conservative National party, the Right merges into the Keynesian/Social Credit hybrid of the New Social Credit party.

Outside of this, Fascism stays mainly in Italy and Germany gets slapped down near Czechoslovakia leading to a Military Coup whilst the Soviet Union hovers on the sidelines consuming countries here and there.
Some lovely Dutt action going on in the background there
 

Time Enough

European Pollution Police Force
Pronouns
He/Him
Some lovely Dutt action going on in the background there
Always love everyone's favourite British Stalinist (also have to say he looks cool). The vague idea here is he's promoted when Harry Pollitt fucks up and doesn't notice the slow formation of the Popular Front under him until it's too late. Dutt is put into the leadership position and he rather ruthlessly makes sure that the members of the party follow the same line. It works and Dutt manages to stop the bleeding essentially and whilst it won't be winning any seats in Parliament it's still a major player on the Council game.
 

Time Enough

European Pollution Police Force
Pronouns
He/Him
Prime Ministers of Quatermass:

1951-1953: Winston Churchill (Conservative)
1951 (Majority) def: Clement Attlee (Labour), Clement Davis (Liberal)
1953-1956: Anthony Eden (Conservative)
1956-1959: Hugh Gaitskell (Labour)
1956 (Majority) def: Anthony Eden (Conservative), Jo Grimond (Liberal)
1959: Tony Benn (Labour Caretaker)
1959-1968: Anthony Greenwood (Labour)
1960 (Majority) def: Harold MacMillian (Conservative), Jo Grimond (Liberal)
1964 (Majority) def: Reginald Maulding (Conservative), Jo Grimond (Liberal)

1968-1974: Reginald Maulding (Conservative)
1968 (Majority) def: Anthony Greenwood (Labour), Jo Grimond (Liberal), Enoch Powell (Liberty)
1972 (Coalition with Liberty) def: George Brown (Labour), Jeremy Thorpe (Liberal), Keith Joseph (Liberty)

1974-1979: Barbara Castle (Labour)
1974 (Majority) def: Reginald Maulding (Conservative), Jeremy Thorpe (Liberal), Keith Joseph (Liberty)
1979: Tony Benn (Labour Caretaker)
1979-: John Silkin (Labour)
1979 (Majority) def: Ian Gilmour (Conservative), John Pardoe (Liberal), Keith Joseph (Liberty), David Owen (PROTECT!)

1953: The British Rocket Group’s first expedition and subsequent failure that leads to the Westminster Abbey incident also leads to Winston Churchill stepping down, his bulldog rhetoric and failing health no match for dealing with monsters from space. Eden takes over after a short leadership ‘election’.
1955: Winnerden Flats incident and the subsequent investigation leads to the people’s faith in a Conservative Government to collapse in one fell swoop. Eden holds off election until the last possible moment. Labour under Gaitskell wins under a landslide.
1959: The London Crisis and subsequent aftermath put Britain briefly in chaos whilst Tony Benn (one of the few members of the Gaitskell cabinet not in London and therefore not to be affected by the Martian psychic energy) manages to rally forces and set about rebuilding London. After the crisis dies down a bit, Benn steps down and in his wake Left Wing Challenger Anthony Greenwood wins on an Anti-Alien/Rebuild platform. Greenwood’s mission and then subsequently Maulding’s is to rebuild Britain, prepare Britain for another alien invasion and maybe expand into the stars.
1979: An Oil Crisis followed by the Planet People incident ends the Castle Government, yet again Tony Benn steps into to manage the country whilst dealing with yet another horrible aftermath. After getting the country back to speed, yet again Benn is replaced by another Left Winger. Silkin manages to win a slim majority mainly helped by a split Tories and the minor parties like Liberty find themselves outshone by the beaming force that is David Owen’s Social Democratic, Paranoid, Anti-Alien Invasion Party PROTECT!

The future for Britain looks rocky, particularly now that Professor Quatermass has died...
 
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Time Enough

European Pollution Police Force
Pronouns
He/Him
Roderick Maclean Manages to Get His Shot in:

House of Hanover
1837-1882*: Victoria, Queen of the United Kingdom, Empress of India*

Issues:
Victoria, Princess Royal
Edward, Prince of Wales
Princess Alice
Alfred, Duke of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha
Princess Helena
Princess Louise
Prince Arthur, Duke of Connaught and Strathearn
Prince Leopold, Duke of Albany
Princess Beatrice
Prime Ministers:
William Lamb, The Viscount Melbourne (Whig) (1837–1841)
Sir Robert Peel (Tory) (1841–1846)
Lord John Russell (Whig) (1846–1852, 1865–1866)
The Earl of Derby (Conservative) (1852,1858–1859,1866–1868)
George Hamilton-Gordon, The Earl of Aberdeen (Peelite) (1852–1855)
The Viscount Palmerston (Liberal) (1855 –1858, 1859–1865)
Benjamin Disraeli (Conservative) (1868, 1874-1880)
William Ewart Gladstone (Liberal) (1868–1874,1880–1882)
*Assassinated 1882
**Made Empress of India in 1870


House of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha
1882-1909: Edward VII, King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Emperor of India

Issues:
Albert Victor, Prince of Wales
George, Duke of York
Louise, Princess Royal
Princess Victoria
Maud, Queen of Norway
Alexander John (1871)
Prime Ministers:
William Ewart Gladstone (Liberal) (1882-1886, 1890-1894)
Marquess of Salisbury (Conservative) (1886-1890)
Joseph Chamberlain (Liberal, then Unionist) (1894-1900, 1900-1904)
Arthur Balfour (Unionist) (1904)
Henry Campbell Bannerman (Liberal) (1904-1909)


1909-1937: Albert Victor, King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain, Ireland* and British Dominions, Emperor of India
Issues:
Edward, Prince of Wales (1894-1916)
Mary, Princess of York
Louise, Tsarina of Russia
Alexandra, Duchess of Richmond
Paul, Duke of Northampton (1896-1928)
Prime Ministers:
Edward Grey (Liberal) (1909-1918)
Austen Chamberlain (Unionist) (1918-1923)
Stanley Baldwin (Unionist) (1923-1925)
George Lansbury (Labour) (1925-1931)
Sir Charles Trevelyan (Labour) (1931-1932)
Oswald Mosley (Unionist) (1932-1938)


*Changes to Ulster Dominion in 1920
1937-: Mary II, Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain, Ulster Dominion and British Dominions, Empress of India

Issues:
Albert, Prince of Wales
Victoria, Duchess of Brandenburg
Arthur, Duke of Cornwall
Beatrice, Duchess of Edinburgh & First Lady to President Roosevelt
Prime Ministers:
Malcolm MacDonald (Labour) (1938-19XX)
 
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neonduke

Inspector Paolo Germi
The gimmick here should be obvious, I may expand on it in the writing forum but it near killed me getting to this point.

First Irish Republic

Prime Minister of Dáil Éireann

1919-1919: Arthur Griffith (Sinn Fein)
Minority def: Cumann na nGaedheal, Irish Parliamentary Party, Irish Dominion League, Democratic Socialist Party, National League

1919-1920: Cathal Brugha (Sinn Fein)

1920-1920: Eamonn De Valera (Sinn Fein)

1920-1921: W.T. Cosgrave (Cumann na nGaedheal)
Minority def: Sinn Fein, Democratic Socialist Party, Irish Dominion League, National League, Irish Parliamentary Party, Irish Workers League,

1921-1922: Richard Mulcahy (Cumann na nGaedheal)

1922-1923: Horace Plunkett (Independent)

1923-1923: John Redmond (National League)

1923-1925: Eóin MacNeil (Cumann na nGaedheal)
May 1924 - Minority def: Sinn Fein, Irish Dominion League, Irish Workers League, National League, National Workers Party, Irish Parliamentary Party,
December 1924 - Minority def: Sinn Fein, Irish Dominion League, National League, Irish Workers League, Irish Parliamentary Party, National Guard


1925-1926: George Gavan Duffy (Independent)

1926-1928: Eóin MacNeil (Cumann na nGaedheal)

1928-1930: Eamonn De Valera (Sinn Fein)
Minority def: Irish Dominion League, Cumann na nGaedheal, Irish Workers League, National League, Irish Parliamentary Party, National Guard

1930-1932: Kevin O'Higgins (Cumann na nGaedheal)
Minority def: Sinn Fein, National Guard, Irish Workers League, Irish Dominion League, National League

1932-1932: Oliver St John Gogarty (Independent)
July 1932 - National Guard largest party def: Sinn Fein, Irish Workers League, Cumann na nGaedheal, Irish Dominion League, Ulster Peoples Party
November 1932 -
National Guard largest party def: Sinn Fein, Irish Workers League, Cumann na nGaedheal, Irish Dominion League, Ulster Peoples Party

1932-1933: Seán Mac Eoin (Independent)

Irish Free State

Taoiseach of the State

1933 – 1945: Eoin O’Duffy (National Guard)
March 1933 - Coalition with Irish Dominion League def: Sinn Fein, Irish Workers League, Cumann na nGaedheal, Irish Dominion League, Ulster Peoples Party
November 1933 – Single Party List
1936 – Single Party List
1938 – Single Party List


1945 – 1945: Ernest Blythe (National Guard)

Military occupation of Ireland

1945 – 1949: Allied Occupation in Ireland Command Council

Republic of Ireland

Prime Minister of Dáil Éireann

1949 – 1963: Frank Aiken (Fianna Fáil)
1949 - Union with Fine Gael and coalition with Clann na Talmhan and Muintir na hÉireann def: Sinn Fein, Clann na Talmhan, Fine Gael, Irish Workers League, Ulster Democratic Party, Muintir na hÉireann, Cumann na nGaedheal
1953 - Union with Fine Gael and coalition with Clann na Talmhan and Muintir na hÉireann def: Sinn Fein, Clann na Talmhan, Fine Gael, Vanguard Unionist Progressive Party, Muintir na hÉireann, Cumann na nGaedheal
1957 - Union with Fine Gael majority def: Sinn Fein, Fine Gael, Clann na Talmhan, Muintir na hÉireann
1961 - Union with Fine Gael and coalition with Clann na Talmhan def: Sinn Fein, Fine Gael, Clann na Talmhan


1963 – 1966: Sean Lemass (Fianna Fáil)
1965 - Union with Fine Gael and coalition with Clann na Talmhan def: Sinn Fein, Fine Gael, Clann na Talmhan

1966 – 1969: Garrett Fitzgerald (Fianna Fáil)

1969 – 1974: Charles Haughey (Sinn Fein)
1965 - Coalition with Clann na Talmhan def: Fianna Fáil, Fine Gael, Clann na Talmhan
1972 - Coalition with Clann na Talmhan def: Fianna Fáil, Fine Gael, Clann na Talmhan


1974 – 1974: John Donnellan (Clann na Talmhan)

1974 – 1982: Noël Browne (Sinn Fein)
1976 - Coalition with Clann na Talmhan def: Fianna Fáil, Fine Gael, Clann na Talmhan
1980 - Coalition with Clann na Talmhan def: Fianna Fáil, Clann na Talmhan, Fine Gael


1982 – 1990: Patrick Hillery (Fianna Fáil)
1983 - Union with Fine Gael and coalition with Clann na Talmhan def: Sinn Fein, Fine Gael, Clann na Talmhan, Green Party
1987 - Union with Fine Gael and coalition with Clann na Talmhan def: Sinn Fein, Fine Gael, Clann na Talmhan, Green Party


Irish Democratic Republic

Joint Chairmen of Saor Éire

1949-1950: Peadar O'Donnell (Irish Workers League)/Michael Collins (Sinn Fein)

General Secretary of the Central Committee

1950 – 1971: Andy Barr (Saor Éire)

1971 – 1989: Cathal Goulding (Saor Éire)

1989 – 1990: Ronald Bunting Jr. (Saor Éire)

United Irish Republic

1990 – 1998: Patrick Hillery (Fianna Fáil)
1990 - Union with Fine Gael and coalition with Clann na Talmhan def: Sinn Fein, Clann na Talmhan, Fine Gael, Democratic Left, Green Party
1994 - Union with Fine Gael and coalition with Clann na Talmhan def: Sinn Fein, Fine Gael, Green Party, Clann na Talmhan, Democratic Left


1998 – 2005: Eamon Gilmore (Sinn Fein)
1998 - Coalition with the Green Party def: Fianna Fáil, Fine Gael, Green Party, Clann na Talmhan, Democratic Left
2002 - Coalition with the Green Party def: Fianna Fáil, Fine Gael, Green Party, Clann na Talmhan, Democratic Left


2005 – XXXX: Mary Coughlan (Fianna Fáil)

2005 - Union with Fine Gael and coalition with Sinn Fein def: Sinn Fein, Clann na Talmhan, Democratic Left, Green Party, Fine Gael
2009 - Union with Fine Gael and coalition with Clann na Talmhan def: Sinn Fein, Clann na Talmhan, Solidarity - PBP, Green Party, Fine Gael
2013 - Union with Fine Gael and coalition with Sinn Fein def: Sinn Fein, Solidarity - PBP, Green Party, Fine Gael
2017 - Union with Fine Gael and coalition with Sinn Fein def: Sinn Fein, Aontú, Clann na Talmhan, Solidarity - PBP, Green Party, Fine Gael


EDIT: thanks to @Time Enough for some useful advice.
 
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Mumby

Always mysterious!
Published by SLP
Location
Municipal Commune of Bourne
Pronouns
He/Him
Tangled Up

1990-1990: John Major (Conservative majority)
1990-1995: Neil Kinnock (Labour)
1990 (Majority) def. John Major (Conservative), Sara Parkin (Green), Alan Beith (Social & Liberal Democrat), Jim Molyneaux (Ulster Unionist)
1995-1997: John Redwood (Conservative)
1995 (Minority, with UUP and SDP c&s) def. Neil Kinnock (Labour), Derek Wall (Green), Jim Molyneaux (Ulster Unionist), David Owen (Social Democrat)
1997-2007: John Prescott (Labour)
1997 (Coalition with Greens) def. John Redwood (Conservative), Derek Wall (Green), Michael Heseltine & David Owen (National Liberal / Social Democrat Alliance), Jim Molyneaux (Ulster Unionist)
2002 (Coalition with Greens) def. Iain Duncan Smith (Conservative), Michael Heseltine (National Liberal), collective (Green), David Owen (Social Democrat), David Trimble (Ulster Unionist), John Hume (Social Democratic & Labour)
2006 (Minority, with SDLP c&s) def. Michael Portillo (Conservative), Oliver Letwin (National Liberal), Ian Paisley (Democratic Unionist), collective (Green), Robert Kilroy-Silk (Social Democrat), Mark Durkan (Social Democratic & Labour), Sylvia Hermon (Ulster Unionist)

2007-2009: Jon Cruddas (Labour minority, with Social Democratic & Labour confidence and supply)
2009-2014: Philip Blond (Conservative)
2009 (Coalition with SDP, with NLP confidence and supply) def. Jon Cruddas (Labour), Robert Kilroy-Silk & Peter Robinson (Social Democrat / Democratic Unionist Alliance), Nick Boles (National Liberal), Grant Marshall (Green), Gerry Adams (Sinn Fein), Sylvia Hermon (Ulster Unionist)
2014 cancelled due to MERS pandemic

2014-0000: Maurice Glasman & Giles Fraser (Labour / Conservative Emergency Co-Premiership in National Government with National Liberals and Greens)
 

Yokai Man

Well-known member
Tangled Up

1990-1990: John Major (Conservative majority)
1990-1995: Neil Kinnock (Labour)
1990 (Majority) def. John Major (Conservative), Sara Parkin (Green), Alan Beith (Social & Liberal Democrat), Jim Molyneaux (Ulster Unionist)
1995-1997: John Redwood (Conservative)
1995 (Minority, with UUP and SDP c&s) def. Neil Kinnock (Labour), Derek Wall (Green), Jim Molyneaux (Ulster Unionist), David Owen (Social Democrat)
1997-2007: John Prescott (Labour)
1997 (Coalition with Greens) def. John Redwood (Conservative), Derek Wall (Green), Michael Heseltine & David Owen (National Liberal / Social Democrat Alliance), Jim Molyneaux (Ulster Unionist)
2002 (Coalition with Greens) def. Iain Duncan Smith (Conservative), Michael Heseltine (National Liberal), collective (Green), David Owen (Social Democrat), David Trimble (Ulster Unionist), John Hume (Social Democratic & Labour)
2006 (Minority, with SDLP c&s) def. Michael Portillo (Conservative), Oliver Letwin (National Liberal), Ian Paisley (Democratic Unionist), collective (Green), Robert Kilroy-Silk (Social Democrat), Mark Durkan (Social Democratic & Labour), Sylvia Hermon (Ulster Unionist)

2007-2009: Jon Cruddas (Labour minority, with Social Democratic & Labour confidence and supply)
2009-2014: Philip Blond (Conservative)
2009 (Coalition with SDP, with NLP confidence and supply) def. Jon Cruddas (Labour), Robert Kilroy-Silk & Peter Robinson (Social Democrat / Democratic Unionist Alliance), Nick Boles (National Liberal), Grant Marshall (Green), Gerry Adams (Sinn Fein), Sylvia Hermon (Ulster Unionist)
2014 cancelled due to MERS pandemic

2014-0000: Maurice Glasman & Giles Fraser (Labour / Conservative Emergency Co-Premiership in National Government with National Liberals and Greens)
i am very confused and I like it