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Lists of Heads of Government and Heads of State

Bolt451

Hello to our posters from NooOOORTH CAR-O-LIN-A
Location
Sandford, Gloucestershire
Pronouns
She/Her
Autumn 2019punk but with extra 2020 Spice


2019-Dec 2019: Boris Johnson (Conservative Minority)
Dec 2019-Jan 2020: Boris Johnson (Caretaker Govt)
Jan 2020-2020: Ed Miliband (Labour lead “Remain” Government)
April 2020- May 2021: Ed Miliband (“Pandemic” National Government)
May 2021-November 2021: Ed Miliband (Labour lead “Remain Government)

August 2021 EU Referendum: DEAL 55% REMAIN 45%
Electoral reform Referendum: YES 52% NO 48%
November 2021- March 2022: Rebecca Long Bailey (Labour Lead “Remain” Government)
March 2022-Present: Priti Patel (Conservative-Moderate Coalition with Lib Dem S&C)

http://forum.sealionpress.co.uk/index.php?threads/ah-run-downs-summaries-and-general-gubbins.905/page-17#post-499419
please see the associated Party rundown
 

Ares96

Timeo Ever Given et dona containers
Published by SLP
Location
Fubbicktown
Pronouns
he/him
What If W.E. Gladstone died in 1879?

List of Prime Ministers of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 1880-1970:

1880-1898: Lord Hartington (Liberal)
1898-1903: Edward Saunderson † (Liberal)
1903-1907: Joseph Chamberlain (Liberal)
1907-1908: Joseph Chamberlain † (Liberal leading War Government)
1908-1912: Lord Curzon (Conservative leading War Government)
1912-1924: Austen Chamberlain (Liberal)
1924-1926: Horatio Bottomley (New Radical minority)
1926-1930: Austen Chamberlain (Liberal-led coalition with the Constitutional Party)
1930-1933: Horatio Bottomley † (New Radical)
1933-1943: Oswald Mosley (New Radical)
1943-1949: R.A. Butler (Liberal and Constitutional Party)
1949-1955: Ernest Bevin (New Radical)
1955-1961: R.A. Butler (Liberal)
1961-1970: Alfred Robens (New Radical)
1970-????: Enoch Powell (New Radical)

Points for anyone who can figure out the game I've played here.
Well, except for Saunderson and Robens, they're all very stereotypical ATL Prime Ministers. I feel like there's probably more to it than that though.
 

BClick

couboi suet
Location
Little Beirut
Pronouns
He/him
1973-1974: Richard Nixon / John Connally (Republican)
1972 def. George McGovern / Sargent Shriver (replacing Thomas Eagleton) (Democratic)
1974: John Connally / vacant (Republican)
1974-1977: John Connally / Bob Dole (Republican)
1977-1982: Tom McCall / William Proxmire (Independent—Third Force)

1976 def. Hubert Humphrey / Lloyd Bentsen (Democratic), John Connally / Bob Dole (Republican)
1980 def. Ronald Reagan / James Holshouser (Republican), Lloyd Bentsen / John Gilligan (Democratic)

1982: William Proxmire / vacant (Independent)
1982-1985: William Proxmire / Jay Hammond (Independent)
1985-1993: John Warner / Edwin Meese (Republican)

1984 def. Donald Fraser / Cliff Finch (Democratic), Jerry Brown / various (Reform Alliance)
1988 def. Jesse Jackson / Alice Tripp (Democratic), Dan Quayle / Steve Symms (American Freedom),
Dick Lamm / Pat Choate (write-in)
1993-1997: Jim Webb / Jane Byrne (Democratic)
1992 def. Edwin Meese / Al D’Amato (Republican)
1997-2001: Bob Dornan / Dick Lugar (Republican)
1996 def. Jim Webb / Willie Brown (Democratic)
2001-2009: Charlotte Pritt / Jim Jontz (Democratic)
2000 def. Bob Dornan / Dick Lugar (Republican)
2004 def. John Ashcroft / G. Walker Bush (Republican)

2009-2017: Linda Smith / Tom Tancredo (Republican)
2008 def. Jim Jontz / Barbara Mikulski (Democratic)
2012 def. Mike Moore / Mike McGinn (Democratic)


2016: Susan Sadlowski Garza / Rick Nolan (Democratic) v. Dennis Kucinich / Rick Santorum (Republican)

After his resignation, McCall tries to play shadow president, phoning Proxmire every day from his hospital bed to discuss policy minutiae. His continued involvement with the White House becomes public knowledge and the story frustrates his successor, who has already begun his own term deep in another man’s shade and finds himself sinking deeper. Tom McCall dies less than a year after leaving office, his popularity high but his historical role still in doubt. One small legacy is visible in the short term: the shocking illnesses of both McCall and Hubert Humphrey contribute to a social push for men to discuss their health problems more openly.

With inflation largely under control by the end of 1982, Proxmire acquiesces to the lifting of the last wage and price restrictions. They remain available in the Presidential toolbox, but the strong pressure for a return to normalcy means they won’t be called out again for a long while.

The trappings of Third Force governance begin to slip. Republicans and independents begin to leave the Cabinet, replaced with a more specific strain of post-Watergate Democrats, and William Cohen quits the administration caucus in the Senate. Everyone knows the new President is a bit of an asshole; there’s no way he can hold together such a personalist coalition.

Proxmire attempts to retain a sheen of bipartisanship by appointing the Republican governor of Alaska, Jay Hammond, as Vice President. Hammond was a participant in the Crisis Conference and an ally of the McCall White House. He is known for his rugged masculinity and for the innovative Alaska Permanent Fund, a mechanism for redistributing oil industry profits that shares similarities with the basic income ideas floated by some Third Force thinkers. The VP, however, becomes a punchline almost as soon as he steps onto the national stage. With his folksy attitude and bristly beard, the former bush pilot might be popular in the Far West but reminds the rest of the country of a caveman.

Proxmire’s only major achievements are passing a campaign finance reform bill and finally signing the much-delayed Panama Canal Treaty. His budgetary wizardry gets him nowhere with Congress. With the economy recovering, austerity politics are a tougher sell, and the news out of Afghanistan makes defense cuts a non-starter. When Jerry Brown announces his intention to challenge Proxmire for the Third Force Presidential endorsement, the organization, never built for dissent, completely falls apart. McCall’s big names head back to their respective parties. One side of the acrimonious split swipes the mailing list and start talking about a Green Party. Aimless and friendless, Proxmire declines to run in 1984, the twentieth century’s own John Tyler.

First Lady Elizabeth Taylor and her handsome husband enter the White House on the first wave of Boomer nostalgia for Camelot. While the Republican Party is deflated and disorganized – the liberals lost all influence by defecting to the Third Force, but the New Right was battered down in turn by Reagan’s electoral failure – their intrapartisan alliance ticket wins by attacking Proxmire’s defense cuts and promoting a buoyant, vaguely patriotic vision of American grandeur that has been lacking for years. The moral equivalent of war was an inspiration, but now people want the moral equivalent of peace.

It’s content-free Reaganism: most McCallite laws end up staying on the books out of inertia. Ed Meese, Bill Bennett, and the rest are given free rein to bash gays and gin up moral panics, but state-sponsored family values seem a little rich when the first Presidential divorce plays out in lurid detail on every supermarket checkstand. (The Moral Majority backs a third-party bid in 1988, which fails once it becomes clear that Quayle and Symms are being bankrolled by the Reverend Sun Myung Moon and a consortium of overseas corporations eager for trade deals). The 3E stands and abortion remains safe, legal, and common. The dovish Warner’s war on the Evil Empire only goes about as far as gladhanding with John Paul II. TTL’s historiography of the Cold War might declare its end in 1975 – everything after Vietnam being a slow simmer down to nonviolent Great Power rivalry.

The conservatives are more successful on the economic front. The Republicans and neoliberal Democrats unite to abolish the ESB completely and “deactivate” the most painful article of the Jackson Act by removing the mechanism for oil price enforcement. (Full repeal of the Act fails, however, so the government retains the right to set prices in another emergency.) There is a credit card boom and Wall Street goes wild: after a Long 70s, it’s finally the 80s of cocaine and padded shoulders. Even the President is now a swinging bachelor. The McCall era is dead and buried, for about a minute.

Jesse Jackson does better than one might expect in 1988, and manages to keep above McGovern levels in the EC. (The farm crisis happens on schedule, seeing as ag policy was not one of McCall’s priorities.) Nevertheless, after failing again with populist liberalism, it’s time for an alt-DLC to take charge, embracing the language of “limits” to attack Republican sleaze and excess.

Meanwhile, an attempt to revitalize the Third Force goes nowhere, since the rich liberals are happy with Warner and the radicals are excited about Jackson. Only a few oddball Westerners get behind Dick Lamm’s write-in bid. Focusing on the two themes of environmentalism and immigration, Lamm invokes McCall’s name at every opportunity as he tries to keep the old dream alive.

The boom of the eighties gives way to a hangover of more stagflation, and the Democrats return for the first time in over two decades with their very own Virginian veteran. Webb’s term is dominated by conflict in the Middle East, Kurdistan having requested aid against Iranian incursions. The American deployment makes history as the first action approved by Congress under the War Powers Act. With the Iranians withdrawing almost as soon as the first US border patrols land, the short, apparently virtuous war and the mood of economic recovery gives Webb the cover to slash regulation and stack the NLUO with building trades leaders and property developers. (Even the international far-left cuts Webb some slack, excited by Abdullah Öcalan’s participation in the Kurdish coalition government – a bright light for socialism as the Soviet Union quietly sheds republics and welcomes American capital.)

The smooth sailing is soon upended by the embarrassing spectacle of Jim Webb publicly feuding with the first woman Vice President. The party had originally selected Chicago Mayor Jane Byrne both as a sop to the liberals and as a counter to their Presidential candidate’s reputation for misogyny. However, the two took an immediate dislike to each other on the campaign trail. A year into their term in office, Webb is making jokes about Byrne’s appearance and Byrne is supporting dissident Democrats in Congress who refuse to vote for Webb’s initiatives.

The always febrile Democrats are beginning to split again, with liberals waking up to Webb’s sexism, his environmentally reckless regulatory bonfire, and his obvious desire for military buildup and a more aggressive foreign policy. Conservatives, meanwhile, are breathing fire over the cracking of NATO, and over a rash of rioting and crime allegedly sparked by gentrification in urban centers. It becomes clear that while Webb’s policies might be broadly popular, nobody really likes him.

1996 is a testosterone fest for the ages, and America waits with bated breath during the debates to see which candidate will throw the first punch. Bob Dornan, the GOP’s id, tosses off homophobic slurs and implies that he chose his vice-presidential candidate for the size of his penis. Jim Webb brags about killing Vietnamese people. The op-ed writers demand a new Third Force. Nobody is satisfied, turnout is low, and when Webb loses, he angrily blames “politically correct liberals” for “forcing” him to run with Governor Brown after several women declined to share the ticket with him.

Dornan and his thin Republican majorities in Congress withdraw from Kurdistan, pass draconian crime legislation, cut social spending and end the 3E’s free contraceptive program and abortion counseling. He even cracks down on the McCall-era cannabis loophole, under which one only need to claim Rastafari identity to buy and sell the scheduled drug. However, the hardest-line Sagebrush Rebels in the west are disappointed. Despite his hatred of “dickless leave-no-tracers,” Dornan is an animal lover, and he lends his support to a bipartisan bill that fully protects America’s remaining old-growth forests.

Indeed, amidst the nasty culture warring clogging up the airwaves throughout the 1990s, environmentalism has stayed a relatively nonpartisan issue. Conservative Republicans might hate the condescending antinatalists at the 3E, and Democrats might blame the NIMBYs at the NLUO for rapidly escalating gentrification, but everyone acknowledges on some level that the excess of the pre-Watergate, pre-McCall order could never stand. Whether they couch it in the language of fiscal prudence, capitalist decadence, or Christian apocalypse, there is no way to turn back the clock. Even Jim Webb, as big on bigness as anybody, happily signed the United States up to the great Jakarta Convention in 1992.

Enter Charlotte Pritt, the Governor of West Virginia, who has managed to refashion McCallism for the proletarian Democratic Party. She asks why so many Americans are miserable, atomized, overworked, and underpaid. Her New Millennium Plan proposes worker self-management, nationally guaranteed family leave, an expansion of Medicare and Medicaid, massive investment in clean energy to meet the Jakarta emissions standards, and protectionist barriers against outsourcing and the rapacity of the global market. Limits to growth do not have to mean austerity. There is already enough wealth for everyone in America; it’s time for American workers to enjoy what they’ve built.

While the plan is dismissed as communism by the Webb wing of the Democrats, it has something for everyone else. Labor loves it, of course, apart from the last conservative holdouts who survived Sadlowski and company’s reforms. Lifestyle liberals are enthused by the NMP’s McCall-esque fixation on the spiritual and aesthetic destruction wrought by unfettered markets. Women and black voters find Pritt a welcome contrast to her rival, ex-President Webb, whose comeback campaign is heavy on the “white working class” rhetoric.

She wins the nomination and opens up a slim lead. During the campaign, there is a wave of neo-Nazi bombings of 3E offices and Planned Parenthood clinics, and Dornan, as unfiltered as ever, hints that it might be a false flag operation by the antinatalist Deep State. This does not go over well.

Pritt’s large personal mandate is not matched by majorities in Congress, and the New Millennium Plan does not survive contact with political reality. Everybody can get excited about clean energy projects and more interurban rail, and the United States quickly takes the lead in the former sector, but how does all this stuff about free prescription drugs and college stipends square with the dogma of Limits? Generous maternity and paternity leave laws are the only new social spending to go through, and along with the Supreme Court’s legalization of euthanasia they contribute to a conservative backlash at the polls. Only by the hard work of her labor allies does Pritt scrape to re-election victory, and the result is so close and contentious that it inspires dark references to the Daleys and Jimmy Hoffa.

Pritt’s second term is dominated by the Second Kurdish War. The US takes a supporting role this time, but the collapse of Iran’s longtime puppet government in Iraq and the opening of a wider regional conflict still has domestic ripples as oil prices soar in the depths of winter. It is time to reactivate the Jackson Act. Wearing a parka and a Miners for Democracy beanie, the president signs an executive order reviving the Economic Stabilization Board and imposing rationing. This time, however, the economists on her advisory council have a different ultimate goal in mind.

The strategy laid out in the Black Mountain Memo is to keep rationing permanent, reducing the potential for future supply shocks. However, it goes on to suggest a slow and intentional escalation of prices to wean America off of fossil fuels entirely. Reports of Pritt’s reaction remain contradictory, and prices don’t change significantly for the rest of her term. However, when the memo leaks in the runup to the 2008 election, it confirms many Americans’ fears that the burden of a green, steady-state economic transition will fall on them.

Showing perhaps more courage than sense, Jontz confirms that he would use the executive price-setting power to phase out fossil fuels, with the rise in gas prices offset by progressive cuts to personal income tax. Unfortunately, President Pritt’s longstanding opposition to gasoline taxes was well-documented on video, already packaged for campaign commercials. The Vice President is forced to run against his own administration’s record. Already smarting from a primary battle against John Hickenlooper, who tried to outflank him on the left by promising to reform the NLUO and build housing again, Jontz loses handily to the second woman President.

Linda Smith is a new breed of Republican. In Congress, she voted for elements of the New Millennium Plan, embracing an image as a compassionate conservative and a pragmatic environmentalist; as Governor of Washington she fashioned herself as a champion of low taxes and private property rights; and throughout her career she stood as a staunch Meesean social conservative, attacking euthanasia and spitting venom at The Gays. President Smith’s America is a land of bioswales behind white picket fences, a land where “NLUO reform” means sprawling acres of LEED-certified McMansions, a land where queer communities across the country are besieged under a veil of pseudofeminist rhetoric, a land where the militarized police drive electric APCs. In a word, it is an era of complacency. The country remains on track to meet its Jakarta targets, but by the mid-2010s it is increasingly clear that it will not be enough. Not only were the targets were based on early, optimistic climate models, some countries such as China have simply disregarded them. 2016 is set to be another crisis election.

Susan Sadlowski Garza, the Governor of Illinois, is no mere dynast, although her father’s role in Jackson II and the revitalization of the labor movement definitely boosted her early career. She has restored dignity to her soiled office by crushing the Daley-Madigan machine, and she has led the liberal governors’ resistance to the Smith administration’s institutionalized racism and homophobia. However, at the moment she’s riding on a wave of grassroots enthusiasm from the so-called Millenarian generation, young people transfixed by the Age of Aquarius notion that we are on the cusp of great possibility and positive change. The most radical elements of her coalition are calling for full national mobilization against climate change, including the full implementation of Black Mountain, hard caps on resource consumption, and a final nail in the coffin of Growth.

The shock-jock of white backlash, onetime Cleveland Mayor and onetime head of Democrats for Dornan, has not held elected office in decades but has cruised the primary nevertheless. In his disregard for the GOP’s traditional fiscal reticence, right-wing radio host Dennis Kucinich is President Smith’s natural heir, but his conservatism is anything but compassionate. His campaign pays lip service to the need for climate action, but asks why Americans should have to suffer for others’ sins, blames ecological destruction on the industrialization of China and Indonesia, and darkly repeats old conspiracy theories about the globalist 3E and white genocide. Instead of encouraging the heinous crime of abortion, he insists, we need to close the borders and keep out the immigrants who will spill out of our overcrowded cities and despoil America’s natural splendor.

The choice is clear: ecosocialism or ecobarbarism.
 

Sideways

A jpeg stock photo of gas station flowers
Published by SLP
Location
Teignmouth, Devon
Pronouns
She/Her
I've found working from home a bit hard and get distracted sometimes


No Throne For The Bug King
Part I: Taking it all back

Justinian Dynasty
Justinian The Great was a man in a hurry - to build the Hagia Sofia, to unite the church, to rebuild the Roman Empire. The first was his greatest legacy, the second was his most obvious failure and the third was a mixed blessing. He managed to retake Africa, Italy and Spain and build an alliance with the Franks that protected his new frontier. Future generations would be stuck paying his debts and defending the enlarged empire. In general, the descendents of Justinian managed this legacy with varying degrees of success. However, Justinian III destroyed the delicate balance with a frenzy of building plans, many impossible, plans at conquest, and many other expensive campaigns that he would frequently lose interest in or attempt to micro-manage.

527-565: Justinian I "The Great"
565-602: Justin II
602-613: Justinian II
613-618: Germanus
618-624: Justinian III "The Mad"


Valentinian Dynasty
A usurper dynasty lead by one of Justinian's generals. While the remnants of the old dynasty had little support the new one struggled to gain a footing in the popular consciousness and relied on payments to the army it could barely afford to keep going.

624-633: Valentinas
633-638: Valentinas II


Saborian Dynasty
Another government by usurption. Saborios II attempted to build legitimacy through building support in the churches. The Third Council of Constantinople agreed upon the doctrine of Monoenergism - that Christ has a single energy that is both divine and human - in a state sponsored attempt to make a compromise between the monophysite and Chalcedonian churches. However, future generations would lean on churches heavily for finance in their wars with the Avars and Kazars, and therefore gained more clout with and power over the emperors, and the doctrine was never really entrenched centrally.

638-643: Saborios I
643-661: Saborios II
661-667: Constantine III
667: Leo II
667-672: Saborios III
672-683: Saborios III


Tiberian Dynasty (Rome)
In the West, the revival of Rome as a political power, religious differences with the East and annoyance from the churches at repeated requests for money led to a general rebellion and war while the Empire in the East was at its weakest. The new West Byzantine Empire, would rapidly establish itself as a power in the region. In the Tiberian Dynasty this culminated in Peter The Great's reconquest of Frankia and re-establishment of the concept of a dual empire.

667-675: Tiberius III
675-679: Tiberian
679-718: Peter The Great
718-726: Peter II
726-747: Peter III


Leontian Dynasty (Byzantium)
While the Leontians were unsuccessful against the Avars they maintained strong contacts in the West and this developed into marital alliances, culminating in Theodotus' successful campaign into Rome to defend what he saw as his familial right to that throne. It worked, during his life, but after his death his two sons vyed for power and the never-really-reunited empire split up again.

683-707: Leontios
707-711: Leo III
711-757: Theodotus
757-768: Theodotus II


Leontian Dynasty (Rome)
In the West the Leontians established a strong relationship with the pope and attempted to assimilate into the political life of their young empire. The family was successful and wealthy, but not fertile. The family was left in the unusual position of being headed up by a woman who attempted the experiment of weilding political power in her own right. This was highly unsuccessful.

747-757: Theodotus
757-771: Constantine IV
771-779: Constantine V
779-782: Julia


Thirty Year Anarchy (Byzantium)
768-799: Multiple claimants

For nearly thirty years, the Byzantine Empire was stricken by a near constant cycle of emperors, none of whom managed to fully unite the country. Much of the difficulties were spurred on by growing religious disunity, as monophysites and chalcedonians and tiny pockets of monoenrgism fought for dominance and occassionally purged the Jewish populations when they couldn't find other Christians to persecute.

Theuderician Dynasty (Rome)
A Frankish general usurped the power of the emperor and relied more on his own people for allies. As a result, power in the empire started to move noth. So far north in fact that they ended up defending the Romano-British in their wars with the Jutes and eventually took control over much of Southern Britain.

782-807: Theuduric I
807-814: Sigebert I
807-821: Leo III


Theophilosian Dynasty (Byzantium)
The post civil war dynasty dealt with a constant threat from the Sassanids and during their time turned the tables against that increasingly ailing empire. This would have presented opportunities were it not for religious disunity within the Empire which spilled out into a drawn religious conflict between the monophysites and the Chalcedonian-Monoenergists that would eventually cost Rome control over Alexandria.

768-799: Theophilos I
799-813: Constantine IV
813-822: Constantine V
822-845: Constans II
845-856: Theophilos II
856-862: Leo IV


Apsimarian Dynasty (Rome)
A dynasty of Ostrogoths backed by the Avar Khanate. The ascent caused serious rebellions, mostly in France, which was coming to view itself as centre of the Empire in the West. The empire might have struggled with internal conflicts, but it was still able to pacify the Balkans, and even defeat the Eastern Empire in battle, securing the West's position as the senior of the two Empires for the first time in centuries.

807-821: Tiberius IV Apsimar
821-836: Tiberius V The Roman
836-838: Tiberius VI The Usurper
838-874: Tiberius VII The Arian / The Heretic
874-878: Leodegar The Confessor


Simean Dynasty (Alexandria)
Pious beyond any reasonable levels, the Simean Dynasty was an elective monarchy strongly overseen by the church which was established as an Empire of the Monophysites and maintained power through an often tyrannical desire for uniformity and paranoia about invasion from the Eastern Byzantines.The Simeans were frequently elderly, retired generals or priests, people who the Church elders could control. With occassional periods where younger men were able to break through and demand change, which always amounted to more religious declarations and more wars with the Byzantines.

852-877: Simeon I
877-883: Theophilus I
883-899: Constantine VI
899-912: Simeon II
912-916: John I
916-918: Agathon I
918-950: Agathon II
950-956: Alexander I
956-968: Simeon III
968-972: Joseph I
972-975: Constantine VII
975-979: Gabriel I
979-988: Agathon II
988-995: Alexander II
995-999: Joseph II
999-1043: John II


The Armenian Dynasty (Byzantium)
Justinian IV secured control over the empire, however his descendents desroyed the reputation of the family fighting amongst themselves in a convoluted series of sometimes incestuous marital alliances, suspicious deaths and outright rebellions.

878-900: Justinian IV
900-906: Justinian V
906-909: Anastasios II
909-918: Phillipikos I
918-924: Justinian VI
924-927: Justinian VII


Eligian Dynasty (Rome)
A Gallic dynasty that mostly found itself defending the empire from the Tuareg and the Norse, along with increased violence from more established enemies like the Avars and the Slavs. Britain was lost again and at times even Rome was threatened, particularly by the Avars.

878-888: Eligius I The Gaul
898-909: Tiberius VIII The Patron
909-924: Theodocius III The Child
924-938: Gratian II The Frank
938-960: Tiberius IX The Wise
960-965: Basilliscus II The Martyr
965-977: Eligius II The Confessor
977-996: Tiberius X The Bearded


Non-Dynastic (Byzantium)
Valentinian was presented with the chance of the millennium, the opportunity to conquer Persia. The ailing Sasanid Empire faced Turkic, Kazar and Arabic enemies and Byzantine forces. The Roman conquest of Ctesiphon saw Valentinian add "King of Kings" to the title of the Byzantine Emperors for the rest of it's survival, and lead to the Eastern Empire briefly being seen as the dominant force in Romania.

927-954: Valentinian II

Forty Year Anarchy (Byzantium)
Valentinian's Empire had been stretched thin and rocked by inflation since their conquest of Ctesiphon. For nearly forty years, no one claimant could claim complete control of the empire and smaller powers bit at the heels of the Empire.

954-991: Various claimants

The Three Good Emperors (Byzantium)
Xeno was the first person to reclaim comtrol over the Empire, and spent his entire life doing so. He died shortly after returning to Constantinople and handed power to his close friend and adopted son, who handed in turn would hand it over by adoption again. Once again, for a brief time, the Eastern Empire was the premier empire.

991-992: Xeno II
992-1009: Basil
1009-1034: Valentinian III
 

Bolt451

Hello to our posters from NooOOORTH CAR-O-LIN-A
Location
Sandford, Gloucestershire
Pronouns
She/Her
I've found working from home a bit hard and get distracted sometimes


No Throne For The Bug King
Part I: Taking it all back

Justinian Dynasty
Justinian The Great was a man in a hurry - to build the Hagia Sofia, to unite the church, to rebuild the Roman Empire. The first was his greatest legacy, the second was his most obvious failure and the third was a mixed blessing. He managed to retake Africa, Italy and Spain and build an alliance with the Franks that protected his new frontier. Future generations would be stuck paying his debts and defending the enlarged empire. In general, the descendents of Justinian managed this legacy with varying degrees of success. However, Justinian III destroyed the delicate balance with a frenzy of building plans, many impossible, plans at conquest, and many other expensive campaigns that he would frequently lose interest in or attempt to micro-manage.

527-565: Justinian I "The Great"
565-602: Justin II
602-613: Justinian II
613-618: Germanus
618-624: Justinian III "The Mad"


Valentinian Dynasty
A usurper dynasty lead by one of Justinian's generals. While the remnants of the old dynasty had little support the new one struggled to gain a footing in the popular consciousness and relied on payments to the army it could barely afford to keep going.

624-633: Valentinas
633-638: Valentinas II


Saborian Dynasty
Another government by usurption. Saborios II attempted to build legitimacy through building support in the churches. The Third Council of Constantinople agreed upon the doctrine of Monoenergism - that Christ has a single energy that is both divine and human - in a state sponsored attempt to make a compromise between the monophysite and Chalcedonian churches. However, future generations would lean on churches heavily for finance in their wars with the Avars and Kazars, and therefore gained more clout with and power over the emperors, and the doctrine was never really entrenched centrally.

638-643: Saborios I
643-661: Saborios II
661-667: Constantine III
667: Leo II
667-672: Saborios III
672-683: Saborios III


Tiberian Dynasty (Rome)
In the West, the revival of Rome as a political power, religious differences with the East and annoyance from the churches at repeated requests for money led to a general rebellion and war while the Empire in the East was at its weakest. The new West Byzantine Empire, would rapidly establish itself as a power in the region. In the Tiberian Dynasty this culminated in Peter The Great's reconquest of Frankia and re-establishment of the concept of a dual empire.

667-675: Tiberius III
675-679: Tiberian
679-718: Peter The Great
718-726: Peter II
726-747: Peter III


Leontian Dynasty (Byzantium)
While the Leontians were unsuccessful against the Avars they maintained strong contacts in the West and this developed into marital alliances, culminating in Theodotus' successful campaign into Rome to defend what he saw as his familial right to that throne. It worked, during his life, but after his death his two sons vyed for power and the never-really-reunited empire split up again.

683-707: Leontios
707-711: Leo III
711-757: Theodotus
757-768: Theodotus II


Leontian Dynasty (Rome)
In the West the Leontians established a strong relationship with the pope and attempted to assimilate into the political life of their young empire. The family was successful and wealthy, but not fertile. The family was left in the unusual position of being headed up by a woman who attempted the experiment of weilding political power in her own right. This was highly unsuccessful.

747-757: Theodotus
757-771: Constantine IV
771-779: Constantine V
779-782: Julia


Thirty Year Anarchy (Byzantium)
768-799: Multiple claimants

For nearly thirty years, the Byzantine Empire was stricken by a near constant cycle of emperors, none of whom managed to fully unite the country. Much of the difficulties were spurred on by growing religious disunity, as monophysites and chalcedonians and tiny pockets of monoenrgism fought for dominance and occassionally purged the Jewish populations when they couldn't find other Christians to persecute.

Theuderician Dynasty (Rome)
A Frankish general usurped the power of the emperor and relied more on his own people for allies. As a result, power in the empire started to move noth. So far north in fact that they ended up defending the Romano-British in their wars with the Jutes and eventually took control over much of Southern Britain.

782-807: Theuduric I
807-814: Sigebert I
807-821: Leo III


Theophilosian Dynasty (Byzantium)
The post civil war dynasty dealt with a constant threat from the Sassanids and during their time turned the tables against that increasingly ailing empire. This would have presented opportunities were it not for religious disunity within the Empire which spilled out into a drawn religious conflict between the monophysites and the Chalcedonian-Monoenergists that would eventually cost Rome control over Alexandria.

768-799: Theophilos I
799-813: Constantine IV
813-822: Constantine V
822-845: Constans II
845-856: Theophilos II
856-862: Leo IV


Apsimarian Dynasty (Rome)
A dynasty of Ostrogoths backed by the Avar Khanate. The ascent caused serious rebellions, mostly in France, which was coming to view itself as centre of the Empire in the West. The empire might have struggled with internal conflicts, but it was still able to pacify the Balkans, and even defeat the Eastern Empire in battle, securing the West's position as the senior of the two Empires for the first time in centuries.

807-821: Tiberius IV Apsimar
821-836: Tiberius V The Roman
836-838: Tiberius VI The Usurper
838-874: Tiberius VII The Arian / The Heretic
874-878: Leodegar The Confessor


Simean Dynasty (Alexandria)
Pious beyond any reasonable levels, the Simean Dynasty was an elective monarchy strongly overseen by the church which was established as an Empire of the Monophysites and maintained power through an often tyrannical desire for uniformity and paranoia about invasion from the Eastern Byzantines.The Simeans were frequently elderly, retired generals or priests, people who the Church elders could control. With occassional periods where younger men were able to break through and demand change, which always amounted to more religious declarations and more wars with the Byzantines.

852-877: Simeon I
877-883: Theophilus I
883-899: Constantine VI
899-912: Simeon II
912-916: John I
916-918: Agathon I
918-950: Agathon II
950-956: Alexander I
956-968: Simeon III
968-972: Joseph I
972-975: Constantine VII
975-979: Gabriel I
979-988: Agathon II
988-995: Alexander II
995-999: Joseph II
999-1043: John II


The Armenian Dynasty (Byzantium)
Justinian IV secured control over the empire, however his descendents desroyed the reputation of the family fighting amongst themselves in a convoluted series of sometimes incestuous marital alliances, suspicious deaths and outright rebellions.

878-900: Justinian IV
900-906: Justinian V
906-909: Anastasios II
909-918: Phillipikos I
918-924: Justinian VI
924-927: Justinian VII


Eligian Dynasty (Rome)
A Gallic dynasty that mostly found itself defending the empire from the Tuareg and the Norse, along with increased violence from more established enemies like the Avars and the Slavs. Britain was lost again and at times even Rome was threatened, particularly by the Avars.

878-888: Eligius I The Gaul
898-909: Tiberius VIII The Patron
909-924: Theodocius III The Child
924-938: Gratian II The Frank
938-960: Tiberius IX The Wise
960-965: Basilliscus II The Martyr
965-977: Eligius II The Confessor
977-996: Tiberius X The Bearded


Non-Dynastic (Byzantium)
Valentinian was presented with the chance of the millennium, the opportunity to conquer Persia. The ailing Sasanid Empire faced Turkic, Kazar and Arabic enemies and Byzantine forces. The Roman conquest of Ctesiphon saw Valentinian add "King of Kings" to the title of the Byzantine Emperors for the rest of it's survival, and lead to the Eastern Empire briefly being seen as the dominant force in Romania.

927-954: Valentinian II

Forty Year Anarchy (Byzantium)
Valentinian's Empire had been stretched thin and rocked by inflation since their conquest of Ctesiphon. For nearly forty years, no one claimant could claim complete control of the empire and smaller powers bit at the heels of the Empire.

954-991: Various claimants

The Three Good Emperors (Byzantium)
Xeno was the first person to reclaim comtrol over the Empire, and spent his entire life doing so. He died shortly after returning to Constantinople and handed power to his close friend and adopted son, who handed in turn would hand it over by adoption again. Once again, for a brief time, the Eastern Empire was the premier empire.

991-992: Xeno II
992-1009: Basil
1009-1034: Valentinian III
I love me some later Rome work. This is fantastic, Lena.
 

Mumby

Always mysterious!
Published by SLP
Location
Municipal Commune of Bourne
Pronouns
He/Him
C H A O S

Prime Ministers of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

2010-2015: David Cameron (Conservative)
2010 (Coalition with Liberal Democrats) def. Gordon Brown (Labour), Nick Clegg (Liberal Democrat), Peter Robinson (Democratic Unionist), Alex Salmond (Scottish National), Gerry Adams (Sinn Fein)
2011 AV referendum; NO 68%, YES 32%
2014 Scottish independence referendum; NO 55%, YES 45%

2015-0000: Ed Miliband (Labour)
2015 (Minority, with SNP confidence and supply) def. David Cameron (Conservative), Nicola Sturgeon (Scottish National), Nick Clegg (Liberal Democrat), Peter Robinson (Democratic Unionist)
2016 Scottish independence referendum; NO 58%, YES 42%
2020; cancelled amid Coronavirus pandemic
2021 (Majority) def. Boris Johnson (Conservative), Tim Farron (Liberal Democrat), Angus Robertson (Scottish National), Arlene Foster (Democratic Unionist), Mary Lou McDonald (Sinn Fein)
 

theev

Las Vegas is a society of armed masturbators
Pronouns
he/him
1961-1965: John F. Kennedy (Democratic)
1960 (with Lyndon B. Johnson): Richard Nixon (Republican)
1965-1969: Barry Goldwater (Republican)
1964 (with William Scranton): John F. Kennedy (Democratic), Ross Barnett (Dixiecrat)
1969-1975: Eugene McCarthy (Democratic)
1968 (with John Connally): George Wallace (Freedom), Barry Goldwater (Republican)
1972 (with George McGovern): John Wayne (National Alliance), Nelson Rockefeller ('Moderate' Republican)

1975-1981: George McGovern (Democratic)
1976 (with Hubert Humphrey): Evan Mecham (National Alliance), John Connally (Moderate)
1981-0000: George L. Rockwell (National Alliance)
1980 (with Ronald Reagan): George McGovern (Democratic), Hugh Carey (Moderate), Jerry Brown (Libertarian)

Perhaps Kennedy should have made an earlier push for civil rights, or perhaps he shouldn't have pushed at all. Maybe it doesn't matter. He could get nothing done once the Baker and Rometsch scandals blew up anyway. All there was left for him to do was run limply in the general election and lose to the Republican nominee. But that Republican nominee would be Barry Goldwater. Now the campaign would be competitive. But it was not to be. Texas was called for Goldwater in the early hour of the morning, giving him the election, as President Kennedy suffered from his worsened appeal, a Dixiecrat splinter, and (alleged) meddling by scorned VP Lyndon Johnson.

The Presidency of Barry Goldwater was as bad as Democratic campaigners had warned. Although Democratic congressional majorities prevented him from cutting FDR's New Deal to pieces, his executive policy of 'benign neglect' and his refusal to sign the 1967 budget, which led to a government shutdown, would degrade public trust in government and the efficacy of existing social services. With Kennedy having been forced out before he could make significant progress, it was up to Goldwater to deal with civil rights. The 1965 Civil Rights Act, which exempted private businesses from integration, was passed even over the opposition of southern stalwarts and liberals decrying it as a half-measure. The 1966 Voting Protection Act empowered state attorney generals to protect potential voters but explicitly established the issue as one of "states' rights." African-Americans and civil rights groups were livid. Martin Luther King Jr. denounced President Goldwater as a "craven coward" and Walter Reuther even considered a general strike as the grueling administration wore on. Both men were assassinated by far-right gunmen just weeks apart in the early months of 1968. On the more militant side of things, Malcolm X's Muslim Mosque Inc. and Stokely Carmichael's African People's Party absorbed a generation of young black men who were enraged at a dysfunctional status quo and sought war with the government in the streets. And then there was Vietnam. With a presence winding down during the Kennedy administration, Goldwater doubled down on the American military commitment to Southeast Asia. Using a recent naval battle as leverage, Goldwater got Congress to grant him war-powers in Vietnam. Tens of thousands of American GI's were sent over and the subsequent military draft drew the ire of the nation's youth. The war would turn into a meatgrinder. By late-1967, North Vietnamese offenses had brought upon untold casualties to American forces and crippled American morale at home. To Goldwater, he was left with no choice. In February, 1968 orders were initiated for Operation Fracture Jaw. Within weeks nuclear weapons were utilized by American forces in combat. The outrage back home was intense. Combined with the racial situation and the draft, opposition to the use of nuclear weapons in combat would galvanize American protesters to the streets in the summer of 1968.

Although he would defeat a primary challenge from Michigan Governor George Romney, Goldwater was not looking good going into the election of 1968. Taking advantage of his perceived weakness on the right was former Alabama Governor George Wallace. In late 1967 Wallace worked closely with Bill Shearer of California and his rump 'Freedom Party.' The Freedom Party was the remnants of the Dixiecrat political apparatus set up for Ross Barnett's independent run in 1964. Wallace was virtually guaranteed the nomination and, alongside the (comparably) moderate Happy Chandler, campaigned on economic populism and law and order. On the Democratic side of things was the rejuvenated campaign of Lyndon Johnson. Apologizing for his (alleged) role in the Bobby Baker scandal and for the Kennedy administration's inaction on civil rights and poverty, the liberal Lyndon Johnson began to establish a rapport with African-American voters and poor whites and cleaned up against candidates like Scoop Jackson, Hubert Humphrey, and George Smathers. He promised further action on civil rights and a new left-wing domestic reform package billed as the 'New Society.' His biggest challenge would be from Minnesota Senator Eugene McCarthy. Running on a platform largely based around his strong opposition to the Vietnam War, McCarthy sweeped the youth vote and the left fringe of the Democratic Party. The Democratic race would narrow down to Johnson and McCarthy as the primaries wore on. McCarthy won the early contests and Johnson was the only one who was able to rally against him later on. It would not be enough for Johnson. McCarthy, despite the initial opposition he faced from the party establishment, used his less strident economic and social stances to form necessary alliances in the lead up to the DNC. Johnson meanwhile, seeing that his influence in the party had degraded after five years, fought to make up for lost ground. A (survived) heart attack on the night before the convention was the nail in the coffin for Johnson and Eugene McCarthy was declared the narrow victor on the first ballot. With a profoundly split conservative front (Wallace dominating the south, and Goldwater dominating the west), the Democrats' McCarthy/Connally ticket achieved victory in November as chaos blazed.

Eugene McCarthy's withdrawal from Vietnam proceeded as swiftly as possible. By the end of the year, US personnel had completely left the beleaguered nation. While McCarthy would be blamed by conservatives for South Vietnam's fall in 1971, he received enough support for following through on his campaign's most prominent plank and solidified support for his re-election. Outside of foreign affairs, McCarthy played a careful balancing act in trying to satisfy the many wings of the Democratic Party in the lead-up to presidential consideration. Although he would empower the federal government to handle the cause of voting rights in 1970, many would be disappointed in the administration's seeming retreat from social issues. Protests continued, but they would never reach the ferocity they had achieved under Goldwater. Arguably McCarthy's biggest achievement on the economic front would be the passage a $2,000 yearly basic income in early 1972. This would have significant electoral implications as well. Seeing as his relationship with Vice President Connally had finally fallen apart (two egos in a house built for one), McCarthy chose the bill's senate sponsor, Senator George McGovern, as his new running mate. Connally was livid but due to the quick nature of his firing was unable to do much immediately outside of withholding his endorsement. McCarthy's opposition stumbled worse than he did. With the assassination of George Wallace in January, 1972 by a black nationalist, the Freedom Party was left moribund and without a leader. That was until California Governor John Wayne entered the scene. The Republican candidate was dominating the Republican primaries against a divided field of Nelson Rockefeller, Charles Percy, William Scranton, Jim Rhodes, and Gerald Ford. After a meeting with Shearer in the spring, Wayne promised that if he won the Republican nomination he would work to fuse the two parties together. Now, once Wayne did become the Republican nominee, the process would become much more difficult. As Wayne's faction (bolstered by alleged "Freedomite" delegates) made it so that an article merging the two parties narrowly passes, Nelson Rockefeller lead a walkout of moderate Republicans. The New 'National Alliance' Party had now lost a substantial amount of support to a renegade 'Moderate' Republican ticket and throughout the fall campaign were never able to make up lost ground against McCarthy. The President had won re-election.

But on what basis? A bombshell report from the New York Times would ask in the fall of 1973. A whistleblower from a high-ranking post in the McCarthy White House had revealed that the President had illegally ordered a wiretapping of the National Alliance Party's makeshift party headquarters in Bar Harbor, Maryland shortly after the events of the RNC. The whistleblower, soon revealed to have been White House Counsel Ramsey Clark, was quickly fired bringing greater attention to the developing scandal. McCarthy would fight the charges for over a year. The National Alliance Party and their Moderate Republican congressional allies had waited until the 1974 elections before formally moving towards articles of impeachment, in order the reap the benefits of a midterm crowd hostile to President McCarthy. And reap they would, bringing the Democrats down to scant majorities in both chambers. In April, 1975 the House of Representatives would pass articles of impeachment against President Eugene McCarthy. Weeks later, he would resign from the presidency in order to avoid a senate trial over his removal. Just days earlier he had been confronted by Vice President George McGovern and Senator Mike Gravel to resign in order to save the country and the party from a nasty senate trial. McCarthy would be sentenced to 4 years in prison in 1977 although he would be released on the orders of President McGovern in 1979.

When George McGovern became President in April, 1975 he was immediately faced with a difficult situation. Although he was currently benefiting from a honeymoon period, his predecessor was hated (McCarthy had a 22% approval rating at the time of his resignation). So, McGovern immediately set about repairing the White House's frayed relations with congress. By the end of the year he would pass landmark administration increasing yearly basic income to $4,000. Meanwhile, his opposition was ready to destroy themselves. As 1975 turned into 1976, the rump moderate faction of the Republican Party formally created the Moderate Party, absorbing the growing number of dissident Democrats in the process. This served to embolden their image as the National Alliance Party commenced a vicious primary between former nominee John Wayne, Representative John Ashbrook, Representative John Schmitz, Louisiana Governor John Rarick, Philadelphia Mayor Frank Rizzo, and Arizona Governor Evan Mecham, among other less popular candidates. The candidates were individually savaged but it would be the theatrical Mecham who rose victorious following several ballots at the convention. The Mecham/Rizzo ticket set about to continue the party's theme of a 'law and order' platform. On the Moderate side of things, former Vice President John Connally, with the aid of party leader Richard Nixon, triumphed over his many intraparty 'Rockefeller Republican' opponents and seized the nomination alongside Elliot Richardson. On the opposite side of the ideological aisle stood the incumbent President George McGovern, who overcame bare opposition in his party's primaries and was paired up with the elderly Senate Majority Leader Hubert Humphrey. The election would end up an easier fight than the DNC had initially thought. The odious Mecham and untrustworthy Connally largely attacked eachother as President McGovern remained above the fray, practicing a Rose Garden strategy. So despite the Democrats' incumbency fatigue and widespread unpopularity, they would be granted an electoral victory in November, 1976.

It was 1977 and segregation still persisted in the United States of America. And not just the school segregation and housing segregation that had come to dominate American suburbia, real legally defined segregation. The Goldwater civil rights bills were considered jokes by those who supported the very concept of civil rights, let alone by those whose lives were directly impacted by their ramifications. Black leaders from the more moderate like Congressman John Lewis and Mayor Tom Bradley, who regularly demanded legal action on the issue, to the more radical like Louis X of Muslim Mosque Inc. and African People's Party Women's Leader Assata Shakur, who used it as reason to condemn the United States, kept the issue in conversation. But President McCarthy didn't really care, similar to how he didn't care to help abolish the poll tax. After all, the black vote went to his primary opponent, Lyndon Johnson, and African-Americans had been a lock for the Democratic Party since the days of FDR. But George McGovern did care. Although it may have not seemed like it based on the inaction of his first year and a half in office, George McGovern was willing to evangelize for the cause of civil rights. He did so in congress and he was willing to do so in front of the notoriously stubborn Eugene McCarthy. His platform had featured an article calling for the end of "legalized discrimination in all its remaining forms" but he really didn't run on the issues. However, now was the time to focus on the issues. So, knowing this about the President, it should not have been a surprise to see him in the Rose Garden with Vice President Humphrey, Congressman Lewis, Ambassador Young, and Speaker Udall, in February, 1977 announcing that his administration was going to end discrimination by private businesses.

It would have been better if Goldwater, or even Kennedy or Eisenhower, ended business discrimination. In the more than decade since Goldwater's bill passed segregation had continued to fester and it had become a right of passage for many southern businesses to throw out black customers. The initial patchwork of integrated/segregated businesses across the South had given way to a bizarre system by the mid-70s. Chain stores and restaurants were almost universally expected to be integrated establishments while small businesses, in near parallel uniformity, were expected to be whites only. The vast majority of integrated southern small businesses were fractured by boycotts and many were forced to change policies or close entirely by the time 1977 rolled around. This toxic social environment was beginning to sink in as a regional peculiarity for the American South. And a large number of southern citizenry wanted to keep it that way. So as the Democratic-dominated House and Senate passed the 1977 Civil Rights Act in quick succession, even breaking a National Alliance filibuster with the help of Moderate senators, and got the bill signed by President McGovern in May, white southerners went up in arms. Enter stage left, George Lincoln Rockwell.

Splitting with Matthias Koehl's occultist 'New Order' organization, George Lincoln Rockwell established the nationalistic and conservative American Citizens' Group in 1968. While initially criticized as "the same old American Nazi Party with a fresh coat of paint" (ACG still used ANP slogans like "White Power") Rockwell simultaneously tried to ingratiate himself to the nation's radicalizing right-wing. Affiliating with candidates backed by groups like the John Birch Society, Rockwell would soon become well respected enough within the burgeoning National Alliance Party to become a delegate at the 1976 convention (Rockwell was initially supportive of John Schmitz but would switch his vote to Evan Mecham alongside much of the convention hall). After that initial credibility Rockwell's stock rose rapidly. He even opened for Evan Mecham at an ACG event in September of that year. With that behind him he announced that he was running for Governor of Virginia in February of 1977. Condemning the civil rights action of the McGovern administration, and Governor Henry Howell's willingness to go along with it, Rockwell would destroy his opposition for the Republican nomination. Rockwell would be elected Governor of Virginia with nearly 60% of the vote. He could attribute nothing but a well-oiled rightist political machine and an enraged bigoted populace to his victory. Rockwell's victor, and his past as leader of the American Nazi Party, grabbed headlines. To many in the national press it was an indication that southern opposition to President McGovern's policies had reached a critical point, but to Governor Rockwell and his backers it merely showed that a decade of work had been enough to scrub away the PR sin of his Nazi involvement. George Lincoln Rockwell had big plans.

The 1978 midterms were a disaster for George McGovern. Like in Virginia, southern opposition to his civil rights policies had led to the rejection of congressional Democrats en masse. But that was not his only problem. The overthrow of the American-backed regime in Iran over the summer had cast a dark haze over the midterms nationwide. The subsequent establishment of the Revolutionary Socialist Republic of Iran aided the President's foreign policy detractors. The revolutionaries' impromptu guillotining of the Shah didn't help matters much either. The National Alliance would claim majorities in both congressional chambers. They vowed to permanently obstruct the agenda of President McGovern. Despite this setback, President McGovern still vowed to run for another term. As 1979 dragged on and the summer's racial and social turmoil worsened as the economy entered a recession, primary challengers entered the fray. California Governor Jerry Brown blamed the President's "big government solutions" and "lack of big ideas" for the nation's current state of disarray while New York Governor Hugh Carey blamed the President's "left-wing radicalism." Brown's challenge would win him several states against McGovern (including the early primary of New Hampshire) while Carey would drop his challenge in October and switch parties to the Moderates to continue his run there. As President McGovern finally defeated Governor Brown, Carey would rise above a fractured field filled with John Connally, John Anderson, Larry Pressler, and Howard Baker. On the National Alliance side, 19 candidates would come to prominence in the party's first national primary. While they ranged from relative moderates to hardline rightists, policy wonks to demagogues, none would stand out like Virginia Governor George Rockwell. Rockwell dominated polling throughout the contest, first with pluralities and then with majorities, and remained the first frontrunner through the first few primaries. Rockwell's "Make America Great Again" slogan and the viciousness of his campaign led by the competitive Roger Stone and Lee Atwater and based on nationalism, social conservatism, and economic populism, captivated National Alliance voters and overcame a hastily assembled "Anybody But Rockwell" coalition to triumph on the convention's first ballot. Rockwell's selection of a National Alliance moderate, California Senator Ronald Reagan was enough to quell the concerns that many in the party had with him. Meanwhile, Hugh Carey selected Representative John Anderson as his running mate at a convention where he welcomed a worryingly small number of fleeing National Alliance supporters. President McGovern attempted to rally Democrats with his selection of the more moderate Senator Ed Muskie to fill the VP role vacated in the wake of Hubert Humphrey's death. But McGovern would face yet another complication. Former opponent Jerry Brown was nowhere to be found at the 1980 DNC because he was planning on becoming the Libertarian Party's presidential nominee alongside a young wealthy donor named Ed Koch. For the entire race McGovern and Rockwell were neck-and-neck as Carey pulled a very strong third and Brown vied for contention. The candidates swapped strong debate performances. McGovern began to pull ahead with just weeks before the election after warning voters in his closing statement in the final debate that Rockwell's ideology was one "we defeated on the beaches of Normandy" and victory appeared just within his grasp until the 'Fort Wayne story' broke. Affairharbor, released by operatives from the Rockwell campaign just days before the election brought the revelation that McGovern had had an affair that produced a child. The backlash was enormous and as the public woke on election day, 1980 the polls showed McGovern and Rockwell were tied.

Rockwell's narrow victory over a divided field brought the National Alliance to power for the first time. Emboldened with congressional gains in both houses, Rockwell was ready to put his plan into action: Singlaub at State, Rarick at Justice, Paul at Treasury, LaRouche at Interior, Buchanan at Communications, Carto running the White House... they would end welfare as American knew it while emboldening Yearly Basic Income, break with weak foreign allies who couldn't fend for themselves, and a lot more than he said on the campaign trail, that's for certain. Finally, George Lincoln Rockwell had made it to the White House.

And a white house it would be.
 

Sideways

A jpeg stock photo of gas station flowers
Published by SLP
Location
Teignmouth, Devon
Pronouns
She/Her
I know we're heading away from history into creative writing but this *is* creative writing


18010789_1489249814441152_2293201771414288719_n (1).jpg
No Throne For The Bug King
Part II: The Inevitable Hordes

Lucretian Dynasty (Rome)
The new, purely Roman dynasty was known for its purity and its devotion to religious matters, building up the authority of the Papacy and establishing the doctrine of what would become the Roman Orthodox Church. However, its policy of ignoring secular matters would prove to be its downfall when its own armies would turn against the Emperor.

996-1017: Lucretius The Roman
1017-1023: Lucian I The Pure
1023-1051: Hadrian II The Unready


The Phillipikian Dynasty (Byzantium)
A short-lived dynasty that focused mainly on the declining power of the Avars but did retake Jerusalem fro the Alexandrians.

1034-1049: Phillipikos II
1049-1052: Phillipikos III


Ezran Dynasty (Alexandria)
A more standard dynasty, passed on from father to son and focused on the military, with attempted to stop the tide of Byzantine reconquest, which seemed for a while to be nearly inevitable.

1043-1066: Ezra I
1066-1074: Ezra II
1074-1091: Ezra III
1091-1111: Joseph III
1111-1117: Ezra IV


Norse Dynasty (Rome)
Norse settlers, long established in northern France, became a key feature of the Imperial navy and eventually an established part of life in the north of Empire, which was of growing economic importance. The Norse dynasty established its base of power there, and used this as the base for it's invasion of Italy, using army pay as a pretext.

The family would assimilate into the Eternal City, to a degree. But maintained strong links to northern France and to the wider Norse world, which would lead to the first Roman expeditions to Hyperborea and even on to Greenland.

1051-1075: Harald I The Barbarian
1075-1079: Leo IV The Bald
1079-1094: Godrun I The Pretender
1094-1099: Leo V The Sailor
1099-1114: Theodocius IV The Sailor
1114-1129: Harald II The Pious
1129-1138: Leo VI The Scholar


The Later Justinian Dynasty (Byzantium)
A well-established noble family from Byzantium, the Justinians presided over a time of relative calm for the Empire which was notable mostly for religious, cultural, and scientific innovation. Firearms, the printing press, and even paper money were experimented with and a heliocentric theory of the heavens was created. However for the Justinians the greatest achievements were religious - the expansion of the Hagia Sophia and the construction of a new dome to replace fire damage, and the development of new doctrinal orthodoxy for the Byzantine Orthodox Church in an attempt to reconcile Monophysitism, Monoenergism and Chalcedonianism into a new whole. This was only partially successful. The Empire never really incorporated the Persians or the Levant and the extra territory lead to religious and ethnic violence at an ever increasing level.

1052-1059: Justinian VIII
1059-1067: Maurice I
1067-1084: Justinian XI
1084-1086: Callinicos
1086-1115: Maurice II


The Ctesiphonian Dynasty (Byzantium)
The primary city of Persia had grown in importance within Rome as a site for campaigning and maintaining control over a religiously volatile part of the empire. The Csteiphonians gained power through marriage but were still in many ways treated as usurpers by a state that feared that they were closet monoenergists - like many of the Romano-Persians. Or worse, all out Zoroastrians. Rumours of strange rituals continued and the family was frequently sidelined by the growing importance of the Senate, and maintained power elsewhere through not asking for too much. However the later emperors regained some prestige by retaking Jerusalem and marching into Egypt itself.

Ironically, the Dynasty spent much of its time fighting Zoroastrian and Jewish rebellions in Persia, where the delicate balance between minimal rule and preventing rebellion was often missed, sometimes with devastating results.

1115-1133: Constans III
1133-1145: Leo V
1145-1158: Basil II
1158-1178: Constantine VI
1178-1193: Leo VI
1193-1206: Valentinian VI


The Despotism (Alexandria)
Early military victories allowed Joshua I to achieve something that should not technically have been possible in the Alexandrian system - a father to son dynasty, which for a lifetime gained an almost supernatural place in the Coptic imagination, despite their failures to capitalise on their success and the economic decline of the region.

1117-1133: Joshua I
1133-1158: Joshua II
1158-1184: Joshua III


Magnian Dynasty (Rome)
The Magnian Dynasty came from Southern Italy and were far closer to East Byzantine, particularly religiously. This came at a time of religious conflict in the East and consequent migration of the more Chalcedonian factions west, which they largely supported.

1138-1151: Magnus I The Heretic
1151-1179: Tiberius XI The Bastard


Parisian Dynasty (Rome)
Used the perception of Chalcedonian heresy to secure their own legitimacy and dealt with the growing religious division between the Roman Orthodox Church (representing papal authority) the Chalcedonians (representing unity with the East), alongside the Celtic, Norse, and Arian churches and various heresies. Beyond these challenges, the Empire built up its presence in Britain, Hibernia, and Greenland, were they came to establish colonies in the Gulf of Gudromsland at the south of the continent, and even got down to Atlantis.

The Empire in this time grew less and less close to the Western Empire due to diplomatic issues as the Romans gained more dominance in the Mediterranean and the threat of the Chalcedonian "heresy". This lead to them ignoring the threats to the Eastern Empire and remaining neutral in the final fight on theat frontier.

1179-1211: Theodebert I The Great
1211-1218: Leo VII The Soldier
1218-1232: Thallasomer I The Law-giver
1232-1256: Bascilicind I The Expected
1256-1263: Lucian II The Artist
1263-1288: Tiberius XI The Peacemaker


The Time of Purity (Alexandria)
Having been badly defeated, Egyptian leadership entered a political freefall that lead to direct rule from the Church.

1184-1221: Council of Elders

Nersian Dynasty (Byzantium)
An Armenian dynasty that ruled mostly from the front. Initially they concentrated on rebellions in Persia, but the arrival of Kereyit Hordes made the situation even worse. At first because of migrating tribes entering the empire on mass to get away from the invaders in Persia, and in the Levant the Empire finally lost Jerusalem to Arabic Jews. Finally, the empire faced a massive invasion along its Persian borders that pushed through the defences so fast that it encircled the Byzantine armies and Emperor Nerses II was killed retreating from the scene of conflict.

1206-1233: Nerses I
1233-1256: Valentinian V
1256-1271: Nerses II


The Civil War (Alexandria)
Facing rebellions in Africa and Egypt, Peter never really gained full control of the region and fought constant usurpers until one of them gained the support of Byzantium.

1221-1226: Peter

The Puppet Emperors (Alexandria)
Elected nominally by the council of Church Elders, real power rested with Byzantium, or rather, Byzantine interests. As war and rebellion stretched on the actual power of Byzantium in the region ebbed and flowed, with Byzantine power. The last two Emperors were totally independent, but also totally powerless to defend the empire, which ultimately couldn't defend itself against Nubian attacks and the end of the Empire.

1226-1229: Solomon I
1229-1235: Joseph IV
1235-1247: Adam
1247-1258: Alexander III
1258-1263: Alexander IV
1263-1270: Moses-Abraham


The Last Dynasty (Byzantium)
Two further waves of Kereyit invasian took place during the Last Dynasty. Much of the Empire's defences were positioned in Persia, and when it fell there was little left. Armenia fell shortly after, and an additional wave pushed into Anatolia against a weakened and demoralised empire.

1271-1273: Valentinian VI
1273-1275: Anastasios III
1275-1278: Phillipikos II
1278-1284: Valentinian VII
1284-1288: Constantine VII
 

Stuyvesant

Just wait until I actually get my shit together
Location
The Place Beyond The Pines
Pronouns
he/him
New York State of Mind

2007-2008: Eliot Spitzer (Democratic) [Resigned in Wake of Prostitution Scandal]
2006 (with David Paterson) def. John Faso (Republican)
2008-2010: David Paterson (Democratic) [Was pressured by President Clinton into not seeking another term]
2011-2011: Anthony Weiner (Democratic) [Resigned in Wake of Sexting Scandal]
2010 (with Byron Brown) def. Rick Lazio (Republican)
2011-2014: Byron Brown (Democratic)
2015-2016: Chris Collins (Republican) [Resigned in Wake of Insider Trading Scandal]
2014 (with Marc Molinaro) def. Byron Brown (Democratic)
2016-2018: Marc Molinaro (Republican)
2019-2021: Kirsten Gillibrand (Democratic) [Resigned to take a position in President Cuomo's Cabinet]
2018 (with Preet Bharara) def. Marc Molinaro (Republican)
2021-????: Preet Bharara (Democratic)

"I'd like something other than eternal Andrew Cuomo in the Governor's Mansion" Monkey's Paw curls
 
Last edited:

JDuggan

Active member
Location
Earth
Pronouns
He/Him
List of Prime Ministers of the United Kingdom (1916 Onwards)
1916-1924: David Lloyd George (Liberal)
1924-1926: Winston Churchill (Liberal)
1926-1932: William Bridgeman (Conservative)
1932-1940: Neville Chamberlain (Conservative)
1940-1946: John Simon (Liberal)
1946-1955: Philip Fothergill (Liberal)
1955-1962: Oliver Lyttelton (Conservative)
1962-1967: Anthony Wedgwood Benn (Liberal)
1967-1973: William Whitelaw (Conservative)
1973-1978: Jeremy Thorpe (Conservative)
1978-1987: Roy Jenkins (Liberal)
1987-1990: William Rodgers (Liberal)
1990-1995: Kenneth Clarke (Conservative)
1995-2002: Jenny Tonge (Liberal)
2002-2007: Michael Ancram (Conservative)
2007-2014: Sandra Gidley (Liberal)
2014-2019: Julie Kirkbride (Conservative)
2019-????: Chris Evans (Liberal / Reform)
 

Makemakean

Rootless Rōnin
Pronouns
Logical, unlike those in German
“When you first start playing chess and you become a half-decent chess-player you always try to go for the opponent's queen first. It makes sense, the queen is the most dangerous piece of all, and if the queen is not immediately for the taking, you go for the rook, the bishop, the knight. It is first when you understand that none of those pieces really matter, that the only piece of your opponent's that truly matters is the king, that is when you start to become a good chess-player.

“The world of politics is full of half-decent chess-players. Ambitious men who seek to swell their ranks, and get everyone to vote for them and their party, fifty percent or more. They need to win everywhere, it seems. To paint the assemblies in their own colours. But what use is commanding the greatest minority if the majority is still against you? And what use is a landslide if it's only fleeting? It is not the politicians who won the greatest victories at the polls that we remember, but the politicians who implemented their programs. Power, not majorities, is what matters.”

– Artur Christian Andersen, Reflections on Parliamentary Democracy, 1939.

The Days of Valdemar Vågmäster[1]:

1914-1922: Sigurd Meissner (Liberal leading Liberal majority government)
1922-1925: Anton Svinhufvud (Unionist leading Unionist-Labour-Radical composition majority government)
1925-1927: Sigurd Meissner (Liberal leading Liberal minority government)
1927-1928: Svante Vikander (Liberal leading Liberal minority government)
1928-1930: Anton Svinhufvud (Unionist leading Unionist-Labour-Radical composition majority government)
1930-1931: Artur Christian Andersen (Radical leading Radical minority government)
1931-1932: Svante Vikander (Liberal leading Liberal-Radical composition majority government)
1932-1934: Artur Christian Andersen (Radical leading Radical minority government)
1934-1936: Patrik Lagercrantz (Unionist leading Unionist-Skeptical composition minority government)
1936-1937: Bernhard Crafoord (Skeptical leading Skeptical minority government)
1937-1939: Gunnar Berglund (Liberal leading Liberal-Radical minority government)
1939-1940: Christoffer Kjeldahl (Radical leading Radical minority government)
1940-1952: Thorsager Brandstrup (Labour leading Labour-Radical majority government, then Labour minority government, then Labour majority government, then Labour minority government)



[1] The Nordic Emperor Valdemar I, who reigned 1919-1947, has become known popularly as Valdemar Vågmäster after vågmästare, an old title referring to an engineer or craftsman tasked with making sure that scales were accurate (the word translates as "master of scales"). As the Nordic Empire's political landscape was experiencing nigh constant realignment owing to the entry into the Unionsdag of the Nordic Labour Party in the early 20th century and the introduction of a uniform system of proportional representation in 1923, the Emperor often had to be consulted and invited to mediate cabinet disputes and constructing government compositions that could survive votes of no confidence, hence becoming called a "scale master" as he was the one who had to make sure the political balance was maintained. Note that this political definition of vågmästare i actually at odds to the two other definitions of vågmästare in politics that exist in OTL Swedish politics.


Very basic idea of where the different political parties stand:

View attachment 4355
I would like to do a follow up on this one some day, but I simply do not know enough about the period that follows afterward to be able to properly figure it out. I do have in mind that there is a Unionist from Norway by the name of Norvald Espensen who serves as Chancery President on three occasions in the 50s and 60s, including leading another Roundtable composition government at a time of something resembling a Cuban missile crisis. There's also a Finnish Labour politician by the name of Pekka Elias Lammikko who runs a Labour-Radical composition government in the 1970s.
 

Ares96

Timeo Ever Given et dona containers
Published by SLP
Location
Fubbicktown
Pronouns
he/him
I would like to do a follow up on this one some day, but I simply do not know enough about the period that follows afterward to be able to properly figure it out. I do have in mind that there is a Unionist from Norway by the name of Norvald Espensen who serves as Chancery President on three occasions in the 50s and 60s, including leading another Roundtable composition government at a time of something resembling a Cuban missile crisis. There's also a Finnish Labour politician by the name of Pekka Elias Lammikko who runs a Labour-Radical composition government in the 1970s.
If you want to flesh it out at some point, hit me up. :)
 

Makemakean

Rootless Rōnin
Pronouns
Logical, unlike those in German
If you want to flesh it out at some point, hit me up. :)
Would much love to. Though of course, you do understand how my creative process works:

"So, basically, my creative process is as follows-..."

"...you come up with an interesting-sounding name first, and then you try to work out everything from that...?"

"..."

"Well...?"

"Yes."
 

lerk

Banned (for real)
Sacred Defense

2017 - 2020: Donald Trump / Mike Pence (Republican Party) [1]
2016 Def: Hillary Clinton / Tim Kaine (Democratic Party)
2020: Mike Pence / vacant (Republican Party) [2]
2020 - 2021: Nancy Pelosi / Andrew Cuomo (Democratic Party) [3]
2021 - 2029: Andrew Cuomo / Kamala Harris (Democratic Party) [4]
2020 Def: Ted Cruz / Brian Kemp (Republican Party), Donald Trump / Jim Gilchrist (Independent)
2024 Def: Tom Cotton / Tim Fox (Republican Party); Tulsi Gabbard / Cynthia McKinney (Green Party)

2029 - : vacant / Josh Hawley (Republican Party) [5]
2028: Tucker Carlson / Josh Hawley (Republican Party), Kamala Harris / Pete Buttigieg (Democratic Party), Evan McMullin / various (Independent)

[1] - Trump's presidency both began and ended with a bang. He won the 2016 election with the skin of his teeth, his first year saw civil unrest which hadn't been seen in decades, his party failed in repealing Obamacare, and the 2018 midterms saw big gains for the Democratic Party. However, future historians would note that his presidency began to end when the US withdrew from the Iran Deal in May 2018. From then until January 2020, tensions between the US and Iran would gradually increase, from Iran supposedly sinking oil tankers to the Houthis in Yemen striking at Saudi Arabia's oil reserves to the attack on American embassies in Baghdad and Beirut in retaliation for America's airstrikes on Kata'ib Hizbollah on New Year's Eve, 2019.

On January 2nd, 2020, in retaliation for the Baghdad and Beirut embassy attacks, the US launched a series of airstrikes in Iraq and Lebanon, killing PMF commander Abu Mahdi al-Muhandis, Badr Organization Secretary General Hadi al-Ameri, Quds Force Commander Qassem Soleimani, "Special Groups" leader Qais Khazali, and IRGC commander Abdul Reza Shahlai, Hezbollah leader Hassan Nasrallah, and Mohammad Radd, head of Hezbollah's political wing. The killing of the "Seven Martyrs" (as they would be known in Iran) were the cause of great outrage in Iran and pro-Iran elements in the Levant. After a week of mourning and threats, Iran, Hezbollah, and the Houthis struck back at the US, Israel, and Saudi Arabia, by launching a series of missile strikes at US military bases, Israeli governmental buildings, and Saudi oil fields. The strikes killed 30 Americans, 80 Saudis, and 10 Israelis. It was war.

The war ended up being a lot quicker than anyone expected, but ended in a way nobody wanted. After a few months of a war of attrition (which included a partition of Iraq, the collapse of Kuwait, and an Israeli invasion of Lebanon), both America and Iran would face a common threat - the Coronavirus. The Coronavirus pandemic began in China, where it killed a thousand people, and then spread to Iran in February. With much of Iran's resources focused on fighting America, it spread like wildfire in Iran, killing hundreds by March 15th. It was March 15th when America saw that its Coronavirus problem was also getting out of hands. Prior to the 15th, Trump spent days arguing with his staff over whether or not America should declare a national emergency under wartime. After days of deliberation, Trump conceded, and in a national address would declare the Coronavirus pandemic to be a national emergency.

Trump's prior dismantling of the CDC would make the problem hard to solve, and many states began to issue stay at home orders in order to lessen the spread. This would harm the war effort as staying at home meant that many Americans would not go to the recruitment office. Trump would find it hard to first combat a pandemic and win a war. Iran and Iraq would both offer ceasefire agreements, but it was rejected out of hand.

By April, Trump found himself exhausted and stressed. News from the front was not good, as the US found it hard to push forward in Iran. There were also reports of the Coronavirus infecting US soldiers. The Coronavirus would kill more Americans than 9/11, and America would have the highest number of reported cases (it was said that Iran had the most, but it wasn't reported). Soon, there would be some in the Trump administration advocating for a ceasefire and for an eventual withdrawal from both Iran and Iraq. Trump found himself isolated - there were many who supported him, but he began to think that many were just doing so for their own gain. Trump soon began to lose sight of what the goal of the war was: to place compliant governments in both Iran and Iraq. However, Trump began to believe his propaganda, and began to feel that they are evil and had to be destroyed

And so, on April 11th, 2020, the order was given out. 5 Minuteman-III ICBMs were to be launched: at Baghdad, at Tehran, at Qom, at Shiraz, and at Isfahan.

For many in the US military, the nuclear attacks were the last straw. Shortly afterwards, another order was given, and that was to arrest Trump. Trump was going through a form of mental breakdown shortly before giving the order to launch nuclear missiles, a breakdown he was still going under. It was clear that he shouldn't be allowed to be in office a moment longer. Secret Service agents detained Trump, and the US Marine Garrison in Washington would move in to arrest him.

[2] - Luckily for Pence, he was not in the White House at the time, and even luckier, many in the military were willing to have him be president on the condition that he does not pardon Trump. Pence was sworn in on April 12th, 2020, and was to become the president of a confused and shocked country. Pence would begin the withdrawal of American soldiers from Iran and Iraq, and declare the end of the Iran War. Withdrawal from Afghanistan was to be sped up as well. With much of Iran's leadership gone, Iran collapsed into anarchy, and . The Sadrists would take over Iraq, with Basra instead of Baghdad as the capital.

Pence felt uneasy over the condition the military gave him over not pardoning Trump, and felt that it meant that the military is getting too powerful. As such, on May 1st he decided to pardon Trump, in spite of the fact that all of his advisors were telling him not to. The pardoning of Trump caused a big controversy, and drastically hurt Pence's approval ratings. It seemed clear that Pence would lose in a landslide, but it didn't even come to that as Pence would be assassinated by an Iranian immigrant two days after the pardoning, for his complicity in the Iran War and the April 11th nuclear strikes.

[3] - Pelosi tried to do the best she could in the eight months of her presidency. Her response to the coronavirus pandemic was better than Trump's, and the number of cases began to decrease by July, and the stay at home orders began to be rescinded. The withdrawal from Iran, Iraq, and Afghanistan was completed as well, but the US still maintained a role in the Saudi-Yemen War and the Israel-Lebanon War. Biden's death in July had led to his delegates being uncommitted, and there was a move to nominate Pelosi, but she took herself out of the nominating process before it could get somewhere. Her Vice President, Andrew Cuomo, was the one most Biden's delegates ended up supporting. Seeing as how Cuomo did not run in the primaries at all, this was seen a stolen convention, but the weakness of the Republican Party post-Trump (and the fact that Trump was running as an independent after failing to retake the nomination) meant that the Democrats still had the upper hand in the election. Her presidency is mainly seen as the transition period from the Trump era to the post-Trump era.

[4] - Andrew Cuomo ran in 2020, urging a return to normalcy. But the forces of history cannot be stopped, and that would prove itself throughout his presidency. The first two years in office would see some changes being made - a public option being implemented, a shift away from the Middle East, and by 2022 the Coronavirus Pandemic was officially over, with over a 2.5 million dead worldwide (the US pandemic was considered over by Spring 2021).

The 2022 Midterms would see a shift in the Democratic Party as much of the older congressmen and women would find themselves be primaried by younger, leftist challengers. Open primaries in Democratic-leaning seats would see the same phenomenon. Though the overall seat change would make it seem like the midterms were unimportant (Republicans gaining 20 seats, just 25 less of controlling the House), the number of DSA members in congress grew from three to twenty, a growth which would be seen in the 2024 and 2026 House and Senate elections as well.

Though Cuomo tried to begin a shift away from the Middle East, America would be forced to return. Cuomo had decreased American support for Saudi Arabia, which had led to MBS becoming unpopular amongst the rest of the Saudi government. A coup in 2023 had led to MBS's death, but most of the coup plotters didn't have a plan after that. Because of this, Saudi Arabia collapsed within two months after the coup. The Middle East, which was dealing with Iran's collapse, the partition of Iraq, the Israel-Lebanon War, now had to deal with Saudi Arabia's collapse. The collapse of Saudi Arabia had ripple effects across the Middle East as much of the Gulf States relied on a stable KSA to survive, and when the KSA collapsed, so did they. Egypt, Jordan, and the Mashriq Republic (Sunni Arab Iraq, which was partitioned during the Iran War) relied on Saudi handouts, and all of their economies collapse.

ISIS, which had been lurking in the shadows since their defeat in Baghouz in 2019, came back with a vengeance after the collapse of the KSA. ISIS had followed a policy of infiltrating the armies of Muslim countries, starting from 2021, and this was most successful in the Mashriq Republic. The collapse of Mashriq's economy had led to a pro-ISIS coup taking place, where they declared the borders of Mashriq to be under jursidiction of ISIS. There were some who came out to rebel, but faced a brutal crackdown. ISIS began to expand south to the former Saudi Arabia and west to the collapsing Jordan and to Syria. They would also begin to take towns in the Sinai Peninsula in Egypt. It was 2014 all over again.

The US would begin a series of airstrikes in ISIS territory starting from December 2023. Many Republicans began to say that this was not enough, and war was the only solution. Tom Cotton was one of those Republicans, which was why he was nominated in 2024. However, most Americans, Democrats, independents, and even many Republicans did not want boots on the ground, which was why Cotton lost in spite of Gabbard acting as a spoiler in some states.

In spite of the airstrikes against ISIS, it continued to expand. Egypt would become a failed state by 2025, leading to ISIS expanding itself there as well. It captured Riyadh, and would try to expand itself to Mecca and Medina, but was stopped by a UN peacekeeping force consisting of entirely Muslim countries. ISIS knew what capturing Mecca and Medina would mean propaganda-wise, and pushed on, making those two cities battlegrounds. ISIS's rise would only be contested on the ground by Russia, which saw ISIS's expansion into Syria as dangerous to the friendly Assad regime. The Russian intervention in the Levant was seen as a model by many Republicans, but Cuomo dug his heels in and still chose not to put boots on the ground. Indeed, it did not take long for Russia to struggle with an intervention this large. The ISIS of the 2020s was not the same ISIS of the 2010s.

Climate Change's uglier effects would begin around Cuomo's second term as well. This was seen in South Asia, which had been going through a water crisis since 2024. India decided to breach the Indus Water Treaty in order to provide water for its northern half, angering Pakistan. Pakistan attacked Indian Kashmir and Indian Punjab in an attempt to prevent India from successfully cutting water from Pakistan, which in turn had led to an Indian retaliation. Pakistan's leadership, realizing it was on the losing end, knew that Pakistan would collapse without the Indus River's water, and decided that if they would go down, so would India. New Delhi, Kolkata, Bombay, and Ahmedabad were all nuked by Pakistan, and in retaliation, India nuked Karachi, Islamabad, Peshawar, and Rawalpindi.

The Indo-Pak Nuclear War had led to the world's economy going down, along with a refugee crisis and hundreds of millions dead. It was the worst humanitarian crisis since the Holocaust. The Taliban government in Afghanistan collapsed without Pakistani support, providing an avenue for ISIS to expand. The Naxalites in India saw a chance to rebound with the Indian government's collapse, and would gain the support of China and Nepal. China, realizing the importance of an ally in India, would intervene in 2028 on the side of the Naxalites.

The nuclear war in South Asia, along with ISIS's rise, had led to a refugee crisis which in turn had led to anti-refugee and anti-immigrant sentiment on the rise once more, just like in 2015-2016. Cuomo urged US governors to open their doors to refugees, but many wouldn't budge. Seeing as how it was the end of Cuomo's presidency and how he didn't have much political capital left, he didn't try to make a big issue out of it.

Cuomo is remembered as a mediocre president, which is strange, considering how much happened under his presidency. But it makes sense - though he did not do anything bad like launch an unnecessary war and end it with nukes, he failed to stop ISIS and mediate the conflict in Kashmir.

[5] - After years of being a Fox News host, Tucker Carlson's show ended in 2026. He was populist, anti-interventionist, and engaged in just enough anti-semitic and anti-immigrant dogwhistles, which weren't bad enough to have him be booted off the air, but loud enough to where he became the darling of the far-right. He became a Republican candidate in 2028 and quickly became the frontrunner, and became the presumptive nominee faster than Trump did in 2016. He was neck-and-neck with Vice President Harris, and when election day came...

...nobody won. It was an electoral tie, 269-269. The Republicans won in the Senate, but the House had them command a small lead of only three seats.

Ever since Trump's victory in 2016, there had been a rise in popularity of both far-right and far-left groups. This had continued under Pence, Pelosi, and Cuomo, and the confusion over the 2028 election was enough to make the former (which had been supporting Carlson all the way) to attack racial and religious minorities, who they proclaimed stole the election from Carlson. Attacks on minorities had led to far-left groups taking on the mantle of protecting them, which had led to an increase in violence between the two. To make things worse, two Utah electors and one Idaho elector, and two Missouri electors put their vote in, not for Carlson who had won the two states but instead for Utah Governor Evan McMullin. McMullin, who had opposed Tucker Carlson throughout the campaign decided that he would run in the House contigent election.

When the new Congress was sworn in, the contingent election began. The Republican Senate made Josh Hawley Vice President, but the House delegations were split between Carlson, Harris, and McMullin. The Contingent Vote was deadlocked, as many of the delegations either had ties or three way splits, preventing any candidate from reaching 26 delegations. This continued until the 20th, making Hawley acting president. It does not seem like America will have a president for the next few months. Threats of assassinating congressmen are, so far, relegated to the internet, but the chances of someone acting on those threats is high.

With ISIS controlling much of the Levant and the Gulf, India divided between a Hindutva death state, Chinese-aligned Maoists, and warlords who don't care about any ideology, along with far-right parties winning in Europe, Russian soldiers in the Middle East, America going through a political crisis, and with catastrophic Climate Change appearing inevitable the world does not have much to look forward to as the 2020s begin to end. One can hope that the 2040s or the 2050s may see some kind of renewal, but it all depends on what happens in the 2030s.

But if the last few years are any indication, we would be lucky if we end the 2030s without civilization collapsing.
 

neonduke

Ernst Röhm's Twink Island
All the worlds a stage - WI famous actors went into politics instead

1952 -1960: Fred MacMurray/Victor Mature (Republican)
1952 def: Humphrey Bogart/Pat O'Brien (Democrat)
1956 def: Joseph Cotten/Eddie Albert (Democrat)

1960 - 1968: Burt Lancaster/Robert Ryan (Democrat)
1960 def: Victor Mature/Harry Crosby (Republican)
1964 def: Cesar Romero/William Beedle (Republican)

1968 - 1972: William Beedle/James Cagney (Republican)
1968 def: Henry Fonda/E.E. Borgnino (Democrat)
1972 - 1980: Aristotelis Savalas/Katharine Hepburn (Democrat)
1972 def: William Beedle/James Cagney (Republican)
1976 def: James Stewart/Marion Morrison (Republican)

1980 - 1984: Katharine Hepburn/Sidney Poitier (Democrat)
1980 def: Marion Morrison/Warren Oates (Republican)
1984 - 1992: William Marshall/R.G. Armstrong (Republican)
1984 def: Katharine Hepburn/Sidney Poitier (Democrat)
1988 def: Robert Vaughan/Burt Reynolds (Democrat)

1992 - 2000: Peter Aurness/Burt Reynolds (Democrat)
1992 def: M.J Nance/Carlos Norris (Republican)
1996 def: Clint Eastwood/James Cann (Republican)

2000 - 2004: Burt Reynolds/Richard Roundtree (Democrat)
2000 def: Carlos Norris/Kurt Russell (Republican)
2004 - 2008: Richard Roundtree/Jane Fonda (Democrat)
2004 def: Kurt Russell/Joseph Pesci (Republican)
2008 - 2016: Tom Selleck/Adam Sandler (Republican)
2008 def: Jeff Daniels/A.L. Einstein (Democrat)
2012 def: Jane Fonda/Sam Jackson (Democrat)

2016 - XXXX: Meryl Streep/Mahershala Ali (Democrat)
2016 def: Adam Sandler/John Goodman (Republican)

Some of the above appear under their birth names rather than stage names, I may expand upon this in the writing folder.
 
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