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Lists of Heads of Government and Heads of State

Japhy

This is the way
Published by SLP
I kind of want it to be real, just because the idea of a bunch of rich businessmen picking notorious critic of American corporations Smedley Butler as their plot's leader tickles me pink.
I think the bigger thing is how everyone he listed was someone he had issues with during his career or had issues with his father the Congressmen or were men he blamed for his career in the Corps stalling out.
 

Turquoise Blue

Exhaustingly Tibby
Patreon supporter
Location
Kemr, FK
Don't Judge A Book By The Cover
Millard Fillmore / none (Whig) 1850-1853

Lewis Cass / Solomon W. Downs (Democratic) 1853-1854
1852: def. Winfield Scott / William A. Graham (Whig) and Franklin Pierce / Salmon P. Chase (Free Soil)

Lewis Cass / none (Democratic) 1854-1857

Lewis Cass / Abraham Lincoln (Democratic) 1857-1861
1856: def. William L. Dayton / Schuyler Colfax (Popular Republican) and Millard Fillmore / Andrew J. Donelson (Know-Nothing)

Franklin Pierce / Henry Smith Lane (Popular Republican) 1861-1865
1860: def. Abraham Lincoln / Jefferson Davis (Southern Democratic) and Sam Houston / Stephen A. Douglas (Democratic Unionist)

Franklin Pierce / Alexander H. Stephens (National Unionist) 1865-1867^
1864: def. Horatio Seymour / Charles O'Conor (Democratic)

Alexander H. Stephens / none (National Unionist/Democratic) 1867-

We all know the story. The story of the New Hampshire Democrat who went down a Free Soil path to become a part of the growing Popular Republican Party, and become a loud opposition to slavery due to his (somewhat secret) socialist beliefs, leading him to lead America into a civil war in which the North and freedom won over a seceding South desperate to keep its slaves bound, and tragically shot in the process by a pro-slavery actor.

How could have Franklin Pierce gone anywhere else?

We all know the story. The story of a Kentucky boy who went south to Tennessee and became more influenced by his neighbours' conservative beliefs, and despite being a moderate at first, radicalised into becoming ultimately the figurehead of a seceding Confederacy, and ultimately hanged for being a traitor after the war finished, but becoming an icon of the defiant South against "Northern tyranny" in the process.

How could have Abraham Lincoln gone anywhere else?

We all know the story. The story of a man torn by his contradictory beliefs in both preserving the Union and preserving slavery, and ultimately he chose the Union above all, and became a pro-war Democrat, up to being chosen by Pierce for his "National Unionist" ticket and after Pierce's untimely death, felt obliged to continue on Pierce's work, even if much more watered down than Pierce would have liked.

How could have Alexander Stephens gone anywhere else?
 

Charles EP M.

Well-known member
Published by SLP
2019-2020: BORIS JOHNSON (CONSERVATIVE)

After months of self-inflicted damage and crises, Johnson narrowly secures a deal with the EU - to get it, most of May's backstop deal is retained but under a brand spanking new "Northern Ireland Special Economic Zone" name, with a Stormont majority allowed to vote NI out of it. The DUP's support vanishes overnight but Johnson is able to restore the whip to 14 of the 22 rebels, and Labour is divided on what to do now there is a deal (and do they want to try and figure it out themselves anyway). Johnson's deal scraps through Commons, he asks for a month's extension to finalise all the details, and then demands an election - conveniently he organises it for the same week as 'Independence Day'.

Both Labour and Conservatives run election campaigns on "I Will Spend On Things", the SNP and Plaid Cymru use the absolute certainty of leaving to call for nationalism, the DUP runs on Betrayed, and both the Lib Dems and Brexit Party are flailing as Remain/Leave is now neutralised as an issue to vote on. Johnson and Corbyn both expect victories.

Johnson enters the election with 302 MPs and leaves with... 295 MPs, losing Lib Dem/Tory marginals and the bulk of the Scottish seats, his grand "take northern Labour seats" plan failing (though there are gains in the Midlands). Labour, Lib Dems, and SNP have all made gains, though not as much as they wanted and this is a major disappointment for Labour. The Brexit Party achieve not a blessed thing. The DUP finds itself losing some seats to its rivals, the TIGs vanish completely.

There is no route to a majority for Johnson but still none for anyone else either. He is helped as Labour explodes into a vicious factional civil war over losing again, but the only way he can pass anything is to crawl to the UUP and Lib Dems for votes on a case-by-case basis, as Swinson refuses a supply-and-control deal with him as much as Corbyn.

This cannot possibly work.


2019-2020: MICHAEL GOVE (CONSERVATIVE)


Johnson is shoved out in a party coup and a new election called. Gove has huge, ambitious plans and he's going to do everything and oh shit the country's in a minor recession as it adjusts to Brexit but he has a campaign plan and--

2020-2025: JOHN MCDONNELL (LABOUR)

Corbyn was convinced to go and McDonnell took charge, and the combination of not-being-Corbyn bounce, the recession, Gove being a bit of a weird looking guy, and the Lib Dems making a greater play for the centre-right (and for the unionist vote in Scotland) help Labour take juuuuust enough seats to be a stable government under a supply-and-control agreement with the SNP - vote support in exchange for an agreed new independence referendum in late 2020.

The Yes voters do better than in 2014 but not well enough to gain independence, because people are goddamn sick of chaos and votes and change, and just want stuff fixed (but not changed!). This soon starts to prove a problem for McDonnell, who has a mandate for Labour's big sweeping reforms but a lot of voters rebel at council level & in MP surgeries when he does any of them. He hopes to get enough of them embedded for the next election, while Swinson hopes to butcher the wounded, devastated Conservative Party (which is rapidly losing every member who isn't far-right) and take the Liberal Democrats into Loyal Opposition status. Johnson and Gove have books out on the same day.
 

Japhy

This is the way
Published by SLP
He literally led a student strike at his university, and was best buds with utopian socialist writers.

Went distressingly conservative later on, but early Pierce is fun for AH stuff.
Its so overexagerated how impactful that stuff was. His closest friendship was with Hawthorne and I mean look at what a slaver piece of shit he was.
 

Sideways

Avenge Magnus Hirschfeld!
Published by SLP
In Marian Rome, the Consuls Elect You!
Marius-Meditating-on-the-Ruins-of-Carthage.jpg

Consuls

86-79 BC: Gaius Marius

Having defeated Sulla Marius settled into his prophesied 7th Consulship, a process that involved purging Rome of Sulla's supporters but leaving the generals supporters alive. For the next four years Rome fought a brutal civil war between the Populares and the Optimates, which ended with the defeat of the Optimates.

79-50 BC: Gnaeus Carbo

Carbo's first challenge was to overcome his political rival Quintus Sertorius for control of the Populares faction, which he achieved through both extra-legal mob actions and redirecting the purges against the Optimates on former Populares. Sertorius escaped, first to Hispania and then onto Mauritania where he was killed by an assassin. More secure and with an unrivalled control of the Roman political system, Carbo focused on the Third Mithradatic War which finally saw Rome defeat their Pontic enemies and claim Armenia as a satellite Kingdom.

Martius to Skipia 50 BC: Triumvirate - Marcus Antonius, Gaius Carrinas, Gaius Marius Minor

The younger Marius began as the dominant figure in the Triumvirate but his reputation for brutality lead the other triumvirs to side with Scipio Asiaticus in bringing him down.

50-39 BC: Scipio Asiaticus

Scipio is remembered primarily for his reforms to the Roman system which avoided the violence of the prior Marian Consuls. Most notably, he implemented the Scipian Calendar, dividing the year into the twelve months we know today. He also created the buffer zone provinces of Gallia Ulterior and Moesia. Thrace was also fully incorporated as a Roman province.

39-21 BC: Julius Caesar

A successful general under Scipio, Julius was considered past his prime by the time he took on the Consulate. Aging, fat and unhealthy, Caesar came to personify an era of political and social stagnation. While he bought about some reforms largely to expand citizenship and political representation of the lower orders, his main goal was to consolidate the work of Marius and return the Marian revolution to its roots.

The grain dole, slave supplies from the Gallic campaigns and increasing army salaries lead to an increasingly urbanised population that was reliant on government handouts. While Caesar attempted to re-energise rural towns by encouraging work for the government, and expanding the grain dole, he could not overcome the economic factors that were bringing the Marian period to an end.

21-19 BC: Marcus Lepidus

As a general of Caesar, Lepidus was responsible for putting down the Pontic revolt. As consul however he dedicated most of his time to attempting to stamp out truancy in the army and corruption in the grain dole, however his reign was brief

19-17 BC: Aulus Hirtius

Aulus' was a representative of the gerontocracy that had established itself within the Consilium of the Populares. Due to his rapidly failing health, Aulus served as Consul for just 13 months between Romula 19 BCE and Martius 17 BCE.

17-12 BC: Quintus Aelius Tubero

Significantly younger than previous Consuls Tubero began a process of reforms to the Marian system, which allowed formerly proscribed families to return to positions of power within the Republic. Tubero's attempts to seek better relations with other kingdoms and to create peace at home would lead to disaster both home and abroad. A wave of revolts hit the republic, culminating in an alliance between Egypt and the Parthian Empire pushing Rome out of Asia Minor. Tubero was placed under house arrest and was replaced as leader.

The Principate

12-4 BC: Marcus Crassus

Crassus refused undergo the niceities of ratification by the Comitia Curiata, or the Consilium of the Populares. He instead focused on the Senate and on restoring the power of what had once been the Patrician class. A military leader and political leader but not necessarily a Consul, Crassus established himself as Princeps - a title which was not yet seen as the same as Emperor. Without grain from Egypt the grain dole was cancelled and Rome was impoverished throughout his reign. Crassus turned to the bottle and to lavish parties and games, and is mostly remembered for leading Rome through a period of intense corruption and decline, and leading very much by example.

4 BC - ???: Sempronius Gracchus

Sempronius was a great general in the dismal era of Crassus, and took power from Crassus by threats of a coup. Sempronius served twice as Consul, but was willing to hand the position over to a political inferior when it was convenient for him. This confirmed the subjugation of the title of consul to that of Princeps. He expanded Gallia Ulteria and established a new province of Celtica. He also re-secured the Greek coast and while he never retook Asia Minor he did retake the strategically valuable province of Crete. Domestically, Sempronius used the newly found wealth of Rome to re-establish the grain dole and began a process of settling soldiers on the frontier, allowing him to them launch punitive campaigns to protect the interests of Roman citizens. However, the old problems of soldier pay and excess labour reared their heads again and ensured that the Principate would, inevitably, fail.

Following Sempronius the alliance of interests that had held Rome together unravelled. Rome would lose control of Greece and with it any claim to cultural dominance in the East, however, the Empire in the West would expand into Britannia and Hibernia and would remain the dominant power into the fourth century AC when it was overcome by the Marcomannic Empire. However due to the cultural exchanges between settlers and Marcomannians Latin continued to be used in a limited form in the Marcomannic legal system into the 9th century and while it was mostly supplanted by Greek during the Messianisation of the West it remained a liturgical language within the Western Church in some isolated areas of Eastern Europe into the thirteenth century and is still the basis for the Western calendar.

For the most part, the Empire has been forgotten but the Republic has cast a long shadow. The influence of Rome can be seen on the Britannic-Hibernian Kingdom's King's Consilium and direct democratic Assembly, and through it, all the ideas of democracy that define modern Europe and Newfoundland.

(can you see the gimmick here?)
 

Mumby

'I love the pun he will go far'
Published by SLP
The Invisible Empire

Presidents of the United States of America

1889-1897: Benjamin Harrison (Republican)
1888 (with Levi P. Morton) def. Grover Cleveland (Democratic)
1892 (with Levi P. Morton) def. David B. Hill (Official 'Silver' Democratic), James B. Weaver (Populist), Simon Bolivar Buckner (National 'Gold' Democratic)

1897-1897: William E. Russell (Democratic)
1896 (with Horace Boies) def. Levi P. Morton (Republican), Eugene V. Debs (Populist)
1897-1901: Horace Boies (Democratic)
1901-1909: George Dewey (Democratic)
1900 (with Adlai Stevenson) def. Cushman Davis (Republican), Eugene V. Debs (Social Democratic)
1904 (with Adlai Stevenson) def. Charles W. Fairbanks (Republican), Eugene V. Debs (Socialist)

1909-1913: Elihu Root (Republican)
1908 (with Joseph B. Foraker) def. Adlai Stevenson (Democratic), Bill Haywood (Socialist)
1913-1924: Woodrow Wilson (Democratic)
1912 (with George E. Chamberlain) def. Bill Haywood (Socialist), Elihu Root (Republican)
1916 (with George E. Chamberlain) def. Charles W. Fairbanks (Republican)
1920 (with A. Mitchell Palmer) def. William Randolph Hearst (Independence), Leonard Wood (Republican)

1924-1933: A. Mitchell Palmer (Democratic)
1924 (with William Gibbs McAdoo) def. Robert M. LaFollette Sr. (Republican), William Randolph Hearst (Independence)
1928 (with William Gibbs McAdoo) def. William Randolph Hearst (Republican), Herbert Hoover (Constitutional)

1933-1941: Edward L. Jackson (Republican)
1932 (with Hanford MacNider) def. William H. Murray (Democratic), Franklin D. Roosevelt (Constitutional)
1936 (with Charles Lindbergh) def. Theodore G. Bilbo (Democratic), Huey Long (Union)


Imperial Wizards of the American Empire

1915-1922: William Joseph Simmons
1922-1935: Hiram Wesley Evans
1935-0000: D.C. Stephenson
 
In Marian Rome, the Consuls Elect You!
View attachment 14195

Consuls

86-79 BC: Gaius Marius

Having defeated Sulla Marius settled into his prophesied 7th Consulship, a process that involved purging Rome of Sulla's supporters but leaving the generals supporters alive. For the next four years Rome fought a brutal civil war between the Populares and the Optimates, which ended with the defeat of the Optimates.

79-50 BC: Gnaeus Carbo

Carbo's first challenge was to overcome his political rival Quintus Sertorius for control of the Populares faction, which he achieved through both extra-legal mob actions and redirecting the purges against the Optimates on former Populares. Sertorius escaped, first to Hispania and then onto Mauritania where he was killed by an assassin. More secure and with an unrivalled control of the Roman political system, Carbo focused on the Third Mithradatic War which finally saw Rome defeat their Pontic enemies and claim Armenia as a satellite Kingdom.

Martius to Skipia 50 BC: Triumvirate - Marcus Antonius, Gaius Carrinas, Gaius Marius Minor

The younger Marius began as the dominant figure in the Triumvirate but his reputation for brutality lead the other triumvirs to side with Scipio Asiaticus in bringing him down.

50-39 BC: Scipio Asiaticus

Scipio is remembered primarily for his reforms to the Roman system which avoided the violence of the prior Marian Consuls. Most notably, he implemented the Scipian Calendar, dividing the year into the twelve months we know today. He also created the buffer zone provinces of Gallia Ulterior and Moesia. Thrace was also fully incorporated as a Roman province.

39-21 BC: Julius Caesar

A successful general under Scipio, Julius was considered past his prime by the time he took on the Consulate. Aging, fat and unhealthy, Caesar came to personify an era of political and social stagnation. While he bought about some reforms largely to expand citizenship and political representation of the lower orders, his main goal was to consolidate the work of Marius and return the Marian revolution to its roots.

The grain dole, slave supplies from the Gallic campaigns and increasing army salaries lead to an increasingly urbanised population that was reliant on government handouts. While Caesar attempted to re-energise rural towns by encouraging work for the government, and expanding the grain dole, he could not overcome the economic factors that were bringing the Marian period to an end.

21-19 BC: Marcus Lepidus

As a general of Caesar, Lepidus was responsible for putting down the Pontic revolt. As consul however he dedicated most of his time to attempting to stamp out truancy in the army and corruption in the grain dole, however his reign was brief

19-17 BC: Aulus Hirtius

Aulus' was a representative of the gerontocracy that had established itself within the Consilium of the Populares. Due to his rapidly failing health, Aulus served as Consul for just 13 months between Romula 19 BCE and Martius 17 BCE.

17-12 BC: Quintus Aelius Tubero

Significantly younger than previous Consuls Tubero began a process of reforms to the Marian system, which allowed formerly proscribed families to return to positions of power within the Republic. Tubero's attempts to seek better relations with other kingdoms and to create peace at home would lead to disaster both home and abroad. A wave of revolts hit the republic, culminating in an alliance between Egypt and the Parthian Empire pushing Rome out of Asia Minor. Tubero was placed under house arrest and was replaced as leader.

The Principate

12-4 BC: Marcus Crassus

Crassus refused undergo the niceities of ratification by the Comitia Curiata, or the Consilium of the Populares. He instead focused on the Senate and on restoring the power of what had once been the Patrician class. A military leader and political leader but not necessarily a Consul, Crassus established himself as Princeps - a title which was not yet seen as the same as Emperor. Without grain from Egypt the grain dole was cancelled and Rome was impoverished throughout his reign. Crassus turned to the bottle and to lavish parties and games, and is mostly remembered for leading Rome through a period of intense corruption and decline, and leading very much by example.

4 BC - ???: Sempronius Gracchus

Sempronius was a great general in the dismal era of Crassus, and took power from Crassus by threats of a coup. Sempronius served twice as Consul, but was willing to hand the position over to a political inferior when it was convenient for him. This confirmed the subjugation of the title of consul to that of Princeps. He expanded Gallia Ulteria and established a new province of Celtica. He also re-secured the Greek coast and while he never retook Asia Minor he did retake the strategically valuable province of Crete. Domestically, Sempronius used the newly found wealth of Rome to re-establish the grain dole and began a process of settling soldiers on the frontier, allowing him to them launch punitive campaigns to protect the interests of Roman citizens. However, the old problems of soldier pay and excess labour reared their heads again and ensured that the Principate would, inevitably, fail.

Following Sempronius the alliance of interests that had held Rome together unravelled. Rome would lose control of Greece and with it any claim to cultural dominance in the East, however, the Empire in the West would expand into Britannia and Hibernia and would remain the dominant power into the fourth century AC when it was overcome by the Marcomannic Empire. However due to the cultural exchanges between settlers and Marcomannians Latin continued to be used in a limited form in the Marcomannic legal system into the 9th century and while it was mostly supplanted by Greek during the Messianisation of the West it remained a liturgical language within the Western Church in some isolated areas of Eastern Europe into the thirteenth century and is still the basis for the Western calendar.

For the most part, the Empire has been forgotten but the Republic has cast a long shadow. The influence of Rome can be seen on the Britannic-Hibernian Kingdom's King's Consilium and direct democratic Assembly, and through it, all the ideas of democracy that define modern Europe and Newfoundland.

(can you see the gimmick here?)
I feel an urge to do the reverse of this. I would if I had more knowledge
 

Oppo

Nationalize Five Guys
When Richard Nixon killed himself in front of a hundred million television viewers, the country was left shocked. Woodward and Bernstein were even more controversial figures, blamed for driving a family man to suicide. Televangelists and religious figures spoke of the end of American morals after such graphic footage was televised. Hunter S. Thompson and George Carlin, struck dark comedy gold, while a young Nixon associate named Roger Stone catapulted himself to stardom. Gerald Ford's presidency was also short-lived, ending in the Manson family's most high-profile murder. Rumsfeld, knowing that his all-volunteer army was ill-equipped for another conflict, presided over the fall of South Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos, and South Korea to communism.

Conservatives were vexed at Rumsfeld's inaction, leading to Richard Viguerie and others promoting Ronald Reagan's primary challenge and Meldrim Thompson's third-party campaign. To them, it was "easier to sell an Edsel or Typhoid Mary" than the Republican Party, and this was proved by Humphrey and McGovern's landslide victory. On his fifth attempt at the White House, the Happy Warrior had only a year to pass full employment before his death. McGovern was far more abrasive to his Senate colleagues than Humphrey and his attempts at passing universal basic income or a national health service were dead on arrival. The international coalition of the US, UK, Vietnam, and the Soviet Union to remove Pol Pot from power in Cambodia hurt relations with Dengist China and American war veterans. A continuing insurgency from the Khmer Rouge did not improve matters, leaving the U.S. powerless when Iran and Saudi Arabia fell to Islamic revolutionaries. McGovern lost the 1980 nomination to Senator Moynihan and ran as a third-party candidate.

Paul Weyrich, who won the special election to Gaylord Nelson's Senate seat, was the candidate blessed by the Viguerie machine. After the death of Ronald Reagan in 1978, Weyrich was opposed by George Bush and former president Rumsfeld, who largely fought between themselves. Promising to appoint former White House chief of staff James M. Cannon as Vice President won over Nelson Rockefeller's personal fortune. For the 1980 election, the GOP rebranded itself to the Conservative Party. Weyrich's presidency saw the end of U.S. involvement in Cambodia, a ramping up of military spending, and a series of ultra-conservative decisions by the Bork Court. Blaming the media for Nixon's death and a decline in morals, Weyrich launched a crusade against cultural Marxism. The administration also inaugurated the country's high-speed rail network and reintroduced trollies to American cities.

Near the end of Weyrich's term, the Rhodesiagate scandal broke, where the administration funneled money into the recruitment of mercenaries for the Rhodesian Security Forces. The scandal led to the election of William Sloane Coffin, a former member of the Skull and Bones society turned CIA operative turned radical anti-war figure. Coffin's staunch advocacy for peace and international disarmament in light of increased military tensions allowed him to win the nomination over more moderate figures. Coffin's inaugural address proclaimed that the Cold War was over. While seen as a "surrender speech" by many within the Conservative Party, the public is struggling to justify why the fight is necessary.

1969 - 1973: Richard Nixon / Spiro Agnew (Republican)
1968 def. Hubert Humphrey / Edmund Muskie (Democratic), George Wallace / Curtis LeMay (AIP)
1972 def. George McGovern / Sargent Shriver (Democratic)

1973 - 1974: Richard Nixon / Gerald Ford (Republican)
1974 - 1975: Gerald Ford / Donald Rumsfeld (Republican)
1975 - 1977: Donald Rumsfeld / John Tower (Republican)
1977 - 1978: Hubert Humphrey / George McGovern (Democratic)
1976 def. Donald Rumsfeld / John Tower (Republican), Meldrim Thompson / Richard Viguerie (AIP)
1978 - 1981: George McGovern / Gaylord Nelson (Democratic)
1981 - 1989: Paul Weyrich / James M. Cannon (Conservative)
1980 def. Daniel Patrick Moynihan / Adlai Stevenson III (Democratic), George McGovern / Gaylord Nelson (Citizens), John B. Anderson / Edward Broke (Independent)
1984 def. Bess Myerson / Tom Foley (Democratic)

1989 - 0000: William Sloane Coffin / Elizabeth Holtzman (Democratic)
1988 def. Barry Goldwater Jr. / Alexander Haig (Conservative)

After the 1974 election, pro-European moderates from both majority parties united together to form a new National Government. The arrangement continued for three years until the American press got their hands on allegations made against several top figures in the coalition. The dossier revealed several rumors surrounding a relationship between Roy Jenkins and Tony Crosland, Jeremy Thorpe murdering his former lover, and Louis Mountbatten's pedophilia. The government quickly fell apart, with the scandals having the same impact on public trust in government as did the Watergate scandal in America. With the moderate wings of both parties discredited, the Bevanite and monetarist wings took over as Tony Benn and Enoch Powell's influence crept in the background. The Liberals rebranded, while anti-Jenkins yet anti-Castle social democrats formed their own grouping.

1970 - 1974: Edward Heath (Conservative)
1970 (Majority) def. Harold Wilson (Labour), Jeremy Thorpe (Liberal)
1974 (Coalition) def. Harold Wilson (Labour), Jeremy Thorpe (Liberal), William Wolfe (SNP)

1974 - 1976: Edward Heath ('National' Conservative leading National Government with Democrats & Liberals)
1976 - 1977: Louis Mountbatten (Peer leading National Government with 'National' Conservatives, Democrats & Liberals)
1977 - 1984: Barbara Castle (Labour)
1977 (Majority) def. Airey Neave (Conservative), William Wolfe (SNP), George Brown (Independent Group), Jo Grimond (Liberal), Dick Taverne (Democratic), Gordon McLennan (CPGB)
1981 (Majority) def. Julian Amery (Conservative), William Wolfe (SNP), George Brown (Independent Group), David Penhaligon (Radical), Gordon McLennan (CPGB)

1984 - 1989: Peter Shore (Labour)
1985 (Majority) def. Julian Amery (Conservative), William Wolfe (SNP), Bob Mellish (Independent Group), Jimmy Reid (CPGB), David Penhaligon (Radical)
1989 - 1989: Tony Banks (Labour majority)
1989 - 0000: Ian Gow (Conservative)
1989 (Majority) def. Tony Banks (Labour), William Wolfe (SNP), Bob Mellish (Independent Group), Michael Meadowcroft (Radical), Jimmy Reid (CPGB)

1974 - 1981: Valéry Giscard d'Estaing (Independent Republicans)
1974 def. François Mitterand (Socialist), Jacques Chaban-Delmas (Union of Democrats for the Republic)
1981 - 1988: Georges Marchais (Communist)
1981 def. Valéry Giscard d'Estaing (Union for French Democracy), Jacques Chirac (Rally for the Republic), Pierre Mauroy (Socialist), Coluche (United Wave Movement)
1988 - 0000: Charles Pasqua (Rally for the Republic)
1988 def. Georges Marchais (Communist), Michel Rocard (Socialist), Raymond Barre (Union for French Democracy), Jean-Marie Le Pen (National Front)

1964 - 1975: Leonid Brezhnev (Communist)
1975 - 1982: Alexei Kosygin (Communist)
1982 - 0000: Yegor Ligachyov (Communist)
 
Last edited:

Ares96

Trenger til kakaolikør
Published by SLP
1974 - 1981: Valéry Giscard d'Estaing (Independent Republicans)
1974 def. François Mitterand (Socialist), Jacques Chaban-Delmas (Union of Democrats for the Republic)
1981 - 1988: Georges Marchias (Communist)
1981 def. Valéry Giscard d'Estaing (Union for French Democracy), Jacques Chirac (Rally for the Republic), Pierre Mauroy (Socialist), Coluche (United Wave Movement)
1988 - 0000: Charles Pasqua (Rally for the Republic)
1988 def. Georges Marchias (Communist), Michel Rocard (Socialist), Raymond Barre (Union for French Democracy), Jean-Marie Le Pen (National Front)
a) You misspelled "Marchais" throughout.
b) What the hell is happening here?