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Lists of Heads of Government and Heads of State

The Jaws of Victory

1932-1946: Franklin D. Roosevelt (Democratic, then Liberal)
1946-1949: W. Lee O’Daniel (Democratic)
1949-1957: Pat Brown (Liberal)
1957-1961: Estes Kefauver (Democratic)
1961-1965: Ralph Yarborough (Liberal)
1965-1969: John F. Kennedy (Democratic [Coalition Ticket])
1969-1972: Ronald Reagan (Democratic-Republican)

1972-1973: John Paul Hammerschmidt (Democratic-Republican)
1973-1981: Richard Nixon (Democratic-Republican)
1981-1984: Lloyd Bentsen (Democratic-Republican)
1984-1985: Gerald Ford (Democratic-Republican)
1985: Frank White (Democratic-Republican)

1985-1987: Lester Maddox (Democratic-Republican [Citizens’ Councils])
1987: Adm. James Carter (leading Continental Congress)
1987-1989: Ronald Reagan (leading Continental Congress)

1989-1997: Bobby Rush (All-American People’s Revolutionary)
1997-2005: Bill Clinton (Continental)
2005-2009: Pat Buchanan (New Citizens)
2009-0000: Kent Hance (Continental)


Finally fed up by the intransigence of the party’s conservatives, who forced him to accept a second-rate right-winger as Vice President, FDR walks out of the Democratic Party as soon as World War II comes to an end to create the truly progressive ticket he and Wendell Willkie had long planned. Unfortunately, both Roosevelt and Willkie die before they can consolidate power. President Pappy retreats pell-mell from world affairs and pisses off so many New Dealers that not only does he lose the Presidential nomination in 1948, the Liberal Party actually wins despite its decapitation.

The left’s answer to Thomas Dewey, accomplished young Frisco DA Pat Brown, does his best to rebuild ties with the rapidly Finlandizing countries of Western Europe and to rebuild a new ruling coalition without the Southern reactionaries. To that end, he embraces the labor movement and encourages the CIO’s Project Dixie to break the rump Democrats’ power – leading to him being smeared as a Communist. Estes Kefauver rejects such disgraceful McCarranism, hammering union corruption instead of union radicalism, and nips the incipient New Majority in the bud. He leaves it to surrogates to spew misogynist bile at the Liberal candidate, Senator Gahagan. (Ironically so, as moralistic social conservatism and brutal policing becomes the order of the day under his administration.)

Ralph Yarborough is a new breed of anti-racist Southern populist, product of the brief ray of light that was Operation Dixie. Defeating Kefauver on a platform of peaceful internationalism, civil rights, and health care reform, he finds himself just as stymied by the Conservative Coalition as were Brown and Roosevelt before him. In 1964, that coalition becomes a formal body. The Republicans, who have not won a Presidential election in over thirty years and have drifted into permanent third place under the leadership of ideologues such as Barry Goldwater and Joe Shell, take Jack Kennedy’s vice-presidential slot with gratitude.

The sickly, privileged, red-baiter is the darling of the right, and his nail’s-edge victory over Yarborough is a calamity for the American left. Kennedy is widely understood to be a figurehead for a Congress now moving firmly to dismantle the New Deal. When his many illnesses force him to step aside in favor of his vice-president in 1969, nothing much changes, apart from the name on the ballot paper as the two conservative parties merge. Ronald Reagan is another grinning nonentity – at least until the explosive revelations of his contact with Soviet spies in Hollywood, which force him from office.

Richard Nixon draws up a deal with the USSR, ceding political control of the Old World to the Communists in return for free trading opportunities for American corporations and unquestioned US authority over the Americas. Domestically, he oversees superficial racial integration and then turns to the opposition: the Liberal Party and its affiliated unions. High-profile Liberals like Ellis Arnall and George McGovern are systematically destroyed through character assassination; for leaders of the militant black freedom movement, unsatisfied with his paper reforms, the assassination is literal.

Of course, not all D-Rs are happy with the authoritarian turn the ascendant conservatives have taken, and a reformist emerges from the 1980 convention. Lloyd Bentsen ends the Hemispheres of Influence policy, stirs up conflict with the Soviets, and uses the patriotic cover to free political prisoners and relax the Kefauver-era censorship laws. Who knows what would have happened if Bentsen had lived to see a second term – a return to multiparty democracy, or a thermonuclear war?

The President and Vice President are both killed in a magazine explosion while viewing new ships at the Washington Naval Yard, only months before the 1984 elections. Gerald Ford, the longtime House Speaker, attempts to keep America calm by insisting that it was only an accident and that the election will go ahead as scheduled. Ford is a well-known moderate and a member of the establishment, however, and the steadily radicalizing grassroots of the party insist he must be covering up the culpability of black radicals. Protests break out demanding a delay of the election and a full investigation. Eventually, Ford is forced out and replaced by a nonentity while the hard-right leadership in Congress gins up a witchhunt, looking for black nationalists in the Navy.

The belated 1985 elections see a D-R split and a victory for Maddox, a white-supremacist restaurateur who chairs the loosely party-affiliated National Citizens’ Councils. Maddox’s outsider status, his crassness, and his ties to extreme vigilante violence all make the party establishment uncomfortable, but they cooperate with him until the ever-widening military witchhunts start to destroy America’s defense capabilities. When Maddox is overthrown by his fellow Georgian – Jim Carter, the former chief of the submarine service, whose powerful criticism of government tyranny before the McDonald Committee stirred hearts across the country – it is the end both of D-R rule and of the Cold War.

Carter, for whom military rule is anathema, quickly hands over power to ex-President Reagan, whose long-ago Soviet sympathy is now an asset rather than a liability. The short rule of the Continental Congress remains controversial today: sweeping racial justice measures are enacted and political prisoners freed, but most state crimes are brushed under the carpet and little fundamental constitutional change is made.

Bobby Rush, one of those prisoners, is elected on a platform of red-white-and-blue socialism, having abandoned his black separatist politics in jail. During his first term, the federal government takes control of the commanding heights of the economy, develops a national health care system, and establishes reparations for African-Americans. During his second, it all starts to go wrong. The nationalized industries quickly become rife with cronyism and corruption, while Rush himself begins to exhibit grandiosity and a disdain for civil liberties. When he is dumped by his own party before his bid for a third term, Rush sneers that they don’t know what they’re doing: after him, the deluge.

Indeed, after his departure the country begins to veer between stagnant center-right and paranoid far-right. As our septuagenarian president gears up for his fourth term, the Soviet intelligentsia has begun to speculate breathlessly about a new cold war.
 
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Yokai Man

Well-known member
The Jaws of Victory

1932-1946: Franklin D. Roosevelt (Democratic, then Liberal)
1946-1949: W. Lee O’Daniel (Democratic)
1949-1957: Pat Brown (Liberal)
1957-1961: Estes Kefauver (Democratic)
1961-1965: Ralph Yarborough (Liberal)
1965-1969: John F. Kennedy (Democratic [Coalition Ticket])
1969-1972: Ronald Reagan (Democratic-Republican)

1972-1973: John Paul Hammerschmidt (Democratic-Republican)
1973-1981: Richard Nixon (Democratic-Republican)
1981-1984: Lloyd Bentsen (Democratic-Republican)
1984-1985: Gerald Ford (Democratic-Republican)
1985: Frank White (Democratic-Republican)

1985-1987: Lester Maddox (Democratic-Republican [Citizens’ Councils])
1987: Adm. James Carter (leading Continental Congress)
1987-1989: Ronald Reagan (leading Continental Congress)

1989-1997: Bobby Rush (All-American People’s Revolutionary)
1997-2005: Bill Clinton (Continental)
2005-2009: Pat Buchanan (New Citizens)
2009-0000: Kent Hance (Continental)


Finally fed up by the intransigence of the party’s conservatives, who forced him to accept a second-rate right-winger as Vice President, FDR walks out of the Democratic Party as soon as World War II comes to an end to create the truly progressive ticket he and Wendell Willkie had long planned. Unfortunately, both Roosevelt and Willkie die before they can consolidate power. President Pappy retreats pell-mell from world affairs and pisses off so many New Dealers that not only does he lose the Presidential nomination in 1948, the Liberal Party actually wins despite its decapitation.

The left’s answer to Thomas Dewey, accomplished young Frisco DA Pat Brown, does his best to rebuild ties with the rapidly Finlandizing countries of Western Europe and to rebuild a new ruling coalition without the Southern reactionaries. To that end, he embraces the labor movement and encourages the CIO’s Project Dixie to break the rump Democrats’ power – leading to him being smeared as a Communist. Estes Kefauver rejects such disgraceful McCarranism, hammering union corruption instead of union radicalism, and nips the incipient New Majority in the bud. He leaves it to surrogates to spew misogynist bile at the Liberal candidate, Senator Gahagan – ironically so, as moralistic social conservatism and brutal policing becomes the order of the day under his administration.

Ralph Yarborough is a new breed of anti-racist Southern populist, product of the brief ray of light that was Operation Dixie. Defeating Kefauver on a platform of peaceful internationalism, civil rights, and health care reform, he finds himself just as stymied by the Conservative Coalition as were Brown and Roosevelt before him. In 1964, that coalition becomes a formal body. The Republicans, who have not won a Presidential election in over thirty years and have drifted into permanent third place under the leadership of ideologues such as Barry Goldwater and Joe Shell, take Jack Kennedy’s vice-presidential slot with gratitude.

The sickly, privileged, red-baiter is the darling of the right, and his nail’s-edge victory over Yarborough is a calamity for the American left. Kennedy is widely understood to be a figurehead for a Congress now moving firmly to dismantle the New Deal. When his many illnesses force him to step aside in favor of his vice-president in 1969, nothing much changes, apart from the name on the ballot paper as the two conservative parties merge. Ronald Reagan is another grinning nonentity – at least until the explosive revelations of his contact with Soviet spies in Hollywood, which force him from office.

Richard Nixon draws up a deal with the USSR, ceding political control of the Old World to the Communists in return for free trading opportunities for American corporations and unquestioned US authority over the Americas. Domestically, he oversees superficial racial integration and then turns to the opposition: the Liberal Party and its affiliated unions. High-profile Liberals like Ellis Arnall and George McGovern are systematically destroyed through character assassination; for leaders of the militant black freedom movement, unsatisfied with his paper reforms, the assassination is literal.

Of course, not all D-Rs are happy with the authoritarian turn the ascendant conservatives have taken, and a reformist emerges from the 1980 convention. Lloyd Bentsen ends the Hemispheres of Influence policy, stirs up conflict with the Soviets, and uses the patriotic cover to free political prisoners and relax the Kefauver-era censorship laws. Who knows what would have happened if Bentsen had lived to see a second term – a return to multiparty democracy, or a thermonuclear war?

The President and Vice President are both killed in a magazine explosion while viewing new ships at the Washington Naval Yard, only months before the 1984 elections. Gerald Ford, the longtime House Speaker, attempts to keep America calm by insisting that it was only an accident and that the election will go ahead as scheduled. Ford is a well-known moderate and a member of the establishment, however, and the steadily radicalizing grassroots of the party insist he must be covering up the culpability of black radicals. Protests break out demanding a delay of the election and a full investigation. Eventually, Ford is forced out and replaced by a nonentity while the hard-right leadership in Congress gins up a witchhunt, looking for black nationalists in the Navy.

The belated 1985 elections see a D-R split and a victory for Maddox, a white-supremacist restaurateur who chairs the loosely party-affiliated National Citizens’ Councils. Maddox’s outsider status, his crassness, and his ties to extreme vigilante violence all make the party establishment uncomfortable, but they cooperate with him until the ever-widening military witchhunts start to destroy America’s defense capabilities. When Maddox is overthrown by his fellow Georgian – Jim Carter, the former chief of the submarine service, whose powerful criticism of government tyranny before the McDonald Committee stirred hearts across the country – it is the end both of D-R rule and of the Cold War.

Carter, for whom military rule is anathema, quickly hands over power to ex-President Reagan, whose long-ago Soviet sympathy is now an asset rather than a liability. The short rule of the Continental Congress remains controversial today: sweeping racial justice measures are enacted and political prisoners freed, but most state crimes are brushed under the carpet and little fundamental constitutional change is made.

Bobby Rush, one of those prisoners, is elected on a platform of red-white-and-blue socialism, having abandoned his black separatist politics in jail. During his first term, the federal government takes control of the commanding heights of the economy, develops a national health care system, and establishes reparations for African-Americans. During his second, it all starts to go wrong. The nationalized industries quickly become rife with cronyism and corruption, while Rush himself begins to exhibit grandiosity and a disdain for civil liberties. When he is dumped by his own party before his bid for a third term, Rush sneers that they don’t know what they’re doing: after him, the deluge.

Indeed, after his departure the country begins to veer between stagnant center-right and paranoid far-right. As our septuagenarian president gears up for his fourth term, the Soviet intelligentsia has begun to speculate breathlessly about a new cold war.
PRESIDENT PAPPY O’DANIEL

[LBJ IS ANGRY AS FUCK]

Great list.
 
is is that rush became a representative the day hammerschmidt ceased to be one
Everybody who beat an OTL president in an election or selection gets a turn.

Reagan gets two separate turns since he beat both Bush Sr. (1980 primaries) and Carter. Bush Sr. is bottom of the heap with four opponents on the list. Eisenhower never lost an election, so he's where I started.
 

Charles EP M.

Well-known member
Published by SLP
LIST OF ACTORS IN DOCTOR WHO

1963 - 1964: Alec Douglas-Home

A bit-part actor who played authority figures and lords - due to the fact he was one, "dabbling" in the arts, as he put it. The role of Dr Who (as it was then) was his first and last major role. In this incarnation, the Doctor was a grand Victorian gentlement scientist, a deliberate anachronism wherever he went and apparent figure of fun who would bring sudden, expected flashes of firmness.

However, Douglas-Home retired the role to return to Lords full-time as Prime Minister Hartnell became increasingly erratic. Needing a way to keep the show going, the BBC decided to reveal the Doctor as an alien who could regenerate himself when wounded - and the Dalek Invasion Of Earth story gave them the opportunity, as a Dalek rose from the Thames and gunned the Doctor down...


1964 - 1970: Harold Wilson

Wilson was deliberately chosen to contrast with his predecessor: younger, a Yorkshire grammar-school lad with a raincoat and pipe (his own), and an engineer out of the modern Sixties. This Doctor would roll his sleeves up, talk 'common sense', and get to work fixing things, and his companions were increasingly younger, 'trendier' figures than the stuffier Ian and Barbara. (Susan, his granddaughter, was phased out in his first story and replaced with Anglo-Indian future rebel Saida)

Behind the scenes, Wilson suffered from depressive moods and this led to clashes with the crew; a few stories had to include moments where the Doctor was "captured" or "lost" to calm things down. This led to Wilson eventually being pushed out, the BBC wanting a more reliable actor around for their budget-saving "Exiled To Earth" stories.


1970 - 1974: Edward Heath

Another lower-middle-class actor, Heath enjoyed the spirit of internationalism from the UNIT setup and pushed for more of it, with his Doctor visiting the nascent EEC on several occasions. With his interests in football and boating, there was a very failed attempt to make him a 'sportsman Doctor' in the first year.

Ratings began to decline in Heath's time in the role, while the supporting cast became more and more prominent: he just wasn't a commanding presence and fellow actors like Nicholas Courtney could do it much better. His intense privacy made it harder for the cast to get to grips with him either. The BBC began to panic and, in 1974, did a thing that seemed sensible maybe if you squint while drunk: they noticed how high the ratings for The Three Doctors had been in early 1973...


1974 - 1976: Harold Wilson

The Doctor was degenerated back into his older form as a reward by the Time Lords. Ratings initially rebounded but then sank again, as by this point Wilson was lacking his old energy and no longer part of the zeitgeist. Ratings fell back down, and the attempt to recentre the show around the Doctor cost most of the Heath-era cast. Once again, the role was recast - as Wilson refused to do the regeneration scene, his successor had to wear his coat from behind and fall over.

Fans have had this Doctor reclassified as "the Fourth Doctor" since the show ended, due to a theory that this was a completely new persona and the Time Lords merely restored his looks.


1976 - 1979: James Callaghan

Initially a popular Doctor, marked with a sunny optimism and a habit of "great debates" about the situation of the episode with his companions - up until behind-the-scenes issues raised their heads again. The BBC was facing financial problems and clashes with the controversial Labour PM Tom Baker, and Callaghan dove in to help the show with suggestions and effort. The nascent fan press reported on this and so whenever anything bad happened, well, Callaghan must've done it.

The nadir was when pressure from Callaghan caused union workers to storm off the set for a week in winter 1978, losing an entire episode. Fanzines and tabloids both had a field day with that one. Wearying of it all, Callaghan agreed to hand in his notice.


1979 - 1990: Margaret Thatcher

Regenerating the Doctor into a woman was seen as a quick attention-getter, and it worked. After a rocky first year, Thatcher's "Auntie Maggie" approach to the role - a warm, maternal, calm figure with steel underneath - struck a chord with children across the nation and helped the show finally crack the American market. Thatcher had once trained as a chemist, and so for the first time the show had an actual scientist working in the role.

The real Thatcher was very much not "Auntie Maggie". The longer she stayed in the role, the more she dominated the show. As long as the ratings were good, the BBC tolerated this even as the writers grew tired of her and various companion actors left - and unlike Callaghan, she gave not a jot what the fanzines said. All this was fine until it wasn't: Thatcher became too settled in the role and forced the show to remain static even as television changed around it. Facing the real possibility that the show could be cancelled, the BBC cornered her in one night and were able to convince her through a mix of threatened resignations and cajoling that it was time to step down.

Unfortunately they didn't have time to get someone else.


1990: John Major

John Major had been part of the "New Comedy" wave, affecting a deliberate and powerful deadpan - his entire schtick was making himself absurdly boring. The BBC, desperate for a replacement, felt Major was popular with certain trendy demographics, he'd do well here, right?

Those demographics were not kiddies, hardcore sci-fi nerds, or Americans. Worse, the end of Thatcher meant the show's writers could go nuts, and did, which created some episodes beloved by fans now but seen as too esoteric for the mainstream at the time.

In the last episode, "Shadows Over Avalon", Major's Doctor finds himself dealing with messages and tricks left behind by his own future self, who will one day end up as 'Merlin' for King Arthur. At the end, this future Doctor is humourously revealed to be played by children's entertainer Alex Johnson - then BoJo the Clown, presenter of Get The Rotters Back! - in full-on court jester activity. "I'm not happy about this," Major says as he looks into the camera.
 

Cevolian

Well-known member
A Thousand Points of Light

1974-1981: George H.W. Bush (Republican)
1976 (with John Connally) def. George C. Wallace (Democratic), George S. McGovern (Independent)
1981-1985: John Connally (Republican)
1980 (with Donald Rumsfeld) def. Henry Jackson (Democratic), Mike Gravel (Citizens')

'Making a new world order'

The day that Richard Nixon resigned as President was the day that the GOP should have died. And yet it did not, and through a mixture of skill, preserverence, and a great deal of luck would go on to win two more presidential elections as a divided and crumbling Democratic Party put up little more than tokenistic opposition. With the nomination of George Wallace by the Democrats in 1976 Bush was able to win re-election to the nation's highest office, in a landslide as the GOP hammered Wallace's former segregation and George NcGovern led a walkout of the party's left. Though not linked to the GOP campaign, the most memorable stickers and posters of the election - probably distributed by disaffected centrist Democrats - bore the phrase "Vote for the crooks, not the fascist." Bush won with 354 electoral votes, and promised a new America, one built on compassion, duty, and public service. What this meant, in practice, was a radical increase in military spending, deeply unpopular tax increases, and a furthering of American-Soviet cooperation. Bush was unable to stand for re-election in 1980, but Vice President Connally would take up the reins as Jackson and Gravel split the left wing vote again, allowing four more years of military buildup, faltering old school Keynesianism, and the much lauded "end of the Cold War" in 1987 with the signing of the signing of the Soviet-American Treaty of Friendship which Connally and Bish had negotiated. Yet with the economy failing at home and the old economic and social order breaking down, the GOP would finally be thrown out in a landslide in 1984.

1985-1993: Jerry Brown (Democratic)
1984 (with Ed Koch) def. John Connally (Republican), Mike Gravel (Citizens') [write-in], Lyndon LaRouche (Citizens')
1988 (with Ed Koch) def. Pat Robertson (Republican), Mark Hatfield (Independent Republican)


'The Neoliberal Revolution'

Jerry Brown's 400 electoral vote landslide was all the mandate that the erratic California Governor needed to transform the country. The budget was to be balanced, at almost any cost, and not even the protestations of the Citizens' Party (destroyed by the nightmare nomination of Lyndon LaRouche and the failed write-in campaign of Mike Gravel) could stop Brown. The GOP's brief embrace of far-right rleigious nationalism and 1988 splinter only gave Brown further scope for change as the military industrial state was rolled back in the face of an ending Cold War, taxes were cut, and the Democrats embraced a heady mixture of social and economic ultraliberalism. If not explicitly isolationist, Brown more or less abandoned the old foreign policy order, and a British led NATO was left to flail in the face of a rising "non-aligned" Germany and as the US adjusted to an economic conflict wth a rising Japan. Such a conflict saw the bizarre u-turn of 1991, and Brown's embrace of protective tariffs and 'dirigiste' economics whilst still attempting to keep taxes low and budgets balanced. This, and the frenzied media speculation around Ed Koch's mysterious private life, would kill the Democrats' attempts to hold onto power in 1988, and though Koch would beat Gary Hart for the Democratic nomination, he lost to Bay Buchanan. After eight years, and as if nothing had happened at all, the GOP was back.

1993-1997: Bay Buchanan (Republican)
1992 (with Michael Huffington) def. Ed Koch (Democratic)

'We can't continue on this path'

When Bay Buchanan declared the above words in her inauguration, she painted a picture of a new America, one which would depart substantially from the old and bring about true change. This was not what came to be. Rather, the Buchanan years represented a period of reaction: an old Reaganite, Buchanan had nevertheless embraced the defeat of the arch conservatives, and embraced a midway point between Nixonism and Reaganism, emphasising both her commitment to former Governor Reagan's supply side economic policies and the realist foreign policy of the Nixon, Bush, and Connally years. Into this mix, Buchanan threw the maintenance of late Brown era protectionism, promising to bring jobs back to America and "win the economic war with Japan". That these policies failed is without doubt, and the 1994 midterms saw the Democrats retake both houses of congress as they railed against protectionist economic policies which had produced a brutal trade war and an agricultural recession as the new "Eurasian Economic Community" was inaugurated by Germany, Japan, and a liberalising Soviet Union, bypassing the need for American grain locked behind tariffs for Japan and Germany, and allowing the USSR to buy consumer goods from Europe and Asia. Indeed, the formation of this alliance led one bold academic to declared "The End of History" as Kojeve's vision of a mixed system between Cold War extremes seemed to triumph in Eurasia. As the economy dipped again in the 95-96 recession, Buchanan was voted out of office and defeated by a rival who pledged to abandon her failure to secure the economy, and to re-emphasise America's role as a global power.

1997-2005: Bruce Babbitt (Democratic)
1996 (with Winthrop P. Rockefeller) def. Bay Buchanan (Republican), George S. McGovern (Citizens')

'Past the end of history'

Under Babbitt the United States has "corrected its course", rejoining the NATO command structure and strengthening its links with Britain and France, whilst also pursuing a detente with a increasingly military ruled China. Likewise, Babbitt has ruthlessly embraced free trade and the "age of neoliberalism" to produce a shock to the economy and rapid "economic rejuvenation". With Japan's economy flagging after a demographic downward spiral and with the Soviet Union now facing brutal insurgencies in Central Asia, semi-violent secession in the Baltics, and a war with far-right Ukrainian nationalists, the Eurasia of the early 2000s, if still a threat to the United Staes has long squandered its moment of "near hegemony". Yet if the "Babbitt miracle" has allowed the US to escape from the economic doldrums of the 1970s and 80s, it has come at a dreadful cost. Unemployment remains high despite a record rate of economic growth, and if the United States has become competitive on the world stage, it has been by outsourcing labour and undercutting domestic labour rights. As Babbitt gears up for the 2000 election, it is clear that he has yet to forge a new consensus: GOP rising stars John Bush and Elizabeth Warren may still be battling it out for the nomination, but they can agree on one thing, no Republican government would allow such flagrant undercutting of the American worker, the backbone of a strong and free United States.

~-~
Just as a bit of background, this isn't an explicitly serious list in the sense that I wanted desperately to track what could happen if Bush had been VP instead of Ford, rather it's an attempt to map out a (hopefully vaguely plausible) way to map out a few different concepts. In this world you have a US even more wedded to the military industrial complex, an explicitly and wholeheartedly neoliberal Democrtaic party (even more so than OTL) in response to a longer period of decline under Nixonian Keynesian economics, a Reaganite nightmare vision of the consequences of detente run amok, and a GOP that's embraced workers' rights as a central plank of a hyper-corporatist military industrial state. I hope you enjoyed it.
 
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Cevolian

Well-known member
I like this but unless Bush moves back to Maine, he can’t put Connally - a long-time rival, I think, at least from Connally’s point of view - on the ticket.
I’m not sure what you mean about Maine since Bush was from Massachusetts originally and grew up in Connecticut, by the 1970s Bush was living in New York, so could easily switch his registration. Not the most plausible thing, perhaps, but as I said the structures of plausibility weren’t the intended goal of the list. I agree re: Connally rivalry, but my thinking is that this is the influence of residual Nixonism in the GOP (including Nixon’s frequently stated desire to be suceeeded by Connally!)

EDIT: with Maine presumably you mean the Bush Compound (which I’d totally forgotten) but GHW didn’t actually own the compound until the late 70s and I don’t think there’s any suggestion that was ever his main residence.
 
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zaffre

when I said "no deal" what I meant was "no, deal"
Location
Massachusetts
found this cleaning out my computer, might delete later idk

1969-1973: Richard M. Nixon / Randolph A. Crossley (Republican)
1968: Hubert H. Humphrey II / Fred R. Harris (Democratic), George C. Wallace, Jr. / Curtis E. LeMay (American Independent)
1972: John V. Lindsay / Joseph M. Montoya (Democratic)

1973-1973: Randolph A. Crossley / vacant (Republican)
1973-1977: Randolph A. Crossley / James L. Buckley (Republican)
1977-1985: James L. Buckley / William D. Dyke (Republican)

1976: Fred R. Harris / Mario Biaggi (Democratic)
1980: John D. Rockefeller IV / Howard Metzenbaum (Democratic), Eugene J. McCarthy / D. Wayne Owens (New Left)

1985-: George S. McGovern / Joseph R. Biden, Jr. (Democratic)
1984: William D. Dyke / Pietro V. Domenici (Republican)
 

BClick

AHC: Iowan Caucasus
1997-2005: Bruce Babbitt (Democratic)
1996 (with Winthrop P. Rockefeller) def. Bay Buchanan (Republican), George S. McGovern (Citizens')

'Past the end of history'

Under Babbitt the United States has "corrected its course", rejoining the NATO command structure and strengthening its links with Britain and France, whilst also pursuing a detente with a increasingly military ruled China. Likewise, Babbitt has ruthlessly embraced free trade and the "age of neoliberalism" to produce a shock to the economy and rapid "economic rejuvenation". With Japan's economy flagging after a demographic downward spiral and with the Soviet Union now facing brutal insurgencies in Central Asia, semi-violent secession in the Baltics, and a war with far-right Ukrainian nationalists, the Eurasia of the early 2000s, if still a threat to the United Staes has long squandered its moment of "near hegemony". Yet if the "Babbitt miracle" has allowed the US to escape from the economic doldrums of the 1970s and 80s, it has come at a dreadful cost. Unemployment remains high despite a record rate of economic growth, and if the United States has become competitive on the world stage, it has been by outsourcing labour and undercutting domestic labour rights. As Babbitt gears up for the 2000 election, it is clear that he has yet to forge a new consensus: GOP rising stars John Bush and Elizabeth Warren may still be battling it out for the nomination, but they can agree on one thing, no Republican government would allow such flagrant undercutting of the American worker, the backbone of a strong and free United States.


I just found out today that during his time as Governor, Babbitt sent in the National Guard to bust the Phelps Dodge miners' strike, so this is a synchronicitous (and very good) pick.

found this cleaning out my computer, might delete later idk

1969-1973: Richard M. Nixon / Randolph A. Crossley (Republican)
1968: Hubert H. Humphrey II / Fred R. Harris (Democratic), George C. Wallace, Jr. / Curtis E. LeMay (American Independent)
1972: John V. Lindsay / Joseph M. Montoya (Democratic)

1973-1973: Randolph A. Crossley / vacant (Republican)
1973-1977: Randolph A. Crossley / James L. Buckley (Republican)
1977-1985: James L. Buckley / William D. Dyke (Republican)

1976: Fred R. Harris / Mario Biaggi (Democratic)
1980: John D. Rockefeller IV / Howard Metzenbaum (Democratic), Eugene J. McCarthy / D. Wayne Owens (New Left)

1985-: George S. McGovern / Joseph R. Biden, Jr. (Democratic)
1984: William D. Dyke / Pietro V. Domenici (Republican)
Interesting - why Crossley?
 

zaffre

when I said "no deal" what I meant was "no, deal"
Location
Massachusetts

I just found out today that during his time as Governor, Babbitt sent in the National Guard to bust the Phelps Dodge miners' strike, so this is a synchronicitous (and very good) pick.



Interesting - why Crossley?
Think Crossley was meant as a bit of an Agnew substitute - elected governor in ‘66 in the ATL and had some history with Nixon.

What can I say, “1968 but Humphrey does even worse” sounded fun at the time.
 

Uhura's Mazda

lying on his back, urinating over his own belly
Published by SLP
Location
Tamaki Makaurau
The Metro Goldwyn Mayor

Metropolitan Mayors of Auckland
1962-1965: Dove-Myer Robinson (Civic Reform) [1]

1962 def: Hugh Lambie (Independent)
1965-1968: Keith Hay (Independent) [2]
1965 def: Dove-Myer Robinson (Independent), George Forsyth (Labour)
1968-1977: Dove-Myer Robinson (Independent) [3]
1968 def: Keith Hay (Independent), George Forsyth (Independent Labour)
1971 def: Ted Flynn (Civic Action)
1974 def: Jim Anderton (Labour)

1977-1980: Jim Anderton (Labour) [4]
1977 def: Dove-Myer Robinson (Independent), Assid Corban (Independent)
1980-1983: Colin Kay (Ratewatchers) [5]
1980 def: Jim Anderton (Labour), Dove-Myer Robinson (Independent)
1983-1989: Cath Tizard (Labour) [6]
1983 def: Colin Kay (Ratewatchers), Lloyd Elsmore (Independent), Tim Shadbolt (Independent), Dove-Myer Robinson (Independent)
1986 def: Colin Kay (Independent)


[1] - Sir Dove-Myer 'Robbie' Robinson is remembered as the father of modern Auckland, having first involved himself in local politics to oppose a sewage plan that would have resulted in the beaches of the Waitemata Harbour being inundated with refuse whenever the wind came from the east. This took him a decade and a lot of his own money, and resulted in Robbie implementing his alternative (oxidation pools out of sight of his house) as Mayor of Auckland City. Unfortunately, the City Council was one of 32 territorial authorities in the city at the time; a problem which incited his second major campaign. The creation of the Auckland Regional Authority, along the lines of the Toronto Metro, was opposed tooth and nail by the existing local government Establishment, some of whom governed boroughs of as little as 8,500 people, but was finally carried through thanks to the support of Prime Minister Holyoake, who saw in Robbie a similarly self-made man. In 1962, Robinson was elected to command the new body he'd made for himself.

The ARA formed a top tier of local government, covering the 32 territorial authorities and a panoply of special purpose boards, such as the Drainage Board and the Airport Authority, which had already been created to co-ordinate matters too interconnected for the tiny boroughs to manage alone. Each borough elected two members, but Auckland City and Manukau elected more by a ward system, making 70 Councillors plus a Mayor elected at large. The populist Robbie, with his ticket backed by the Labour Party, did poorly in Manukau (upon which he had foisted his oxidation ponds) and in the small boroughs, but defeated the Mayor of Manukau, Hugh Lambie, in a close contest, as voters balked at Lambie's proposal to abolish the ARA before it had even been given a fair trial.

[2] - What ought to have been Robbie's apogee promptly became his annus horribilis. The over-represented conservative boroughs ensured a majority opposed to all of his zany schemes (for instance, bringing the electricity boards into the ARA), while his home life went from hectic to downright scandalous. Always a philanderer, he had married a much younger woman as his fourth wife while only Mayor of Auckland City, but repressed her desire to make a career of her own. In 1965, this resulted in a separation, after which both were hospitalised under mysterious circumstances. One rumour alleged that he'd chased her down the street with a meat cleaver - which is unlikely, as both of them were vegetarians. In any case, Robbie handily lost the Metro Mayor race to Keith Hay, the bible-bashing Mayor of Mount Roskill, while Labour stood a candidate against him for the first time. Hay's reign embarked on no big-ticket items but is well-regarded in hindsight for using the sizeable ARA rates to build social housing. However, his re-election efforts were spectacularly misguided - his hoardings featured a picture of himself and the Mayoress, with the slogan "Auckland Needs Both Of Us". Robbie, now a bachelor once more, was returned to office on a wave of sympathy.

[3] - Old enmities with the Auckland Establishment now healing, Robbie launched himself into his third big project - rapid rail for Auckland. The existing commuter services were run by the Railways Department on the trunk lines, and were infrequent and often delayed as freight had right of way. Robinson proposed a separate, standard-gauge network to go along with the new motorways which were springing up around Auckland, and set up a committee to draw up a proposal. Unfortunately, the General Manager of the ARA (and ex officio member of the committee), Ted Flynn, was resolutely opposed to rapid rail and obstructed the committee for two and a half years. Eventually, the irascible Robbie removed him (with questionable authority), only to be faced by him in the Metro Mayor race in 1968. By this stage, Robinson had both Labour and the Establishment back on-side due to the fact that the extensive rail plans serviced almost every borough, so Flynn was only supported by an anti-rail lobby group and did quite poorly.

Even so, Auckland had to wait for the election of the Third Labour Government in 1972 for the project to get the state funding it needed to get started. The legacy of the ART network is mixed: the standard-gauge lines take up room that could have been used to triple- or -quadruple-track the narrow-gauge freight lines, while speeds aren't appreciably higher than they would have been on narrow-gauge. Other issues include the expense of the underground City Rail Loop (Stage 1 of the project, and only completed in 1984) and the infrequency of the stations, which mean that most passengers have to take a bus to get to their local train station. However, this latter point does make the ART genuinely rapid, with transit times to Whangaparoa or the Airport hovering at around 30 minutes.

[4] - Robinson also implemented forward-thinking recycling and composting initiatives (he had been President of the NZ Humic Compost Society since before he entered politics) and is remembered today as a talisman of the Green movement, although he was of course an upstanding and successful businessman and keen capitalist. However, he endorsed a vote for Values at both the 1972 and 1975 elections, encouraging Labour to run against him for the Mayoralty. Jim Anderton, a Manukau City Councillor, laid the groundwork in 1974 by painting Robbie as a defanged stooge of the conservative element, but only managed to pull off a victory when the Citizens and Ratepayers endorsed the Westie winemaker Assid Corban to - as it turned out - split the vote. The new Mayor was of a whole new generation to Robinson, who was now in his seventies but still possessing the energy to be a vehement critic of his successor. Anderton waylaid progress on the City Rail Loop and diverted more funds to local suburban hubs as opposed to just making it easier for them to go shopping on Queen Street. He even temporarily redesignated the underground Civic ART station as a swimming pool, although it was drained soon after when nobody dared go down there. But the project went slowly on, amid mounting costs.

[5] - Anderton's high spending (a lot of which he was committed to by his predecessor) sparked the rise of the New Right in Auckland, with the formation of Ratewatchers as a genuine movement for the freezing of rates - which no conservatives had ever actually believed in before, even as they demanded it in the triennial elections. The former Citizens and Ratepayers member of Auckland City Council, Colin Kay, led the charge of the City and small boroughs against the South Auckland interloper Anderton, and defeated him on a very split vote. Meanwhile, Robinson made a doomed play to give his life meaning once more by donning the mayoral chains. Kay, however, quickly discovered that contracting out Council services and selling the Mayoral Daimler didn't actually save enough money to cut rates by as much as his supporters demanded, and was swept away when the conservative Establishment withdrew support.

[6] - Cath Tizard, a relatively youthful woman was part of the Labour aristocracy and had made a name for herself on her own terms by opposing Council house rent increases pushed by Robinson and Kay. Her victory, however, was marred by two things: firstly, the fact that the ailing Robinson called the people of Auckland "gutless, shallow and uncaring" for giving him such a paltry vote; secondly, the majority of conservatives on the ARA, permanent and unimpeachable by dint of representing the tiny boroughs. Under Tizard, the ART network began to really take shape, and the tendency of Auckland to sprawl in the general direction of Hamilton was arrested by high-density building along the rail corridors. These gains came at a price, though, because the boroughs served by the ART were all very much opposed to the intensification and rezoning of all their peaceful suburbs. Over the 1980s, relations between Mayor and Councillors, and between ARA and Councils, declined to historic lows of backbiting and recalcitrance.

On the plus side, the boroughs had never been more united among themselves, and this gave the Fourth Labour Government a unique opportunity to reform local government. Put off by the disputes between the two tiers in Auckland, the Government merged the patchwork of Councils, Boards and Authorities in New Zealand into a much smaller number of unitary authorities, cutting the 32 Auckland Councils down to just four - and most of the 32 were happy to put their differences aside in order to be rid of the Metro Mayor. As such, Cath Tizard served out her term until the Auckland Regional Authority was disestablished at the 1989 local elections.

The first Metro Mayor, Sir Dove-Myer Robinson, had passed away just two months beforehand.
 
3 Predictions for the next 12 months

1.Boris Bottles It (aka "Hey Wayne, lets do the mega happy ending!" )

2019- November 2019: Boris Johnson (Conservative Minority)
November 2019-June 2020: Jeremy Corbyn (Labour-SNP-PC Coalition with LD, Independent, One Nation, and GPEW Support)

Def: Michael Gove (Conservative) Jo Swinson (Lib Dem) Nicola Sturgeon (SNP) Rory Stewart (One Nation) Nigel Farage (Brexit) Arlene Foster (DUP) Mary Lou MacDonald (SF) Adam Price (Plaid Cymru) Jon Bartley and Sian Berry (GPEW)
2020 January EU Deal Referendum:
Remain: 51% Leave 49%
May: Scottish Independence Referendum
Remain 52.5 Leave: 47.5%
(1)June 2020- Present: Jo Swinson (Liberal Democrat-One Nation-Social Democrat Coalition)
Def: Jeremy Corbyn (Labour) Dominic Raab (Conservative) Jo Swinson (Lib Dem) Tom Watson (Social Democrat) Nicola Sturgeon (SNP) Rory Stewart (One Nation) Nigel Farage (Brexit) Arlene Foster (DUP) Mary Lou MacDonald (SF) Jon Bartley and Sian Berry (GPEW) Adam Price (Plaid Cymru)

(1) First referendum after voting reform

In this (unlikely) scenario Boris goes to Brussels and asks for an extension and immediately resigns as Tory leader. The Opposition hold a vote of no confidence in the government and a general election is held in November. Faced with a Right split between the Pro-Deal One Nation, the floundering Tory party and the pro no-deal Brexit Party Labour get the most seats but fall far short of a majority. They come to an agreement with most parties to hold a second referendum between remain and a Norway style single market deal). They also pass electoral reform. With many pro-no-deal parties boycotting the second referendum the UK votes to remain. Scotland votes to remain in the UK (indyref2 was an agreement for the SNP to support Labour) and the UK goes to the polls again, this time under a Scotland/Wales style Additional member system. Post-election talks between Labour and the Lib Dems break down over Jeremy Corbyn being Prime Minister. Several Labour MPs withdraw from the party to back a Lib-Dem lead centrist government.


2. Crashing the heck out

2019- October 2020: Boris Johnson (Conservative Minority)

October 2020-April 2020 Sajid Javid

April 2020-Present: Jeremy Corbyn (Labour Majority)

Def: Sajid Javid (Conservative) Jo Swinson (Lib Dem) Tom Watson (Social Democrat) Nicola Sturgeon (SNP) Rory Stewart (One Nation) Arlene Foster (DUP) Mary Lou MacDonald (SF) Jon Bartley and Sian Berry (GPEW) Adam Price (Plaid Cymru)

Boris sacrifices himself to avoid asking for an extension. He is arrested for contempt of Parliament in the confusion of it all the UK crashes out of the EU. Sajid Javid is selected as a temporary Prime Minister and eventually is elected leader of the Conservative party. Protests and riots are seen across the country as many see food and medicine shortages and the pound tanks. There’s a surprising amount of cooperation in the months following no-deal to get food and medicine into the country but the fairly impotent Javid government doesn’t get through any legislation over taxation reform. By April with things calmly down slightly the opposition parties call for a general election. While the Liberal Democrat lead Democratic ticket does well Labour secure a small majority. Labour has great plans for Britain, but first they have to secure food supplies and medication.


3.The Long Awaited Unity Government


2019- October 2019: Boris Johnson (Conservative Minority)
October 2019- November 2019: Sir Kier Starmer (Labour leading National Emergency government)
November 2019-Present: Boris Johnson (Conservative Majority)

Def: Jeremy Corbyn (Labour) Jo Swinson (Lib Dem) Nicola Sturgeon (SNP) Rory Stewart (One Nation) Arlene Foster (DUP) Mary Lou MacDonald (SF) Jon Bartley and Sian Berry (GPEW) Adam Price (Plaid Cymru)

Kier Starmer is chosen as Prime minister to head up a National Unity government and goes to Brussels to ask for an extension to the Brexit Deadline. Following this an election is called and Boris Johnson uses the full power of his populist narrative to drain the Brexit Party of support and secure a decent majority and Britain leaves the EU at the end of January 2020. By September 2020 Labour are leading the Conservatives in the polls they lack the seats to call for a general election
 

Sideways

Avenge Magnus Hirschfeld!
Published by SLP
2017-2019: Jeremy Corbyn (Labour) confidence and supply with Nicola Sturgeon (SNP)

2017: Jeremy Corbyn (Labour) [294] Theresa May (Conservative) [282] Nicola Sturgeon (SNP) [35] Tim Farron (Liberal Democrat) [17] Arlene Foster (DUP) [10] Gerry Adams (Sinn Fein) [7] Leanne Wood (Plaid Cymru) [2] Caroline Lucas and Jon Bartley (Green Party England & Wales) [1] Sylvia Herman (Independent) [1] John Bercow (Speaker) [1]
Conservative Leadership Election:
Boris Johnson: 52.2%
Justine Greening: 47.8%
4 October 2018: Meaningful Vote 1 - Yes: 247 No: 390 - Labour's deal was for a customs union and free movement of people.​
8 November 2018: Meaningful Vote 2 - Yes: 226 No: 374 - A customs union and common market, as a transitional agreement - the political statement making it clear that this will be reviewed within two years​
7 January 2019: Having failed to win a majority for his deal there was speculation on whether Corbyn would make a deal with the SNP and Liberal Democrats to get a majority for a second referendum. However, it was becoming clear that he was, instead, planning to develop a harder Brexit deal. After the Christmas recess Labour MPs called for a new leadership election​
4 March 2019: Labour Leadership Election
Round 1
Jeremy Corbyn: 46.1%
Keir Starmer: 35.1%
Jess Phillips: 15.3%
Kate Hooey: 3.5% - Eliminated
Round 2
Jeremy Corbyn: 47.5%
Keir Starmer: 35.7%
Jess Phillips: 16.8% - Eliminated
Round 3
Keir Starmer: 51.6% - Elected
Jeremy Corbyn: 49.4%
2019-: Kier Starmer (Labour) confidence and supply with Nicola Sturgeon (SNP)
11 March 2019: Meaningful Vote 3 - Deal-v-Remain People's Vote​
Yes: 367 No: 273​
18 April 2019: EU Referendum
Leave: 50.2%
Remain: 49.8%
Turnout: 59.6%
23 May 2019 EU Election: Nigel Farage (Brexit) [31] Boris Johnson (Conservative) [14] Tim Farron (Liberal Democrat) [11] Kier Starmer (Labour) [9] Nicola Sturgeon (SNP) [2] Arlene Foster (DUP) [2] Sian Berry and Jon Bartley (Green Party England & Wales) [2] Michelle O'Neill (Sinn Fein) [1] Gerrard Batten (UKIP) [1]
12 September: Vote of no confidence passes.​
17 October: Date of the next general election.​

98th Thread Run-Down

Major Parties
Labour:
Starmer really struggled in the debates - not being able to go all out Revoke like the Lib Dems and Greens but also not being considered an out and out leader in these divided times. It;s hard to imagine that anyone would like anyone the person who is actually delivering Brexit
Conservative: Boris is still pausing for that studio laughter, any day now.
Brexit Party: Standing down in any constituency where the Tories promisie to renegotiate a deal so... what? Nigel's Party is opposing the Tories in Broxtowe and wherever Boles represents and that's it?
Liberal Democrat: Are now the party of revoke. They're not calling for a third referendum. Referendums are apparently broken now. They're just not going to vote for Brexit ever which I guess is at least honest.
Green: The real tragedy of this election is that it's interfered with the Green Party Conference just when we were going to debate a motion on gender self-ID. You'd think at least the big parties would respect conference season

National Parties
SNP:
Salmond's legal challenge continues. They're playing heavy revoke, but it's not clear if this is actually as popular in Scotland as they think. Sturgeon must be glad Ruth is gone - so at least they might keep some of those Tory votes.
DUP: Came back to Assembly fast enough when equal marriage and abortion was threatened - it remains to be seen if they can actually prevent them
Sinn Fein: A guy in Wales called Billy Hampton died and left £1.5 million to Sinn Fein as a fuck you to the establishment
Plaid Cymru: Adam Price did okay in the seven lectern debate yesterday. But any Welsh people with any dignity will no doubt be glad he's not on again next week.
UKIP: By the look of Kipper Central the General Election is basically being treated as one small front in Ben Walker's biggest political goal - to abolish UKIP's NEC.

Minor Parties (Devolved government representation only)
Redacted due to time soz. but we just finished a thread overnight due to the gods damned debate and I didn't get around the finishing.

Minor Parties
For Britain:
The candidate in my constituency apparently had a musical career at one stage before he became basically a professional racist. I didn't realise, he wrote poetry. I didn't realise he wrote such bloody awful poetry.
Yorkshire Party: All hands n deck for a few constituencies basically chosen at random
Liberal: 20 general election candidates, two of whom are women. Good job, guys.
Women's Equality Party: Sophie Walker is standing against Boris this time. I'm not sure when the last time was a party leader stood against another party leader.
Democrats and Veterans: The candidate in Sheffield Hallam claimed to have been beaten up for his beliefs but basically shat himself in a pub toilet and knocked his nose on the door hook, passing out. That's... that's special.
English Democrats: Are running candidates on the platform that Britain left the EU without a deal on 29 March and nobody realised which... I mean it's a unique stance on Brexit.