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Lists of Heads of Government and Heads of State

Uhura's Mazda

Queer Hardie
Published by SLP
Location
Tamaki Makaurau
List of Prime Ministers of the United Kingdom
1994-1995:
Robert Kilroy-Silk (Three Lions)
1994 def: Vacant (Labour), Ken Clarke (Alliance for Britain)
1995-1996: Eddie George (Independent)
1996-1998:
Vince Cable (Democrats)
1996 def: Robert Kilroy-Silk (Three Lions), Nigel Farage (Anti-Union)
1998-2000: Peter Mandelson (Democrats)
2000-2001: Gordon Brown (Democrats)
2001-2006:
Robert Kilroy-Silk (Three Lions)
2001 def: Paddy Ashdown (Democrats), Tony Benn (Labour Renewal)
2006-2008: Vince Cable (Democrats)
2006 def: Robert Kilroy-Silk (Libertas)
2008-2011: Robert Kilroy-Silk (Libertas)
2008 def: Ken Livingstone (Democrats), William Hague (Centre Union)
2011-2013: Digby Jones, Baron Jones of Birmingham (Independent)
2013-2014:
Jeremy Hunt (Democrats)
2013 def: Robert Kilroy-Silk (Libertas), John Cleese (For Britain), Digby Jones, Baron Jones of Birmingham (DIGBY)
2014-0000: Chuka Umunna (Democrats)


Brought low by sleaze, Major loses the confidence of the House in 1994. Before nominations close, two things happen: a run on the banks, leading to the remains of the Conservative Party forming an electoral alliance with the Lib Dems just to salvage the family silver; and the death of John Smith, causing uncertainty as to who exactly would be Labour's Prime Minister. The stage is set for Robert Kilroy-Silk to re-enter politics with a populist vehicle that has - somehow - weathered the political storms of post-Thatcherite Britain for two decades.

Now, however, the waxen face of Kilroy is old news, and new parties of the Right are on the rise. Holding back the brink is the last, best hope of European Social Democracy, Chuka Umunna. As Italy prepares to hold a referendum on whether to leave the EU, who knows what 2016 will bring in Britain?
 

Mumby

'I love the pun he will go far'
Published by SLP
List of Prime Ministers of the United Kingdom
1994-1995:
Robert Kilroy-Silk (Three Lions)
1994 def: Vacant (Labour), Ken Clarke (Alliance for Britain)
1995-1996: Eddie George (Independent)
1996-1998:
Vince Cable (Democrats)
1996 def: Robert Kilroy-Silk (Three Lions), Nigel Farage (Anti-Union)
1998-2000: Peter Mandelson (Democrats)
2000-2001: Gordon Brown (Democrats)
2001-2006:
Robert Kilroy-Silk (Three Lions)
2001 def: Paddy Ashdown (Democrats), Tony Benn (Labour Renewal)
2006-2008: Vince Cable (Democrats)
2006 def: Robert Kilroy-Silk (Libertas)
2008-2011: Robert Kilroy-Silk (Libertas)
2008 def: Ken Livingstone (Democrats), William Hague (Centre Union)
2011-2013: Digby Jones, Baron Jones of Birmingham (Independent)
2013-2014:
Jeremy Hunt (Democrats)
2013 def: Robert Kilroy-Silk (Libertas), John Cleese (For Britain), Digby Jones, Baron Jones of Birmingham (DIGBY)
2014-0000: Chuka Umunna (Democrats)


Brought low by sleaze, Major loses the confidence of the House in 1994. Before nominations close, two things happen: a run on the banks, leading to the remains of the Conservative Party forming an electoral alliance with the Lib Dems just to salvage the family silver; and the death of John Smith, causing uncertainty as to who exactly would be Labour's Prime Minister. The stage is set for Robert Kilroy-Silk to re-enter politics with a populist vehicle that has - somehow - weathered the political storms of post-Thatcherite Britain for two decades.

Now, however, the waxen face of Kilroy is old news, and new parties of the Right are on the rise. Holding back the brink is the last, best hope of European Social Democracy, Chuka Umunna. As Italy prepares to hold a referendum on whether to leave the EU, who knows what 2016 will bring in Britain?
@Comisario smashes through the wall
 

Comisario

Hello Tony, I am 1952
Published by SLP
Location
Bow, London
List of Prime Ministers of the United Kingdom
1994-1995:
Robert Kilroy-Silk (Three Lions)
1994 def: Vacant (Labour), Ken Clarke (Alliance for Britain)
1995-1996: Eddie George (Independent)
1996-1998:
Vince Cable (Democrats)
1996 def: Robert Kilroy-Silk (Three Lions), Nigel Farage (Anti-Union)
1998-2000: Peter Mandelson (Democrats)
2000-2001: Gordon Brown (Democrats)
2001-2006:
Robert Kilroy-Silk (Three Lions)
2001 def: Paddy Ashdown (Democrats), Tony Benn (Labour Renewal)
2006-2008: Vince Cable (Democrats)
2006 def: Robert Kilroy-Silk (Libertas)
2008-2011: Robert Kilroy-Silk (Libertas)
2008 def: Ken Livingstone (Democrats), William Hague (Centre Union)
2011-2013: Digby Jones, Baron Jones of Birmingham (Independent)
2013-2014:
Jeremy Hunt (Democrats)
2013 def: Robert Kilroy-Silk (Libertas), John Cleese (For Britain), Digby Jones, Baron Jones of Birmingham (DIGBY)
2014-0000: Chuka Umunna (Democrats)


Brought low by sleaze, Major loses the confidence of the House in 1994. Before nominations close, two things happen: a run on the banks, leading to the remains of the Conservative Party forming an electoral alliance with the Lib Dems just to salvage the family silver; and the death of John Smith, causing uncertainty as to who exactly would be Labour's Prime Minister. The stage is set for Robert Kilroy-Silk to re-enter politics with a populist vehicle that has - somehow - weathered the political storms of post-Thatcherite Britain for two decades.

Now, however, the waxen face of Kilroy is old news, and new parties of the Right are on the rise. Holding back the brink is the last, best hope of European Social Democracy, Chuka Umunna. As Italy prepares to hold a referendum on whether to leave the EU, who knows what 2016 will bring in Britain?
Mandelson is a very good D’Alema, I have to admit.

Also, I suppose by implication, Giuliano Amato lost out on heading up the IMF because of his defence of the lira?
 

Mumby

'I love the pun he will go far'
Published by SLP
Putting On A Front

1957-1961: Harold Macmillan (Conservative)
1959 (Majority) def. Hugh Gaitskell (Labour), Jo Grimond (Liberal)
1961-1961: Robert Gascoyne-Cecil, 5th Marquess of Salisbury (Conservative majority)
1961-1962: Reginald Maudling (Conservative majority)
1962-1969: Tony Greenwood (Labour)
1962 (Majority) def. Reginald Maudling (Pro-EEC Conservative), Jo Grimond (Liberal), Rab Butler (Anti-EEC Conservative)
1966 (Majority) def. Ted Heath (Moderate-Liberal Alliance), Duncan Sandys (Conservative)

1969-1971: Ian Mikardo (Labour majority)
1971-1976: Jeremy Thorpe (Liberal-Moderate Alliance)
1971 (Majority) def. Ian Mikardo (Labour), Richard Body (Conservative), A.K. Chesterton (National Front)
1973 (Coalition with Democrats) def. Ian Mikardo (Labour), John Kingsley Read (Conservative), John Tyndall (National Front), Dick Taverne (Democratic)

1976-1978: Ted Heath (Liberal-Moderate Alliance-Democratic coalition)
1978-1979: Mary Whitehouse (Independent)
1978 (Minority pact with Conservatives and National Front) def. Tony Benn (Labour), Ted Heath (Liberal-Moderate Alliance)
1979-XXXX: Mary Whitehouse (National Democracy)
1979 (Majority) def. Ted Short (Labour), Ted Heath (Alliance), Cyril Smith (Independent Liberal)

A new take on one of my favourite PODs, namely a Thor missile exploding (not detonating) at Ludford Magna an RAF base 12 miles east of Lincoln, in 1960.

The scattering of weapons grade material over an area of 300 square miles - requiring the evacuation of much of Lincolnshire and the establishment of an exclusion zone saw the sudden reversal of Harold Macmillan's fortunes. The disaster had been caused by RAF engineers clandestinely interfering in the Thor missile's two key launch sequence, attempting to find a back door that would allow Britain to launch the American missiles without seeking Washington's permission. This understandably caused an international crisis, and in combination with Macmillan's other liberal or permissive instincts, by 1961 his position was untenable and was removed via internal party coup.

The eventual Tory leader was Maudling, who had ascended to his permission with the implicit backing of the anti-Americans in the Conservative Party, and with the Empire crumbling thanks to Macmillan, he was forced to go cap in hand to the EEC. This was too much for a specific wing of the party, who along with opportunists like Butler, brought down the Government. In the meantime, Gaitskell was removed by internal leadership election - his pro-nuclear instincts looked ill-judged post-Ludford Magna. Greenwood won a landslide majority, helped along by the bitter Tory split and the shocking re-emergence of the Liberals to electoral relevancy.

Greenwood would usher in a new age of Red Prosperity, rejecting the EEC to forge bonds with the post-imperialist states of Africa and Asia, encouraging detente between the Germanies and in general trying to make a neutral, disarmed Britain a handy go between the Western and Eastern blocs. As the political right tore itself apart, and Greenwood was able to hammer through even his more controversial policies, concerns grew that the United Kingdom could become the next domino to fall to the left in the Cold War.

This fear didn't manifest itself under the premiership of the handsome, charismatic and quite thoroughly British Greenwood - he seemed an appropriate Prime Minister for an age of prosperity, radical liberalisation of social norms, and of course James Bond. His replacement however was the brilliant but short-tempered and undeniably Jewish Mikado. Mikado inherited Greenwood's legacy - namely a steadily overheating economy. Nonetheless, as rebellion and revolution began to tear down the crowned heads of Europe, in 1969 it seemed that Greenwood had been vindicated and Mikado was happy to bask in that warm afterglow. However, bare months later, the Summer of Socialism was over and the Winter of Discontent began. The United States backed a hard-right military coup in Germany one that returned Kiesinger to power and ended the British-engineered Ostpolitik. Jaques Massu bloodily put down those who had overthrown de Gaulle and the boomerang of fighting communism with military juntas in Latin America and Southeast Asia came home to roost.

Britain was isolated now, more so than it had ever been. And Mikado reacted, trying to shore up Britain's democracy against the seemingly inevitable tanks on Whitehall. They never came, and as inflation rose and the unions demanded higher wages, he was stuck between a rock and a hard place. It came as no surprise when the Liberal-Moderates triumphed at the general election, albeit only narrowly.

Thorpe renormalised relations with Washington and with the EEC, and slowly but surely prised open the steel jaws of dictatorship. A new administration in the White House backed him to the hilt and soon the talk was of joining the EEC now its members had agreed timetables for restoring democracy. The snap election of 1973 was a slight downer as British scepticism of European unity saw the government lose its majority - but the pro-European wing of the Labour Party was there to keep them in power. 1973 also saw the slow re-emergence of the Right - as the rump Tories and the crypto-fascist National Front slowly began to see eye to eye more often than not.

The revelation of first Thorpe's homosexuality (which wasn't illegal, but was certainly frowned upon by many) and then his attempted murder of his lover (very much illegal), ended the dream of soft gooey centrist government. Ted Heath struggled on, but a bachelor like himself faced a barrage of allegations from the gutter press and the increasingly bitter right-wing opposition. The new Labour leader was ironically a defender of Heath's integrity, but when it came to policy was his bitter rival - proposing a radical programme to restore British industry and build a new high-technology socialism. Meanwhile, the Tories and National Front locked step behind Mary Whitehouse's Moral Majority movement and her independent candidacy against the permissiveness that had been allowed to fester (or thrive, depending on your point of view). The election proved shockingly close - between Labour and Whitehouse anyway, the Democrats were wiped out and the Liberal-Moderates reduced to a fraction of their previous numbers. But the Right had narrowly carried the day - and they wasted no time. The coalition was formalised into the National Democracy Party and their combined manifesto began its implementation.

Behind the scenes, the chessboard shifted. Tony Benn was slain by a carbomb, apparently planted by the IRA. Heath formalised the Alliance but clung firmly to the leadership - after Thorpe he didn't quite trust anybody else to take the reins. Cyril Smith led a contingent of Independent Liberals out - effectively a group of municipal pork barrellers who seemed a bit too enthusiastic about the new administration. The snap election of 1979 was held amidst Labour's leadership election and produced a heavy majority for the government. What happens next, as the timetables for restoring democracy in the Elysee and the Bundestag are torn up? Who knows.
 

Bolt451

Seven Days to the River Tyne
List of Prime Ministers of the United Kingdom
1994-1995:
Robert Kilroy-Silk (Three Lions)
1994 def: Vacant (Labour), Ken Clarke (Alliance for Britain)
1995-1996: Eddie George (Independent)
1996-1998:
Vince Cable (Democrats)
1996 def: Robert Kilroy-Silk (Three Lions), Nigel Farage (Anti-Union)
1998-2000: Peter Mandelson (Democrats)
2000-2001: Gordon Brown (Democrats)
2001-2006:
Robert Kilroy-Silk (Three Lions)
2001 def: Paddy Ashdown (Democrats), Tony Benn (Labour Renewal)
2006-2008: Vince Cable (Democrats)
2006 def: Robert Kilroy-Silk (Libertas)
2008-2011: Robert Kilroy-Silk (Libertas)
2008 def: Ken Livingstone (Democrats), William Hague (Centre Union)
2011-2013: Digby Jones, Baron Jones of Birmingham (Independent)
2013-2014:
Jeremy Hunt (Democrats)
2013 def: Robert Kilroy-Silk (Libertas), John Cleese (For Britain), Digby Jones, Baron Jones of Birmingham (DIGBY)
2014-0000: Chuka Umunna (Democrats)


Brought low by sleaze, Major loses the confidence of the House in 1994. Before nominations close, two things happen: a run on the banks, leading to the remains of the Conservative Party forming an electoral alliance with the Lib Dems just to salvage the family silver; and the death of John Smith, causing uncertainty as to who exactly would be Labour's Prime Minister. The stage is set for Robert Kilroy-Silk to re-enter politics with a populist vehicle that has - somehow - weathered the political storms of post-Thatcherite Britain for two decades.

Now, however, the waxen face of Kilroy is old news, and new parties of the Right are on the rise. Holding back the brink is the last, best hope of European Social Democracy, Chuka Umunna. As Italy prepares to hold a referendum on whether to leave the EU, who knows what 2016 will bring in Britain?
Putting On A Front

1957-1961: Harold Macmillan (Conservative)
1959 (Majority) def. Hugh Gaitskell (Labour), Jo Grimond (Liberal)
1961-1961: Robert Gascoyne-Cecil, 5th Marquess of Salisbury (Conservative majority)
1961-1962: Reginald Maudling (Conservative majority)
1962-1969: Tony Greenwood (Labour)
1962 (Majority) def. Reginald Maudling (Pro-EEC Conservative), Jo Grimond (Liberal), Rab Butler (Anti-EEC Conservative)
1966 (Majority) def. Ted Heath (Moderate-Liberal Alliance), Duncan Sandys (Conservative)

1969-1971: Ian Mikardo (Labour majority)
1971-1976: Jeremy Thorpe (Liberal-Moderate Alliance)
1971 (Majority) def. Ian Mikardo (Labour), Richard Body (Conservative), A.K. Chesterton (National Front)
1973 (Coalition with Democrats) def. Ian Mikardo (Labour), John Kingsley Read (Conservative), John Tyndall (National Front), Dick Taverne (Democratic)

1976-1978: Ted Heath (Liberal-Moderate Alliance-Democratic coalition)
1978-1979: Mary Whitehouse (Independent)
1978 (Minority pact with Conservatives and National Front) def. Tony Benn (Labour), Ted Heath (Liberal-Moderate Alliance)
1979-XXXX: Mary Whitehouse (National Democracy)
1979 (Majority) def. Ted Short (Labour), Ted Heath (Alliance), Cyril Smith (Independent Liberal)

A new take on one of my favourite PODs, namely a Thor missile exploding (not detonating) at Ludford Magna an RAF base 12 miles east of Lincoln, in 1960.

The scattering of weapons grade material over an area of 300 square miles - requiring the evacuation of much of Lincolnshire and the establishment of an exclusion zone saw the sudden reversal of Harold Macmillan's fortunes. The disaster had been caused by RAF engineers clandestinely interfering in the Thor missile's two key launch sequence, attempting to find a back door that would allow Britain to launch the American missiles without seeking Washington's permission. This understandably caused an international crisis, and in combination with Macmillan's other liberal or permissive instincts, by 1961 his position was untenable and was removed via internal party coup.

The eventual Tory leader was Maudling, who had ascended to his permission with the implicit backing of the anti-Americans in the Conservative Party, and with the Empire crumbling thanks to Macmillan, he was forced to go cap in hand to the EEC. This was too much for a specific wing of the party, who along with opportunists like Butler, brought down the Government. In the meantime, Gaitskell was removed by internal leadership election - his pro-nuclear instincts looked ill-judged post-Ludford Magna. Greenwood won a landslide majority, helped along by the bitter Tory split and the shocking re-emergence of the Liberals to electoral relevancy.

Greenwood would usher in a new age of Red Prosperity, rejecting the EEC to forge bonds with the post-imperialist states of Africa and Asia, encouraging detente between the Germanies and in general trying to make a neutral, disarmed Britain a handy go between the Western and Eastern blocs. As the political right tore itself apart, and Greenwood was able to hammer through even his more controversial policies, concerns grew that the United Kingdom could become the next domino to fall to the left in the Cold War.

This fear didn't manifest itself under the premiership of the handsome, charismatic and quite thoroughly British Greenwood - he seemed an appropriate Prime Minister for an age of prosperity, radical liberalisation of social norms, and of course James Bond. His replacement however was the brilliant but short-tempered and undeniably Jewish Mikado. Mikado inherited Greenwood's legacy - namely a steadily overheating economy. Nonetheless, as rebellion and revolution began to tear down the crowned heads of Europe, in 1969 it seemed that Greenwood had been vindicated and Mikado was happy to bask in that warm afterglow. However, bare months later, the Summer of Socialism was over and the Winter of Discontent began. The United States backed a hard-right military coup in Germany one that returned Kiesinger to power and ended the British-engineered Ostpolitik. Jaques Massu bloodily put down those who had overthrown de Gaulle and the boomerang of fighting communism with military juntas in Latin America and Southeast Asia came home to roost.

Britain was isolated now, more so than it had ever been. And Mikado reacted, trying to shore up Britain's democracy against the seemingly inevitable tanks on Whitehall. They never came, and as inflation rose and the unions demanded higher wages, he was stuck between a rock and a hard place. It came as no surprise when the Liberal-Moderates triumphed at the general election, albeit only narrowly.

Thorpe renormalised relations with Washington and with the EEC, and slowly but surely prised open the steel jaws of dictatorship. A new administration in the White House backed him to the hilt and soon the talk was of joining the EEC now its members had agreed timetables for restoring democracy. The snap election of 1973 was a slight downer as British scepticism of European unity saw the government lose its majority - but the pro-European wing of the Labour Party was there to keep them in power. 1973 also saw the slow re-emergence of the Right - as the rump Tories and the crypto-fascist National Front slowly began to see eye to eye more often than not.

The revelation of first Thorpe's homosexuality (which wasn't illegal, but was certainly frowned upon by many) and then his attempted murder of his lover (very much illegal), ended the dream of soft gooey centrist government. Ted Heath struggled on, but a bachelor like himself faced a barrage of allegations from the gutter press and the increasingly bitter right-wing opposition. The new Labour leader was ironically a defender of Heath's integrity, but when it came to policy was his bitter rival - proposing a radical programme to restore British industry and build a new high-technology socialism. Meanwhile, the Tories and National Front locked step behind Mary Whitehouse's Moral Majority movement and her independent candidacy against the permissiveness that had been allowed to fester (or thrive, depending on your point of view). The election proved shockingly close - between Labour and Whitehouse anyway, the Democrats were wiped out and the Liberal-Moderates reduced to a fraction of their previous numbers. But the Right had narrowly carried the day - and they wasted no time. The coalition was formalised into the National Democracy Party and their combined manifesto began its implementation.

Behind the scenes, the chessboard shifted. Tony Benn was slain by a carbomb, apparently planted by the IRA. Heath formalised the Alliance but clung firmly to the leadership - after Thorpe he didn't quite trust anybody else to take the reins. Cyril Smith led a contingent of Independent Liberals out - effectively a group of municipal pork barrellers who seemed a bit too enthusiastic about the new administration. The snap election of 1979 was held amidst Labour's leadership election and produced a heavy majority for the government. What happens next, as the timetables for restoring democracy in the Elysee and the Bundestag are torn up? Who knows.
You're both always so very good at this!
 
1989-1991: George Bush (Republican)
1988 def. Jesse Jackson (Democratic), Paul Simon (Moderate)
1991-1992: Jack Kemp (Republican)
1992-1993: Jack Kemp (An American Party)

1993-2001: Bob Kerrey: (Moderate)
1992 def. Pat Buchanan (Republican), Jerry Brown (Reform), Jack Kemp (An American Party)
1996 def. Phil Gramm (An American Party), Ralph Nader (Reform), Pete Wilson (Serve America Movement), Dan Burton (Independence)

A quick-and-dirty attempt to make a backstory for my "Centrist Third Parties Party System" project.
 
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Mumby

'I love the pun he will go far'
Published by SLP
A Theoretical Look Forward - Japhy did a series of them back on AH.com, looking forward from the end of each of Turtledove's TL-191 books, ignoring subsequent canon, only taking the established canon up to that point. It was a really interesting format, I thought.