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Evolution of the Alien Space Bat

AndyC

No
Patreon supporter
Published by SLP
#3
It's really interesting to see how a phrase that's become an integral part of the lexicon came about, and how the use has moved since it did.
There's almost a linguistics lesson in there.

Oh, and the image of the Alien Space Bat is, I think, really cool. And was probably made by a very handsome person.
 

David Flin

A home of love and laughter.
#4
It's really interesting to see how a phrase that's become an integral part of the lexicon came about, and how the use has moved since it did.
There's almost a linguistics lesson in there.
No question that it was an example of a change in meaning, and interesting to observe the almost complete 180 that it did.

I guess that it is an example of how, in TLs that span some years, one can introduce such changes. Perhaps especially relevant for time-travelling types. We're used to such things as differences between American English and English English (how good is something that is quite good?), but we're perhaps less good at spotting changes in meaning over a decade or so. Say to an East End boy in the 1960s: "I want to introduce to a Gentleman," and you might get a different reaction than if you used that same phrase to a 1990s East End boy, which might be different to the reaction of a present-day East End boy.
 

RyanF

Abbot of Unreason
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Published by SLP
Location
Falkirk
#5
Reading this has made me wonder, do we perhaps need a new term to refer to sci-fi/fantasy AH? Perhaps referring to them by whatever genre they fall into rather than the catch-all, and arguably belittling, term ASB.
 

Ncw8

Person. Woman. Man. Err. Covfefe.
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Published by SLP
Location
Baselland
#9
No question that it was an example of a change in meaning, and interesting to observe the almost complete 180 that it did.
A good example of that is the way that “the law of the jungle” now means something almost the opposite to Kipling’s poem. The poem describes the strict rights and responsibilities of the various wolves in the pack, and is designed to protect the weakest members.