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Election maps and assorted others

Alex Richards

Etched Swiftly.
Patreon supporter
Published by SLP
Location
Derbyshire
Oh, right, the World Raj wasn't mental enough.
I've flagged with that since I discovered that the Q-BAM isn't really large enough to be able to show a tiny Narrangasset Protectorate hanging around in Rhode Island and I've been unsure about whether I want to go down the rabbit hole of remaking it on a larger scale.
 

Ares96

Liver Deep, Mountain High
Published by SLP
I like how Normandy is halfway sensible or Provence could use some work but things are basically fine, and then you look at the utter mess of Picardie or Lorraine or the Ardennes and my brain reboots into a hard 'nope'.

Also what the hell is happening with that massive Vendée?
That is the sénéchaussée de Poitiers (sénéchaussées secondaires : Civray, Saint-Maixent, Fontenay-le-Comte, Lusignan, Montmorillon, Niort, Vouvant séant à la Châtaigneraie), at 28 députés the largest constituency in this election after Paris. Even Dauphiné, undivided because its estates elected députés indirectly, was not as big as Poitiers.

No, I don't know why they didn't subdivide it either.
 

Redolegna

Champagne Socialist
Published by SLP
Location
Paris
That is the sénéchaussée de Poitiers (sénéchaussées secondaires : Civray, Saint-Maixent, Fontenay-le-Comte, Lusignan, Montmorillon, Niort, Vouvant séant à la Châtaigneraie), at 28 députés the largest constituency in this election after Paris. Even Dauphiné, undivided because its estates elected députés indirectly, was not as big as Poitiers.

No, I don't know why they didn't subdivide it either.
It's going to be something to do with the Angevins and the 12th century somehow, isn't it?
 

Ares96

Liver Deep, Mountain High
Published by SLP
Any plans for further Quebec maps? The elections in the 70s would be an interesting series at some point.
I'd quite like to dig in deeper - so far I've found maps going back to the 1992 distribution, but there's probably older descriptions lurking somewhere. I know the Library of Parliament website has descriptions of the federal constituencies going back to Confederation.
 
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Uhura's Mazda

Ohohoho, wir ham des richtige Weltbild
Published by SLP
Location
Tamaki Makaurau
I'd quite like to dig in deeper - so far I've found maps going back to the 1992 distribution, but there's probably older descriptions lurking somewhere. I know the Library of Parliament website has descriptions of the federal constituencies going back to Confederation.
The Department of Energy, Mines and Resources also made some quite groovy results maps of federal elections between 1968 and 2001, if you weren't already aware of these. I live in the hope that some of their provincial counterparts did the same thing.
 
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Actually I keep forgetting there's been a municipal election in Montréal, and actually quite an interesting one at that. Might get to work on that when I get home.
The names of the two major Montréal municipal parties really are remarkably French in nature: Projet Montréal - Équipe Valérie Plante, and Ensemble Montréal.

The latter in particular leaves you worrying that a certain President of the Fifth French Republic has a longterm plan towards the establishment of a 102nd département...
 

Ares96

Liver Deep, Mountain High
Published by SLP
Started a map of the old counties of Québec, which also formed the constituencies for the Legislative Assembly before the Quiet Revolution.

quebec-comtes.png

As it stands I've done everything north of the river and west of Charlevoix - including the infamous strips of land around Trois-Rivières resulting from the seigneurial system and the lack of... much of anything more than a few miles from the riverbank in those parts. Note that the boundaries around Shawinigan are probably off due to municipal amalgamations rendering me unable to trace an equivalent boundary. I may just alter it by hand - that's what I did around Mirabel.
 

Ares96

Liver Deep, Mountain High
Published by SLP
I've been unable to find data for the 1998 municipal election in Montreal, the last pre-merger one, but that's not a huge deal seeing as how it was very boring and basically just a rehash of the 1994 one, so here's that one.

val-ca-montreal-1994.png

The thirty-year reign of Mayor Jean Drapeau and his personalist, federalist, vaguely right-of-centre, extremely corrupt Parti civique was ended in 1986, when he was defeated in an open race by Jean Doré of the Rassemblement des citoyens de Montréal (RCM), an alliance of social-democratic associations, student action groups, community activists, anglophone minority rights activists and trade unions. The RCM simultaneously captured the vast majority of the city council, which it would continue to hold for eight years as the city continued to struggle with population loss and a sky-high municipal debt left behind from Drapeau's lavish spending habits and love of megaprojects (having brought both the World's Fair and the Olympics to the city along with the construction of the Métro). Doré found himself unable to do much about either problem.

In 1994, the citizens decided to toss the RCM out and instead elected Pierre Bourque, the manager of the Montreal Botanic Gardens and organiser of the 1980 Floralies Internationales (because of course Drapeau made sure to bring those to Montreal as well). Bourque was also responsible for the construction of the Montreal Biodome, still an icon of the city, out of the former Olympic velodrome. This had brought him into the public spotlight, and in 1994 he formed a political party which he called Vision Montréal. Bourque's plan combined fiscal responsibility with environmental initiatives, and he's credited with a number of urban renewal projects as well as the stabilisation of the city budget during his first term in office.

Bourque's second term would be more controversial. He believed the root of Montreal's economic problems lay in the municipal boundaries, which kept the city mostly working-class while the more affluent West Island communities governed themselves. This, in Bourque's view, meant that their residents used Montreal's services while not paying tax to the city, and the PQ government of Lucien Bouchard broadly agreed with this view. Bouchard planned a series of municipal amalgamations, similar to those undertaken in Ontario a few years earlier, and Bourque became an enthusiastic participant in this project, calling for the entire Island of Montreal to merge into a single city. Despite some hand-wringing by the West Island towns, who feared their anglophone residents would be poorly taken care of in a majority-francophone city, the merger went ahead on New Year's Day 2002.

Ironically, the merger would prove Bourque's undoing. His two primary opposing groups - the RCM and the West Island anglophones - united into a loose coalition christened the Montreal Island Citizens' Union (MICU, soon shortened to Union Montréal), and nominated businessman Gérald Tremblay for mayor. Tremblay turfed out Bourque as unceremoniously as Bourque had Doré, and Montreal would go on to have absolutely no more troubles ever.