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Election maps and assorted others

Ares96

Liver Deep, Mountain High
Published by SLP
Have another update to the 1958 map. Yes, Algeria is insane, no, not much has actually changed from 1951 party-wise - it's just that the local lists with nondescript names formed their own group rather than dispersing among the metropolitan ones. The electoral system is the "list FPTP" of Second Republic fame, with a Singaporean twist in that lists were required to make up a set number of French and Muslim candidates. Also a Singaporean twist in that every list that came within a mile of being elected had to subscribe to hard-right pied-noir unionist ideology.

val-fr-1958.png
 

kratostatic

Not a complete bellend from start to end
What the hell happened to the left in the second round, especially in the petite couronne ? Even St. Denis (if I'm looking at the map right, St. Owen at the very least) only just barely elected a communist which feels pretty weird to me given its reputation.
 

Ares96

Liver Deep, Mountain High
Published by SLP
What the hell happened to the left in the second round, especially in the petite couronne ? Even St. Denis (if I'm looking at the map right, St. Owen at the very least) only just barely elected a communist which feels pretty weird to me given its reputation.
St-Denis elected a communist in the first round, the seat with St-Ouen in it was narrowly won by the SFIO. And yes, as mentioned, quite a lot of urban seats were three-way runoffs between PCF, SFIO and UNR.

The six communists elected in the Seine still made up 60% of the party’s representation - there weren’t even enough of them to form a group in the Assembly. The contrast against 1956 is pretty stark, isn’t it.
 

Ares96

Liver Deep, Mountain High
Published by SLP
And back to this old thing. Well into sénéchausséeland now, both Bretagne, Anjou, Auvergne and Lyonnais have them. As did Dauphiné, but of course, it didn't hold direct elections to the Estates-General, sending instead a 24-man delegation from its Estates-Provincial.

Yes, Bretagne was a mess, no, it did indeed not elect any Second Estate representatives at all. The high clergy also abstained from participating in the First Estate's electoral assemblies, while the Third Estate was heavily influenced by the radicalisation and low-level class warfare that had led the nobles and high clergy to boycott the election in the first place. The lowborn and radical delegates formed a "Breton Club" in Versailles that would, in time, become the kernel of the Jacobins.

val-fr-1789.png
 

Ares96

Liver Deep, Mountain High
Published by SLP
France 1839
val-fr-1839.png

A look into the political geography of the July Monarchy, with affiliations largely taken from this map (large file). Bear in mind that each of these constituencies only had about 150-200 actual voters in any given election, on average (they varied hugely in size, being mostly based on the arrondissements). Another massive caveat is that the map only shows government vs. opposition, and while I can guess that the west and the area around Toulouse were largely legitimist rather than liberal, I haven't looked into the precise nature of the split. I think a seat chart would be unhelpful for that same reason.
 
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